An article in the Columbus (GA) Enquirer (2 Sep 1898) tells us that "Mrs. Billard, the daughter of the late Rev. Edward Oldrin, who lives on Bank Street [Stamford, CT]" ... and that she got it "by inheritance from her father. ... The book is in the original binding and well preserved, the Old Testament part having been printed in 1597 and the New Testament in 1596. The covers are of wood."

This is an important point. Always check the dates that each of the Testaments was printed. Printers often printed them separately and then joined them together when they published the Bible. This is a way to date a family Bible.

"Inscribed on the yellow fly-leat are the words: Edward Oulldron owns this book and after his death to his son Edward Oulldron, given by his grandfather - 1651." Elsewhere it states "Edward Oldrin's [note the change in spelling] book, given by his father on is deathbed in the 1827, July 28, to be kept in the family."

Mrs. Jennie Fairbanks Milligan of Springfield, Ohio brought the family Bible when she was called to testify in a case trying to break the will of the late Delavan Smith of Lake Forest, IL. (Dallas Morning News. 1 October 1921).

John M. Butler of Ocean Grove, NJ found out by double checking his family Bible that he was 101 and not 100 years old when he went to celebrate his birthday. He said it was a "pretty tough job trying to keep track of so many birthdays." He said with a smile ... "I must have lived two years in Brooklyn [NY, the] one year that I was there. That's the only way I can account for the discrepancy." (Evening Times - Pawtucket, RI - 17 jan 1901).