More Newspapers Go Online – 41 newspapers, 23 states

GenealogyBank adds and expands 41 newspapers from 23 states.

21 new titles.

That’s nearly 14 million articles contained in 8,052 issues!

Click and search them right now!!
Connecticut. Middletown. American Sentinel. 326 issues. 1823-01-01 to 1833-04-24
Connecticut. Middletown.
Constitution. 47 issues. 1854-12-13 to 1855-12-05
Connecticut. New London.
New London Gazette. 160 issues. 1838-01-03 to 1843-03-22
Connecticut. Nor wich.
True Republican. 49 issues. 1804-06-20 to 1806-10-01

Washington, DC. Daily National Intelligencer. 3,230 issues. 1842-07-01 to 1866-06-25

Florida. Gainesville. *Gainesville Sun. 1995-01-18 to Present

Illinois. Chicago. Chicago Metro News. 118 issues. 1974-07-06 to 1990-10-06
Illinois. Freeport. *
Journal Standard. 2002-12-14 to Present

Indiana. Crawfordsville. *Paper of Montgomery County. 2004-11-26 to Present
Indiana. Noblesville. *
Times. 2008-10-22 to Present

Kentucky. Paris. *Western Citizen. 45 issues. 1808-12-24 to 1814-12-31

Louisiana. New Orleans. Orleans Gazette. 1 issue. 1817-09-27
Louisiana. New Orleans.
Times-Picayune. 30 issues. 1872-09-26 to 1900-11-15

Maine. Kennebunk. *Annals of the Times. 68 issues. 1803-01-13 to 1805-01-03
Maine. Portland. *Independent Statesman. 167 issues. 1821-07-14 to 1825-05-06

Massachusetts. Boston. *American Traveller. 19 issues. 1825-07-26 to 1836-03-25
Massachusetts. Gloucester. *
Gloucester Democrat. 362 issues. 1834-08-19 to 1838-02-16
Massachusetts. Springfield.
Federal Spy. 133 issues. 1800-01-07 to 1805-12-31
Massachusetts. Springfield. *
Hampden Whig. 2 issues. 1831-05-11 to 1836-06-08

Maryland. Baltimore. *Baltimore Bulletin. 93 issues. 1872-04-20 to 1876-09-23

Michigan. Grand Rapids. Grand Rapids Press. 330 issues. 1893-01-19 to 1920-10-25

Mississippi. Columbia. *Columbian Progress. 2008-11-03 to Present

Montana. Great Falls. Montana Herold. 1 issue. 1896-09-03

New Hampshire. Concord. New Hampshire Patriot. 2 issues. 1881-02-24 to 1884-01-10

New Jersey. Trenton. Trenton State Gazette. 293 issues. 1847-01-12 to 1847-12-31

New York. Albany. Albany Evening Journal. 83 issues. 1850-09-19 to 1874-06-10
New York. Catskill. *
Catskill Recorder. 143 issues. 1807-04-07 to 1833-04-18
New York. Goshen. *Goshen Repository. 37 issues. 1797-03-21 to 1798-12-25
New York. New York.
Hodge’s Banknote Reporter. 4 issues. 1861-06-01 to 1861-06-22
New York. New York.
New York Herald. 1,121 issues. 1864-01-28 to 1871-11-04; 1874-10-04 to 1888-01-05
New York. New York.
New York Herald-Tribune. 962 issues. 1856-10-30 to 1879-03-27
New York. Poughkeepsie. *
Country Journal. 136 issues. 1785-12-15 to 1789-07-07

North Carolina. Forest City. *Daily Courier. 2005-01-01 to Present

Ohio. Cincinnati. *Advertiser and Journal. 9 issues. 1819-01-26 to 1827-09-26
Ohio. Cincinnati. *
Cincinnati Daily Gazette. 722 issues. 1835-01-01 to 1845-06-25
Ohio. Warren. *Trump of Fame. 15 issues. 1812-11-05 to 1814-07-27

Rhode Island. Pawtucket. *Valley Breeze. 2009-08-19 to Present

South Carolina. Charleston. City Gazette. 206 issues. 1824-01-01 to 1824-08-31

Texas. Beaumont. Beaumont Enterprise & Journal. 14 issues. 1906-05-30 to 1911-09-01

Utah. Salt Lake City. Salt Lake Tribune. 1 issue. 1881-06-11

Vermont. Newport. *Newport Daily Express. 2008-07-24 to Present
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Newspapers from 23 states go online!

