About Thomas Jay Kemp

Thomas Jay Kemp is the Director of Genealogy Products at GenealogyBank. Tom Kemp is an internationally known librarian and archivist – he is the author of over 35 genealogy books and hundreds of articles about genealogy and family history. He previously served as the Chair of the National Council of Library & Information Associations (Washington, DC) and as Library Director of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania and the New England Historic Genealogical Society. An active genealogist, he has been working on his own family history for 47 years. With the rapidly growing online archives at GenealogyBank – it is a great day for genealogy!

1869 Medal of Honor Recipient Getting New Burial

Charles Schroeter received the Medal of Honor for “Gallantry in action” during a fight with Apache Indians in Arizona’s Chiricahua Mountains in 1869.

Despite this recognition, no one claimed the old soldier’s ashes when he was cremated following his death in January 1920. His ashes lay in an unmarked crypt in San Diego for nearly a century until his story finally came to light. In July, Schroeter will be buried at Miramar National Cemetery with full military honors.

“General Staff Corps and Medals of Honor.” Serial Set, Vol. No. 7609, Report Senate Document 58 (Washington, D.C.), 23 July 1919

Source: GenealogyBank’s Historical Documents, “General Staff Corps and Medals of Honor.” Serial Set, Vol. No. 7609, Report Senate Document 58 (Washington, D.C.), 23 July 1919

This is one of those very unusual cases where the person’s death occurred decades ago – but because of his modern reburial, his obituary is included in GenealogyBank’s Recent Obituaries collection.

obituary for Charles Schroeter, San Diego Union-Tribune newspaper article 30 May 2015

San Diego Union-Tribune (San Diego, California) 30 May 2015

Charles Schroeter had served in the Civil War in the U.S. Cavalry, 1st Division. According to his obituary:

After the Civil War ended, Schroeter enlisted again, this time in the newly formed 8th U.S. Cavalry Regiment. He headed west, to Arizona, to fight in the Indian Wars and protect American settlers and their wagon trains. It was the 1869 Campaign of the Rocky Mesa that resulted in his Medal of Honor. Schroeter and other troopers were dispatched to respond to an Apache attack. At the end of the deadly battle in Arizona’s Chiricahua Mountains, 32 cavalrymen were nominated for the top combat medal.

Throughout history, 3,493 Medals of Honor have been awarded. Of those, [Don] Morfe estimated there are still about 200 ‘lost souls’ whose grave sites are unknown — like Schroeter’s was until recently.

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GenealogyBank has more than 1.7 billion records that tell your ancestor’s story. Dig in – find and pass down your family’s stories.

Note: FamilySearch International (FamilySearch.org) and GenealogyBank are partnering to make over a billion records from recent and historical obituaries searchable online. The tremendous undertaking will make a billion records from over 100 million U.S. newspaper obituaries readily searchable online. The newspapers are from all 50 states and cover the period 1730 to the present.  Find out more at: http://www.genealogybank.com/family-search/

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Family Reunites after 90-Year Mystery in Springfield Solved

In this video, librarian Irene Nolan (Hamden Public Library, Connecticut) shares the story of how a family – separated for more than 90 years – was brought together once again with information from GenealogyBank.

This librarian was helping a family research their family tree. They had their grandfather’s first and last names. That was enough for Nolan to begin her search in GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives. Within 10 minutes she had located valuable genealogical information about the grandfather and his surviving relatives that facilitated the family’s reunion after nine decades of separation.

Enter Last Name

We can do this.
Start now and find your family – all of them – by finding their stories in old newspapers.

Tell us what you find out about your family in the comments section.

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Historic Illinois Cemetery Project Is Documenting the Dead

Like many historic cemeteries, the Herrin City Cemetery in Herrin, Illinois, is trying to document all of the persons buried in the cemetery.

screenshot from an article on the South Illinoisan website about the Herrin City Cemetery in Herrin, Illinois

Source: South Illinoisan (Summer 2015)

See: http://bit.ly/1I1HJdT

So far their efforts have uncovered “89 previously unknown burial sites.” Good work!

Are you working on a cemetery project this summer?

If you are, here’s a cemetery research tip.

screenshot of GenealogyBank's search results page for a search for “Herrin Cemetery”

Genealogy Tip: Use GenealogyBank to help you find all burials in America’s cemeteries. The example above shows a search using “Herrin Cemetery” in the “Include Keywords” search box. Since the cemetery name is not a common word, you could also expand the range of accurate results by searching on just “Herrin.”

Enter Last Name

Also see more of our previous articles about cemetery research: http://blog.genealogybank.com/tag/cemetery-research.

Armed with more information on people who have been buried there, it will be easier to document each gravesite.

Tell us what cemeteries you are working on this summer in the comments.

