Civil War Nurse Mary Maxwell Featured in OGSQ

I received the latest copy of the Ohio Genealogical Society Quarterly (OGSQ) in the mail this week and was interested in the cover story about “Mary Francis (Stokes) Huddleston Maxwell, Civil War Nurse.” The article was written by Laurel Sheppard, the Assistant Editor of the OGSQ – who was assisted by Barbara Hart, Susan... (Read More)

Court Records in Newspapers: A Gold Mine for Genealogy Research

Introduction: Duncan Kuehn is a professional genealogist with over nine years of client experience. She has worked on several well-known projects, such as “Who Do You Think You Are?” In this blog post, Duncan show how legal articles in old newspapers can tell you about some of the experiences your ancestors went through, and... (Read More)

Arizona Archives: 73 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

Arizona became a state on 14 February 1912 – the 48th state to join the Union, and the last of the nation’s contiguous states. AZ is the country’s sixth largest state and the 15th most populous. One of the Four Corners states (it touches Colorado), Arizona has borders with four other states (New Mexico,... (Read More)

Genealogy Humor: 7 Funny and Odd Inheritances & Bequests

Introduction: Mary Harrell-Sesniak is a genealogist, author and editor with a strong technology background. In this blog article, Mary reminds us that humor can be a fun part of family history research by sharing seven strange bequests she ran across in old newspapers. They say that in order to be remembered long after you’re... (Read More)

North Carolina Archives: 169 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

One of America’s original 13 states, North Carolina’s state flag has two dates that commemorate NC’s drive for independence from Britain. On 20 May 1775 citizens of Mecklenburg County, NC, approved the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence – supposedly the first declaration of independence made in the Thirteen Colonies. Then on 12 April 1776, North... (Read More)

Elijah Sold Shoes Straight from His Saddlebags

No shoe stores in Boston in the late 1700s? According to Elijah Leathe’s obituary, “he was about the first who carried shoes, in saddle bags, to market to Boston, there being then no shoe stores.” This old 1800s newspaper article added that “He peddled them out from a bench, north side Faneuil Hall.” Can... (Read More)

Civil War Newspaper Research: Personal Notices & Letters

Introduction: Mary Harrell-Sesniak is a genealogist, author and editor with a strong technology background. In this blog article, Mary shows that one of the ways ordinary citizens and families communicated across enemy lines during the Civil War was by having personal notices and even letters published in newspapers – and these are a great... (Read More)