GenealogyBank Has More than 100 North Carolina Newspapers

GenealogyBank Has More than 100 North Carolina Newspapers

GenealogyBank has a strong and growing archive of newspapers from all 50 U.S. states. Our historical newspaper archives contain more than 100 old and recent newspaper titles from North Carolina: from Charlotte to New Bern to Chapel Hill to Raleigh to Danbury.

We’ve got the online genealogy resources you need to document your N.C. family history.

State City Title Dates
NC Albemarle Stanly News and Press 1/2/2007 – Current
NC Apex Apex Herald 10/2/2009 – Current
NC Asheboro Courier-Tribune 4/6/2010 – Current
NC Asheboro Randolph Guide 4/6/2008 – Current
NC Blowing Rock Blowing Rocket 10/2/2009 – Current
NC Boone Mountain Times 2/4/2011 – Current
NC Burgaw Pender Chronicle 10/28/2009 – Current
NC Burgaw Pender Post 10/8/2009 – Current
NC Cary Cary News 2/13/2011 – Current
NC Chapel Hill Chapel Hill Herald 1/1/2002 – Current
NC Chapel Hill Chapel Hill News 5/3/2000 – Current
NC Charlotte Africo-American Presbyterian 12/21/1899 – 12/21/1899
NC Charlotte Carolina Israelite 2/1/1944 – 12/1/1958
NC Charlotte Charlotte News 12/11/1888 – 9/29/1922
NC Charlotte Charlotte Observer 3/13/1892 – 12/31/1922
NC Charlotte Charlotte Observer 1/1/1992 – Current
NC Charlotte Charlotte Post 2/3/2011 – Current
NC Clinton Sampson Independent 4/18/2010 – Current
NC Danbury Stokes News 12/20/2007 – Current
NC Durham Herald-Sun 1/1/2002 – Current
NC Elizabeth City Daily Advance 11/9/2004 – Current
NC Elizabethtown Bladen Journal 2/23/2007 – Current
NC Elkin Tribune 9/19/2007 – Current
NC Fayetteville American 4/26/1816 – 4/11/1827
NC Fayetteville Fayetteville Observer 1/18/1988 – Current
NC Forest City Daily Courier 1/1/2005 – Current
NC Fuquay-Varina Cleveland Post 1/18/2007 – Current
NC Fuquay-Varina Fuquay-Varina Independent 10/2/2009 – Current
NC Garner Garner News 10/2/2009 – Current
NC Greensboro Daily Record 3/17/1906 – 11/30/1929
NC Greensboro Greensboro Daily News 7/20/1909 – 11/30/1980
NC Greensboro Greensboro News and Record 4/11/1985 – 4/20/1985
NC Greensboro Greensboro Record 9/5/1927 – 2/28/1983
NC Greensboro News & Record 1/1/1990 – Current
NC Greenville Daily Reflector 8/30/2004 – Current
NC Halifax North-Carolina Journal 8/1/1792 – 9/11/1797
NC Hampstead Topsail Voice 9/10/2008 – Current
NC Henderson Daily Dispatch 4/10/2002 – Current
NC Hickory Hickory Daily Record 2/10/2011 – Current
NC High Point High Point Enterprise 4/14/2007 – Current
NC Holly Springs Holly Springs Sun 7/10/2008 – Current
NC Kannapolis Independent Tribune 2/20/2010 – Current
NC Kannapolis Kannapolis Citizen 4/1/2008 – 5/12/2009
NC Laurinburg Laurinburg Exchange 1/2/2006 – Current
NC Lenoir News-Topic 11/12/2008 – Current
NC Littleton True Reformer 7/25/1900 – 7/25/1900