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A Native American Revolutionary War Veteran’s Final Request

When I am gone, beat the drum and fire the guns. ~ Captain and Chief Tishomingo

As we get closer to July 4th, we think back on the stories of our American ancestors who fought for our freedom in the Revolutionary War. This old newspaper obituary tells us about the story of one of those Revolutionary War veterans, whose heroic story deserves to be more widely known.

obituary for Chief Tishomingo, Evening Post newspaper article 24 June 1841

Evening Post (New York, New York), 24 June 1841, page 2

Chief Tishomingo was the last great chief of the Chickasaw Nation.

According to his obituary:

Although but little known beyond the limits of his nation, yet he was a man who had seen wars and fought battles; stood high among his own people as a brave and good man. He served under Gen. [Anthony] Wayne in the revolutionary war, for which he received a pension from the government of the United States; and in the late war with England [the War of 1812] he served under Gen. [Andrew] Jackson, and did many deeds of valor.

Chief Tishomingo was born in Tishomingo, Mississippi – the town was renamed in his honor. The early history of the 19th Century was not kind to Native Americans – even those like Chief Tishomingo who had “fought in nine battles for the United States.” He and his tribe were forced to relocate to Oklahoma. He died on the trip near Little Rock, Arkansas.

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The first capital of Oklahoma was located in Tishomingo, Oklahoma, which was also named in Captain Tishomingo’s honor.

Watch this video about Chief Tishomingo’s life that was produced by Chickasaw.tv https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PL9O9lNNzTk

Find your ancestors’ true life stories in more than one billion historical articles that cover over 300 years of American history from coast to coast. Start searching in GenealogyBank.com.

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Note: FamilySearch International (FamilySearch.org) and GenealogyBank are partnering to make over a billion records from recent and historical obituaries searchable online. The tremendous undertaking will make a billion records from over 100 million U.S. newspaper obituaries readily searchable online. The newspapers are from all 50 states and cover the period 1730 to the present.  Find out more at: http://www.genealogybank.com/family-search/

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African American Slave Born in 1686 Dies at Age 116 in 1802!

While doing genealogy research recently in GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives, I came upon the obituary of a woman identified only as “a female slave named Alice,” who died at Bristol, Pennsylvania, at the remarkable age of 116!

obituary for a female slave named Alice, Newburyport Herald newspaper article 13 July 1802

Newburyport Herald (Newburyport, Massachusetts), 13 July 1802, page 3

Alice was only 10 when she was taken from her parents in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to Bristol, Pennsylvania – where she lived in servitude as an African American slave the rest of her days. The newspaper article states that her parents were from Barbados.

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Philadelphia was founded in 1682 – so her family had to be among the first African American slaves brought to that area. Bristol township in Bucks County was founded in 1692.

Illustration: “Alice, a Female Slave, ca. 1802” from Eccentric Biography; or Memoirs of Remarkable Female Characters (Worcester, Mass., 1804), frontispiece

Illustration: “Alice, a Female Slave, ca. 1802” from Eccentric Biography; or Memoirs of Remarkable Female Characters (Worcester, Mass., 1804), frontispiece. Source: Image Reference NW0120, as shown on www.slaveryimages.org, sponsored by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and the University of Virginia Library.

Because of her extreme old age and excellent memory, Alice served as a local historian for the community. According to her obituary:

Being a sensible, intelligent woman, and having a good memory, which she retained to the last, she would often make judicious remarks on the population and improvement of the city and country; hence her conversation became peculiarly interesting, especially to the immediate descendants of the first settlers, of whose ancestors she often related acceptable anecdotes.

The old news article relates some of the memories she shared with her neighbors:

She remembered the ground on which Philadelphia stands when it was wilderness, and when the Indians (its chief inhabitants) hunted wild game in the woods; while the panther, the wolf, and beasts of the forest, were prowling about the wigwams and cabins in which they lived.

She remembered William Penn, the proprietor of Pennsylvania; Thomas Story, James Logan, and several other distinguished characters of that day.

The old 1800s obituary also tells a wonderful story about Alice herself:

She was a worthy member of the Episcopal society, and attended their public worship as long as she lived. Indeed she was so zealous to perform this duty in proper season, that she has often been met on horseback in full gallop to church, at the age of 95 years.

The old newspapers in GenealogyBank’s archives have her remarkable life story.
Find your ancestors’ stories – don’t let them be lost to your family.

Note: FamilySearch International (FamilySearch.org) and GenealogyBank are partnering to make over a billion records from recent and historical obituaries searchable online. The tremendous undertaking will make a billion records from over 100 million U.S. newspaper obituaries readily searchable online. The newspapers are from all 50 states and cover the period 1730 to the present.  Find out more at: http://www.genealogybank.com/family-search/

Related African American Slavery Articles:

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Have You Seen This Intricate Patchwork Heirloom Quilt?