GenealogyBank added and expanded 32 newspapers from 23 states.
16 new titles.

Click and search them right now.

California
Benecia.
California Gazette*. 1 issue. 1851-07-12

Colorado
Denver. Denver Mirror* 33 issues. 1874-06-28 to 1875-05-30

Connecticut
Bristol.
Bristol Press*. 2007-12-28 to Present
Manchester.
Journal Inquirer*. 2004-03-08 to Present
Middletown.
Constitution. 20 issues. 1856-12-31 to 1857-12-02
New London.
New London Daily Star. 120 issues. 1837-01-05 to 1858-09-02

DC
Washington.
Reconstructionist* 2 issues. 1866-02-10 to 1866-03-24

Idaho
Blackfoot.
Morning News*. 2008-08-02 to Present

Illinois
Chicago.
Chicago Times. 77 issues. 1855-01-16 to 1856-07-03

Indiana
Terre Haute.
Wabash Courier. 18 issues. 1840-10-31 to 1841-12-25

Kansas
Kansas City.
Kansas City Kansan*. 2008-08–12 to Current

Louisiana
New Orleans.
New Orleans Argus*. 117 issues. 1828-01-19 to 1832-09-29

Maryland
Baltimore.
American and Commercial Daily Advertiser. 3,722 issues. 1801-07-15 to 1820-12-30
Baltimore.
Federal Republican. 66 issues. 1811-01-01 to 1811-03-18
Cumberland.
Weekly Civilian. 126 issues. 1859-03-17 to 1861-09-26

Montana
Great Falls.
Montana Herold. 260 issues. 1893-05-04 to 1899-05-25

Nevada
Carson City. Nevada Appeal*. 2000-07-04 to Present

New Hampshire
Concord.
New Hampshire Patriot*. 545 issues. 1878-10-10 to 1890-04-10

New Jersey
Trenton.
Trenton State Gazette. 602 issues. 1848-01-01 to 1850-12-31

New York
Albany.
Albany Evening Journal. 1 issue. 1854-08-19
New York.
Morning Telegraph*. 509 issues. 1870-01-02 to 1879-12-28
New York.
New York Herald. 50 issues. 1871-06-18 to 1871-08-09
New York.
New York Herald-Tribune*. 527 issues. 1858-01-01 to 1877-09-24

North Dakota
Valley City. Valley City Times-Record*. 2008-06-02 to Present

Ohio
Cincinnati.
Cincinnati Daily Enquirer. 2,065 issues. 1861-01-04 to 1876-09-30

Oklahoma
Poteau.
Poteau Daily News & Sun*. 2009-07-29 to Present

Pennsylvania
Philadelphia.
National Gazette. 1,558 issues. 1822-12-03 to 1841-04-08
Philadelphia.
Public Ledger. 1,103 issues. 1840-09-17 to 1868-05-30

Rhode Island
Providence.
Manufacturers’ and Farmers’ Journal. 52 issues. 1820-08-07 to 1870-01-03

South Carolina
Charleston.
City Gazette. 200 issues. 1826-01-02 to 1826-12-30

Vermont
Milton.
Milton Independent*. 2009-01-08 to Present

West Virginia
Keyser.
Mineral Daily*. 2009-04-05 to Present
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Joel Munsell – a genealogist & publisher who went to jail to protect his sources

Joel Munsell was an active genealogist, publisher, printer and journalist. He’s always been one of my “heroes” for his legendary contributions to genealogy and local history. (Photo – Munselle’s Picassa Gallery)

I was looking on GenealogyBank and found his marriage to Jane Caroline Bigelow (1812-1854)

17 June 1834 Independent Inquirer 28 Jun 1834

And here is his obituary - (New York Herald – 17 Jan 1880).

