Search 21 St. Louis, Missouri, Newspapers

Show me the papers! Start searching GenealogyBank’s strong coverage of St. Louis, MO, with this list of newspapers and obituaries now available online in our archives. Get started tracing your ancestry in the “Show Me State” with these 21 newspapers from St. Louis that date back to the early 1800s.

collage of St. Louis newspapers available in GenealogyBank's online historical newspaper archives

Collage of St. Louis newspapers available in GenealogyBank’s online historical newspaper archives

Search Missouri Newspaper Archives (1808 – 1941)

Search Missouri Recent Obituaries (1988 – Current)

Newspaper Date Range Collection
Citizen Journal 1/19/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Daily Commercial Bulletin 5/18/1835 – 12/31/1838 Newspaper Archives
Daily Missouri Republican 3/1/1841 – 4/1/1888 Newspaper Archives
Missouri Gazette and Public Advertiser 3/23/1808 – 9/18/1818 Newspaper Archives
North County Journal – Overland Edition 11/24/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
North Side Journal 10/27/2004 – 4/23/2008 Recent Obituaries
Press Journal 10/20/2004 – 12/31/2008 Recent Obituaries
South City Journal 10/27/2004 – 7/25/2007 Recent Obituaries
South County Journal 2/9/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
South Side Journal 10/27/2004 – 4/13/2011 Recent Obituaries
Southwest City Journal 10/20/2004 – 12/23/2008 Recent Obituaries
Southwest County Journal 10/27/2004 – 1/27/2009 Recent Obituaries
St. Louis American 2/1/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
St. Louis Clarion 12/18/1920 – 4/2/1921 Newspaper Archives
St. Louis Enquirer 3/17/1819 – 12/18/1824 Newspaper Archives
St. Louis Palladium 1/10/1903 – 10/5/1907 Newspaper Archives
St. Louis Post-Dispatch 1/1/1988 – Current Recent Obituaries
St. Louis Republic 5/1/1888 – 10/31/1900 Newspaper Archives
Tri-County Journal 10/20/2004 – 1/21/2009 Recent Obituaries
Weekly St. Louis Pilot 1/6/1855 – 11/15/1856 Newspaper Archives
West County Journal 2/9/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries

 

 

 

More Additions to GenealogyBank’s Online Newspaper Archives

GenealogyBank continues to add more content to its online historical newspaper archives every day, a continuous effort to provide more information to help with your family history research.

collage of newspapers available in GenealogyBank's online historical newspaper archives

Collage of newspapers available in GenealogyBank’s online historical newspaper archives

Here is a list of more than 3,000 back issues of seven newspapers from the District of Columbia, Illinois, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Ohio and Virginia that we will be adding to our online newspaper archives soon. We work every day to expand and deepen our newspaper archives.

State City Newspaper Issues Pages Start End
District of Columbia Washington Evening Star 58 1,018 4/16/1896 8/8/1896
Illinois Evanston Northwestern 221 3,907 9/13/1894 5/28/1903
Massachusetts Boston Boston Herald 1,724 101,493 8/1/1957 10/15/1965
North Carolina Greensboro Greensboro Daily News 54 1,291 4/8/1923 5/31/1926
North Carolina Greensboro Greensboro News and Record 704 50,011 3/19/1984 9/11/1987
Ohio Cincinnati Cincinnati Post 52 904 5/2/1921 6/30/1921
Virginia Richmond Richmond Times Dispatch 286 13,597 12/16/1950 5/15/1954
3,099 172,221

 

 

Our Online Newspaper Archives Keep Growing & Growing..

GenealogyBank adds more content to its online historical newspaper archives every day, a continuous effort to provide more birth notices, wedding announcements, obituaries, and local news stories to help with your family history research.

Historical Newspapers Archives Collage from GenealogyBank.com

Here is a list of just 3,100 of the back issues of six newspapers that we will be adding to our online newspaper archives in the next month. That’s over 122,000 pages of newsprint—and as impressive as that is, it’s only a fraction of the newspapers that are being added online for your genealogy research.