In 1881 New Hampshire held its 26th Annual State Fair in Laconia, New Hampshire. The fair had not been held in Laconia since 1852.

The New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette devoted an entire page to reporting the handicrafts, food, animals and other award-winning items that were proudly displayed during this three-day event.

According to the newspaper report:

The fair of last week, although in many respects not meeting the expectations of all, was an unqualified success as far as attendance and receipts were concerned.

In reading over the description of the items on display, this brief mention of a quilt caught my eye:

Miss Jennie M. Huse a patchwork quilt of handsome pattern containing 10,368 pieces.

article about Jennie Huse and her quilt, New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette newspaper article 29 September 1881

New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette (Concord, New Hampshire), 29 September 1881, page 4

Remarkable patchwork – 10,368 pieces!

My wife and I have old heirloom quilts that have been passed down in our family, safely tucked away in the family cedar chest.

Enter Last Name

I wonder if Jennie Huse’s quilt was passed down in her family?

A quick check of her family history shows that while she never married, several of her siblings did.

screenshot of records from FamilySearch about the Huse family

Source: FamilySearch

Speaking of her family, both her father Thomas Muzzey Huse (1812-1877) and her brother David Scobey Huse (1844-1863) served in the Civil War. Her brother died during the war in Mound City, Illinois.

Genealogy Tip: Be sure to look for family photos using the Internet Archive Book Images tool. I wrote about this website before. See: Top Genealogy Websites Update: Internet Archive Book Images + Flickr

screenshot of the website Internet Archive Book Images

Source: Internet Archive Book Images

This handy site quickly lets you find photographs that were printed in the millions of books that they have digitized and put online.

In this example, you can see that this site quickly identified photographs of both Jennie’s father and her brother. Here’s an entry on her father:

screenshot from the website Internet Archive Book Images showing a photo of Thomas Huse

Source: Internet Archive Book Images

Here’s an entry on her brother:

screenshot from the website Internet Archive Book Images showing a photo of David Huse

Source: Internet Archive Book Images

Are you related to Jane “Jennie” Muzzey Huse?
Do you know where her intricate quilt is now?
If so, have you counted the pieces in her patchwork quilt? Does it really contain 10,368 pieces?

Please let us know in the comments section.

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Elisha Perkins Invented Metallic Tractors – in the 1700s?

Here is the death notice of Dr. Elisha Perkins (1741-1799). It is fairly straightforward.

obituary for Elisha Perkins, Norwich Courier newspaper article 11 September 1799

Norwich Courier (Norwich, Connecticut), 11 September 1799, page 3

The death notice tells us that Perkins died in New York City on Friday morning, 6 September 1799, and that he was the inventor of “metallic tractors.”

Wait – he was the inventor of the metal tractor? In the 1700s?

Didn’t John Deere (1804-1886) or Cyrus McCormick (1809-1884) invent the metal tractor in the 1800s?

What exactly did Elisha Perkins invent?

Enter Last Name

Looking for more information in GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives, I found this article in the Norwich Courier reporting that Perkins’ “metallic tractors” were being used to cure people in Great Britain – including over two hundred people in Durham, England.

article about the Perkinsian Institution founded by Elisha Perkins, Norwich Courier newspaper article 10 July 1805

Norwich Courier (Norwich, Connecticut), 10 July 1805, page 3

So, Perkins’ “metallic tractors” was some sort of medical device.

Dr. Perkins’ son Benjamin Douglas Perkins wrote a booklet in 1798: The Influence of Metallic Tractors on the Human Body, in Removing Various Painful Inflammatory Diseases, Such as Rheumatism, Pleurisy, Some Gouty Affections, &c. &c. Lately Discovered by Dr. Perkins, of North America.

title page of the book written by Benjamin Perkins about the medical device "metallic tractors"

Source: Internet Archive

This booklet has been digitized and is online on the Internet Archive.

(I wrote about the Internet Archive before – see “Top Genealogy Websites, Pt. 2: Google Books & Internet Archive.” This site has digitized and put online millions of early books and manuscripts. It is one of the “Best” websites online.)

Perkins’ metallic tractors were actually just two small metal rods he used to prod and massage areas of inflammation – not the kind of tractors used in farming, as we might initially assume when reading Perkins’ death notice.

According to Wikipedia: “The Connecticut Medical Society condemned the tractors as ‘delusive quackery,’ and expelled Perkins from membership on the grounds that he was ‘a patentee and user of nostrums.’”

Genealogy Tip: Don’t assume anything during your genealogy research. At first glance it appeared that Elisha Perkins had invented an early version of the farming tractor – but by digging deeper we see that his invention was actually a quack medical device.