NC Lousiburg Franklin Times 10/3/2009 – Current
NC Lumberton Robesonian 1/1/2004 – Current
NC Marion McDowell News 2/12/2011 – Current
NC Monroe Enquirer-Journal 10/1/2009 – Current
NC Mooresville Mooresville Tribune 2/16/2011 – Current
NC Morehead City Carteret County News-Times 4/16/2008 – Current
NC Morganton News Herald 1/12/2008 – Current
NC Mt. Airy Mt. Airy News 10/2/2009 – Current
NC Nashville Nashville Graphic 1/28/2010 – Current
NC New Bern Carolina Federal Republican 1/12/1809 – 4/25/1818
NC New Bern Morning Herald 9/17/1807 – 12/30/1808
NC New Bern Newbern Herald 1/20/1809 – 2/26/1810
NC New Bern Newbern Sentinel 3/21/1818 – 6/12/1828
NC New Bern North Carolina Sentinel 1/13/1827 – 12/21/1836
NC New Bern State Gazette of North Carolina 8/9/1787 – 2/20/1799
NC New Bern True Republican 4/2/1810 – 8/7/1811
NC Newton Observer News Enterprise 9/6/2008 – Current
NC Pilot Mountain Pilot 2/20/2008 – Current
NC Princeton Princeton News-Leader 5/30/2007 – Current
NC Raleigh Dispatch 12/21/1991 – 4/10/1993
NC Raleigh Gazette 12/16/1893 – 2/19/1898
NC Raleigh News & Observer 1/1/1991 – Current
NC Raleigh News & Observer, The: Web Edition Articles 5/6/2004 – Current
NC Raleigh North-Carolina Minerva 11/26/1799 – 5/20/1800
NC Raleigh Raleigh Extra 6/18/1995 – Current
NC Raleigh Semi-Weekly Standard 8/10/1861 – 3/8/1868
NC Raleigh Star 11/3/1808 – 5/12/1831
NC Red Springs Red Springs Citizen 7/10/2008 – Current
NC Reidsville Reidsville Review 3/25/2008 – Current
NC Richlands Richlands-Beulaville Advertiser News 10/28/2009 – Current
NC Roanoke Rapids Daily Herald 9/2/2003 – Current
NC Rockingham Richmond County Daily Journal 5/5/2003 – Current
NC Rocky Mount Rocky Mount Telegram 9/3/2002 – Current
NC Roxboro Courier-Times 11/22/2006 – Current
NC Saint Pauls St. Pauls Review 9/4/2008 – Current
NC Salisbury Salisbury Post 12/1/1998 – Current
NC Sanford Sanford Herald 2/17/2007 – Current
NC Shallotte Brunswick Beacon 4/21/2010 – Current
NC Smithfield Smithfield Herald 1/19/2011 – Current
NC Southern Pines Pilot 10/8/2009 – Current
NC Spring Hope Spring Hope Enterprise & The Bailey News 8/3/2006 – Current
NC Statesville Statesville Record & Landmark 2/6/2011 – Current
NC Swansboro Tideland News 9/3/2008 – Current
NC Sylva Sylva Herald & Ruralite 10/2/2009 – Current
NC Tabor City Tabor-Loris Tribune 3/14/2007 – Current
NC Tarboro Daily Southerner 1/23/2007 – Current
NC Thomasville Thomasville Times 1/1/2011 – Current
NC Tryon Tryon Daily Bulletin 5/14/2007 – Current
NC Wadesboro Anson Record 6/19/2003 – Current
NC Wallace Wallace Enterprise 1/6/2010 – Current
NC West Jefferson Jefferson Post 9/25/2007 – Current
NC Whiteville News Reporter 4/22/2004 – Current
NC Wilmington StarNews 1/31/2002 – Current
NC Zebulon Eastern Wake News 1/19/2011 – Current

