Tremendous Battle on Lake Ontario – War of 1812 – Team Looking for Wreck of HMS Wolfe

This month a Canadian dive team is expected to search the water near Kingston, Ontario for the wreck of the HMS Wolfe, later renamed the HMS Montreal.

Launched 5 May 1813 the HMS Wolfe was the flagship of the British fleet on Lake Ontario during the War of 1812. The ship was badly damaged by the USS General Pike under the command of US Commodore Isaac Chauncey on 28 August 1813.

The ship escaped and was repaired but did not return as the flagship for the British fleet. Years later the ship sunk off of Kingston, Ontario.
You can read the accounts of the battle as they were reported in the newspapers of the day in GenealogyBank.

(Tremendous Battle on Lake Ontario – Universal Gazette (Washington, DC) 8 Oct 1813). Click on the link above or the image (left) to read the article.

GenealogyBank has more than 3,800 newspapers, covering 1690 to today. It is the source that genealogists rely on to document the lives of their ancestors.

Read the news as it happened.

Subscribe to GenealogyBank today.

Click Here.

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German Language Newspapers 1750-1898

GenealogyBank has over 3,800 newspapers – including titles in German.

(Lancaster, PA: Neue Unpartheyische Lancaster Zeitung – 6 Aug 1788).

GenealogyBank has 28 German-American newspapers that were published from 1750-1898 – in 6 States.

You may click on the links to begin searching each newspaper immediately.

Maryland
Frankfort. Bartgis’s Marylandische Zeitung. 1 issue. 1789-02-18 to 1789-02-18
Fredericktown. General Staatsbothe. 1 issue. 1811-12-27 to 1811-12-27

Montana
Helena. Montana Herold. 105 issues. 1899-06-01 to 7/11/1901

New Jersey
Egg Harbor City. Beobachter Am Egg Harbor River. 11 issues. 1858-10-02 to 1858-12-25
Egg Harbor City. Der Egg Harbor Pilot. 260 issues. 1860-03-22 to 1866-03-31
Egg Harbor City. Der Pilot. 13 issues. 1858-12-18 to 1859-03-19
Egg Harbor City. Der Wochentliche Unzeiger. 9 issues. 1859-06-04 to 1859-08-06
Egg Harbor City. Der Zeitgeist. 261 issues. 1867-04-06 to 1872-03-23
Egg Harbor City. Egg Harbor Aurora. 13 issues. 1860-08-18 to 1860-11-28
Egg Harbor City. Egg Harbor Beobachter. 13 issues. 1859-01-13 to 1859-04-28
Egg Harbor City. Egg Harbor Pilot. 312 issues. 1866-04-07 to 1872-03-23

New York
New York. New Yorker Volkszeitung. 2,561 issues. 1889-01-06 to 1898-12-31
New York. Sociale Republic. 109 issues. 1858-04-24 to 1860-05-26

Pennsylvania
Carlisle. Freyheits-Fahne. 122 issues. 1814-08-27 to 1817-03-25
Chestnut Hill. Chesnuthiller Wochenschrift. 109 issues. 1790-10-08 to 1793-08-20
Lancaster. Der Wahre Amerikaner. 369 issues. 1804-11-10 to 1811-12-28
Lancaster. Deutsche Porcupein. 98 issues. 1798-01-03 to 1799-12-25
Lancaster. Neue Unpartheyische Lancaster Zeitung. 126 issues. 1787-08-08 to 1789-12-30 Lebanon. Weltbothe. 30 issues. 1809-02-14 to 1809-09-05
Philadelphia. Amerikanischer Beobachter. 156 issues. 1808-09-09 to 1811-08-29
Philadelphia. Pelican. 39 issues. 1805-10-28 to 1807-02-21
Philadelphia. Pennsylvanische Fama. 2 issues. 1750-03-10 to 1750-03-17
Philadelphia. Wochentliche Philadelphische Staatsbote. 899 issues. 1762-01-18 to 1779-05-26
Reading. Reading Adler. 1,512 issues. 1796-01-03 to 1825-12-27
Reading. Welt Bothe. 73 issues. 1812-02-05 to 1820-12-06
Sunbury. Nordwestliche Post. 411 issues. 1812-08-12 to 1822-07-26
Sunbury. Northumberland Republicaner. 49 issues. 1817-01-15 to 1818-01-02

Wisconsin
Milwaukee. Milwaukee’r Socialist. 3 issues. 1876-09-22 to 1877-09-21

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Passenger Lists

GenealogyBank is growing – it now has nearly 300 million items.
This morning I found this passenger list – published as a souvenir handbill that was likely given to the passengers on the steamship Silesia when it left on Tuesday November 30, 1869 bound for Plymouth, Cherbourg, London and Hamburg.

