How to Research Historical Events for Genealogy with Newspapers

Introduction: Duncan Kuehn is a professional genealogist with over eight years of client experience. She has worked on several well-known projects, such as “Who Do You Think You Are?” and researching President Barack Obama’s ancestry. In this guest blog post, Duncan shows three real-life examples in which she helped genealogists find newspaper articles about their ancestors, explaining the tips and techniques that got her successful results.

Some of the best information we find in family history research is news that helps us learn the motivations behind our ancestors’ actions. After all, these family members are so much more than just names and dates on a family tree. Finding out what our ancestors did and the events they were involved in—and their possible motivation—helps us better understand them as real people, not just collections of data.

The best sources to look for these details of our ancestors’ lives are the journals and letters they wrote. The next best source is old newspapers. They were the Facebook of the day and the gossip rag too. Searching through newspapers using the names of our ancestors can bring back many valuable results. We can also search for news articles about events in our ancestors’ lives that don’t mention our ancestors by name.

I’ve included several examples here of how to find these valuable articles and stories that provide a window into our ancestors’ lives.

The Explosion That Killed Emanuel Urban

A GenealogyBank member was looking for an article about a nitroglycerin explosion that killed her relative Emanuel Urban in September 1904 in Upper Sandusky, Ohio. I ran a search for the name Emanuel Urban but got back no results. She is confident that the date and location of the event are correct, but I couldn’t find any relevant historical newspaper articles. Perhaps the name wasn’t mentioned in the old news articles about the explosion. How can we search on GenealogyBank without using a name?

Tips for Searching the Newspaper Archives

I ran the search like this:

screenshot of GenealogyBank's search page for a search on nitroglycerin and explosion

Why did I formulate the newspaper archives search like this? I put nitroglycerin OR nitro-glycerin in the last name field and explosion in the first name field because I wanted the words to appear very close to each other in the news articles. Since I don’t know if the newspaper articles use nitroglycerin or nitro-glycerin, I can search for both using the word OR (both letters capitalized) between them (this is called a “Boolean Operator”).

Nitroglycerin has a tendency to explode! Without some keywords and a narrow date range, I would get too many search results. To avoid this, I narrowed the results by entering “Upper Sandusky” in the keyword field. Using quotation marks around the name Upper Sandusky will make sure it appears exactly as I typed it.  I also added the date range of September 1904 to October 1904 to further narrow the results.

Enter Last Name










Search News Nationwide

What I didn’t do is select just one state’s newspapers to look through. And it is a good thing I searched nationwide. Upper Sandusky is a city in Ohio, but only two of the six search results were published in Ohio newspapers. The others were published in Idaho, Illinois, Michigan and Washington, D.C., newspapers.

Your Ancestor’s Name Might Have Been Misspelled

Surprisingly, several of the historical news articles mention Emanuel Urban by name. So why didn’t I find his name when I ran the search the first time? Apparently the newspaper editors couldn’t get the spelling of the name correct. I found Emanuel Urban under the following names: Emanuel Urcan, Irban, Urican, Hurcan, and even Samuel Green. Who knows how the name Emanuel Urban became Samuel Green!

Explosion Is Fatal to Five, Daily Illinois State Journal newspaper article 5 September 1904

Daily Illinois State Journal (Springfield, Illinois), 5 September 1904, page 1

West Virginia Train Robbery

Another GenealogyBank member was searching for articles about an event she had personally been involved in as a young girl in the late 1940s. She was traveling by train with her grandmother when the train was robbed somewhere in West Virginia. She wanted to find some newspaper articles about it so that she could learn more about the event. Her name would not be mentioned in the newspaper articles and she wasn’t sure how to search for information about the incident.

I ran this search:

screenshot of GenealogyBank's search page for a search on train robbery and West Virginia

This search found 35 articles, most of which were about the exact train robbery she remembered! Here is one article that has pictures of some of her fellow passengers:

photos of the victims of a West Virginia train robbery, Boston Traveler newspaper article 10 March 1949

Boston Traveler (Boston, Massachusetts), 10 March 1949, page 27

Try Using Different Keywords in Your Searches

Of course if I entered different keywords into the genealogy search engine, I might be able to find even more old news articles. For example now that I know the date of the train robbery, I could run an archive search like this:

screenshot of GenealogyBank's search page for a search on train and Martinsburg

This search returned 78 newspaper results! There are certainly more details and stories that could be gathered from these articles.

Passenger Train Robbed; One Shot, Dallas Morning News newspaper article 10 March 1949

Dallas Morning News (Dallas, Texas), 10 March 1949, page 1

You will notice that my previous record search used the keywords “West Virginia” and robbery. The above article has neither term, which is why it did not show up on that first search. It abbreviates West Virginia to W.Va., and uses the term robbed rather than robbery.

Enter Last Name










James Nealand & the Gunpowder Mill

A GenealogyBank member was looking for an ancestor named James Nealand who was killed in an explosion at a gunpowder mill in Hazardville, Connecticut, during the Civil War. He knew there were multiple spellings of the name Nealand, but hadn’t been able to find newspaper articles under any of the known spellings. I tried the following search:

screenshot of GenealogyBank's search page for a search on powder mill and explosion

Search without a Surname

I was able to find six articles relating to the event. I even found James Nealand. His name had been misspelled as James Kneeland.

Explosion of a Powder Mill, Boston Evening Transcript newspaper article 24 July 1862

Boston Evening Transcript (Boston, Massachusetts), 24 July 1862, page 1

Even if your ancestors weren’t directly involved in any big events, they were affected by the major historical events around them. Researching more about how these important events affected your ancestors’ neighbors and community will help you learn more about the people you are interested in. For example, while researching a small community in South Dakota, I found that the neighbors of the person I was researching had their house destroyed in a devastating tornado. If I had only searched for the people I was directly interested in, I would have missed out on knowing about this tornado that surely affected them too.