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Sukey, I Never Knew You

This obituary caught my eye for several reasons.

obituaries, The Balance and Columbian Repository newspaper article 15 October 1801

The Balance and Columbian Repository (Hudson, New York), 15 October 1801, page 87

First is the header, with its poem and graphic.

“The Knell.”
Not “Deaths” or “Died” – which are very common headers for obituary notices even today – but instead “The Knell,” as in death knell.

Crisp. An excellent choice of words that immediately tells us this newspaper editor took time with the layout and content of each issue.

The poem also is on target to the newspaper’s audience.
It is mournful but upbeat.

Next is the illustration, centered toward the top of the article.
It evokes an image of the somber tone of the obituaries we are going to read in this newspaper article.

The tombstone, leaning to the side – the setting sun – the barren tree – all framed by the grass and the outline of the ground.

Striking.
Remember – this was published in 1801. What a memorable graphic.
This is a good example of the care that “Sampson, Chittenden and Croswell” – the newspaper’s publishers – took with this newspaper.

Enter Last Name

The other part of this obituary that caught my eye was the first death notice:

In this city, Mrs. Sukey Smith, wife of Mr. Matthew Smith, aged 35.

Sukey – that name sounds so familiar – but at the same time, I don’t think I’ve ever met a person named “Sukey.”

I wondered if it was an abbreviation.
No, according to the dictionary it is “a Hebrew baby name… [and means] Graceful Lily.” (Source: SheKnows.com)

Hebrew name? So I checked the Bible to see if there were any women named Sukey who were mentioned in the Bible. Nope – no one named Sukey is listed in the Bible.

A quick search of GenealogyBank showed that there are only 6 people with the name Sukey in the Social Security Death Index; there are over 150 marriages and nearly 400 obituaries involving a person named Sukey.

Maybe “Sukey” sounded familiar to me because of Sukey Tawdry from the lyrics of “Mack the Knife” by Bobby Darin.

Do you have a Sukey in your family tree?

Note: FamilySearch International (FamilySearch.org) and GenealogyBank are partnering to make over a billion records from recent and historical obituaries searchable online. The tremendous undertaking will make a billion records from over 100 million U.S. newspaper obituaries readily searchable online. The newspapers are from all 50 states and cover the period 1730 to the present.  Find out more at: http://www.genealogybank.com/family-search/

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My Ancestor’s Trip to America: Newspapers Tell the Story

I knew my ancestor William Kemp had come to America – but I didn’t know anything about the trip itself. What was it like for him as an immigrant traveling by passenger ship across the ocean to the new frontier?

Could GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives help me find the answer?

I knew that William came to America on board the ship Benjamin Adams, arriving 21 October 1853. He left from Liverpool, England, and arrived in New York City.

painting: “The Bay and Harbor of New York” by Samuel Waugh (1814-1885)

Painting: “The Bay and Harbor of New York” by Samuel Waugh (1814-1885). Source: Wikipedia.

Since I knew that shipping was big business, I wondered if newspapers could tell me more about the movements of the Benjamin Adams and William’s trip to America.

In testing my search I found that the name of the passenger ship appeared multiple ways in various newspaper articles – so I strategized that I needed to search every possible variation for any mention of the Benjamin Adams, from the spring to the fall of 1853, to make sure I didn’t miss any articles.

To find all of the articles I needed to search GenealogyBank’s archives using:

  • Benjamin Adams
  • Adams
  • Benj. Adams
  • Benj Adams
  • B. Adams
  • B Adams

This should give me all references to the passenger ship and William’s voyage to America.

Enter Last Name

Here’s what I found.

This Maine newspaper told me that by 23 August 1853, the passengers had boarded the Benjamin Adams and the ship was positioned “outward bound” in the Mersey River in Liverpool.

shipping news about the ship "Benjamin Adams," Portland Weekly Advertiser newspaper article 13 September 1853

Portland Weekly Advertiser (Portland, Maine), 13 September 1853, page 3

This Massachusetts newspaper gave me the critical fact that the ship sailed the next day – 24 August 1853. Wow – good to know.

shipping news about the ship "Benjamin Adams," Daily Atlas newspaper article 10 September 1853

Daily Atlas (Boston, Massachusetts), 10 September 1853, page 2

Next I looked for reports of the passenger ship arriving in America.

Here it is – this New York newspaper reported that the ship had docked in New York on 21 October 1853.

shipping news about the ship "Benjamin Adams," Weekly Herald newspaper article 22 October 1853

Weekly Herald (Albany, New York), 22 October 1853, page 344

The trip to New York took 56 days. There were 620 passengers – but here’s where the news turned more somber.

The old newspaper article reported:

Sept. 10, while laying to under a close reefed topsail in a heavy gale from the NW, lost all three topgallant masts, closed reefed mizzen topsail, foresail, mainsail, stern boat, and received other damage.

