BOGO: Search for One Relative & Find Another One as a Bonus

I was searching for newspaper articles about my cousin Cyrus Lane (1824-1911) from Sanbornton, New Hampshire, and quickly found an announcement of his marriage

wedding announcements for Cyrus Lane and Sarah Plummer, also for Oliver Piper and Judith Lane, New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette newspaper article 30 November 1848

New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette (Concord, New Hampshire), 30 November 1848, page 3

But wait – there’s more.

Here was an added bonus.

Following the report of Cyrus’s marriage to Sarah H. Plummer on 25 October 1848, there is this next announcement: “also, Oct. 30, Mr. Oliver P. Piper to Miss Judith C. Lane, all of S.”

Enter Last Name

This refers to his sister, Judith Clifford Lane (1826-1899).
Wow – that must have been a time of family gathering and joy with two weddings within a week.

Newspapers reported the news of our ancestors.
Dig in to GenealogyBank and find your ancestors’ stories.

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Wedding Belles! How to Find Your Ancestors’ Marriage Records

Introduction: Mary Harrell-Sesniak is a genealogist, author and editor with a strong technology background. In this blog post, Mary provides search tips for finding your ancestors’ marriage records in old newspapers.

When romance is in the air, newspapers report it in many surprising ways. By searching old newspapers, you’ll find copious details about your ancestors’ engagements, rehearsal dinners and weddings!

photo of a bride in her wedding dress

Photo: bride in wedding dress, 11 September 1929. Credit: Infrogmation; Wikimedia Commons.

Newspapers Provide Shower & Wedding Details

You might even find old newspaper articles on wedding showers, such as this one from 1910, when Grace (Floyd) Kannaman’s friends surprised her with one. Even though the wedding had already occurred, they couldn’t resist more festivities.

They dined on frappes and wafers, while entertaining themselves with the games “Ring on the String,” “Button, Button, Who’s Got the Button,” “Jenkins Up,” and a clothes-pin race. Color-coded gifts were accompanied by poetical dedications, and recipes were pasted in a blue-bound book to become her “infallible household guide!” What a treasure that recipe book must have been to receive – and a great family heirloom to locate if it’s still around!

article about Grace Floyd's bridal shower, Sedan Times-Star newspaper article 1 September 1910

Sedan Times-Star (Sedan, Kansas), 1 September 1910, page 1

Notice how the wedding of Mr. Le Grand C. Cramer and Miss Nellie Almy was described in the following newspaper article as a virtual feast of details. This lengthy historical news article names family members, bridesmaids, groomsmen, the officiant and even the organist – and you get to read about the magnificent pearl and diamond earrings bestowed on Nellie by her groom.

Her bridal costume “consisted of a very rich Velour white-ribbed silk dress with court train, the front breadth elaborately trimmed with flowers and tulle, and the remainder of the dress also elaborately trimmed with waxed orange buds and tulle.” There was a matching veil and extraordinary gifts abounded. An imported camel’s hair shawl was “very cheap at twelve hundred dollars” and of the solid silverware “there seemed to be no end, either in quantity or variety.” The article went on to say that “Those who ought to be good judges say that no bride in this city has ever received such a large quantity of elegant presents as have been bestowed upon Mrs. Cramer.” (I imagine that was an understatement!)

wedding  notice for Le Grand C. Cramer and Nellie Almy, Providence Evening Press newspaper article 17 November 1871

Providence Evening Press (Providence, Rhode Island), 17 November 1871, page 2

The elite are usually proffered prime newspaper coverage for their weddings – but even if your ancestor wasn’t a society belle, you’ll likely uncover intriguing details and descriptions of her wedding.

In 1897, this wedding notice for J. C. Love and Hattie Upchurch reported that the church was “crowded to the doors” and that after the “knot had been tied, to be broken only by death” there was a “swell reception.”

wedding notice for J. C. Love and Hattie Upchurch, Gazette newspaper article 30 October 1897

Gazette (Raleigh, North Carolina), 30 October 1897, page 3

Ancestor Wedding Photographs

Don’t forget to hunt for photographs of marriage engagements and weddings.

Enter Last Name

Historical newspapers have always been prone to printing arrays of pictures. When you find weddings, you get a special treat – not only do you get to see the bride and sometimes the groom, but you also get a fashion show of earlier styles!

Genealogy Tip: As discussed in other articles on this blog, if you’ve got an undated photo, browse early newspapers to see if you can figure out the time period when similar clothing styles were popular. For example, read the article How to Date Family Photos with Vintage Fashion Ads in Newspapers.