In addition to the 3,800 newspapers – GenealogyBank has over 255,000 digital books, documents and early printed items – like this one page passenger list from 1869. It’s amazing what you’ll find in GenealogyBank.

On close inspection of the newspapers I also found these articles giving more details of the passengers, the progress of the ship to the various ports of Europe and even this interesting article about the value of the gold bars that the ship was carrying.

Brief article in a Cincinnati newspaper about local residents who were passengers on the Silesia.
(Cincinnati Commerican Tribune – 5 Dec 1869)
Notice of the gold bars carried as cargo on that voyage.
(Philadelphia Inquirer – 6 Dec 1869).

Silesia arrives at the port of Le Havre, France. (Cincinnati Commercial Tribune – 11 Dec 1869).

GenealogyBank is a core tool for genealogists – packed with the practical information you’ll rely on for documenting your ancestor’s lives. Subscribe now.
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Two timer names

Tip: “A rose by any other name would smell as sweet” – but newspapers very often have the same or similar names.

Be sure to carefully document your sources so that your descendants and other genealogists will know which “Daily Globe” newspaper that article came from.


There were two “Daily Globe” newspapers published in the US. One in San Francisco and the other in Washington, DC.

GenealogyBank has both of them.
Search for a specific article – or – browse through the entire paper, page by page.

Was TV Series Who Do You Think You Are? Inspired by Minnesota Newspaper Series?

The popular British TV series – Who Do You Think You Are? is now in it’s seventh season. It has focused on tracing the family history of UK movie stars and celebrities.

In sifting through the old newspapers I found this regular column – Whom Did He Marry? by Mary Adrian. Was it the inspiration for the hit series Who Do You Think You Are? (Duluth News Tribune 13 Dec 1921).

Probably not. Just like Ralph Edward’s TV series – “This is Your Life” — the newspaper series “Whom Did He Marry?” and the TV show “Who Do You Think You Are?” all appeal to everyone’s basic interest in family history.

Mary Adrian wrote hundreds of “Whom Did He Marry?” articles, semi-genealogical vignettes about the wives of the famous and the obscure in her weekly column that appeared for years in the Duluth, MN – Duluth News-Tribune.

You can look up these articles by going to GenealogyBank’s Duluth-News Tribune search page and putting the worlds “Whom Did He Marry?” (in quotes) in the other search terms box. Your search will quickly pull up nearly 200 articles.
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Church History Library Opens in Salt Lake City – June 12th & 13th

After 15 years of planning, four years of construction and a million artifacts moved, Elder Marlin K. Jensen from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints placed the last historical item on the shelf in the new Church History Library in front of local media.

Jensen, the historian and recorder of the Church, explained that this last item was one of the 100 scrapbooks kept by President David O. McKay. “It is a personal record filled with photos, letters and journal entries that documented his travels as an apostle in 1921 to the far corners of the earth.” Elder McKay’s world tour took him 55,000 miles to such countries as Australia, France, England, Italy, Switzerland, Samoa, Palestine, India and Egypt to survey the Church’s missions. One photograph captured a moment in Egypt with Elder McKay and his traveling companion, Hugh J. Cannon, both sitting on camels in front of the famous Sphinx. Elder Jensen was joined by President McKay’s grandson, Alan Ashton, when the journal was placed in one of the many vaults of the Church History Library.

The scrapbook was the last item but certainly not the least of the priceless artifacts and records Elder Jensen and assistant Church historian Richard E. Turley presented to news reporters as part of a media tour on June 11, 2009. Assistant executive director Elder Paul K. Sybrowsky and managing director of the Church History Department, Steve Olsen, were also in attendance and shared their knowledge of Church history with members of the media.

The group was given a first glimpse of what the public can expect to see during the upcoming open house at the Church History Library on June 12 and 13.

In addition to a media presentation and tour of the library, journalists were given a rare look at dozens of one-of-a-kind and intriguing pieces of Church history treasures on display. Perhaps one of the most unique items was an early edition of the Book of Mormon that was printed in French and German — on alternating pages. This early edition, the only one in existence, was translated through the supervision of John Taylor, an apostle and the eventual third president of the Church, while he was serving a mission in Europe in 1852.