Genealogy Tip: When searching newspapers to learn more about your ancestors, don’t forget to look for the events they were involved in—or at least affected by—as well. Genealogy is more fun and complete when you learn not just about your ancestors’ individual lives—but also the communities where they resided and the times in which they lived.

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Top Genealogy Websites, Pt. 5: State Vital Records in the U.S.

A growing number of states in the U.S. are putting their vital records online, making it easier for genealogists to obtain these records.

collage of genealogy records available online from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History

Credit: West Virginia Division of Culture and History

The West Virginia Division of Culture and History is a prime example of how these state projects are revolutionizing family history research in the 21st Century.

West Virginia has put up millions of genealogical documents including:

wedding records for Joseph Strother and Amelia Davenport available online from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History

Credit: West Virginia Division of Culture and History

With a click you can see the original vital records registers for the Mountain State.

Take for example the marriage of Joseph Strother and Amelia Davenport on 5 June 1808 in Charles Town, West Virginia.

wedding records for Joseph Strother and Amelia Davenport available online from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History and GenealogyBank

Credit: West Virginia Division of Culture and History and GenealogyBank

West Virginia has given us easy online access to the original entry in the 1808 marriage register for this couple’s marriage.

photo of the wedding register for Joseph Strother and Amelia Davenport available online from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History

Credit: West Virginia Division of Culture and History

Brief and to the point: we get the date of their marriage, their names and the name of the minister that performed the wedding.

Couple that information with their marriage announcement that we find in GenealogyBank and we get the rest of the story.

wedding announcement for Joseph Strother and Amelia Davenport, Farmer’s Repository newspaper article 10 June 1808

Farmer’s Repository (Charleston, West Virginia), 10 June 1808, page 2

The marriage announcement tells us that the minister, Rev. Mr. Mines, is of Leesburg (Loudoun County), Virginia.

Now we know where to look for the church registers of that denomination.

From the marriage announcement we also learn that the groom, Joseph Strother, is of Madison County, Virginia, and that the bride, Miss Amelia Davenport, is the daughter of Major A. Davenport of Jefferson County, West Virginia.

This is critical information for genealogists.

Now we know where to dig deeper for information about the Strother and Davenport families: Jefferson, Loudoun and Madison counties.

Newspapers are the cutting-edge source for genealogists. GenealogyBank has made it easy to find facts like these details of the Strother-Davenport wedding. Combine this newspaper information with states like West Virginia putting digital copies of the original birth, marriage and death registers online—and it’s easy to see that this is a great time for genealogists!

For reference, here is a list provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of all the state websites offering vital records across the United States: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/w2w.htm

There Are Some Obituaries Everyone Needs to Read

I. D. Lilly, a retired trucker and promoter of the largest family reunion ever held, died in March of this year. He was an active participant in the famous West Virginia family’s gatherings, and served on the Lilly Family Reunion Board of Directors.

In 2009 some 2,585 Lilly relatives gathered in Flat Top, West Virginia. It was such a large reunion that Guinness’ Book of World Records named it the largest family reunion ever held.

Don’t you wish that your family was as organized and connected as the Lilly family?

Ira Dupuy Lilly’s obituary appeared in GenealogyBank and was published in the Orlando Sentinel (Orlando, Florida), 22 April 2013, page B-4. Here is that obituary in full; it’s well worth reading.

His Family’s Reunions Set World Records

On Aug. 9, 2009, the Lilly family set the Guinness world record for the biggest family reunion. Within that group of 2,585, meeting for three days in a big pasture on Flat Top, W.Va., was I.D. Lilly, a former Orlando trucking company owner.

Before his death on March 27 at age 93, Lilly would earn family-reunion recognition for traveling the farthest, being the oldest and being one-half of the longest-married couple to attend the reunion. He died of complications related to dementia.

Before his mind began to abandon him, Lilly came to the reunions with a tent, a table and some chairs so relatives, near and far, could sit down and catch up.

“He would tell you about his Aunt Sally Ann and he would pull out his family tree,” said his daughter Barbara Savino, 65, of Longwood. “He had 102 cousins — can you imagine?”

So big is the Lilly family that just about anybody can find themselves on the family tree.

“This part of West Virginia, people call it Lillyland. There’s a Lilly everywhere you turn,” Savino said.

So important is the reunion, Savino said, that the governor of West Virginia often makes an appearance.

The family reunion is held on 38 acres of land that includes a kitchen and dining area, covered bleachers, stage and restrooms — all built for the purpose of the reunion. There are booths for family members selling jewelry, quilts, children’s toys and souvenir embroidered T-shirts and caps. The Lilly genealogist has a booth where she can show everyone where they fit on the family tree.

There are games and prizes for kids and a potluck buffet that would include a butterscotch pie baked by Lilly’s wife of 65 years, Allegra.

The reunion to I.D. Lilly was about home, heritage and linage. It was about staying connected to family no matter how far removed the relation or how far away the relatives. It was about walking into the kitchen and dining area and seeing the pictures of his ancestors on the wall, where his face will join the gallery of ghosts this summer.

His father and two brothers are on the wall. So is his mother, the woman who ran the general store in Cool Ridge. From her, he learned the lesson of selfless generosity.

Lilly moved to Orlando from West Virginia, in the late 1950s, when he started Laskco Inc., a trucking company. Through the years, Lilly helped out his drivers and mechanics whenever they ran out of money or into hard times.