Here is a 1913 photograph depicting a society belle with her groom. He was Frances Bowes Sayre (1885-1972), the lucky fellow who married President Woodrow Wilson’s daughter, Jessie (1887-1933). Her gown was magnificent – and if you search GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives for reports about their wedding, you’ll learn about the White House ceremony and their honeymoon in Europe.

wedding photo for Frances Bowes Sayre and Jessie Wilson, Evening Times newspaper article 29 November 1913

Evening Times (Grand Forks, North Dakota), 29 November 1913, page 8

This next photo example, from 1936, is a virtual collage of people – from the wedding party to family members and attendees. What a treasure it would be to include this wedding picture collage in the family scrapbook!

wedding photos, Heraldo de Brownsville newspaper article 9 August 1936

Heraldo de Brownsville (Brownsville, Texas), 9 August 1936, page 8

Search Tips for Ancestor Wedding Information in Old Newspapers

I’d like to leave you with some search tips, and invite you to share your own with us in the comments section.

screenshot of GenealogyBank's newspaper search page

  • After exhausting these two, try other search categories. Occasionally you’ll find a honeymoon mentioned in the Passenger Lists category, or the unfortunate divorce filing in the Legal, Probate & Court category. Any of these can help with finding an elusive date of marriage.
  • Don’t forget to broaden date ranges when you do your newspaper searches. Engagement notices can appear in newspapers many years prior to a wedding. Although local wedding notices are usually printed not long after a wedding, out-of-town papers may report the wedding after a long delay. Even honeymoon stop-overs are reported when the happy couple visits relatives.
Enter Last Name

  • Research wedding legal requirements. An often overlooked query are banns, which had to be published prior to a wedding. This was done so that people could report concerns as to why a couple should not be married. The amusing anecdote in the following newspaper article showcases the process. In this instance, the groom had written to the church sexton with a request to publish the banns. Trying to be congenial, he concluded his letter: “So no more from your well wisher and Mary Williams.” This sexton unfortunately interpreted the man’s name as “William Wisher,” which was used in the published banns. Imagine the couple’s disappointment when they learned their wedding had to be postponed until after the corrected banns had been published!
article about wedding banns, Biloxi Herald newspaper article 16 December 1893

Biloxi Herald (Biloxi, Mississippi), 16 December 1893, page 3

  • Many records kept by organizations are only available at the source. Go to your family’s house of worship to see if any canonical records can be searched. One example comes from my own family. I tried to order my parents’ marriage certificate, but it is lost. So Mom and I went to the church where they were married, only to find that the official wedding book had been lost. The church finally located a report in the monthly newspaper which verified the details of their wedding.
  • Learn about religious customs. An example comes from those with ancestors belonging to the Society of Friends (or Quakers). Many of their accounts make for interesting reading. Recently, I spotted reports where members were directed to observe weddings. The intent was to make sure the ceremony was performed in a manner appropriate to the religion. When it wasn’t, there were follow-ups as to how the marriage had occurred out of unity and whether or not a member took appropriate steps to restore the relationship with the church.
  • If you can’t find a family wedding notice in a newspaper, focus on the groom. Enter his full name, and follow up with a search using his given name’s initials. As seen in the Sayre-Wilson wedding photo above, the bride wasn’t even mentioned by name – and the groom only as “F. B.” Sayre
  • A related tip is to search for the bride or groom’s father. It’s all too common to read reports that “a daughter or son of Mr. So & So was married recently.”
  • Many historical newspaper articles will have headlines reporting just the surnames of the wedding couple, so try searching without given names, such as “Smith-Kline marriage.”
  • If your primary objective is to determine a date and you’re striking out as to the exact date of the marriage, look for anniversary notices and obituaries. Many will report that a couple was married on a certain day, or that they were celebrating a special milestone such as a golden wedding anniversary.
article about wedding anniversaries, San Francisco Bulletin newspaper article 26 September 1866