Monthly Update: GenealogyBank Adds 16 Million Records in January!

Every day, GenealogyBank is working hard to digitize more newspapers and obituaries, expanding our online collection to give you the largest newspaper archives for family history research available anywhere.

Here are some details about our most recent additions to our website (we actually added new content to thousands of newspaper titles, but the following is a representative sample):
A total of 103 newspaper titles from 26 states plus the District of Columbia

Titles marked with an asterisk * are newspapers new to our archive
We’ve shown the archive date ranges so that you can determine if the new content is relevant to your personal research

If a recent addition to our online archive interests you, simply click on that newspaper’s title: it is an active link leading to that paper’s search form.

There is also an option available on the historical newspapers’ search form that gives you the ability to search only the new newspaper content added in the past month, two months, or three months.

Alabama. Grove Hill. Grove Hill Herald*. 03/06/1850–12/06/1854
Arkansas. Little Rock. Arkansas Democrat-Gazette: Web Edition Articles*. 03/30/2007–Current
Arkansas. Little Rock. ARPreps*. 05/28/2011–Current
Arkansas. Fayetteville. Whole Hog Sports*. 04/14/2007–Current
Arkansas. Camden. Camden News*. 12/02/2011–Current
Arkansas. Fort Chaffee. Helping Hand *. 05/02/1975–12/19/1975
Arkansas. Bella Vista. Weekly Vista, The*. 11/30/2011–Current
Arkansas. Little Rock. Arkansas State Press. 08/23/1957–08/23/1957
Arkansas. Fayetteville. NW Arkansas Times*. 11/14/2011–Current
Arkansas. Fayetteville. NWAOnline: Web Edition Articles*. 07/28/2009–Current
Arkansas. El Dorado. El Dorado News-Times*. 12/01/2011–Current
Arkansas. Magnolia. Banner-News*. 11/19/2011–Current
Arkansas. Springdale. Springdale Morning News*. 11/18/2011–Current
Arkansas. Rogers. Rogers Morning News*. 11/14/2011–Current
Arkansas. Searcy. Daily Citizen, The*. 08/26/2003–Current
California. San Francisco. Alaska Appeal *. 03/06/1879–04/15/1880
California. Santa Anita. Santa Anita Pacemaker *. 04/24/1942–07/29/1942
California. Tanforan. Tanforan Totalizer *. 05/15/1942–09/12/1942
California. San Diego. Evening Tribune. 7/1/1925–1/25/1935
California. Riverside. Riverside Daily Press. 5/20/1938–10/1/1942
California. San Diego. San Diego Union. 3/1/1908–7/8/1934
Colorado. Denver. Denver Rocky Mountain News. 12/3/1880–1/5/1881
Connecticut. New Haven. Columbian Register. 1/1/1831–5/27/1876
Florida. Tampa. Tampa Tribune. 10/31/1928–9/22/1932
Florida. Jacksonville. Florida Times-Union, The: Web Edition Articles*. 11/28/2011–Current
Georgia. Savannah. Closeup*. 11/11/1999–Current
Georgia. Marietta. Marietta Journal. 7/22/1966–6/30/1989
Illinois. Rockford. Register Star. 8/31/2006–4/20/2007
Louisiana. New Orleans. Times-Picayune. 3/30/1841–2/28/1915
Louisiana. Baton Rouge. Daily State. 1/14/1907–1/1/1910
Louisiana. Baton Rouge. State Times Advocate. 3/24/1911–12/30/1922
Louisiana. Baton Rouge. Daily Advocate. 9/17/1855–1/4/1889
Louisiana. Baton Rouge. Weekly Advocate. 6/28/1855–6/28/1902
Louisiana. Baton Rouge. Advocate. 10/23/1925–5/31/1985
Louisiana. New Orleans. Courrier de la Louisiane. 10/01/1821–10/01/1821
Massachusetts. Boston. Boston Herald. 10/11/1893–8/31/1907
Massachusetts. Springfield. Springfield Daily News. 11/16/1916–11/16/1916
Massachusetts. Springfield. Springfield Union. 09/10/1963–12/26/1986
Michigan. Gaylord. Gaylord Herald Times*. 01/01/2001–Current
Michigan. Jackson. Jackson Citizen Patriot. 06/15/1875–12/07/1921
Missouri. Lake Ozark. Lake Today, The*. 05/06/2009–Current
North Carolina. Charlotte. Carolina Israelite*. 02/01/1944–12/01/1958
North Carolina. Winston-Salem. Winston-Salem Journal. 1/5/1917–7/31/1920
Nebraska. Omaha. Omaha World Herald. 8/1/1945–12/4/1983
New Jersey. New Brunswick. Jewish Journal. 06/14/1963–04/28/1967
New York. Westbury. Westbury Times, The*. 12/04/1997–Current
New York. New York. Irish American Weekly. 02/08/1873–07/04/1914
New York. New York. Truth *. 07/06/1880–01/06/1884
New York. New York. Irish Nation *. 11/26/1881–10/06/1883
New York. New York. Socialist Call. 06/09/1944–08/13/1948
New York. New York. Daily People. Current–Current
New York. New York. Worker. 05/04/1903–02/23/1907
New York. New York. People. 05/03/1891–03/22/1896
Oregon. Portland. Oregonian. 04/08/1917–04/08/1917
Pennsylvania. Pittsburgh. National Labor Tribune. 03/19/1903–07/01/1958
Pennsylvania. Erie. Erie Labor Press *. 06/18/1921–12/31/1921
Pennsylvania. Pittsburgh. Welsh-American *. 01/08/1914–12/15/1918
Pennsylvania. Erie. Truth *. 10/25/1913–06/11/1921
Rhode Island. Providence. Providence Evening Press*. 03/14/1859–12/29/1869
South Carolina. Charleston. Charleston Mercury. 7/2/1860–12/31/1866
South Carolina. Clemson. Tiger, The*. 04/14/2002–Current.
South Carolina. Charleston. Charleston Courier. 7/14/1859–3/19/1866
Texas. Dallas. Dallas Morning News. 4/4/1983–1/29/1984
Utah. Salt Lake City. Intermountain Catholic*. 10/05/2007–Current
Virginia. Richmond. Richmond Times Dispatch. 7/1/1929–3/14/1930
Wisconsin. Fond du Lac. Fond du Lac Trade Extension*. 02/13/1918–02/13/1918
Wisconsin. Gratiot. Gratiot Reporter *. 06/13/1912–10/09/1913
Wisconsin. Grafton. Grafton Enterprise *. 07/27/1927–08/03/1927
Wisconsin. Fox Lake. Fox Lake Representative*. 12/15/1911–12/20/1917