State City Newspaper

Issues

Pages

Start

End

District of Columbia Washington (DC) Evening Star

136

1,869

1/1/1896

8/12/1896

Illinois Evanston Northwestern

156

2,855

1/16/1891

6/14/1900

Massachusetts Boston Boston Herald

1,303

72,084

11/8/1953

7/31/1963

North Carolina Greensboro Greensboro Record

147

6,295

10/1/1962

3/16/1984

Ohio Cincinnati Cincinnati Post

754

12,994

1/3/1916

10/31/1922

Virginia Richmond Richmond Times Dispatch

610

26,180

1/7/1939

12/31/1952

Total

3,106

122,277

List of Recent Newspaper Obituaries Going Online in GenealogyBank

GenealogyBank adds more records online every day to give you the content you need to explore your genealogy. In the next few weeks we will be adding recent obituaries from more than 20 newspapers from 8 states—additional online newspaper obituaries to keep adding resources for your family history research.

Recent obituaries and death notices from newspapers in Florida, Georgia, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Washington are being added to our Recent Obituaries Collection (1977 – Today), adding thousands more obituaries for your genealogy research. Look for these recent obits to go live online soon on the New Content page.

Newspaper Death Notices & Obituaries Collage

Here’s a list of recent obituaries coming to the obituary archives soon:

Plant City Observer (Plant City, Florida)

Obituaries:  07/19/2012 – Current

East Coweta Journal (Senoia, Georgia)

Obituaries:  11/11/2010 – Current

Fayette Chronicle (Fayetteville, Georgia)

Obituaries:  08/25/2011 – Current

Fayette County News (Fayetteville, Georgia)

Obituaries:  12/02/2010 – Current

Today in Peachtree City (Fayetteville, Georgia)

Obituaries:  05/02/2012 – Current

Wicked Local: Avon (Stoughton, Massachusetts)

Obituaries:  06/16/2009 – Current

Death Notices:  12/01/2008 – 04/21/2009

Eden Prairie Sun-Current (Eden Prairie, Minnesota)

Obituaries: added 2/22/2010 – 9/13/2011

Edina Sun – Current (Edina, Minnesota)

Obituaries: added 1/28/2010 – 9/13/2011

Excelsior – Shorewood Sun-Sailor (Excelsior, Minnesota)

Obituaries: added 2/22/2010 – 2/22/2011

Grand Rapids Herald-Review (Grand Rapids, Minnesota)

Obituaries: added 10/12/1997 – 1/10/2011

Winona Post (Winona, Minnesota)

Obituaries:  02/12/2006 – Current: Scattered earlier data available

Commercial Dispatch (Columbus, Mississippi)

Death Notices:  01/30/2009 – Current

Beaufort-Hyde News (Belhaven, North Carolina)

Obituaries:  07/27/2011 – Current

Bertie Ledger-Advance (Windsor, North Carolina)

Obituaries:  07/13/2011 – Current

Duplin Today – Pink Hill Review (Kenansville, North Carolina)

Obituaries:  03/08/2012 – Current

Farmville Enterprise (Farmville, North Carolina)

Obituaries:  07/13/2011 – Current

Perquimans Weekly (Hertford, North Carolina)

Obituaries:  07/13/2011 – Current

Standard Laconic (Snow Hill, North Carolina)

Obituaries: 05/22/2010 – Current

Canton Independent-Sentinel (Canton, Pennsylvania)

Obituaries:  02/05/2008 – Current

Tukwila Reporter (Tukwila, Washington)

Obituaries:  08/18/2012 – Current

Thomas Hill—American Revolutionary War Minuteman Hero Gone

“Hardly a man is now alive

Who remembers that famous day and year.”

—Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

In searching through early 19th Century newspapers, time and again we find historical obituaries about the passing of “Revolutionary Heroes,” as America’s newspapers recorded the honored service of those who fought to secure this country’s freedom from England.

This 1851 American Revolutionary War soldier’s obituary of Thomas Hill is a good example.