In keeping with the Church History Department’s efforts to collect modern and current history, Elder Jensen spoke of the significance of the newly published LDS first edition Spanish language Bible. Another important undertaking on display was the Joseph Smith Papers project; the second volume is due out later this year.

In an extraordinary operation, thousands of similarly valued documents, books, photos, diaries, microfiche and film were

moved from their old home at the Church Office Building across the street to the Church History Library. It took just 19 days to physically accomplish the move, but it took hundreds of volunteers a year and a half to tag and categorize each piece slated for the move. One project leader compared the mammoth undertaking to moving the Library of Congress.

The most priceless and sacred records and documents were the last to make the move, under heightened security measures. They now join more than 600,000 other historic records housed and preserved on nearly 50 miles of shelving in temperature-controlled vaults with fire and seismic protection. Items such as film will even be kept in sub zero chambers. Brent Thompson from the Church History Department says the new temperature-controlled vaults will ensure that “not only will the artifacts be available in 100 years but they will look good 100 years from now.”

The Church History Library not only houses priceless documents and artifacts but also provides the latest methods in

conservation, collection development and research. Conservators repair, restore and stabilize books, documents and photographs with a state-of-the-art Conservation Lab. The lab includes a darkroom, where conservators are able to turn acetate negatives into useable photographs, and a document cleaning room that enables them to wash historical records and apply age-slowing chemical treatments.

That state-of-the-art spirit is also found in the innovation of the Church History Library’s design. Great care was taken to make sure the building not only met, but surpassed building code and energy efficiency standards. That attention to a “green” building design is found in such areas as the filtering system, which eliminates allergens.

The paper, plastic and metal products used in the Church History Library will be recycled, and the heating and cooling systems have the highest efficiency ratings. The landscaping and plumbing will use less water, and the windows, blinds and insulation will preserve temperatures. These careful implementations have put the Church History Library on track for the prestigious Silver Design certificate given through the acclaimed Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system.

But perhaps one of the most notable aspects of the new library is that it is designed for public accessibility. The Church History Department’s previous accommodations were designed to be more of an internal archive, said Steve Olsen, managing director over Church history. “The Church in its foundational documents has a huge commitment to preserving history and to making history useful for members and others interested in learning about its history,” said Olsen. “It is the first time in the Church’s 179-year history that we have had a dedicated public building for this purpose. … It’s really quite significant.”

Episcopal Church (ECUSA) to build new Archives

The Episcopal Church (ECUSA) has purchased site for their national historical archives in downtown Austin, Texas.

The Episcopal Church has bought a block in downtown Austin where it plans to build a facility to house its national archives and provide space for meetings, exhibits, research and other purposes.

The church purchased the block, now a parking lot bounded by Seventh, Eighth, Trinity and Neches streets, from Jimmy Nassour, an Austin real estate attorney. The purchase price was $9.5 million, said Mark Duffy, director of the Archives of the Episcopal Church.

The entire project is projected to cost over $40 million. The new church archives building will allow the church to consolidate it’s historical archives and documents into one location serving the local congregations across the country. There are 2.2 million Episcopalians in the US.

RFK Dies 41 years ago today

Robert F. Kennedy died 41 years ago today.

With GenealogyBank.com you can read the newspapers just as your ancestors did. It has the stories of your ancestor’s lives – the famous or the obscure – whether it is 40 years ago or over 300 years ago

GenealogyBank has the coverage genealogists rely on to document their family history. Over 3,800 newsapers, all 50 States, over 300 years of coverage. Sign up now.

I had the opportunity to hear RFK speak at Brigham Young University on March 27, 1968. The 1960s were difficult times – in 1968 – the Vietnam War was raging, RFK was challenging a sitting President LBJ for his party’s nomination, demonstrators were in all of the major cities. Less than a week following RFK’s talk Martin Luther King would be shot & killed. Two months after that RFK was shot and killed.

Kennedy’s remarks on campus were effective. He had done his homework; he had broken the ice and won over the respect of the packed arena. That fairly conservative campus was no longer his adversary but was ready to listen. He spoke briefly and took all questions. Tough questions. He was grilled but he was comfortable explaining his positions on the current state of the war and the country.

I clearly remember his opening remarks – with humor he reached out to his audience and showed respect for their history and beliefs. His actions and remarks echo in today’s headlines.

“Thank you very much. Thank you. I appreciate very much being here at this campus … I understand that this is a campus made up of all political persuasions. I had a very nice conversation with Dr. {Ernest L.} Wilkinson [laughter] … and I promised him that all Democrats would be off campus by sundown [laughter, applause].

