November Update: GenealogyBank Just Added 5 Million More Records!

Every day, GenealogyBank is working hard to digitize more newspapers and obituaries, expanding our collection to give you the largest newspaper archives for family history research available online. We just completed adding 5 million more U.S. genealogy records, vastly increasing our content coverage from coast to coast! Here are some of the details about... (Read More)

Researching Your Female Ancestor: Women in the WCTU

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this blog article, Gena shows how you can research your female ancestor by searching old newspapers for articles about the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union. Having trouble learning about the lives of your female ancestors? A good place to... (Read More)

Is There a Pirate in Your Family Tree?

Introduction: Mary Harrell-Sesniak is a genealogist, author and editor with a strong technology background. In this blog article, Mary searches old newspapers to learn more about pirates – their legends, and their true stories. As long as there have been newspapers, there have been stories published about pirates. You can certainly find lots of... (Read More)

Veterans Day: Saluting Amos Barnes, Revolutionary War Vet

Our nation has long been grateful to our veterans, starting with the American Revolutionary War. When Amos Barnes died in 1840 newspapers remembered him – giving the details of his life, his family and his service to the nation in a detailed obituary. He died 6 December 1840 in Conway, New Hampshire He had... (Read More)

Mississippi Archives: 66 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

Mississippi, whose western border is primarily the Mississippi River, was admitted into the Union as the nation’s 20th state on 10 December 1817. The 32nd largest state in the country, Mississippi is the 31st most populous. If you are researching your ancestry from Mississippi, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online MS newspaper archives:... (Read More)

How to Research City Records to Find Your Urbanite Ancestors

Introduction: Duncan Kuehn is a professional genealogist with over nine years of client experience. She has worked on several well-known projects, such as “Who Do You Think You Are?” In this blog post, Duncan provides search tips to help research your ancestors who lived in cities and large towns. Lots of people are and... (Read More)

Genealogy Puzzle: What Do These 3 Obituaries Have in Common?

What do the obituaries of Daniel Coit Gilman (1831-1908) of Norwich, Connecticut; Richard Y. Cook (1845-1917) of Lansdowne, Pennsylvania; and James J. Lovitt (1838-1892) have in common? Answer: they all described their immigrant ancestors. It is common for an obituary to name the spouse, children, parents and siblings of the deceased – but to... (Read More)

Nebraska Archives: 42 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

A land of vast prairies, Nebraska was admitted into the Union as the nation’s 37th state on 1 March 1867. The 16th largest state in the country, Nebraska is the 37th most populous. If you are researching your ancestry from Nebraska, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online NE newspaper archives: 42 titles to... (Read More)

Mayflower Genealogy: Finding Your Cousins Using Newspapers

Searching through GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives recently, I found this old newspaper announcement for Margaret (Rogers) Smith’s 81st birthday. Margaret Anne (Rogers) Smith (1857-1943) didn’t come to America on the Mayflower ship – but according to this newspaper article her ancestor Thomas Rogers (c. 1572-Winter 1620/21) did. Ding! Hey – I am also descended... (Read More)