Look at this article from the New York Herald – 28 Feb 1845.

Munsell published a small pamphlet in 1845 – Pulpit Sketches, or Dreams of a Pew Holder. The author was not identified. The pamphlet by innuendo subjected prominent citizens to “libelous ridicule”.

Real controversy erupted and following a Grand Jury Munsell was found in contempt and had a “choice to pay two hundred and fifty dollars or stand the imprisonment” …. all for not revealing the author’s name. He went to jail.

This case is held up as one of the early cases where journalists went to jail rather than reveal their sources.

But dig a little deeper.

This pamphlet was pointed and barbed – on page 27 the new chapter compares “Rev Dr. J.N.C. to “Judas Iscariot”. Tough stuff.

Who was the Rev. Dr. J.N.C.? Why attack him?

As in our day when the President’s team had moral problems they called on the minister’s of the day to resolve the issue. In Andrew Jackson’s day his cabinet was deeply involved with a scandal involving Peggy Eaton – that drove cabinet members to resign.

The President called on the Rev. John Nicholson Campbell (1798-1864) to examine the situation and counsel with the parties involved. Read the details here in the San Jose Mercury 3 May 1903.

Those actions in 1831 resulted in Munsell’s pamphlet in 1845.

But, who was the author?

Librarians and historians have concluded that the author was Henry Steel Olcott (1832-1937). So it was a 13 year old boy who wrote this pamphlet attacking the most learned and respected clergy of his day.

My question is: Did Joel Munsell refuse to say who the author was from journalistic zeal to protect his sources or because his source was a 13 year old boy? Or – was someone else the author of that pamphlet?

Write me and tell me what you think.

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GenealogyBank adds and expands 25 newspapers in 17 states.

GenealogyBank adds and expands 25 newspapers in 17 states.

AK. Juneau.
Daily Record-Miner
1 issue. 10/8/1903

CO. Colorado Springs
Gazette-Telegraph. 12 issues. 5/24/1903 to 3/11/1920

CT. Middletown
Constitution. 37 issues. 1878-01-01 to 1878-12-03

CT. New London
New London Gazette. 146 issues. 1828-01-07 to 1835-12-30

KY. Louisville
Western Courier*. 148issues 1813-11-16 to 1816-09-26

LA. New Orleans
Times Picayune. 246 issues. 1861-05-15 to 1894-09-04

MD. Baltimore
Baltimore American. 12 issues. 6/27/1905 to 8/12/1911
MD. Baltimore
Federal Republican. 232 issues. 1811-03-19 to 1812-06-18

NC. Henderson
Daily Dispatch. 4/10/2002 to Present

NE. Nebraska City
Daily Nebraska Press. 2 issues. 1875-04-12 to 1875-08-23

NJ. Cranford
Chranford Chronicle. 6/9/2005 to Present

NJ. Somerville

Chronicle. 6/11/2005 to 3/3/2007
NJ. Somerville
Reporter. 6/9/2005 to Present

NJ. Summit
Independent Press. 8/2/2006 to Present
NJ. Trenton
Trenton State Gazette. 303 issues. 1849-01-01 to 1849-12-31

NY. New York
New York Herald. 206 issues. 1874-04-25 to 1883-12-17

OH. Cincinnati
Cincinnati Volksfreund*. 813 issues. 1863-02-18 to 12/28/1904

OH. Cleveland
Plain-Dealer. 307 issues. 1/15/1914 to 9/27/1922

OR. Portland
Oregonian. 1920 issues. 1867-04-22 to 3/10/1907

PA. Philadelphia
Aurora General Advertiser. 12 issues. 1797-03-01 to 1797-10-18

RI. Pawtucket
Pawtucket Times. 1 issue. 3/18/1920

SC. Charleston
City Gazette. 512 issues. 1823-01-01 to 1825-12-31

SD. Pierre
Capital Journal. 12/11/2007 to Present

UT. Salt Lake City
Salt Lake Telegram. 1 issue. 3/28/1919
UT. Salt Lake City
Salt Lake Tribune. 1 issue. 1893-03-02

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The best source for old newspapers & documents on the planet.