The ship was damaged in a fierce storm just 17 days after leaving Liverpool. The passengers must have been terrified – wondering if they were going to make it.

But there was more bad news:

Had 15 deaths on the passage.

Significant storm damage to the ship and 15 people died?
What?
Fifteen people died?
Wow. Was that normal on these trips? Why did so many die?

William was lucky to make it safely to America!

Enter Last Name

In a follow-up article a week later, the Weekly Herald explained why so many had died on the passage. These passengers just didn’t die of random causes – they died from an outbreak of cholera, which struck  many ships.

…it is pretty certain that the disease which carried them off was cholera. ….The sickness on the Benjamin Adams was decidedly cholera.

shipping news about the ship "Benjamin Adams," Weekly Herald newspaper article 29 October 1853

Weekly Herald (Albany, New York), 29 October 1853, page 350

This was a tough trip.

GenealogyBank’s newspapers continued to tell me more about William’s trip.

This New York newspaper mentioned that the ship Benjamin Adams had arrived “from Syria.”

shipping news about the ship "Benjamin Adams" and cholera, Albany Evening Journal newspaper article 22 October 1853

Albany Evening Journal (Albany, New York), 22 October 1853, page 2

From Syria?
I thought they left from Liverpool?

They did – but before arriving in Liverpool, the ship had been in Syria.

This Massachusetts newspaper told me that the Benjamin Adams had docked in Beirut, Syria, on 25 July 1853, before it went to Liverpool to pick up William Kemp and the other 619 passengers.

shipping news about the ship "Benjamin Adams," Daily Atlas newspaper article 1 September 1853

Daily Atlas (Boston, Massachusetts), 1 September 1853, page 2

The reason for the trip to the Holy Land was explained in this Massachusetts newspaper. The Benjamin Adams picked up artifacts there to display at the World’s Fair:  “an Arab plough and other agricultural implements for the World’s Fair…canes from the banks of the Jordan, branches from the Mount of Olives and cedars of Lebanon…” and apparently somewhere along the way it picked up cholera.

shipping news about the ship "Benjamin Adams," Springfield Republican newspaper article 25 October 1853

Springfield Republican (Springfield, Massachusetts), 25 October 1853, page 2

GenealogyBank doesn’t just give you the names, dates and places for your family tree – it gives you the stories of our ancestors’ lives.

You know when your ancestors arrived in America – dig in GenealogyBank and find out the rest of their stories.

Genealogy Tip: Search Wide Geo Areas

Did you notice a pattern with the newspaper articles in this blog post?

There were newspapers in Maine, New York, Massachusetts and beyond that reported on the Benjamin Adams. You want to search for this type of article and for the articles about your ancestors across all 8,000 of GenealogyBank’s newspapers. To find these articles, you cannot limit your search to only the newspapers of one or two states. If you limit your search geographically, you might miss an article critical to the telling of your ancestor’s story.

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List of 450+ Historical Newspapers Just Added Continued – Page 4

We just made a major addition of more than 450 historical newspapers, all of them new to our online newspaper archives.This is a continuation of our complete list of 450+ historical newspapers just added to GenealogyBank. You are currently viewing page 4 which lists newspapers 301 to the end.