Holiday Gifts for Genealogists

Give yourself the gift of a subscription to GenealogyBank to help with all your family history research—and right now we are offering our best price ever of $48.95 for an annual membership. Click now: This special Holiday offer is good for three days—today through Friday, Dec. 16—so act now!
GenealogyBank has more than 5,850 newspapers available online, from 1690 to today, from all 50 states—and over 95% of that content is not available anywhere else. Our genealogy site also offers the Social Security Death Index and millions of historical books, documents and government records.

Our genealogy site is dynamic and growing daily, as we continuously add new content. In January 2010 GenealogyBank had 421 million records. Now, almost two years later, we have 1.1 billion records to help genealogists do in-depth family history research.
Did you realize that GenealogyBank now has beautiful historical maps—over 72,000 of them?
These historical maps are gems in our Historical Documents collection.
Look at these great vintage maps, like this example showing land ownership and property lines along with the local cemetery in Edgewater, New Jersey, in 1898.

Or this stunning old cemetery map of Palermo, Italy, that clearly shows the cemeteries as they existed in 1887.

Look at the detail in this historical 1863 Civil War map of the Siege of Vicksburg, showing the battle zone between Miliken’s Bend, Louisiana, and Jackson, Mississippi. The Siege of Vicksburg lasted from May 18 to July 4, 1863.

Give yourself the best genealogy gift this holiday season—give yourself GenealogyBank.com

How Did You Get Started as a Genealogist? Share Your Story with Us!

A Louisiana newspaper in 1853 said of family historians that “their memory is a forest planted with genealogical trees.” How true that is!
Daily Picayune (New Orleans, Louisiana), 25 October 1853, page 5.