San Francisco Bulletin (San Francisco, California), 26 September 1866, page 3

  • From one’s engagement to the actual wedding, there are more steps associated with marriages than any other type of life event – so consider all of them as potential keywords. Browse the following list to find keywords that can be cross-referenced:
  • bachelor
  • banns
  • best man
  • betrothal or betrothed
  • bride
  • bridal
  • bridal party
  • bridal shower
  • bridegroom
  • bridesmaid
  • ceremony
  • civil ceremony
  • civil union
  • commitment ceremony
  • dowry
  • elope
  • eloped
  • elopement
  • engaged
  • engagement
  • engagement ring
  • fiancé or fiancée
  • flower girl
  • groom
  • groomsmen
  • guests
  • honeymoon
  • intended
  • intentions
  • maid of honor or matron of honor
  • marriage
  • marriage certificate
  • marriage license
  • married
  • marry
  • newlyweds
  • nuptials
  • officiant (minister, priest, rabbi, reverend, etc.)
  • proposal
  • ring
  • shotgun wedding
  • shower
  • spinster
  • trousseau
  • union
  • veil
  • vows
  • wedding
  • wedding party
  • witness and witnesses

Related Marriage & Divorce Articles:

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Wedding Records: Everyone Loves a Rainbow

Everyone loves a rainbow. An auspicious symbol of luck, hope and promise, rainbows signify happy new beginnings.

photo of a rainbow

Credit: Wikipedia

This was especially true for Albert Buckholtz, who married Laura Frances Rainbow in Trenton, New Jersey, in 1896.

Details of their wedding were published in this newspaper marriage announcement.

Buckholtz-Rainbow wedding announcement, Trenton Evening Times newspaper article 22 October 1896

Trenton Evening Times (Trenton, New Jersey), 22 October 1896, page 1

Do you have any Rainbows in your family tree or any other surnames with double meanings? Please share them with us in the comments.

Genealogy Tip: You can easily search for wedding announcements (by your ancestor’s first name, surname or using keywords) from the last three centuries in GenealogyBank’s newspaper archives. Simply go to: http://www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/newspapers/?type=marriage_engagement

screenshot of the wedding announcements search page on GenealogyBank.com

Credit: GenealogyBank.com

Top Genealogy Websites: Alabama Genealogy Resources

If you’re researching your family roots in Alabama, I suggest you rely on two online sources—GenealogyBank and FamilySearch—to find digitized newspapers and genealogy records from the “Heart of Dixie.”

Concentrating your Alabama genealogy research on these two websites will give you the documentation you need to learn about your family’s stories—and the specifics of their birth, marriage and death dates.

collage of Alabama genealogy records and newspapers from FamilySearch and GenealogyBank

Credit: FamilySearch and GenealogyBank

You want to focus on the best genealogy websites—the ones that have the information you need to trace your ancestry from Alabama.

GenealogyBank has the most extensive newspaper archive of Alabama newspapers online.

Search Alabama Newspaper Archives (1816 – 1992)

Search Alabama Recent Obituaries (1992 – Current)

FamilySearch has 14 collections of early Alabama records free online.

Search Alabama Census, Probate & Vital Records

Let’s look at the marriage of Joseph A. Gilbert and Margianna Whiddon on 4 August 1859 in Mobile, Alabama.

collage of records about the 1859 wedding of Joseph A. Gilbert and Margianna Whiddon, from FamilySearch and GenealogyBank

Credit: FamilySearch and GenealogyBank

Looking in GenealogyBank’s historical Alabama newspaper archive we find their marriage announced in the Mobile Register (Mobile, Alabama), 11 August 1859, page 2.

The newspaper article tells us:

  • The date of the marriage: 4 August 1859 at 8 p.m.
  • The exact place of the marriage: “the residence of Levi H. Norton”
  • Groom: Joseph A. Gilbert, formerly of Greenville, Butler County, Alabama
  • Bride: Margianna Whiddon, “adopted daughter of the officiating gentleman”

Great genealogical information—we have the who, what, when and where.

Let’s dig deeper and find out exactly who the “officiating gentleman” at the wedding was.

Looking at the Alabama marriage certificates online records on FamilySearch we can easily find the marriage certificate for Joseph Gilbert and Margianna Whiddon.

photo of the 1859 Alabama marriage certificate for Joseph Gilbert and Margianna Whiddon

Credit: FamilySearch

Who performed the wedding?

Looking at the signature of the Justice of the Peace, it appears to be L.H. Hardin or L.H. Nordin.

“L.H. Nordin” —that looks a lot like the Levi H. Norton named in the marriage announcement published in the Mobile Register. Their wedding was performed at his home.

So—we have the “officiating gentleman’s” name from the old newspaper and, although very difficult to read, confirmed again in the signature on the marriage certificate.

The marriage certificate gives us the basic facts given in the newspaper marriage announcement: their names and the date and place of the wedding, plus it tells us who performed the wedding.