Once, his wife came home and found her washing machine missing because Lilly gave it to an employee who needed one, Savino said.

“That’s the West Virginia style,” his daughter said. “If somebody needed something, he would just help them.”

The Lilly family reunion produces an annual program that is 160 pages thick. This year, there will be a tribute page to Ira Dupuy Lilly for his contributions on the Lilly Family Reunion Board of Directors.

After his death, Lilly’s body was flown back home to Beckley, W.Va., and the Sunset Memorial Park where so many of his relatives are buried. His interment on April 2 wasn’t in the family plot, but an above-ground mausoleum.

A Navy pilot who flew a blimp during World War II in search of German submarines, I.D. Lilly couldn’t abide being laid to rest underground.

In addition to his wife and daughter, Ira Dupuy Lilly is survived by his sons Larry Lilly, of Cool Ridge, W.Va., and Alan Lilly, of Orlando; six grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

Rose & Quesenberry Funeral Home, Beckley, W.Va., handled funeral arrangements.

Irish American Genealogy & Family History Facts Infographic

Irish American Genealogy & Family History Facts Infographic

In celebration of Irish Heritage Month, here are some interesting facts about Irish ancestry in America.

Irish American Population Statistics

  • There are 34.5 million people who claim Irish ancestry in America
  • Approximately 11% of the total United States population is Irish American
  • There are over 7 times more people of Irish descent in the United States than the entire population of Ireland

History of Irish Immigration to America

There were 2 major waves of Irish immigration to America.

  1. The first immigration period was in the Colonial era of the 18th century. These people set sail from the northern provinces of Ireland looking for new lives as American pioneers. The migration consisted of approximately 250,000 Scots-Irish who were predominately Protestant. The major ports of entry for these incoming Irish immigrants were in New York and Philadelphia.
  1. The second wave of immigration was between 1846 and 1900. During this period approximately 2,873,000 people fled to America from the southern provinces of Ireland. This was primarily due to the Great Irish Potato Famine, which caused poverty and starvation throughout Ireland. These new arrivals were predominately of Catholic denomination. The major American ports of entry were in New York and Boston. The Irish also arrived on trains and ships from Canada, which was then called British North America.

Origins of the Saying “Luck of the Irish”

During the 1848-1855 California Gold Rush many Irish immigrants headed out West to mine silver & gold. Many Americans said the immigrants’ mining success was due to luck, not skill—hence the saying “Luck of the Irish.”

Common Irish Surnames

Here is a list of the top 10 most common Irish last names and their meanings:

  • Murphy – Sea Battlers
  • Kelly – Bright-headed Ones
  • O’Sullivan – Hawkeyed Ones
  • Walsh – Welshmen
  • O’Brien – Noblemen
  • Byrne – Ravens
  • Ryan – Little Kings
  • O’Connor – Patrons of Warriors
  • O’Neill - From a Champion, Niall of the Nine Hostages
  • O’Reilly – Outgoing People, Descendants of Reilly

Percentage of Irish Americans by State

The Northeastern United States has the highest concentration of Irish Americans. The following 9 states all have more than 15% Irish ancestry in their total populations. The states are listed in descending order from highest to lowest total Irish population percentages. Massachusetts has the highest percentage in the United States with 22.5% of its residents claiming Irish ancestry.

  1. Massachusetts
  2. New Hampshire
  3. Rhode Island
  4. Delaware
  5. Connecticut
  6. Vermont
  7. Pennsylvania
  8. New Jersey
  9. Maine

The following 9 U.S. states also have high Irish American populations of 12-14%. Montana has the highest in this range with 14.8% of its population claiming Irish ancestry.

  1. Montana
  2. Iowa
  3. Nebraska
  4. Wyoming
  5. New York
  6. Missouri
  7. Ohio
  8. Colorado
  9. Illinois

11% to 11.9% of the residents in the following 7 states claim Irish ancestry.

  1. Oregon
  2. Maryland
  3. Kansas
  4. Washington
  5. Minnesota
  6. Nevada
  7. West Virginia

The remaining states have less than 11% Irish ancestry in their total populations.

Famous Americans Who Are a Wee Bit Irish

From presidents to outlaws, there have been many famous Irish Americans throughout U.S. history. Here are a few of them:

  • John F. Kennedy a.k.a. JFK: 35th President of the United States
  • Henry Ford: Founder of Ford Motor Company
  • Barack Obama: 44th President of the United States
  • William Henry McCarty Jr. a.k.a. Billy the Kid: Outlaw
  • Judy Garland: Actress & Singer
  • Bill O’Reilly: TV Host & Political Commentator
  • Conan O’Brien: TV Host & Comedian
  • Grace Kelly: Actress & Princess of Monaco
  • Walter Elias Disney a.k.a. Walt Disney: Film Producer & Co-founder of the Walt Disney Company
  • Danica Patrick: NASCAR Driver
  • Eddie Murphy: Actor & Comedian
  • Mel Gibson: Actor & Film Producer

Top Irish Genealogy Records

The top genealogy records to trace your Irish roots are:

Did You Know?

Civil registration in Ireland didn’t begin until 1864, although some non-Catholic marriages were recorded as early as 1845. Fortunately for genealogists, Irish American newspapers routinely published the news of Irish births, marriages and deaths for more than half a century before Ireland started recording them.

Got a little Irish in you? Discover your Irish American ancestry at http://www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/ethnic/irish_american/

Follow GenealogyBank on social media with hashtag #IrishHeritage for more Irish American genealogy facts throughout Irish Heritage Month.