State City Title Date Range

Collection

301 New Mexico> Santa Fe Santa Fe Daily New Mexican 12/9/1869–12/31/1877 Newspaper Archives
302 New Mexico> Silver City Southwest Sentinel 11/03/1887–03/28/1888 Newspaper Archives
303 New York Canandaigua Ontario Messenger 11/25/1806–10/16/1810 Newspaper Archives
304 New York Kingston Ulster County Whig 09/17/1834–11/16/1836 Newspaper Archives
305 New York New York Argus 1/2/1797–3/8/1800 Newspaper Archives
306 New York New York Evening Star 10/10/1833–7/6/1840 Newspaper Archives
307 New York New York Frank Leslie’s Illustrirte Zeitung 01/02/1858–01/27/1866 Newspaper Archives
308 New York New York National Advocate for the Country 3/3/1813–12/25/1827 Newspaper Archives
309 New York New York National Police Gazette 11/07/1846–12/21/1876 Newspaper Archives
310 New York New York New York Aurora 5/26/1807–6/7/1809 Newspaper Archives
311 New York New York New York Semi-Weekly Express 8/26/1862–7/12/1867 Newspaper Archives
312 New York New York New-York Gazette 5/11/1730–5/26/1740 Newspaper Archives
313 New York New York New-York Gazette, or Weekly Post-Boy 07/25/1743–01/12/1747 Newspaper Archives
314 New York Ossining Westchester Herald 1/2/1821–12/23/1856 Newspaper Archives
315 New York Poughkeepsie New-York Journal, or, General Advertiser 7/20/1778–11/19/1781 Newspaper Archives
316 New York Troy Farmer’s Oracle 02/28/1797–04/17/1798 Newspaper Archives
317 New York Troy Federal Herald 04/28/1788–06/07/1790 Newspaper Archives
318 New York Troy Lansingburgh Gazette 9/18/1798–10/23/1827 Newspaper Archives
319 New York Westfield Chautauque Phenix 10/03/1828–11/01/1831 Newspaper Archives
320 North Carolina Edenton Edenton Gazette 2/26/1806–2/26/1821 Newspaper Archives
321 North Carolina Fayetteville North Carolina Chronicle or Fayetteville Gazette 02/01/1790–07/19/1790 Newspaper Archives
322 North Carolina Lincolnton Lincoln Courier 5/2/1846–2/15/1851 Newspaper Archives
323 North Carolina Lincolnton Lincoln Republican 01/23/1840–05/25/1842 Newspaper Archives
324 North Carolina Milton Milton Gazette and Roanoke Advertiser 05/03/1822–04/21/1825 Newspaper Archives
325 North Carolina Murfreesboro Hornets’ Nest 10/01/1812–07/22/1813 Newspaper Archives
326 North Carolina New Bern North-Carolina Gazette 03/24/1775–07/14/1775 Newspaper Archives
327 North Carolina Raleigh North-Carolina Minerva 05/16/1803–12/31/1804 Newspaper Archives
328 North Carolina Raleigh Raleigh Register 06/04/1819–12/28/1821 Newspaper Archives
329 North Carolina Raleigh Semi-Weekly Standard 01/14/1852–12/31/1853 Newspaper Archives
330 North Carolina Raleigh Star 02/13/1850–09/29/1852 Newspaper Archives
331 North Carolina Tarboro Tarboro Press 01/04/1840–03/02/1844 Newspaper Archives
332 North Carolina Washington American Recorder 4/28/1815–5/27/1825 Newspaper Archives
333 North Carolina Wilmington True Republican or American Whig 01/03/1809–11/07/1809 Newspaper Archives
334 North Carolina Wilmington Wilmington Centinel and General Advertiser 06/18/1788–06/18/1788 Newspaper Archives
335 North Carolina Wilmington Wilmington Gazette 01/01/1801–/01/1816 Newspaper Archives
336 North Dakota Fort Rice Frontier Scout 06/15/1865–10/12/1865 Newspaper Archives
337 North Dakota Mandan Daily Pioneer 1/4/1883–12/29/1883 Newspaper Archives
338 North Dakota Mandan Sunday Pioneer 11/11/1883–12/23/1883 Newspaper Archives
339 North Dakota Tower City Tower City Herald 05/02/1884–02/06/1885 Newspaper Archives
340 Ohio Chillicothe Ohio Herald 07/27/1805–11/15/1806 Newspaper Archives
341 Ohio Cincinnati Centinel of the North-Western Territory 5/23/1795–3/5/1799 Newspaper Archives
342 Ohio Cincinnati Liberty Hall 12/23/1805–12/30/1814 Newspaper Archives
343 Ohio Lebanon Western Star 02/13/1807–06/08/1811 Newspaper Archives
344 Ohio Marietta American Friend 4/24/1813–6/19/1818 Newspaper Archives
345 Ohio Steubenville Jefferson Democrat and Farmers’ and Mechanics’ Advocate 05/25/1831–02/06/1833 Newspaper Archives
346 Ohio Warren Trump of Fame 11/01/1816–08/07/1861 Newspaper Archives
347 Ohio Xenia Greene County Torch-Light 07/31/1845–12/26/1850 Newspaper Archives