The old newspaper announcement adds the important details that the officiator was her adopted father and that Joseph Gilbert was from Greenville, Butler County, Alabama.

By using only the best genealogy resources online we can find the facts we need to document our family and, importantly, the crucial details that fill in the stories of their lives…while focusing our ancestry research and saving time.

Note that this article is part of our ongoing series covering the top genealogy websites. To read the previous articles in this series visit the links below:

Top Genealogy Websites Pt. 1: Google

Top Genealogy Websites Pt. 2: Google Books & Internet Archive

Top Genealogy Websites Pt. 3: Burial & Cemetery Records

Case Study: Using Old Newspaper Articles to Learn about Your Ancestors

Old newspapers provide the stories of our ancestors’ lives, helping to flesh out the names and dates on our family trees.

What kind of family history can be found in historical newspapers? Let’s pick a typical, ordinary family and find out.

For example, what can I discover about the Crofoot family that lived in Connecticut back to colonial times? Did they appear in the old newspapers?

Let’s see.

I’ll do a search in GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives for the family surname Crofoot.

screenshot of GenealogyBank's newspaper search page for Crofoot

Let’s take a look at some of the surname search results.

Here is a wedding announcement article I found in an old newspaper for Ephraim Crofoot.

wedding announcement for Ephrim Crofoot and Elizabeth Winship, Connecticut Mirror newspaper article 1 May 1830

Connecticut Mirror (Hartford, Connecticut), 1 May 1830, page 3

OK. The core facts: Ephraim Crofoot married Miss Elizabeth W. Winship about April 1830 in Middletown, Connecticut.

Here is another reference to Ephraim Crofoot I found in an old newspaper death notice.

death notice for Esther Elizabeth Crofoot, Constitution newspaper article 4 October 1848

Constitution (Middletown, Connecticut), 4 October 1848, page 3

Ephraim’s daughter Esther Elizabeth, aged 17 years, died 29 September 1848. Calculating back, this means she was born about 1831.

OK. That piece seems to fit nicely in the family puzzle, since Ephraim was married the year before in 1830. Esther Elizabeth probably was the daughter of Ephraim and Elizabeth W. (Winship) Crofoot. We’ll need to do more genealogy research to confirm that.

Here is another old newspaper reference to a child of Ephraim’s: Thomas S. Crofoot.

death notice for Thomas Crofoot, Constitution newspaper article 25 August 1852

Constitution (Middletown, Connecticut), 25 August 1852, page 3

This death notice tells us that Ephraim’s son, Thomas S. Crofoot, was 19 years, 4 months old when he died in August 1852. Calculating back, that would put his birth at about April 1833. Again, that fits Ephraim’s 1830 marriage.

There is another clue: this newspaper article refers to his father as “the late Ephraim Crofoot, Esq.”

So—had our Ephraim Crofoot died by August 1852?

More genealogical facts to double check.

But, look at this old newspaper article. It is another marriage announcement for an Ephraim Crofoot, to a Betsey Sampson.

wedding announcement for Ephraim Crofoot and Betsey Sampson, Constitution newspaper article 27 February 1850

Constitution (Middletown, Connecticut), 27 February 1850, page 3

Is this the same Ephraim Crofoot? A different Ephraim Crofoot?

Had something happened to Elizabeth (Winship) Crofoot? Had she died? Was there a divorce?

It takes time to piece together all the genealogical clues and facts that document a family tree. As you can see, there are many articles in old newspapers that can help us discover the stories of our ancestors’ lives.

In the weeks ahead I will continue to report on my findings about the Crofoot family and provide similar case study examples from other typical American families to help you better understand how to find newspaper articles about your ancestors—and how you can use them to fill in your family tree.

How to Find Georgia Marriage Records

It is easy to find copies of your Georgia ancestors’ marriage certificates and records using two basic online genealogy tools: GenealogyBank.com and FamilySearch.org. If your ancestors lived in Georgia, let’s see how we can find information about them.

marriage certificate for Walter B. Dense and Mamie T. Thornton found using FamilySearch's Georgia marriage records

Marriage certificate for Walter B. Dense and Mamie T. Thornton found using FamilySearch’s Georgia marriage records. Credit: FamilySearch.

FamilySearch.org has put Georgia marriage records from 1785 to 1950 online.

You may search for these old marriage records online here: https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1927197

A typical search will produce a marriage certificate like this one for Walter B. Dense and Mamie T. Thornton.

marriage certificate for Walter B. Dense and Mamie T. Thornton

Marriage certificate for Walter B. Dense and Mamie T. Thornton. Credit: FamilySearch.