Sources:

http://www.biography.com/people/groups/famous-irish-americans

http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/facts_for_features_special_editions/cb13-ff03.html

http://www.edwardtodonnell.com/

http://www.energyofanation.org/waves_of_irish_immigration.html

http://www.irishcentral.com/roots/The-10-most-popular-Irish-last-names-2-133737553.html?page=3

http://names.mongabay.com/ancestry/st-Irish.html

http://www.udel.edu/soe/deal/IrishImmigrationFacts.html

http://www.wikipedia.org/

Family History Expos – Georgia 2011

Georgia Family History Expo – Duluth, Georgia 2011

Over 400 genealogists gathered in Duluth, Georgia, for the annual Family History Expo held at the Gwinnett Center on Nov. 11-12, 2011.

Now in its second year, this conference has the size and feel of a national conference. There were over 60 informative family history sessions taught by two dozen experienced national speakers. Topics covered at this premier event for genealogists ranged from “Searching Your Scottish Ancestors” to “Special Sources for Confederate Research in the National Archives.” Thanks to the conference’s solid organization and the Gwinnett Center’s well-managed layout, it was easy for genealogists to mingle with nationally-recognized speakers and take the time to ask meaningful, detailed questions.

For example, the Family History Expo made it easy for working genealogists to attend by having sessions scheduled well into the evening. Working genealogists that couldn’t make the day-time sessions could attend sessions at night as well as all day on Saturday.

The speakers and vendors each shared their latest genealogy insights and tips. One nifty new application I learned about at this conference is a free family tree software program from TreeSeek.com. This application creates a nine-generation family tree fan chart that is easy to share with relatives and other researchers, as shown below. TreeSeek pulls family data from Geni or FamilySearch.Genealogists will find this free family tree software program a terrific way to easily share some of their family discoveries with relatives over the Holidays.

In addition to traditional family tree charts this program can also create a “Name Cloud” familiar to those of us working with 21st Century genealogy computing. Tom Kemp, GenealogyBank’s Director of Genealogy Products, gave three lectures at the Expo, all focused on the value of newspapers for genealogists.

Friday, Nov. 11: “African American Newspapers”

(Beginner Level) Tom talked about the more than 270

African American newspapers in GenealogyBank’s collection, published from 1827-1999—the largest collection of African American newspapers online. He provided practical advice for genealogists, such as: methods for efficient searching; and how to clip and save newspaper articles about your family. The lecture gave practical examples of the type of information family historians can find in these old newspapers, such as this obituary of Mary Stamps that appeared in the Atlanta Age (Georgia) 13 January 1900, page 2.

Saturday, Nov. 12: “21st Century Genealogy”
(All Levels) For this lecture, Tom concentrated on the ten essential online resources that you need to research your family online, save time, and improve the accuracy of your family history. He showed his audience how to cut through the clutter on the Internet and focus on the ten core resources with the reliable, essential content that genealogists use to document and preserve their family trees.

Genealogy sites Tom discussed included:
· Ancestry
· FamilySearch
· GenealogyBank
· Google Books
· Internet Archive
· Scribd

As Tom told his audience: “It’s a great day for genealogy! Researchers need to know about these terrific online genealogy resources.” Saturday, Nov. 12: “Newspapers: Finding the Details about Your Family”
It was standing room only for this 2011 Family History Expo session, in which Tom explained how to use the more than 5,700 newspapers in GenealogyBank’s
online newspaper archives, published from 1690-Today. He taught how to search efficiently, and clip and save newspaper articles about your family—providing practical tips for searching these online newspapers published over the past three centuries.

Newspapers from 23 states go online!

GenealogyBank added and expanded 32 newspapers from 23 states.
16 new titles.

Click and search them right now.

California
Benecia.
California Gazette*. 1 issue. 1851-07-12

Colorado
Denver. Denver Mirror* 33 issues. 1874-06-28 to 1875-05-30

Connecticut
Bristol.
Bristol Press*. 2007-12-28 to Present
Manchester.
Journal Inquirer*. 2004-03-08 to Present
Middletown.
Constitution. 20 issues. 1856-12-31 to 1857-12-02
New London.
New London Daily Star. 120 issues. 1837-01-05 to 1858-09-02

DC
Washington.
Reconstructionist* 2 issues. 1866-02-10 to 1866-03-24

Idaho
Blackfoot.
Morning News*. 2008-08-02 to Present

Illinois
Chicago.
Chicago Times. 77 issues. 1855-01-16 to 1856-07-03

Indiana
Terre Haute.
Wabash Courier. 18 issues. 1840-10-31 to 1841-12-25

Kansas
Kansas City.
Kansas City Kansan*. 2008-08–12 to Current

Louisiana
New Orleans.
New Orleans Argus*. 117 issues. 1828-01-19 to 1832-09-29

Maryland
Baltimore.
American and Commercial Daily Advertiser. 3,722 issues. 1801-07-15 to 1820-12-30
Baltimore.
Federal Republican. 66 issues. 1811-01-01 to 1811-03-18
Cumberland.
Weekly Civilian. 126 issues. 1859-03-17 to 1861-09-26

Montana
Great Falls.
Montana Herold. 260 issues. 1893-05-04 to 1899-05-25

Nevada
Carson City. Nevada Appeal*. 2000-07-04 to Present

New Hampshire
Concord.
New Hampshire Patriot*. 545 issues. 1878-10-10 to 1890-04-10

New Jersey
Trenton.
Trenton State Gazette. 602 issues. 1848-01-01 to 1850-12-31

New York
Albany.
Albany Evening Journal. 1 issue. 1854-08-19
New York.
Morning Telegraph*. 509 issues. 1870-01-02 to 1879-12-28
New York.
New York Herald. 50 issues. 1871-06-18 to 1871-08-09
New York.
New York Herald-Tribune*. 527 issues. 1858-01-01 to 1877-09-24