Thomas Hill Revolutionary War Hero Obituary - Massachusetts Spy Newspaper 1851

Massachusetts Spy (Worcester, Massachusetts), 15 July 1851, page 3.

This soldier’s obituary says of Thomas Hill: “He was in the battle of Concord, and was on Bunker Hill, but not in the engagement.”

Wait—he was there at the battle but didn’t fight?

Why was he given a pension by the U.S. federal government and called a “Revolutionary Hero” in this historical obituary if he was there at the battle but not engaged in the fighting?

Digging deeper in GenealogyBank I found this old newspaper article profiling Thomas Hill when he was 89, one year before he died. It was published in the New Hampshire Gazette (Portsmouth, New Hampshire), 23 April 1850, page 2, giving more details about his military service.

Thomas Hill New Hampshire Gazette NewspaperSo he was at the Battle of Concord as a 14-year-old boy and also at the Battle of Bunker Hill “with his father and eldest brother Abraham.” They were part of “the volunteer minute men who fought.”

Thomas Hill went on to fight in “two campaigns in the Jerseys and New York.”

Thomas Hill was honored along with “four other survivors, being all that could be found in the country around who were active in the scenes of 1775.”

And honored he was—the historical newspaper article went on to say:

Thomas Hill New Hampshire Gazette Newspaper 1850We can picture the old Revolutionary War veteran being escorted by the grateful citizens of West Cambridge over the same route used by the British when they attacked Lexington and Concord.

It calls to mind the words of the poet Longfellow:

“Listen my children and you shall hear

Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere,

On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-five;

Hardly a man is now alive

Who remembers that famous day and year.”

Longfellow’s immortal words were published in January 1861, 11 years after the 1850 tribute to Thomas Hill. Perhaps he was inspired by this celebration honoring Hill and the other four remaining men “who remembered that famous day and year.”

GenealogyBank gives us the key opportunity to dig in and find the details of the thousands who served as soldiers in the American Revolutionary War. Search GenealogyBank’s newspaper archives and document your ancestors—don’t let their stories be lost.

Handy Quick List: 10 Trenton, New Jersey, Newspapers Now Online

GenealogyBank continues to grow every day—we now have 10 Trenton, New Jersey, newspapers online. That’s a lot of local papers to research your family history from New Jersey’s capital city.

Trenton New Jersey Newspapers Archive

Trenton, N.J., was the site of George Washington’s first victory during the Revolutionary War, the important Battle of Trenton, when Washington led his men over the icy Delaware River the day after Christmas, 1776. The city proudly carries the nickname “Turning Point of the Revolution.”

Interesting bit of U.S. history trivia: Trenton was once the capital of the United States, albeit briefly, in November and December 1784.

Trace your genealogy from this historical New Jersey city. Here is the complete list of Trenton, NJ, newspapers currently available in our online archives, providing coverage from 1792 to today.

Newspaper Coverage Collection
Miscellany 6/10/1805 – 12/2/1805 Newspaper Archives
New Jersey State Gazette 9/19/1792 – 12/31/1799 Newspaper Archives
Sentinel 6/26/1880 – 11/13/1882 Newspaper Archives
Times 3/21/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Trenton Evening Times 1/7/1883 – 3/15/1993 Newspaper Archives
Trenton Federalist 12/2/1800 – 12/27/1824 Newspaper Archives
Trenton State Gazette 1/12/1847 – 12/31/1898 Newspaper Archives
Trenton Sunday Times-Advertiser 11/6/1938 – 8/26/1973 Newspaper Archives
Trentonian 4/12/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
True American 3/10/1801 – 9/21/1818 Newspaper Archives

Find and document your family history. Make sure your family tree is accurately documented, including every obituary and news article.

We can do this!