Period!

When I print the article – it is too small. I can’t read it. What do I do now?

A: Great question. GenealogyBank makes it easy to enlarge any page or article.

Newspapers over the past 4 centuries have been printed in all shapes and sizes. That is particularly true of Colonial American newspapers.

GenealogyBank captures each article and page and displays them for you online – making it easy for you to save them as an Adobe PDF document.

When you want print or save an article and you see that it is too small to be easily read – simply enlarge it using Adobe Acrobat.

Step One: Click on the PDF icon to open up the article as a PDF document.

Step Two: Use the zoom button to enlarge the article to the desired size.

Now you can easily read the article, copy, save or print it.

Look closely at this example – an account of the statue of King George III being torn down and made into bullets – Connecticut Journal 17 July 1776 page 1.
On July 9, 1776, after the Declaration of Independence was read to the American army in New York City, the soldiers rushed to the foot of Broadway at the Bowling Green. As depicted in this engraving, they had the assistance of free Blacks or slaves in pulling down the statue of King George III. The lead statue was later brought to Connecticut, where it was made into bullets.”

GenealogyBank brings you:
▬ More Colonial American Newspapers than any other source
▬ Over 3,800 newspapers
▬ 1690 to Today


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Happy Independence Day!

Read about it – as it happened in GenealogyBank.
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GenealogyBank adds more newspapers – 51 titles – 16 States

GenealogyBank announces that it has added newspaper backfiles for 51 newspapers from 16 States.

This major upgrade brings GenealogyBank to nearly 300 million articles, books and records from over 3,800 newspapers; 260,000 books/documents and other resources. An esitmated One Billion Names.

Click on the following links and start searching!

California
Colton.
Chicano. 1 Issue. 5/10/1973
Los Angeles.
Dos Republicas. 1 Issue. 1892-06-07
Los Angeles.
Heraldo de Mexico. 27 Issues. 8/8/1918 to 11/1/1928
Oakland.
Mundo. 36 Issues. 8/2/1973 to 4/2/1975

Colorado
Trinidad.
Anunciador. 1 Issue. 9/9/1922

DC
Washington, DC.
Daily National Intelligencer. 1,624 Issues. 1822-01-01 to 1884-12-31

Florida
Ybor City.
Diario de Tampa. 6 Issues. 1/6/1909 to 1/30/1909

Georgia
Sparta.
Farmer’s Gazette*. 51 Issues. 1803-06-17 to 1807-08-08

Indiana
Indiana Harbour.
Amigo del Hogar. 2 Issues. 5/29/1927 to 5/27/1928

Louisiana
Donaldsville.
Donaldsonville Chief . 6/11/2008 to Today
New Orleans.
Times Picayune. 528 Issues. 1861-05-01 to 1897-04-10

Maine
Eastport. Eastport Sentinel*. 555 Issues. 1818-08-31 to 1832-08-15

Maryland
Baltimore. Federal Gazette. 1,989 Issues. 1796-02-05 to 1823-11-08 Uniontown. Engine of Liberty & Uniontown Advertiser*. 73 Issues. 1813-10-21 to 1815-04-27

Massachusetts
Gloucester.
Gloucester Telegraph. 1,597 Issues. 1827-01-01 to 1851-12-31
Springfield.
Federal Spy*. 170 Issues. 1794-05-13 to 1804-05-29

Nebraska
Nebraska City.
Nebraska City News-Press. 4/6/2009 to Today

New Mexico
Albuquerque.
Opinion Publica. 1 Issue. 1893-01-21
Las Cruces.
Eco del Valle. 5 Issues. 1/6/1906 to 2/13/1912
Las Cruces.
Estrella. 12 Issues. 6/19/1915 to 2/21/1925
Las Cruces.
Labrador. 12 Issues. 1897-11-21 to 9/1/1911
Las Cruces.
Las Cruces Democrat. 1 Issue. 1892-03-09
Las Cruces.
Mesilla Valley Bulletin. 1 Issue. 4/30/1937
Mountainair.
Independent. 2 Issues. 4/20/1918 to 12/7/1918
Santa Fe.
Daily New Mexican. 30 Issues. 1871-06-21 to 1875-01-30
Santa Fe.
Santa Fe Weekly New Mexican and Livestock Journal. 1 Issue. 1895-12-26
Socorro.
Defensor del Pueblo. 16 Issues. 1925-0-16 to 9/24/1937
Springer.
Colfax County Stockman. 1 Issue. 12/10/1910
Springer.
Estandarte de Springer. 124 Issues. 1890-07-03 to 1893-05-25