348 Oklahoma Caddo Caddo Free Press 11/01/1878–11/01/1878 Newspaper Archives
349 Oklahoma Doaksville Choctaw Intelligencer 04/02/1851–04/02/1851 Newspaper Archives
350 Oklahoma Fort Washita Chickasaw Intelligencer 04/21/1855–04/21/1855 Newspaper Archives
351 Oregon Corvallis Oregon Statesman 10/13/1855–12/08/1855 Newspaper Archives
352 Oregon Oregon City Oregon Spectator 02/10/1848–05/12/1854 Newspaper Archives
353 Oregon Oregon City Oregon Statesman 01/06/1852–02/26/1853 Newspaper Archives
354 Oregon Portland Oregon Weekly Times 12/25/1852–03/03/1860 Newspaper Archives
355 Pennsylvania Carlisle Cumberland Register 09/20/1805–06/22/1814 Newspaper Archives
356 Pennsylvania Germantown Pensylvanische Berichte 1/16/1746–12/24/1757 Newspaper Archives
357 Pennsylvania Lancaster Hive 07/06/1803–06/12/1805 Newspaper Archives
358 Pennsylvania Lancaster Lancaster Inquirer 7/7/1863–2/13/1864 Newspaper Archives
359 Pennsylvania Philadelphia Complete Counting House Companion 5/28/1785–10/30/1790 Newspaper Archives
360 Pennsylvania Philadelphia Pennsylvania Gazette 1/3/1776–12/18/1793 Newspaper Archives
361 Pennsylvania Philadelphia Philadelphische Zeitung 05/06/1732–06/24/1732 Newspaper Archives
362 Pennsylvania Philadelphia Press 1/1/1859–12/31/1865 Newspaper Archives
363 Pennsylvania Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Gazette 8/12/1786–9/23/1831 Newspaper Archives
364 Pennsylvania Tunkhannock Wyoming Democrat 09/24/1850–09/24/1850 Newspaper Archives
365 Pennsylvania Washington Western Telegraphe 08/17/1795–07/04/1807 Newspaper Archives
366 Rhode Island Providence Independent Inquirer 8/28/1823–8/20/1830 Newspaper Archives
367 Rhode Island Providence Microcosm 01/08/1831–03/30/1833 Newspaper Archives
368 Rhode Island Providence New Age and Constitutional Advocate 11/20/1840–3/8/1842 Newspaper Archives
369 Rhode Island Providence Rhode Island Press 06/29/1861–12/29/1877 Newspaper Archives
370 Rhode Island Providence Rhode-Island Farmer 08/09/1804–01/31/1805 Newspaper Archives
371 South Carolina Beaufort Free South 01/10/1863–04/16/1864 Newspaper Archives
372 South Carolina Charleston Carolina Weekly Messenger 8/11/1807–11/7/1809 Newspaper Archives
373 South Carolina Charleston Charleston Mercury 6/4/1831–11/14/1868 Newspaper Archives
374 South Carolina Charleston Charleston Spectator 08/09/1806–12/05/1806 Newspaper Archives
375 South Carolina Charleston Royal Gazette 02/09/1782–02/09/1782 Newspaper Archives
376 South Carolina Charleston Royal South Carolina Gazette 06/08/1780–07/16/1782 Newspaper Archives
377 South Carolina Charleston South-Carolina Gazette 1/11/1735–12/29/1737 Newspaper Archives
378 South Carolina Charleston South-Carolina and American General Gazette 03/11/1768–10/01/1778 Newspaper Archives
379 South Carolina Pendleton Miller’s Weekly Messenger 01/03/1821–04/02/1841 Newspaper Archives
380 South Dakota Artesian Diana Sentinel 11/23/1883–08/01/1884 Newspaper Archives
381 South Dakota Fort Randall Independent 01/18/1865–12/20/1865 Newspaper Archives
382 South Dakota Pierre Pierre Daily Capital 8/20/1890–3/31/1891 Newspaper Archives
383 Tennessee Knoxville Knoxville Register 8/10/1816–10/22/1839 Newspaper Archives
384 Tennessee Knoxville Press and Messenger 01/08/1873–12/15/1875 Newspaper Archives
385 Tennessee Memphis Memphis Evening Post 04/27/1868–05/31/1869 Newspaper Archives
386 Tennessee Nashville Nashville Clarion 2/16/1808–7/20/1819 Newspaper Archives
387 Tennessee Nashville Nashville Examiner 09/29/1813–05/25/1814 Newspaper Archives
388 Texas Corpus Christi Corpus Christi Gazette 01/08/1846–04/02/1846 Newspaper Archives
389 Texas Houston Morning Star 04/15/1839–03/12/1846 Newspaper Archives
390 Texas Houston National Banner 04/25/1838–04/25/1838 Newspaper Archives
391 Texas Houston National Intelligencer 03/01/1839–07/04/1839 Newspaper Archives
392 Texas Houston Weekly Houstonian 05/27/1841–07/22/1841 Newspaper Archives
393 Texas Paris Texas Vindicator 10/29/1867–06/21/1871 Newspaper Archives
394 Texas Pittsburg Pittsburg Gazette 01/06/1887–12/30/1892 Newspaper Archives