Image Credit: “Georgia, County Marriages, 1785-1950,” index and images, FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/KXVC-7NK Accessed 19 March 2013, Walter B. Dense and Mamie T. Thornton, 1879.

This historical marriage certificate tells us that they were married by the Rev. Walker Lewis on 10 September 1879 in Bibb County, Georgia.

Marriage certificates can be brief and to the point. As genealogists we are thrilled to have them and to look at them—but we want to know more about the couple and their wedding.

Newspapers can give us even more details on the lives of our ancestors.

Let’s start searching the marriage records that were published in Georgia newspapers.

Let’s strategize this search.

In this case the groom’s surname, Dense, is a common word—but the surname itself is not very common. The word “dense” could possibly appear in a marriage announcement, but it is not likely to come up except as a surname.

By searching on the “Georgia Marriage Records” page in GenealogyBank I can focus my search results to bring up just marriage announcements that were printed in Georgia newspapers.

GenealogyBank search page for Georgia Marriage Records & Engagement Announcements

GenealogyBank search page for Georgia Marriage Records & Engagement Announcements

Search Georgia marriage records at GenealogyBank here: http://www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/newspapers/explore/USA/Georgia/?type=marriage_engagement

GenealogyBank search box and search results page for Dense wedding

GenealogyBank search box and search results page for Dense wedding

That worked: their wedding announcement was the first of ten search results.

Marriage in First Street Methodist Church, Macon Daily Telegraph newspaper article 16 September 1879

Macon Daily Telegraph (Macon, Georgia), 16 September 1879, page 4

The historical newspaper article is giving us a lot more detail about the wedding then the basic facts recorded on the marriage certificate—so many details that we can almost picture the wedding in our minds.

Marriage in First Street Methodist Church, Macon Daily Telegraph newspaper article 16 September 1879, page 4

Macon Daily Telegraph (Macon, Georgia), 16 September 1879, page 4

  • For example, we learn that the couple was married at the First Methodist Church in Macon, Georgia.
  • The church, “crowded to its utmost capacity,” was “tastefully decorated with evergreens” at half past eight in the evening when the wedding began.
  • The old newspaper article named the members of the wedding party and chief guests.
  • The Rev. Walker Lewis performed the wedding ceremony “in a clear and distinct manner.”
  • At the end of the ceremony “Professor Coley played the wedding march.”

Think about it—the details, the setting…picture the wedding scene in your mind.

The end of the old newspaper marriage announcement gives us even more details about the family and their occupations, and describes the reception and supper that followed at the bride’s father’s (Reuben Thornton) home on Second Street.

Marriage in First Street Methodist Church, Macon Daily Telegraph newspaper article 16 September 1879, page 4

Macon Daily Telegraph (Macon, Georgia), 16 September 1879, page 4

Details about special life events like this are only found in historical newspapers.

These are two great genealogy resources for finding your Georgia marriage records: the certificates on FamilySearch, and the newspaper marriage announcements in GenealogyBank with the details about the couple and the wedding.

Oh, the newspaper editor added one more comment about this wedding.

Marriage in First Street Methodist Church, Macon Daily Telegraph newspaper article 16 September 1879, page 4

Macon Daily Telegraph (Macon, Georgia), 16 September 1879, page 4

The editor had described the packed church and the beautiful wedding and added “At the close Professor Coley played the wedding march, and the dense audience dispersed.”

It’s great to not only learn about the details of our ancestors’ lives and weddings— it’s also fun to see the wry humor of the times.

It’s a great day for genealogy!

Treasured Discovery: Only-Known Photos of Ancestors Found in Old Newspapers

Introduction: Scott Phillips is a genealogical historian and owner of Onward To Our Past® genealogy services. In this guest blog post, Scott tells about finding the only-known photos of two of his ancestors in old newspaper wedding announcements—and a surprising engagement notice that told him something he never knew about his own mother!

Summertime! The livin’ is easy and traditionally it is the time for weddings. My bride and I just celebrated our 37th wedding anniversary a short time ago and it got me to thinking about how much I have gained in my family history and genealogy work from searching for engagement notices and wedding announcements in GenealogyBank.com.

Mr. & Mrs. Scott Phillips Wedding Photo 1975

The author’s wedding photo from 1975.

As many of us go about developing and nurturing our family trees, I think you’ll agree that one of the best aspects of that work is discovering photographs of our ancestors. Let me tell you, few places that I have found beat newspaper engagement and wedding stories for personal photos—sometimes the only picture anyone in the family has of a particular ancestor. I have had terrific success in my family tree with these types of articles.