New York
Albany.
Albany Evening Journal. 69 Issues. 1854-04-22 to 1874-06-30
Brooklyn.
Espana Libre. 2 Issues. 2/7/1941 to 5/9/1941
New York.
Doctrina de Marti. 30 Issues. 1896-07-25 to 1898-02-15
New York.
Eco de Cuba. 3 Issues. 1855-06-22 to 1855-07-20
New York.
Prensa. 1832 Issues. 7/19/1919 to 12/30/1929
Poughkeepsie.
Dutchess Observer*. 60 Issues. 1816-07-24 to 1821-12-26
Sag Harbor.
Frothingham’s Long Island Herald*. 8 Issues. 1791-07-26 to 1798-03-12

Ohio
Chilliocothe.
Fredonian*. 27 Issues. 1807-02-19 to 1819-06-10

Tennessee
Athens.
Daily Post-Athenian. 3/28/2009 to Today
Newport.
Newport Plain Talk. 7/1/1998 to Today

Texas
Brownsville.
Cronista del Valle. 13 Issues. 2/21/1925 to 8/9/1927
Brownsville.
Heraldo de Brownsville. 18 Issues. 7/21/1937 to 2/20/1940
Brownsville.
Progreso. 1 Issue. 1876-05-07
Brownsville.
Puerto. 1 Issue. 9/27/1958
Corpus Christi.
Nueces County News. 1 Issue. 11/17/1938
El Paso.
Atalaya Bautista: Semanario Evangelico Bautista. 8 Issues. 11/3/1910 to 1/21/1929
El Paso.
Continental. 3 Issues. 10/17/1937 to 8/19/1938
El Paso.
Monitor. 1 Issue. 1897-07-03
Kingsville.
Notas de Kingsville. 2 Issues. 8/2/1951 to 11/11/1954
Laredo.
Correo de Laredo. 2 Issues. 1892-02-11 to 1892-05-26
San Antonio.
Bejareno. 2 Issues. 1855-08-18 to 1856-04-19
San Antonio.
Prensa. 662 Issues. 2/13/1913 to 9/15/1916

* New titles are marked with the *

Find and document your ancestors in GenealogyBank - the best source for old newspapers on the planet.

Period!

German Language Newspapers 1750-1898

GenealogyBank has over 3,800 newspapers – including titles in German.

(Lancaster, PA: Neue Unpartheyische Lancaster Zeitung – 6 Aug 1788).

GenealogyBank has 28 German-American newspapers that were published from 1750-1898 – in 6 States.

You may click on the links to begin searching each newspaper immediately.

Maryland
Frankfort. Bartgis’s Marylandische Zeitung. 1 issue. 1789-02-18 to 1789-02-18
Fredericktown. General Staatsbothe. 1 issue. 1811-12-27 to 1811-12-27

Montana
Helena. Montana Herold. 105 issues. 1899-06-01 to 7/11/1901

New Jersey
Egg Harbor City. Beobachter Am Egg Harbor River. 11 issues. 1858-10-02 to 1858-12-25
Egg Harbor City. Der Egg Harbor Pilot. 260 issues. 1860-03-22 to 1866-03-31
Egg Harbor City. Der Pilot. 13 issues. 1858-12-18 to 1859-03-19
Egg Harbor City. Der Wochentliche Unzeiger. 9 issues. 1859-06-04 to 1859-08-06
Egg Harbor City. Der Zeitgeist. 261 issues. 1867-04-06 to 1872-03-23
Egg Harbor City. Egg Harbor Aurora. 13 issues. 1860-08-18 to 1860-11-28
Egg Harbor City. Egg Harbor Beobachter. 13 issues. 1859-01-13 to 1859-04-28
Egg Harbor City. Egg Harbor Pilot. 312 issues. 1866-04-07 to 1872-03-23

