North Carolina Archives: 169 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

One of America’s original 13 states, North Carolina’s state flag has two dates that commemorate NC’s drive for independence from Britain. On 20 May 1775 citizens of Mecklenburg County, NC, approved the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence – supposedly the first declaration of independence made in the Thirteen Colonies. Then on 12 April 1776, North... (Read More)

Elijah Sold Shoes Straight from His Saddlebags

No shoe stores in Boston in the late 1700s? According to Elijah Leathe’s obituary, “he was about the first who carried shoes, in saddle bags, to market to Boston, there being then no shoe stores.” This old 1800s newspaper article added that “He peddled them out from a bench, north side Faneuil Hall.” Can... (Read More)

Civil War Newspaper Research: Personal Notices & Letters

Introduction: Mary Harrell-Sesniak is a genealogist, author and editor with a strong technology background. In this blog article, Mary shows that one of the ways ordinary citizens and families communicated across enemy lines during the Civil War was by having personal notices and even letters published in newspapers – and these are a great... (Read More)

The Three Stooges’ Story Told in Their Obituaries

Introduction: Duncan Kuehn is a professional genealogist with over nine years of client experience. She has worked on several well-known projects, such as “Who Do You Think You Are?” In this blog post, Duncan searches GenealogyBank’s obituaries collection to learn more about the zany comedy act “The Three Stooges.” The Three Stooges, active from... (Read More)

Resources to Trace African American Slave Ancestry

FamilySearch recently announced it is working with the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, the Afro-American Historical & Genealogical Society and the California African American Museum to crowdsource the online indexing of 1.5 million Freedman’s Bureau records that FamilySearch has put online. This is a great resource to start learning about African American slaves in early... (Read More)

Hawaii Archives: 25 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

Hawaii, the most recent addition to the United States, became the nation’s 50th state when it joined the Union on 21 August 1959. The only U.S. state not located in the Americas, the state of Hawaii is a string of islands located in the central Pacific Ocean. Hawaii is the country’s 8th smallest state... (Read More)

Google Remembers Olympian & Surfer Duke Kahanamoku

This week’s Google Doodle honors famed five-time Olympic medalist, Hawaiian athlete and swimmer, Duke Kahanamoku (1890-1968), who was born 24 August 1890 in Hawaii. He was known as the “Father of Surfing.” Here is a 1965 interview with him by Bruce Brown at the start of the first annual Duke Kahanamoku invitational surfing competition.... (Read More)

Vintage Fashion: Our Ancestors’ Summer Apparel

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this blog article, Gena searches old newspapers to find articles and advertisements that show what our ancestors wore during the hot summer months. I don’t know about where you live, but here in California it is HOT. This... (Read More)

August Update: 4 Million Genealogy Records Just Added!

Every day, GenealogyBank is working hard to digitize more newspapers and obituaries, expanding our burgeoning collection to give you the largest newspaper archives for family history research available online. We just completed adding 4 million more U.S. genealogy records, vastly increasing our content coverage from coast to coast! Here are some of the details... (Read More)