Handy Quick List: 25 New Orleans, Louisiana, Newspapers Now Online

GenealogyBank is growing fast—we now have over 25 New Orleans, Louisiana, newspapers online. That’s a lot of local city papers to research your ancestry from the largest city in Louisiana!

collage of New Orleans newspapers

Collage of New Orleans newspapers

Trace your genealogy from “The Big Easy,” one of the most interesting, diverse, multi-lingual and multi-cultural metropolitan areas in the U.S. Here is the complete list of New Orleans, LA, newspapers currently available in our online archives, providing coverage from 1805 to 1988.

Let the good times roll: “Laissez les bons temps rouler.” Start researching your roots in LA now.

Newspaper Date Range Collection
Abeille 1/3/1829 – 12/27/1831 Newspaper Archives
Black Republican 4/15/1865 – 5/20/1865 Newspaper Archives
Courrier de la Louisiane 1/1/1821 – 1/14/1824 Newspaper Archives
Daily Delta 6/17/1846 – 2/14/1863 Newspaper Archives
Daily True Delta 5/23/1857 – 12/31/1864 Newspaper Archives
Inside New Orleans 5/1/1965 – 5/1/1965 Newspaper Archives
Jeffersonian 5/30/1842 – 5/30/1842 Newspaper Archives
Jeffersonian Republican 12/21/1844 – 3/30/1847 Newspaper Archives
Louisiana Advertiser 4/19/1820 – 11/3/1827 Newspaper Archives
Louisiana State Gazette 11/11/1825 – 12/7/1826 Newspaper Archives
L’Union 9/27/1862 – 7/19/1864 Newspaper Archives
Misisipi 10/12/1808 – 10/12/1808 Newspaper Archives
New Orleans Argus 1/19/1828 – 9/29/1832 Newspaper Archives
New Orleans Daily Creole 7/1/1856 – 1/10/1857 Newspaper Archives
New Orleans Item 7/6/1877 – 12/31/1922 Newspaper Archives
New Orleans States 1/1/1916 – 12/31/1922 Newspaper Archives
New Orleans Times 1/1/1865 – 9/30/1878 Newspaper Archives
New Orleans Tribune 7/21/1864 – 2/28/1869 Newspaper Archives
New Orleans Weekly Times 2/18/1865 – 12/28/1867 Newspaper Archives
Orleans Gazette & Commercial Advertiser 6/11/1805 – 12/31/1819 Newspaper Archives
Sunday Delta 9/28/1856 – 3/25/1860 Newspaper Archives
Times-Picayune 1/25/1837 – 12/31/1988 Newspaper Archives
True Delta 5/27/1862 – 7/30/1862 Newspaper Archives
Weekly Louisianian 12/18/1870 – 6/17/1882 Newspaper Archives
Weekly Pelican 12/4/1886 – 11/23/1889 Newspaper Archives

 

Earthquake! Newspapers Record Destruction in California History

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this guest blog post, Gena shows how historical newspapers provide excellent coverage of disasters such as earthquakes, including detailed casualty lists helpful to genealogists.

Living in California as I do, earthquakes are a fact of life. Because of their suddenness and intensity, earthquakes can be a terrifying event to experience. When the shaking begins your mind starts racing, wondering when the earthquake will stop. Seconds feel like minutes. An automatic reaction to an earthquake is to run to safety. I remember during one trembler a few years ago yelling to my kids not to run down the stairs. Earthquakes can kill—so too can the panicked actions of those experiencing the earthquake.

It goes without saying that our ancestors experienced devastating natural disasters as well. My great-grandmother used to talk of the 1933 Long Beach earthquake when all of her china was broken. That 6.4 (on the Richter scale) earthquake cost millions of dollars in damage and killed more than 100 people. My guess is it must have been a terrifying experience for a young married woman with an 8-year-old child, as my great-grandmother was at the time. She was lucky that her only loss was the china.

When thinking of historic California earthquakes, many people think of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. The destruction caused by that earthquake and the resulting fires has been the subject of books, documentaries, and vintage photos. But that earthquake wasn’t the only one that resulted in heavy destruction for a California city. Lone Pine, a little town in the Eastern Sierra region of California, experienced an earthquake in 1872 so strong that it almost leveled the entire town.