New York
New York. New Yorker Volkszeitung. 2,561 issues. 1889-01-06 to 1898-12-31
New York. Sociale Republic. 109 issues. 1858-04-24 to 1860-05-26

Pennsylvania
Carlisle. Freyheits-Fahne. 122 issues. 1814-08-27 to 1817-03-25
Chestnut Hill. Chesnuthiller Wochenschrift. 109 issues. 1790-10-08 to 1793-08-20
Lancaster. Der Wahre Amerikaner. 369 issues. 1804-11-10 to 1811-12-28
Lancaster. Deutsche Porcupein. 98 issues. 1798-01-03 to 1799-12-25
Lancaster. Neue Unpartheyische Lancaster Zeitung. 126 issues. 1787-08-08 to 1789-12-30 Lebanon. Weltbothe. 30 issues. 1809-02-14 to 1809-09-05
Philadelphia. Amerikanischer Beobachter. 156 issues. 1808-09-09 to 1811-08-29
Philadelphia. Pelican. 39 issues. 1805-10-28 to 1807-02-21
Philadelphia. Pennsylvanische Fama. 2 issues. 1750-03-10 to 1750-03-17
Philadelphia. Wochentliche Philadelphische Staatsbote. 899 issues. 1762-01-18 to 1779-05-26
Reading. Reading Adler. 1,512 issues. 1796-01-03 to 1825-12-27
Reading. Welt Bothe. 73 issues. 1812-02-05 to 1820-12-06
Sunbury. Nordwestliche Post. 411 issues. 1812-08-12 to 1822-07-26
Sunbury. Northumberland Republicaner. 49 issues. 1817-01-15 to 1818-01-02

Wisconsin
Milwaukee. Milwaukee’r Socialist. 3 issues. 1876-09-22 to 1877-09-21

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NY Student History Research Contest Deadline Approaching

New York State Archives Sponsors 19th Annual Student Research Contest Albany, NY

This is a terrific opportunity to encourage students to use historical records.
The deadline for the contest is July 1st.
Awards go to individual students and to class projects.

GenealogyBank.com has over 300 New York (1719-Today) newspapers.

Click here to search all New York newspapers.

Use GenealogyBank to win this award.

The New York State Archives, a program of the State Education Department, is sponsoring the 19th annual Student Research Awards. The deadline for entry is July 1, 2009 and the contest is open to all New York students in grades 4-12 who use historical records in their research projects.

Three awards are presented each year: grades 4-5, grades 6-8, and grades 9-12. The awards consist of a framed certificate, a check for $100 from an endowment established by Regent Emerita Laura Chodos and her husband Robert Chodos, an invitation to have lunch with the Regents in Albany, and a behind-the-scenes tour of the State Archives.

Eligible projects are computer-based entries, such as websites or PowerPoint presentations; exhibits; documentaries; performances; research for a historical marker, property or district; and traditional research papers.

Student Research Award winners for 2008, Grades 4-5, were: Walden Elementary School (Orange County) students Jenalee Amundsen, Sarah Baker, Brianna Canto, Nicholas Cavallucci, Annalise Cardish, Felix Cepeda, Isaiah Skyler Chapman, Alex Clum, Frank Cook, Jr., Ilyssa Daly, Michael Daly, Brandon DiSimone, Sara Donovan, Abigail Hardy, Antonio Jackson, John lamb, Shiann Malvasi, Joshua Metzger, Jad Moumen, Sammy Moumen, Anthony Newton, Alyssa Rosario, Nyle Rose, Sarah Savasta, Brianna Sheehy, and Mary Sherman for their entry Capron, He’s My Street.