North Dakota
Valley City. Valley City Times-Record*. 2008-06-02 to Present

Ohio
Cincinnati.
Cincinnati Daily Enquirer. 2,065 issues. 1861-01-04 to 1876-09-30

Oklahoma
Poteau.
Poteau Daily News & Sun*. 2009-07-29 to Present

Pennsylvania
Philadelphia.
National Gazette. 1,558 issues. 1822-12-03 to 1841-04-08
Philadelphia.
Public Ledger. 1,103 issues. 1840-09-17 to 1868-05-30

Rhode Island
Providence.
Manufacturers’ and Farmers’ Journal. 52 issues. 1820-08-07 to 1870-01-03

South Carolina
Charleston.
City Gazette. 200 issues. 1826-01-02 to 1826-12-30

Vermont
Milton.
Milton Independent*. 2009-01-08 to Present

West Virginia
Keyser.
Mineral Daily*. 2009-04-05 to Present
.

GenealogyBank.com has 1883 Pensioner List Online

GenealogyBank.com is pleased to announce that it has the five volume List of Pensioners – 1883 online. This basic reference set is actively used by genealogists.

List of Pensioners on the Roll January 1, 1883; giving the name of each pensioner, the cause for which pensioned, the post office address, the rate of pension per month, and the date of original allowance. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1883. Senate Document. Serial Set Vol. No. 2078, Session Vol. No.5; Report: S.Exec.Doc. 84 pt. 1-5.

The List of Pensioners – lists the pensioners by State/Town. Volume 5 includes the lists of pensioners that lived overseas.

Each entry gives:
Name of Pensioner
Pension Certificate Number
Date of the Original Pension
Reasons why the person received the pension
The monthly pension payment
Post Office where the pensioner receives their mail

Tip: This is a crucial source for identifying pensioners from all wars still living in 1883 and it pinpoints where they were living – anywhere in the US or around the world.

Connecticut; District of Columbia; Maine; Massachusetts; New Hampshire; New Jersey; Rhode Island; Vermont

New York; Pennsylvania;

Illinois; Iowa; Ohio

Alaska; Arizona; California; Colorado; Dakota; Idaho; Indiana; Kansas; Michigan; Minnesota; Montana; Nebraska; Indian Territory (Oklahoma); Nevada; New Mexico; Oregon; Utah; Washington; Wisconsin; Wyoming

Alabama; Arkansas; Delaware; Florida; Georgia; Kentucky; Louisiana; Maryland; Mississippi; Missouri; North Carolina; South Carolina; Tennessee; Texas; Virginia; West Virginia.

Countries of the World – including Hawaii which was listed as the “Sandwich Islands”.

Africa; Austria; Belgium; Brazil; Denmark; England; France; Germany; Ireland; Italy; Madeira Island (Portugal); Malta; Mauritius; Mexico; Netherlands; New Zealand; Norway; Peru; Romania; Russia; Scotland; Spain; Sweden; Switzerland; Wales; West Indies; Foreign – Address Unknown.
.

GenealogyBank – adds 170 newspapers from 31 States – 1830 to today

In the last few weeks GenealogyBank has added a staggering 7.2 million records and documents! In all of 2008 we added 39 million records and documents

GenealogyBank hits new high: 253 million records and documents – If each document was a person – that would be more than the population of the UK, Ireland, Germany, France and Canada combined!

Specifically in the last few weeks GenealogyBank added:
170 newspapers from 31 states
Content from 1830 to the present

Here is a list of the titles added:

Alaska
Juneau. Daily Record-Miner. 3 issues. 7/16/1910 to 10/10/1910

Alabama
Jasper. *Daily Mountain Eagle. 1/22/1998 to Current

Arkansas
Benton. *Benton Courier. 5/8/2008 to Current
Carlisle. *Carlisle Independent. 6/6/2008 to Current
Jonesboro. Jonesboro Evening Sun. 120 issues. 10/3/1905 to 11/9/1921
Little Rock. Arkansas Gazette. 17 issues. 8/23/1842 to 10/11/1899
Malvern. *Malvern Daily Record. 1/1/2008 to Current

Arizona
Nogales. *Monitor. 1 issue. 9/5/1890
Tucson. Amigos. 1 issue. 2/9/1977
Tucson. Tucsonense. 159 issues. 1/2/1923 to 12/29/1923

California
Colton. Chicano. 34 issues. 3/14/1974 to 6/16/1977
Los Angeles. *Aguacero. 2 issues. 3/24/1878 to 3/31/1878
Los Angeles. Clamor Publico. 6 issues. 10/9/1855 to 4/25/1857
Los Angeles. *Con Safos. 2 issues. 3/21/1969 to 6/1/1970
Los Angeles. *Correo Mejicano. 1 issue. 10/18/1917
Los Angeles. *Cronica. 1 issue. 9/12/1874
Los Angeles. *Democrata. 6 issues. 10/14/1882 to 11/4/1882
Los Angeles. Dos Republicas. 3 issues. 10/28/1892 to 2/1/1893
Los Angeles. *Eco de la Patria. 2 issues. 2/14/1878 to 2/21/1878
Los Angeles. *Fe en la Democracia. 2 issues. 10/29/1884 to 11/3/1884
Los Angeles. Heraldo de Mexico. 145 issues. 5/20/1919 to 11/29/1928
Los Angeles. *Joven. 2 issues. 9/18/1877 to 4/12/1878
Los Angeles. *Malcriado. 1 issue. 4/17/1927
Los Angeles. *Mesazero. 1 issue. 12/21/1954
Los Angeles. *Monitor Mejicano. 10 issues. 10/26/1895 to 10/29/1898
Los Angeles. Prensa. 68 issues. 7/26/1919 to 12/22/1921
Los Angeles. *Regeneracion. 250 issues. 9/5/1910 to 10/6/1917
Los Angeles. *Union. 3 issues. 11/21/1896 to 5/15/1897
San Francisco. *Centro America. 20 issues. 2/20/1921 to 8/25/1921
San Francisco. *Hispano America. 48 issues. 1/3/1931 to 12/5/1931
San Francisco. *Imparcial. 5 issues. 11/20/1931 to 2/1/1935
San Francisco. *Jalamate. 10 issues. 1/30/1972 to 6/9/1972
San Francisco. Mefistofeles. 1 issue. 3/23/1918
San Francisco. *Seminario Imparcial. 12 issues. 8/20/1938 to 11/12/1938
San Francisco. Voz del Nuevo Mundo. 97 issues. 3/27/1865 to 9/23/1884