A great example was the newspaper article I recently found when researching my Havlic branch. I discovered the wedding announcement for Eleanor Anna Havlic as reported in the Plain Dealer on 30 September 1928 in Cleveland, Ohio. Not only was I thrilled that there was a picture of my ancestor, but it showed some lovely period dress for a 1928 wedding. Additionally, I was treated to the names of parents, spouse, in-laws, addresses of both, the new couple’s home address, bridal party members, wedding date, and the name of their church.

Mrs Louis J Beran Old Marriage Announcement

Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 30 September 1928, page 50.

Another nice find for me was the wedding story of another cousin, Margaret Tager, again in the Plain Dealer (27 August 1961) in Cleveland. Once more I was excited to find an old wedding photo that illustrated the current fashion, this time of the early 1960s, plus addresses, parents’ and in-laws’ names, the name of the church where the ceremony was held—and there was even a mention of where both the bride and groom attended college. As an added treat, the newspaper article explained where the couple honeymooned.

Margaret Ann Tager Marriage Announcement

Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 27 August 1961, page 108.

In the case of both of the above family members, the old newspaper articles provided me with the only photos I have of these particular ancestors, which make them all the more important to my work, my family, and our family tree.

Oh, and don’t forget that every so often you just might find one of those “ah-ha” moments we all enjoy so much in genealogy. I had one myself not long ago.

After working on one of my grandparent’s branches I was having some fun searching different family surnames to see what I could find. As I was running my grandmother’s married name lo and behold I found an engagement announcement! I clicked on the article to find…my mother had been engaged one time before becoming engaged to, and then marrying, the man who was to become my father. This was a fact that had not been a topic of discussion in my life ever before.

Thank goodness my mom made the choice she did or I wouldn’t be here writing this today!

That was a close call…and a really fun discovery.

Using Newspaper Marriage Records for Genealogy: Free Webinar Download

Newspapers are the next big thing for genealogists, with news stories that can flesh out the names and dates on your family tree so that you can better know your ancestors. With over 1.2 billion  genealogy records online, GenealogyBank is the best source for mining old newspapers for engagement, wedding, and anniversary announcements—as well as for divorce records.

GenealogyBank search form for marriage records and engagement announcements

GenealogyBank search form for marriage records and engagement announcements

Download Tom Kemp’s latest genealogy webinar on marriage records to learn handy tips and search strategies, as well as what kinds of marriage records you can expect to find in newspapers:

http://slidesha.re/MKseIt

Practical and timely, this informative presentation will show the research skills you need to get the most out of GenealogyBank’s online historical newspaper archives.

GenealogyBank adds 63 newspapers from 21 States

GenealogyBank announced today that added 63 historical newspapers from 21 States – including 33 more Spanish language newspapers.

With well over 3,500 newspapers on GenealogyBank it has never been easier to find birth records, wedding announcements, obituaries and the biographical details of more than 1 billion of our ancestors and cousins.

These titles are live on GenealogyBank right now. Give it a try.

Arkansas
Jonesboro, AR: Jonesboro Evening Sun. 10/8/1904 to 12/27/1916

Arizona
Tucson, AZ: Tucsonense. 3/17/1915 to 11/1/1931

California
Berkeley, CA: Grito. 9/1/1967
Colton, CA: Chicano. 4/21/1968
Los Angeles. CA: Heraldo de Mexico. 12/9/1917 to 12/28/1928

Colorado
Colorado Springs, CO: Gazette-Telegraph. 1/1/1903 to 12/31/1908
San Luis, CO: Adobe 3/1/1974


Connecticut
New London, CT: New London Democrat. 1845-04-26 to 1851-01-25

Georgia
Savannah, GA: Savannah Tribune. 1/6/1912 to 12/28/1912

Idaho
Idaho City, ID: Idaho Falls Times. 1891-07-09 to 9/16/1920
Idaho City, ID: Idaho Register. 2/17/1908 to 8/7/1908
Twin Falls, ID: Twin Falls News. 4/22/1921


Illinois
Chicago, IL: Latin Times. 2/1/1958 to 5/2/1975
Chicago, IL: Vida Latina. 10/21/1954 to 12/21/1959

Louisiana
New Orleans, LA: Abeja. 1829-01-03

Massachusetts
Boston, MA: Boston Evening Transcript. 1850-03-01 to 1850-12-31
Nantucket, MA: Nantucket Inquirer. 1821-09-20 to 1830-04-24
Springfield, MA: Springfield Republican. 1886-01-01 to 1891-12-31