But I feel very close to this state. Not only did part of my wife’s family live in the state of Utah for a long period of time, I traveled down your Green River…spent part of the time in the water (laughter) … part of my honeymoon here and I’ve had ten children since – so I have learned something from the Mormons [laughter].

I think that we still have a great deal in common, and in common with the man this university honors. For I too have a large family [laughter], I too have settled in many states [laughter]. And now I too know what it is to take on Johnson’s army. [Standing ovation, laughter and applause].” (Read the complete text at: Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought Vol 3, Number 3, Autumn 1968).

The reference to “Johnson’s Army” was a reference to his taking on President Lyndon B. Johnson in the Democratic Party Primaries as well as to President James Buchanan sending General Albert S. Johnston and his troops to quell the non-existent “Utah Rebellion” in 1857. This otherwise obscure reference was well known to BYU students schooled in Utah history. With this series of well thought out personal & historical references he won over the crowd.

After his remarks students crowded around to shake his hand. I was one of them. I was surprised at how short he was. I had always pictured him as over 6’ tall – but he was only 5’9” … shorter than I was then (but now that I am shrinking, I am catching up to him :)

(Photo courtesy BYU Archives).

I learned that day that it is important to see and hear a person speak for themselves – to take the measure of a man. I concluded that he was an honest man who believed in what he was doing and trying to accomplish. It was an honor to shake his hand that day – 27 March 1968.

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GenealogyBank.com adds 14 newspapers from states – Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Indiana, North Carolina

GenealogyBank.com adds 14 newspapers from 5 states – Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Indiana, North Carolina

Daily World, The (Helena, West Helena, AR)
Obituaries: 06/26/2008 – Current
Death Notices: 05/27/2008 – Current

Hope Star (Hope, AR)

Obituaries: 10/20/2008 – Current
Death Notices: 11/18/2008 – Current

Apache Junction-Gold Canyon Independent (Apache Junction, AZ)
Obituaries: 07/01/2008 – Current
Death Notices: 11/13/2007 – Current

East Mesa Independent (Apache Junction, AZ)
Obituaries: 01/01/2008 – Current
Death Notices: 11/13/2007 – Current
Notes: No Data: 5/6/2008-12/30/2008

North Scottsdale Independent (Scottsdale, AZ)
Obituaries: 01/16/2008 – Current
Death Notices: 02/27/2008 – Current

Peoria Independent (Peoria, AZ)
Obituaries: 01/16/2008 – Current
Death Notices: 01/16/2008 – Current

Queen Creek Independent (Queen Creek, AZ)
Obituaries: 08/27/2008 – Current
Death Notices: 01/30/2008 – Current
Notes: No Data: 5/7/2008-12/31/2008

Sun City West Independent (Sun City West, AZ)
Obituaries: 04/29/2009 – Current
Death Notices: 01/02/2008 – Current

Sun City-Youngtown Independent (Sun City-Youngtown, AZ)
Obituaries: 07/16/2008 – Current
Death Notices: 01/02/2008 – Current

Surprise Independent (Surprise, AZ)
Obituaries: 04/16/2008 – Current
Death Notices: 01/02/2008 – Current

Town of Paradise Valley Independent (Paradise Valley, AZ)
Obituaries: 01/16/2008 – Current
Death Notices: 01/28/2009 – Current

La Junta Tribune-Democrat (La Junta, CO)
Obituaries: 04/17/2008 – Current
Death Notices: 03/27/2008 – Current

Washington Times-Herald, The (Washington, IN)
Obituaries: 11/23/2007 – Current
Death Notices: 11/05/2007 – Current

Salisbury Post (Salisbury, Spencer, NC)
Obituaries: 12/01/1998 – Current:
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Possible Avery Family Artifact dating from 1689-1702 Found

313-year-old English silver sixpence, likely once owned by Rev. John Avery (1685/6-1754) found in Truro, Massachusetts. The coin dates from 1689-1702

The Boston Globe is reporting this unusual find of an early British coin found by Truro resident Peter Burgess while working in his garden.

“At first, I wasn’t sure what it was,” said Burgess. “It didn’t look so much like a coin, but like a brown wafer.”

The coin was minted during the reign of King William III – 1689-1702 who assumed the throne jointly with his wife Mary II – following the Glorious Revolution of 1688 which overthrew her father, King James II. “William and Mary” were the only joint monarchs – both serving with equal authority.

Here is what the original coin looked like

Read the entire story here:
Bishop, Stewart. Cape man finds 313-year-old sixpence. Boston Globe 3 June 2009