Colorado
Colorado Springs. Gazette-Telegraph. 3 issues. 9/29/1903 to 9/16/1922
San Luis. Adobe. 1 issue. 8/31/1975

Connecticut
New London. New London Democrat. 1 issue. 5/17/1851
Norwich. Norwich Morning Bulletin. 2 issues. 12/3/1875 to 8/13/1887
Shelton. *Fairfield Sun. 9/18/2008 to Current

Florida
Tampa. Diario de Tampa. 13 issues. 8/21/1908 to 7/10/1911
Tampa. Internacional. 16 issues. 6/30/1939 to 8/7/1942
Tampa. Revista de Cuba Libre. 1 issue. 8/27/1898
Tampa. *Traduccion Prensa. 14 issues. 4/9/1941 to 9/4/1956
Tampa. *West Tampa Leader. 1 issue. 12/8/1940
Tampa. *Ybor City Sunday News. 1 issue. 11/18/1951

Hawaii
Kailua. *West Hawaii Today. 8/31/2008 to Current

Idaho
Idaho City. Idaho Register. 3 issues. 11/17/1905 to 4/23/1915
Twin Falls. Twin Falls News. 2 issues. 4/30/1919 to 6/18/1919

Illinois
Centralia. Centralia Sentinel. 7 issues. 1/12/1865 to 6/15/1865
Chicago. Latin Times. 2 issues. 9/24/1960 to 4/6/1962
Chicago. Noticia Mundial. 2 issues. 10/9/1927 to 10/23/1927
Chicago. Vida Latina. 1 issue. 2/21/1958

Kansas
Abilene. *Abilene Reflector-Chronicle. 12/17/1999 to Current
Dodge City. *Dodge City Daily Globe. 8/9/2005 to Current

Kentucky
Corbin. *Times-Tribune. 6/17/2008 to Current

Louisiana
New Orleans. Abeja. 166 issues. 5/24/1830 to 4/25/1831
New Orleans. Times Picayune. 3,086 issues. 1/11/1861 to 10/22/1900
New Orleans. Times Picayune. 2,856 issues. 1/26/1901 to 12/30/1922

Massachusetts
Boston. Boston Journal. 2,176 issues. 7/6/1866 to 8/31/1897
Boston. *Liberator. 72 issues. 9/6/1896 to 4/15/1906
Brockton. *Enterprise. 10/9/2008 to Current
Dedham. Norfolk Democrat. 2 issues. 12/27/1850 to 12/2/1853
Stoughton. Stoughton Sentinel. 79 issues. 7/30/1864 to 11/11/1876

Maryland
Baltimore. Baltimore American. 4 issues. 7/23/1905 to 7/13/1910

Michigan
Grand Rapids. *Grand Rapids Press. 3,138 issues. 7/1/1901 to 12/30/1922
Jackson. *Jackson Citizen Patriot. 137 issues. 8/15/1849 to 12/2/1858

Missouri
Kansas City. Cosmopolita. 1 issue. 1/30/1915
Kansas City. Kansas City Times. 99 issues. 5/13/1884 to 9/20/1894

Mississippi
Vicksburg. Daily Commercial. 1 issues. 7/16/1878

Montana
Helena. Western Clarion. 1 issue. 9/30/1865

Nebraska
Nebraska City. Daily Nebraska Press. 1 issue. 3/25/1876

New Jersey
Trenton. *Trenton Evening Times. 880 issues. 5/7/1883 to 12/30/1922
Trenton. *Trenton Sunday Times-Advertiser. 497 issues. 6/1/1902 to 6/23/1918