It is easy to understand why the 1872 Lone Pine earthquake and the 1906 San Francisco earthquake (both believed to have measured over 7.0 on the Richter scale) caused so much damage in and around California. 19th century buildings in the West, mostly wood and brick structures, were not forgiving when the earth shook. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, that March 1872 earthquake destroyed 52 out of 59 homes and killed 27 people in the city of Lone Pine. The earthquake was felt as far south as San Diego and as far east as Elko, Nevada.

Historical newspapers give us a sense of what the resulting chaos was like when Lone Pine residents were rudely awakened at 2:35 that March morning. The Inyo Independent newspaper quoted one resident as yelling to his wife during the earthquake: “Get up; hell’s broke loose!” The newspaper’s front page headline for March 30 screamed: “HORRORS!! Appalling Times! EARTHQUAKES. Awful Loss of Life! 24 People Killed! Earth Opens! Houses Prostrated!!” Some people were crushed by the debris of their collapsing houses as they lay in their bed. This earthquake and the inevitable aftershocks must have made it seem like the world was ending.

The 1872 Lone Pine earthquake was reported in newspapers across the country. These earthquake reports reveal the sense of shock felt at the time of the natural disasters and also provide genealogists with practical information like causality lists.

For example this historical San Francisco newspaper article, reprinted by a New York paper, provides lists of the dead and the injured.

The Earthquake in California, New York Herald newspaper article 9 April 1872

New York Herald (New York, New York), 9 April 1872, page 7

The list of fatalities in this historical newspaper article also reports where the victims were from originally:

List of the Killed (in 1872 earthquake), New York Herald newspaper article 9 April 1872

New York Herald (New York, New York), 9 April 1872, page 7

Survivors of this terrifying California earthquake buried their loved ones. Earthquake victims without family members, mostly immigrants, were buried in a mass grave. The Inyo Independent reported that “a large grave was prepared on a little rise north of town. In this grave all of foreign birth were consigned the next day. Fifteen coffins numbered and contained sixteen bodies were all deposited in one huge grave.” Catholic and Protestant rites were said at the burial. A modern memorial marks the mass grave and lists the known names. For the victims whose names were not known, it says “…of French, Irish, Chilean, Mexican & Native American ancestry are known but to God.”

photograph of the historical marker for the 1872 Lone Pine, California, earthquake

1872 Earthquake Historical Marker. Lone Pine, California. © 2012 David Ortega

To read more about the history of the 1872 Lone Pine earthquake, consult the Historic Earthquakes page of the United States Geological Survey and visit GenealogyBank’s historical newspaper archives.

 

 

You Find Family in the Most Unexpected Ways

Introduction: Scott Phillips is a genealogical historian and owner of Onward To Our Past® genealogy services. In this guest blog post, Scott tells about doing genealogy research on an author—and finding a surprising, direct link to one of his own ancestors.

Recently I was searching the Internet for genealogy resources relating to the early Czech-American immigrant community. I was looking for information that would assist me with my work on my early Bohemian (Czech) immigrant ancestors who settled in the City of Cleveland, Ohio. In conducting my genealogy search one of my first hits was for an article in the journal MELUS (Volume 6, Number 2) published by the Society for the Study of the Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States.

This article, written by Professor Clinton Machann of Texas A&M University, is titled “Hugo Chotek and Czech-American Fiction.” Reading this scholarly article on author Hugo Chotek and early Czech fiction writing in America, I was so impressed that I gave Dr. Machann a call. Since that day we have enjoyed staying in touch and I am pleased to say we have now become friends.

One sentence stuck in my head as I read Dr. Machann’s article. It was this one: “Although we have little biographical data on Chotek…” I found this particularly interesting since Dr. Machann also pointed out that Hugo Chotek spent at least some portion of his life in the Czech community in Cleveland. So, always hoping to find a hidden genealogical gem, I began investigating to see what I might discover about this gentleman.

photograph of gravestone of author Hugo Chotek (1851-1911)

Gravestone of Hugo Chotek in Lake View Cemetery, Cleveland, Ohio. © 2012 Scott Phillips

Wondering where to begin, I decided on searching GenealogyBank.com to see what I might discover about Chotek in its online archives. I was especially hopeful that I would find relevant information because I remembered that Machann’s article also mentioned that Chotek spent time living in the Czech communities of New York, Michigan, Texas and Nebraska in addition to the time he spent in Ohio.