Grade 6-8 winners for 2008 were Persell Middle School (Chautauqua County) students Mark Brombacher, Jennie Gross, Taylor Estrada, Michelle Ferry, Alex Hoagland, Justin Hodges, Holly Johnson, Nick Myers, Jacob Perkins, Marisa Pope, Lucas Raak, Lindsey Rensel, Olivia Sinatra, Johnna Vanstrom, and Ben Whitney for their entry The Lost Neighborhood Project.

The Grade 9-12 Student Research Award winner for 2008 was Alexandra Rheinhardt, a student from Cooperstown Central High School (Otsego County), for the documentary, Sounds of Conflict: A Cultural Divide.

Julie Daniels, coordinator of the awards program, explained that in order for an entry to be competitive, a substantial portion of the research should be based on historical records from archives, historical newspapers, museums, historical societies, libraries, local governments, or other organizations. She offered some examples of historical records: original letters, diaries, and photographs; meeting minutes; police and court records; ledgers, census records; and wills.

For information about this year’s program, click on “Education” at www.archives.nysed.gov, call (518) 474-6926 or email archedu@mail.nysed.gov.

Elizabeth Gladys Dean (1912-2009) Last Titanic Survivor Dies

Elizabeth Gladys Dean was born on 12 Feb 1912. Her parents sold their family business in England and planned to emigrate to America like so many others from the UK before them.

Along with her mother Georgette Eva Dean, father Bertram Frank Dean and brother Bertram Dean they boarded the Titanic just a few weeks later to settle in their new home in Kansas. Her father perished in the sinking of the Titanic and the family returned to England to mourn their loss.

The newspapers of the day gave the grim listss of those that perished and those that survived.
(Boston Journal 12 April 1912)

Macon (GA) Weekly Telegraph 18 April 1912

Elizabeth Gladys Dean’s obituary appears in GenealogyBank.com

In fact GenealogyBank has the obituaries and stories of over 1,000 of the Titanic passengers that died in 1912 and the survivors that have died since.

Deseret News, The (Salt Lake City, UT) – May 31, 2009
Last survivor of the Titanic dies, aged 97

LONDON — Millvina Dean, the last survivor of the sinking of RMS Titanic, died Sunday in her sleep, her friend Gunter Babler said. She was 97.

Babler said Dean’s longtime companion, Bruno Nordmanis, called him in Switzerland to say that Dean died at her nursing home in southern England, on the 98th anniversary of the launch of the ship that was billed as “practically unsinkable.”

He said staff discovered Dean in her room Sunday morning. Babler said she had been hospitalized with pneumonia last week but she had recovered and returned to the nursing home.

A staff nurse at Woodlands Ridge Nursing Home in Southampton said no one could comment until administrators came on duty Monday morning.

Dean was just over 2 months old when the Titanic hit an iceberg on the night of April 14, 1912. The ship sank in less than three hours.

Dean was one of 706 people — mostly women and children — who survived. Her father was among the 1,517 who died.

Babler, who is head of the Switzerland Titanic Society, said Dean was a “very good friend of very many years.”
“I met her through the Titanic society but she became a friend and I went to see her every month or so,” he said.

The pride of the White Star line, the Titanic had a mahogany-paneled smoking room, a swimming pool and a squash court. But it did not have enough lifeboats for all of its 2,200 passengers and crew.

Dean’s family were steerage passengers setting out from the English port of Southampton for a new life in the United States. Her father had sold his pub and hoped to open a tobacconists’ shop in Kansas City, Missouri, where his wife had relatives.

Initially scheduled to travel on another ship, the family was transferred to the Titanic because of a coal strike. Four days out of port and about 600 kilometers (380 miles) southeast of Newfoundland, the ship hit an iceberg. The impact buckled the Titanic’s hull and sent sea water pouring into six of its supposedly watertight compartments.

Dean said her father’s quick actions saved his family. He felt the ship scrape the iceberg and hustled the family out of its third-class quarters and toward the lifeboat that would take them to safety. “That’s partly what saved us — because he was so quick. Some people thought the ship was unsinkable,” Dean told the British Broadcasting Corp. in 1998.

Wrapped in a sack against the Atlantic chill, Dean was lowered into a lifeboat. Her 2-year-old brother Bertram and her mother Georgette also survived.