New Mexico
Albuquerque. Indito. 1 issue. 4/4/1901
Albuquerque. Nuevo Mundo. 5 issues. 12/25/1897 to 7/28/1900
Bernalillo. *Agricultor Moderno. 1 issue. 3/23/1916
Bernalillo. *Espejo. 1 issue. 3/8/1879
Bernalillo. *Voz del Valle. 53 issues. 10/12/1899 to 1/31/1901
Deming. *Deming Headlight. 5 issues. 1/24/1891 to 2/18/1899
Deming. *Deming Tribune. 1 issue. 12/25/1884
Deming. *Democracia. 1 issue. 1/14/1906
Elizabethtown. *Mining Bulletin. 17 issues. 1/4/1900 to 8/11/1900
Estancia. *Estancia News. 4 issues. 9/1/1905 to 7/5/1907
Las Cruces. *Borderer. 1 issue. 8/16/1873
Las Cruces. Dona Ana County Republican. 2 issues. 1/19/1901 to 3/30/1901
Las Cruces. Labrador. 2 issues. 1/25/1901 to 3/10/1905
Las Vegas. *Boletin de Anuncios. 1 issue. 1/19/1878
Las Vegas. *Cachiporra. 1 issue. 10/19/1888
Las Vegas. *Campaign Bulletin. 2 issues. 8/25/1880 to 8/27/1880
Las Vegas. *Hispano Americano. 6 issues. 4/21/1892 to 10/15/1892
Las Vegas. *Las Vegas Daily Optic. 11 issues. 3/1/1890 to 7/8/1893
Las Vegas. *Las Vegas Weekly Optic. 2 issues. 10/23/1880 to 10/30/1880
Las Vegas. Revista Catolica. 54 issues. 4/1/1888 to 2/10/1895
Las Vegas. *Sol de Mayo. 8 issues. 5/1/1891 to 7/24/1891
Las Vegas. *Voz del Pueblo. 4 issues. 9/21/1895 to 12/13/1904
Maldonado. *Estrella. 1 issue. 1/30/1897
Mesilla. Mesilla News. 1 issue. 12/18/1880
Mora. *Cronica de Mora. 2 issues. 6/13/1889 to 11/2/1889
Mora. *Mora Echo. 2 issues. 9/16/1890

Mora. *Mosquito. 15 issues. 12/3/1891 to 6/30/1892
Raton. *Relampago. 11 issues. 5/21/1904 to 8/6/1904
Rincon. *Rincon Weekly. 11 issues. 8/29/1895 to 5/11/1897
Rincon. *Roswell Record. 1 issue. 7/14/1893
San Acacio. *Comercio. 1 issue. 7/11/1907
San Marcial. *San Marcial Bee. 2 issues. 6/10/1893 to 3/29/1902
Santa Fe. Cachiporrota. 1 issue. 10/16/1890
Santa Fe. *Clarin Mejicano. 1 issue. 8/10/1873
Santa Fe. Daily New Mexican. 227 issues. 4/15/1871 to 3/28/1872
Santa Fe. *Gauntlet. 1 issue. 6/25/1894
Santa Fe. *Nuevo Mejicano. 2 issues. 4/25/1863 to 9/24/1881
Santa Fe. *Nuevo Mexicano. 40 issues. 8/16/1890 to 5/9/1908
Santa Fe. *Registro de Nuevo Mexico. 1 issue. 5/2/1916
Santa Fe. *Santa Fe Daily New Mexican. 23 issues. 8/8/1885 to 2/9/1887
Santa Fe. Santa Fe Weekly New Mexican and Livestock Journal. 2 issues. 3/22/1888 to 10/26/1893
Santa Fe. *Verdad. 1 issue. 9/12/1844
Santa Fe. *Voz del Pueblo. 2 issues. 4/27/1889 to 6/1/1889
Santa Fe. Weekly New Mexican.1 issue. 9/27/1919
Socorro. Defensor del Pueblo. 8 issues. 3/30/1906 to 5/24/1935
Springer. Colfax County Stockman. 1 issue. 1/6/1912
Wagon Mound. *Combate. 198 issues. 12/6/1902 to 11/2/1918

New York
Albany. Albany Evening Journal. 98 issues. 5/31/1850 to 6/1/1874
Garden City. Eco. 26 issues. 5/1/1930 to 5/15/1932
New York. *Artes y Letras. 56 issues. 10/21/1933 to 10/21/1939

New York. Cacara Jicara. 2 issues. 10/9/1897 to 12/13/1897
New York. Ecos de Nueva York. 31 issues. 2/26/1950 to 1/6/1957
New York. (Brooklyn). Espana Libre. 12 issues. 11/10/1939 to 8/14/1942

New York. *Novedades. 274 issues. 1/3/1880 to 12/21/1918
New York. Papagayo. 1 issue. 2/23/1855
New York. Patria. 1 issue. 3/14/1892
New York. Prensa. 1 issue. 8/24/1925
New York. Puerto Rico en Marcha. 1 issue. 6/21/1951

Ohio
Cincinnati. Cincinnati Commercial Tribune. 1,592 issues. 5/1/1869 to 6/30/1890
Wooster. Wooster Republican. 112 issues. 1/4/1855 to 12/30/1922
Cleveland. Plain-Dealer. 355 issues. 11/26/1914 to 12/30/1922

Oregon
Portland. Oregonian. 3,355 issues. 4/1/1861 to 7/12/1906

Pennsylvania
Philadelphia. Public Ledger. 3,364 issues. 3/25/1836 to 12/31/1873

Rhode Island
Pawtucket. Pawtucket Times. 3 issues. 1/8/1920 to 1/28/1921

South Carolina
Aiken. *Aiken Standard. 8/27/2008 to Current
Pickens. *Pickens Sentinel. 8/13/2008 to Current