It was exciting to see how much data availability and access has improved since 1979 when Dr. Machann’s article was written. Searching on Hugo Chotek with GenealogyBank, my first hit was stellar! It was a 1911 newspaper obituary entitled “Bohemian Editor Stricken by Death.” Opening this article, I was even treated to a portrait of Hugo Chotek himself. If you are like me in your genealogy work, you love getting to “see” someone and there he was—looking quite dapper, I might add.

Bohemian Editor Stricken by Death, Plain Dealer newspaper article 11 May 1911

Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 11 May 1911, page 4

My interest in author Chotek was deepening the more I was reading. Here was a fellow who, while not only an author, was also an accomplished newspaperman! As a genealogical historian I believe there is little better than reading work by newspapermen and women as they follow that old adage of the 5 Ws: “Who, What, Where, When and Why,” exactly the kind of information we so wish to find.

I was quickly discovering Hugo Chotek’s family history, connecting with his living descendants, and finding more information about his work in the Cleveland Czech community. For example, this newspaper article announcing the marriage of Hugo Chotek’s daughter Anna was very helpful, containing many excellent genealogical leads, and including her picture.

Cleveland Woman Who Marries Lawyer, Plain Dealer newspaper article 7 July 1913

Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 7 July 1913, page 11

Look how much genealogical information is contained in Anna Chotek’s one-paragraph marriage announcement:

Mrs. Edward J. Russick, Plain Dealer newspaper article 7 July 1913

Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 7 July 1913, page 11

I was especially interested to learn that Chotek had written about the early Czech community not once but twice, and—for me most exciting of all— finding his one-on-one interview with Frantisek (Frank) Knechtl, my very first Bohemian ancestor who arrived in Cleveland in 1852 and remained there until his death in 1911.

It really is amazing how you can find family in the most unexpected ways!

photograph of a page from "Amerikan Narodni Kalendar" featuring interview with Frantisek (Frank) Knechtl

Page from Amerikan Narodni Kalendar featuring interview with Frantisek (Frank) Knechtl. Scan courtesy of Archives of Czechs and Slovaks Abroad collection, University of Chicago Library. © 2012 Scott Phillips

Now I have my work cut out for me. My company, Onward To Our Past® Genealogy Services (http://www.OnwardToOurPast.com) is undertaking the first-ever translation from Czech to English of the more than 220 pages of both of Hugo Chotek’s works on the Cleveland Bohemian (Czech) community, written in 1894 and 1895. Containing several hundred surnames, these works, once translated, should be a bonanza for many genealogists and family historians for generations to come.

 

 

Who Do You Think You Are? Sourcing GenealogyBank

Gather round the telly, grab some popcorn and let the kids stay up!

Special alert to our GenealogyBank members in the United Kingdom and beyond: please pay careful attention to the next television episode featuring Samantha Womack on Who Do You Think You Are? being broadcast on BBC-TV in the UK.

We received word that GenealogyBank’s newspaper archive was used to trace Womack’s family tree and is one of the sources credited in this WDYTYA episode. Yea!

Samantha Womack is the star of the UK hit television series “EastEnders.”

At the Playhouses, Evening Journal newspaper article 6 August 1904, plus photo of actress Samantha Womack

Photo of actress Samantha Womack plus newspaper article published by the Evening Journal (Jersey City, New Jersey), 6 August 1904, page 3

Tune in to BBC and watch this new WDYTYA episode on Wednesday, August 15.

To read the newspaper article used to trace the Womacks in the upcoming show, see the article “At the Playhouses” published in the Evening Journal (Jersey City, New Jersey), 6 August 1904, page 3.