Missouri
Kansas City, MO: Kansas City Times. 1884-05-14 to 1896-01-31

Nebraska
Nebraska City, NE: Daily Nebraska Press. 1870-05-27

New Mexico
Las Cruces, NM: Dona Ana County Republican. 1897-03-11 to 2/15/1902
Las Cruces, NM: Labrador. 1896-09-08
Las Cruces, NM: Las Cruces Democrat. 1892-02-03 to 1899-11-29
Las Cruces, NM: Mesilla Valley Bulletin. 4/30/1937
Las Cruces, NM: Newmans Semi-Weekly. 1881-04-13
Las Cruces, NM: Thirty-Four. 1879-04-16 to 1880-11-03
Las Vegas, NM: Las Vegas Daily Gazette. 1880-07-27 to 1886-01-31
Las Vegas, NM: Misionero Bautista: Organo Oficial de la Convencion Bautista HispanoAmericana de Nuevo Mexico. 7/1/1948
Mesilla, NM: Mesilla News. 1879-02-08 to 1883-11-24
Santa Fe, NM: Daily New Mexican. 1872-04-02 to 1875-06-28
Santa Fe, NM: Santa Fe Weekly New Mexican and Livestock Journal. 1885-10-08bto
1895-12-26
Silver City, NM: Silver City Independent. 1897-08-03
Springer, NM: Colfax County Stockman. 1893-07-08
Springer, NM: Sentinel. 2/15/1901 to 12/27/1901

New York
Albany, NY: Albany Evening Journal. 1834-06-12 to 1849-03-22
Cazenovia, NY: Pilot. 1808-08-10 to 1821-09-06
Cazenovia, NY: Union Herald. 1838-05-11 to 1840-04-11
New York, NY: Grafico. 11/11/1928 to 1/3/1931
New York, NY: Jewish Daily News. 1/2/1916 to 12/31/1922
New York, NY: True Sun. 1847-05-24 to 1848-02-25
Oxford, NY: Times. 1838-10-10 to 1839-12-25
Schoharie, NY: Schoharie Observer. 1818-11-25 to 1823-05-07
Troy, NY: Times. 1885-07-09 to 1886-06-24

Ohio
Chillicothe, OH: Supporter. 1809-01-05 to 1818-01-20
Dayton, OH: Democratic Herald. 1835-05-07 to 1837-08-12
Xenia, OH: Greene County Torch-Light. 1841-07-01 to 1842-01-20

Rhode Island
Pawtucket, RI: Pawtucket Times. 1/1/1920 to 2/28/1921

Tennessee
Nashville, TN: Tennessee Gazette. 1800-02-25 to 1807-05-30

Texas
Austin, TX: Texas Gazette. 1829-09-25 to 1832-02-18
Beaumont, TX: Beaumont Enterprise & Journal. 3/28/1906 to 9/30/1911
Brazoria, TX: Texas Republican. 1834-07-05 to 1835-10-17
Brownsville, TX: Heraldo de Brownsville. 1/12/1936 to 2/29/1940
Cleburne, TX: Cleburne Morning Review. 7/4/1911 to 5/30/1916
El Paso, TX: Atalaya Bautista: Semanario Evangelico Bautista. 1/2/1908
El Paso, TX: Continental. 12/12/1934 to 3/11/1960
El Paso, TX: Evening Tribune. 1889-04-03
Kingsville, TX: Eco. 4/1/1931
Kingsville, TX: Tex. Mex. Reflector. 1/21/1921
San Antonio, TX: Pan American Labor Express. 9/4/1918 to 12/4/1918
San Antonio, TX: Prensa. 10/11/1918 to 2/19/1935

Utah
Salt Lake City, UT: Salt Lake Telegram. 2/3/1902

Virginia
Winchester, VA: Winchester Virginian. 1828-04-18 to 1836-09-06

Vermont
St. Albans, VT: St. Albans Daily Messenger. 1853-01-13 to 12/31/1922

GenealogyBank adding newspapers from 22 States

In a major release GenealogyBank today announced that it is adding 67 historical newspapers from 22 States – including 32 more Spanish language newspapers.

With well over 3,500 newspapers on GenealogyBank it has never been easier to find birth records, wedding announcements, obituaries and the biographical details of more than 1 billion of our ancestors and cousins.