“She said goodbye to my father and he said he’d be along later,” Dean said in 2002. “I was put into lifeboat 13. It was a bitterly cold night and eventually we were picked up by the Carpathia.”

The family was taken to New York, then returned to England with other survivors aboard the rescue ship Adriatic. Dean did not know she had been aboard the Titanic until she was 8 years old, when her mother, about to remarry, told her about her father’s death. Her mother, always reticent about the tragedy, died in 1975 at age 95.

Born in London on Feb. 2, 1912, Elizabeth Gladys “Millvina” Dean spent most of her life in the English seaside town of Southampton, Titanic’s home port. She never married, and worked as a secretary, retiring in 1972 from an engineering firm.

She moved into a nursing home after breaking her hip about three years ago. She had to sell several Titanic mementoes to raise funds, prompting her friends to set up a fund to subsidize her nursing home fees. Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet, the stars of the film “Titanic,” pledged their support to the fund last month.

For most of her life Dean had no contact with Titanic enthusiasts and rarely spoke about the disaster. Dean said she had seen the 1958 film “A Night to Remember” with other survivors, but found it so upsetting that she declined to watch any other attempts to put the disaster on celluloid, including the 1997 blockbuster “Titanic.”

She began to take part in Titanic-related activities in the 1980s, after the discovery of the ship’s wreck in 1985 sparked renewed interest in the disaster. At a memorial service in England, Dean met a group of American Titanic enthusiasts who invited her to a meeting in the U.S.

She visited Belfast to see where the ship was built, attended Titanic conventions around the world — where she was mobbed by autograph seekers — and participated in radio and television documentaries about the sinking.

Charles Haas, president of the New-Jersey based Titanic International Society, said Dean was happy to talk to children about the Titanic. “She had a soft spot for children,” he said. “I remember watching as little tiny children came over clutching pieces of paper for her to sign. She was very good with them, very warm.”

In 1997, Dean crossed the Atlantic by boat on the QEII luxury liner and finally visited Kansas City, declaring it “so lovely I could stay here five years.” She was active well into her 90s, but missed the commemoration of the 95th anniversary of the disaster in 2007 after breaking her hip.

Dean had no memories of the sinking and said she preferred it that way. “I wouldn’t want to remember, really,” she told The Associated Press in 1997. She opposed attempts to raise the wreck 4,000 meters (13,000 feet) from the sea bed.

“I don’t want them to raise it, I think the other survivors would say exactly the same,” she said in 1997. “That would be horrible.”

The last survivor with memories of the sinking — and the last American survivor — was Lillian Asplund, who was 5 at the time. She died in May 2006 at the age of 99. The second-last survivor, Barbara Joyce West Dainton of Truro, England, died in October 2007 aged 96.
Reprinted by permission: Copyright (c) 2009 Deseret News Publishing Company

Wow – we found him!

Yesterday the GenealogyBank Blog wrote about using the old documents in the “Serial Set” that are in GenealogyBank.com. It has been very popular.

Today I received this note from a genealogist about what she found on her Revolutionary War ancestor – Captain William York.

Tom – We used this set (Serial Set) to prove our ancestor, Captain William York, was a Revolutionary Soldier. Forming his own Troop of Horse, he was, initially, said to be a ‘mercenary’, but after being denied his pension in 1832, he asked his congressman to pursue it.

After William’s death in 1837, his son, Josiah Cowan York, kept this request alive, and it was finally approved in 1860.

My cousins and I almost screamed when I found the page where the ‘heirs of Captain William York’ are approved for his pension. Actually, there were 7 or 8 different bills on his behalf from 1832 to 1860, and I think I have most of them, but will check, just in case.

I cried when I saw the ‘memory’ marker that is now placed beside the grave of Josiah Cowan York. Not only did we prove his service, we found the first name of his wife, the dates both died, and two daughters we did not know existed. It’s amazing how much you can glean from these pages.

Diane Stark Sanfilippo
May 30, 2009 5:30 AM

What will you find in GenealogyBank?
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