Texas
Beaumont. Beaumont Enterprise and Journal. 4 issues. 4/27/1906 to 4/9/1911
Borger. *Borger News Herald. 6/11/2008 to Current
Brownsville. Cronista del Valle. 3 issues. 12/15/1924 to 9/8/1925
Brownsville. Puerto 16 issues. 7/24/1954 to 12/26/1959
Brownsville. Republican 34 issues. 10/23/1862 to 7/23/1868
Cleburne. *Cleburne Times Review. 7/18/2008 to Current
Corpus Christi. Horizonte. 2 issues. 11/26/1879 to 3/3/1880
Corpus Christi. *Progreso. 31 issues. 6/23/1939 to 3/15/1940
Corpus Christi. Verdad. 12 issues. 11/11/1955 to 9/6/1957
El Paso. Atalaya Bautista: Semanario Evangelico Bautista. 116 issues. 1/5/1911 to 6/26/1919
El Paso. *Clarin del Norte. 1 issue. 12/27/1906
El Paso. Continental. 1 issue. 6/5/1936
El Paso. *Dia. 2 issues. 2/18/1919 to 2/23/1919
El Paso. El Paso Evening Tribune. 1 issue. 6/23/1893
El Paso. Noticias. 5 issues. 10/21/1899 to 1/20/1900
El Paso. Republica. 8 issues. 11/2/1919 to 5/22/1920
Galveston. Galveston News. 6 issues. 8/20/1877 to 9/1/1881
Kingsville. Eco. 4 issues. 5/1/1934 to 12/1/1934
Kingsville. Notas de Kingsville. 29 issues. 6/29/1950 to 5/12/1960
Kingsville. Tex. Mex. Reflector. 3 issues. 5/21/1921 to 1/21/1923
Laredo. *Cronica. 95 issues. 1/1/1910 to 4/18/1914
Laredo. Evolucion. 31 issues. 7/27/1917 to 1/30/1920
San Antonio. Epoca. 4 issues. 11/24/1918 to 7/24/1927
San Antonio. Heraldo de Mexicano. 8 issues. 1/29/1928 to 9/8/1929
San Antonio. Imparcial de Texas. 45 issues. 9/19/1918 to 9/30/1920
San Antonio. Prensa. 4,781 issues. 10/1/1916 to 6/13/1957
San Antonio. Revista Mexicana. 158 issues. 5/28/1916 to 7/6/1919

Vermont
St. Albans. St. Albans Daily Messenger. 2 issues. 2/29/1916 to 7/5/1918

West Virginia
Montgomery. *Montgomery Herald. 4/1/2008 to Current
Oak Hill. *Fayette Tribune. 6/11/2008 to Current
Princeton. *Princeton Times. 4/17/2008 to Current

More newspapers go online

GenealogyBank adds 17 newspapers – from 10 States to America’s Obituaries Section

That section now has 1,161 newspapers!
Here is the list of the new titles added:

Alabama
Daily Mountain Eagle (Jasper, AL)
Obituaries: 01/30/1998 – Current
Death Notices: 01/22/1998 – Current

Arkansas
Benton Courier, The (Benton, AR)
Obituaries: 05/14/2008 – Current
Death Notices: 05/08/2008 – Current

Carlisle Independent (Carlisle, AR)
Obituaries: 06/06/2008 – Current
Death Notices: 10/24/2008 – Current

Malvern Daily Record (Malvern, AR)
Obituaries: 08/12/2008 – Current
Death Notices: 08/01/2008 – Current

Connecticut
Fairfield Sun (Shelton, CT)
Obituaries: 09/18/2008 – Current
Death Notices: 09/18/2008 – Current

Hawaii
West Hawaii Today (Kailua-Kona, HI)
Obituaries: 09/02/2008 – Current
Death Notices: 08/31/2008 – Current

Kansas
Abilene Reflector-Chronicle (Abilene, KS)
Obituaries: 12/17/1999 – Current
Death Notices: 01/10/2000 – Current

Dodge City Daily Globe, The (Dodge City, KS)
Obituaries: 08/17/2005 – Current
Death Notices: 08/09/2005 – Current

Kentucky
Times-Tribune, The (Corbin, KY)
Obituaries: 06/17/2008 – Current
Death Notices: 10/06/2008 – Current

Massachusetts
Enterprise, The (Brockton, MA)
Obituaries: 10/09/2008 – Current

South Carolina
Aiken Standard (Aiken, SC)
Obituaries: 09/01/2008 – Current
Death Notices: 08/27/2008 – Current

Pickens Sentinel, The (Pickens, SC)
Death Notices: 08/13/2008 – Current

Texas
Borger News-Herald (Borger, TX)
Obituaries: 06/11/2008 – Current
Death Notices: 06/12/2008 –

Cleburne Times-Review (Cleburne, TX)
Obituaries: 07/25/2008 – Current
Death Notices: 07/18/2008 – Current

West Virginia
Fayette Tribune (Oak Hill, WV)
Obituaries: None received to date
Death Notices: 06/11/2008 – Current

Montgomery Herald (Montgomery, WV)
Obituaries: None received to date
Death Notices: 04/01/2008 – Current

Princeton Times (Princeton, WV)
Obituaries: 09/12/2008 – Current

Death Notices: 04/17/2008 – Current
.

More Birth, Marriage & Death Records Go Online


Volunteers working at FamilySearchLabs are digitizing microfilm and original vital records and putting them online. (Photo, courtesy: Newsroom.lds.org)

Today I see that they have added records for:

MICHIGAN
Michigan Birth Records 1867-1902 – Complete – includes digital images of the original documents

Michigan Death Records 1867 to 1897 – Complete – includes digital images of the original documents

WEST VIRGINIA
West Virginia Births 1853-1930 – 36% complete – includes digital images of the original documents
West Virginia Marriages 1853-1970 – 36% complete – includes digital images of the original documents
West Virginia Deaths 1853-1970 – 50% complete – includes digital images of the original documents

GERMANY and MEXICO
In addition to that FamilySearchLabs has put up German & Mexican baptismal & marriage registers for 1700-1900. These two resources are text only and give the citation for the original document but not the digital page images.

This is great news!

FamilySearchLabs is keeping up a brisk pace of uploading genealogical records and images.
GenealogyBank adds 4 million articles and records each month. To see what has been added this month click here.

GenealogyBank now has over 227 million records and documents – that’s over 1 billion names. Give it a try now – search and see what GenealogyBank has on your ancestors.