Full List of Mayflower Passengers in Gov. Bradford’s Newly-Restored Journal

Governor William Bradford’s (ca. 1590-1657) handwritten Of Plymouth Plantation is well known to genealogists as the earliest journal history of the Mayflower passengers, their voyage across the Atlantic, and the settlement in Plymouth Plantation.

According to the Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC), the Bradford Manuscript contains 580 pages, is hand sewn, “and bound in a parchment-covered binding.” It is housed in the State Library of Massachusetts.

photo of the Bradford Manuscript being restored by the Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC)
Photo: the Bradford Manuscript. Source: Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC).

Click here to read the State Library’s guide to the Bradford Manuscript.

The Northeast Document Conservation Center took on the task of conserving, repairing and restoring this historic manuscript. The NEDCC has now put a detailed article about the conservation process for this important document online.

Click here to read the NEDCC’s account of their work on the Bradford Manuscript.

screenshot of a page from the Northeast Document Conservation Center website describing the restoration of the Bradford Manuscript
Source: Northeast Document Conservation Center

The conservation work was done to prevent further deterioration of the historical journal, and to make it more accessible to the public by the creation of two facsimile volumes.

A digitized version of the Bradford Manuscript is available online.

Of special interest to genealogists, the Bradford Manuscript contains a multipage list of the passengers on the Mayflower.

photo of a page from the Bradford Manuscript showing the list of Mayflower passengers
Photo: Bradford Manuscript page showing the list of Mayflower passengers. Source: State Library of Massachusetts.

Having this invaluable historical Mayflower resource protected – and having a digital copy of the manuscript online – is a great benefit to genealogists.

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8 thoughts on “Full List of Mayflower Passengers in Gov. Bradford’s Newly-Restored Journal

  1. Hi Cousin Beryl,
    That is great news. I really like seeing genealogists carefully research and document their family tree – especially when we share a common ancestor.
    Will you be putting your research online? If so, where?

    All the best in your research,
    Tom

  2. I am helping my neighbor Richard Bell who is directly related to William Bradford. I need to know how to obtain the booklet on the 5 generations . He has no birth, death, marriages dates. I doubt our library in Ocala FL has the book . Thank you

  3. I am a descendant of Richard Warren. My mother was a member of the Mayflower Society. Her brother compiled research for 14 generations. She recently died, but was very proud of her New England heritage. Barbara Jean Warren Balding was her name.

    1. Hi Cousin Julia –
      Good to hear from you and to know of the genealogy research that your family has compiled.

      Glad that you are continuing to document and expand on our mutual family tree.

      Tom

  4. It’s always great to learn something more about the Mayflower passengers. I knew William Bradford was in the textile industry but until I saw this site I didn’t know he was a silk worker. I am his ninth great-granddaughter, his great-granddaughter Jerusha having married my maternal ancestor Hezekiah Newcomb. I am the current editor (and a major contributor) of The Mayflower Chronicles for the Albany, New York Colony of the General Society of Mayflower Descendants, an assignment I thoroughly enjoy!
    Sylvia

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