Photo courtesy: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, DC – LC-USW3-F104-009104-E [P&P].
Alaska
AK. Juneau. Daily Record-Miner. 1903 to 1911

Arkansas
AR. Helena. Western Clarion. 1864 to 1865
AR. Jonesboro. Jonesboro Evening Sun. 1905 to 1916
AR. Heber Springs. Jacksonian. 1890 to 1904

California
CA. Sacramento. Prensa Libre. 1969 to 1970

Connecticut
CT. Danielsonville. Windham County Transcript. 1863 to 1890
CT. New London. New London Daily Chronicle. 1849 to 1861
CT. New London. New London Democrat. 1846 to 1873
CT. Norwich. Norwich Morning Bulletin. 1860 to 1887

Florida
FL. Tampa. Revista de Cuba Libre. 1897 to 1898

Georgia
GA. Savannah. Georgia Republican & State Intelligencer. 1803 to 1807

Idaho
ID. Twin Falls. Twin Falls Daily News. 1918 to 1922

Illinois
IL. Chicago. Sol de Chicago. 1960
IL. Centralia Marion Co. Centralia Sentinel. 1863 to 1867
IL. Chicago. Vorbote. 1974 to 1876

Kansas
KS. Topeka. Colored Citizen. 1978 to 1904

Massachusetts
MA. Stoughton. Stoughton Sentinel. 1863 to 1874

Maryland
MD. Bel-Air. National American. 1861 to 1865
MD. Chestertown. Chestertown Transcript. 1866 to 1876
MD. Fredrick. Republican Gazette & General Advertiser. 1822 to

Minnesota
MN. St. Paul. Daily Minnesota Pioneer. 1854 to 1855
MN. St. Paul. Saint Paul Daily Press. 1868 to 1872

Missouri
MO. Kansas City.
Kansas City Times. 1884 to 1895

Mississippi
MS. Vicksburg. Daily Commercial. 1877 to 1882

Nebraska
NE. Nebraska City. Daily Nebraska Press. 1868 to 1876
North Carolina
NC. Raleigh. Semi-Weekly Standard. 1861 to 1863

New York
NY. Bronx. Republicas Hispanas Unidas. 1943
NY. Bronx. Vida Hispana. 1953 to 1954
NY. Brooklyn. Curioso. 1934 to 1935
NY. Cazenovia. Union Herald. 1838 to 1840
NY. New York. Ahora. 1950
NY. New York. Alba de Nueva York. 1954
NY. New York. America Continental. 1956
NY. New York. Americana. 1947 to 1948
NY. New York. Artistas Hispanos. 1948
NY. New York. Ateneo. 1934
NY. New York. Cascabeles. 1934
NY. New York. Crisol. 1949
NY. New York. Cronica. 1950 to 1950
NY. New York. Eco Antillano. 1941 to 1942
NY. New York. Guaimaro. 1895 to 1896
NY. New York. Kan-de-la. 1949
NY. New York. Liberacion. 1946 to 1959
NY. New York. Machete Criollo. 1927
NY. New York. New Yorker Volkszeitung. 1886 to 1898
NY. New York. Nueva Republica. 1897 to 1898
NY. New York. Nueva Voz. 1962 to 1965
NY. New York. Nueva York al Dia. 1945
NY. New York. Pueblos Hispanos. 1953 to 1944
NY. New York. Puerto Rico en Marcha. 1951 to 1969
NY. New York. Semanario. 1955
NY. New York. Seminario Hispano. 1946
NY. New York. Soberania. 1958
NY. New York. Voz. 1960 to 1962

Ohio
OH. Cincinnati. Cincinnati Weekly Herald and the Philantropist. 1936 to 1840
OH. Ravenna. Portage County Democrat. 1854 to 1855
OH. Wooster. Wooster Republican. 1862 to 1863
OH. Xenia. Greene County Journal. 1863 to 1864
OH. Cincinnati. Cincinnati Volksfreund. 1863 to 1864
OK. Miami. Miami Record-Herald. 1899 to 1903

Pennsylvania
PA. Philadelphia. Sunday Mercury. 1864 to 1865

Texas
TX. Cleburne. Cleburne Morning Review. 1911 to 1916
TX. Galveston. Galveston News. 1877 to 1893
TX. Kingsville. Accion. 1931 to 1932
TX. San Antonio. Revista Mexicana. 1916 to 1920
TX. Taft. Pan Americana News. 1942 to 1956

Utah
UT. Salt Lake City. Inter-Mountain Advocate. 1894 to 1897