395 Texas San Luis San Luis Advocate 09/04/1840–05/11/1841 Newspaper Archives
396 Utah Ogden Ogden Junction 3/12/1870–8/19/1876 Newspaper Archives
397 Utah Salt Lake City Kirk Anderson’s Valley Tan 12/3/1858–1/25/1860 Newspaper Archives
398 Utah Salt Lake City Telegraph 12/19/1864–05/17/1866 Newspaper Archives
399 Vermont Bellows Falls Vermont Intelligencer 01/01/1821–12/30/1822 Newspaper Archives
400 Vermont Bennington Bennington Banner 2/27/1841–12/31/1885 Newspaper Archives
401 Vermont Burlington Burlington Mercury 6/3/1796–3/24/1797 Newspaper Archives
402 Vermont Montpelier Freemen’s Press 08/25/1809–08/27/1812 Newspaper Archives
403 Vermont Montpelier State Journal 10/25/1832–10/25/1832 Newspaper Archives
404 Vermont Montpelier Watchman 11/20/1807–12/31/1873 Newspaper Archives
405 Vermont Westimnster Vermont Gazette or Green-Mountain Post-Boy 04/02/1781–09/27/1871 Newspaper Archives
406 Vermont Windsor Vermont Republican 08/08/1829–10/09/1834 Newspaper Archives
407 Vermont Woodstock Woodstock Observer 1/7/1823–6/5/1832 Newspaper Archives
408 Virginia Alexandria Local News 10/07/1861–02/10/1862 Newspaper Archives
409 Virginia Charlottesville Virginia Advocate 08/25/1827–04/02/1830 Newspaper Archives
410 Virginia Fredericksburg New Era 05/23/1865–06/29/1866 Newspaper Archives
411 Virginia Lynchburg Lynchburg Star 2/27/1806–1/8/1812 Newspaper Archives
412 Virginia Norfolk American Beacon 11/02/1821–02/28/1827 Newspaper Archives
413 Virginia Norfolk American Gazette and Norfolk and Portsmouth Weekly Advertiser 10/10/1792–08/28/1795 Newspaper Archives
414 Virginia Norfolk New Regime 03/08/1864–04/16/1864 Newspaper Archives
415 Virginia Richmond Observatory, or A View of the Times 3/1/1798–11/26/1798 Newspaper Archives
416 Virginia Richmond Sentinel 6/19/1863–1/3/1866 Newspaper Archives
417 Virginia Richmond Virginia Federalist 06/01/1799–03/01/1800 Newspaper Archives
418 Virginia Richmond Virginia Independent Chronicle 05/23/1787–04/01/1789 Newspaper Archives
419 Virginia Winchester Virginia Gazette and Winchester Advertiser 08/29/1787–10/14/1789 Newspaper Archives
420 Washington Olympia Echo 07/29/1876–07/29/1876 Newspaper Archives
421 Washington Olympia Pioneer and Democrat 02/11/1854–11/16/1860 Newspaper Archives
422 Washington Port Townsend Puget Sound Weekly Argus 08/04/1870–04/26/1883 Newspaper Archives
423 Washington Steilacoom Puget Sound Express 10/22/1874–08/070/1880 Newspaper Archives
424 West Virginia Charles Town Farmers’ Repository 12/15/1824–11/15/1826 Newspaper Archives
425 West Virginia Martinsburg Potomak Guardian and Berkeley Advertiser 9/3/1792–4/2/1800 Newspaper Archives
426 West Virginia Shepherdstown Potowmac Guardian and Berkeley Advertiser 12/27/1791–12/27/1791 Newspaper Archives
427 Wisconsin Galesville Galesville Independent 11/5/1874–8/30/1889 Newspaper Archives
428 Wisconsin Green Bay Green-Bay Intelligencer and Wisconsin Democrat 12/11/1833–06/01/1836 Newspaper Archives
429 Wisconsin Green Bay Wisconsin Free Press 10/03/1835–03/30/1836 Newspaper Archives
430 Wisconsin Lancaster Grant County Herald 03/18/1843–12/05/1850 Newspaper Archives
431 Wisconsin Madison Daily Argus and Democrat 01/03/1854–07/21/1854 Newspaper Archives
432 Wisconsin Milwaukee Milwaukee Advertiser 07/14/1836–03/20/1841 Newspaper Archives
433 Wisconsin New Lisbon Juneau County Argus 11/8/1858–12/6/1894 Newspaper Archives
434 Wisconsin Oshkosh Oshkosh True Democrat 02/09/1849–05/12/1857 Newspaper Archives
435 Wisconsin Racine Weekly Racine Advocate 1/8/1851–4/25/1866 Newspaper Archives
436 Wisconsin Sheboygan Sheboygan Nieuwsbode 10/06/1849–11/07/1850 Newspaper Archives
437 Wyoming Cheyenne Cheyenne Argus 11/14/1867–11/14/1867 Newspaper Archives
438 Wyoming Cheyenne Cheyenne Daily Argus 04/02/1868–04/05/1868 Newspaper Archives
439 Wyoming Cheyenne Cheyenne Daily Leader 04/03/1868–04/03/1868 Newspaper Archives
440 Wyoming Evanston Evanston Age 10/03/1876–10/03/1876 Newspaper Archives
441 Wyoming Laramie Laramie Daily Sentinel 10/21/1876–10/21/1876 Newspaper Archives

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