After years of family history research many genealogists have had all types of “Eureka!” moments and breakthroughs, when they found a particular newspaper article or government record in their genealogical research that filled in gaps on their family trees.

My breakthrough moment as a genealogist was finding an 1811 real estate ad for my great-great-great-great-great grandfather’s farm in Maine. Aging sea captain James Garcelon (1739-1813) was selling his farm and moving in with his son William. The newspaper ad gave a terrific description of my ancestor’s property: a two-story house “very pleasantly situated” on 150 acres “with a handsome young orchard” and featuring two barns, outhouses, and “an excellent well of water.” Portland Gazette and Maine Advertiser. (Portland, Maine), 25 February 1811, page 4.

When I read this real estate ad, I could really picture my ancestor’s farm. I grew up on old farm property in New Hampshire. There were cellar holes where the homes and barns had once stood, wild apple trees, and with a little priming the well still gave ice cold water—and all around us stretched the long-idle fields. Maybe it was like my ancestor’s Garcelon Farm in the 1700s?

Thinking back on your own family history research—what first got you interested in genealogy? What was your most surprising genealogical discovery? What have you learned about your family along the way? What are your most prized genealogical discoveries? GenealogyBank wants to hear from you! Tell us your story.

Newspaper Genealogy Research Discoveries: 7 Brothers Meet at Last

Family reunions are special occasions, but the Jones family reunion in the fall of 1881 in Lewiston, Maine, was especially noteworthy: although they ranged in age from 47 to 72 years old, this reunion was the first time all seven Jones brothers were together in one place at the same time!

This happened because the oldest brother (Ebenezer, born in 1809) married Rebecca Adams in 1831 and settled in Newport, Vermont, while the rest of the family relocated to Lewiston, Maine, before the youngest brother (Luther) was born in 1833.

The family had tried several times over 40 years to have a complete family reunion, but they led busy lives and always one brother or another missed each reunion. Finally, the stars must have fallen into proper alignment, everything clicked into place, and the joyous family occasion happened at last.

Can you imagine the smiles on all the faces? At that remarkable—and long awaited—reunion of all the living members of the family, the seven brothers sat at the table in the order of their ages. To make the reunion complete, the brothers’ one remaining sister, Mrs. Albert Frost, joined them.

This heartwarming family reunion story illustrates two important points about using newspapers to research your genealogy. First of all: you never know what you will find once you start looking through a newspaper archive. Even if the Jones family is not related to you, little discoveries like this story—and newspapers are full of them—add the human touch to your genealogy pursuit, and make your research fun and interesting.

For the second point, look closely at the family reunion newspaper article below: notice that it was originally printed in the Lewiston Journal (Maine), but was reprinted in the Huntsville Gazette—an Alabama paper! This special family reunion story was so popular it was also reprinted by the Sun (Maryland) and Omaha Herald (Nebraska) newspapers as well. Perhaps the newspaper editors thought this amazing story would interest their readers, or maybe someone in those areas was related to the Jones family, and editors are always looking for news items that have connections to their readers.

The lesson here is to expand the geographic scope of your newspaper search if your initial search didn’t turn up enough information. The newspaper archive you’re looking in may not have the issue of the Lewiston Journal this article first appeared in, but it might have the Huntsville Gazette issue where the article was reprinted. It is a good thing that GenealogyBank has brought together the largest collection of U.S. newspapers available online—5,700 of them from all 50 states—with a powerful search engine, making it easy to search through this large newspaper archive to research your genealogy.

What will you discover?

This family reunion story, was printed by the Huntsville Gazette (Alabama), 5 November 1881, page 4.

Researching Genealogy with Military Records and Lists in Newspapers

Researching Genealogy with Military Records and Lists in Newspapers
From the Revolutionary War to Pearl Harbor to Iraq, newspapers are a valuable resource for researching your military ancestry and learning about the history of war in the United States. Newspapers have been a dependable source of information that Americans have relied upon throughout this nation’s history.

U.S. War History in Newspapers
This was vividly demonstrated after Dec. 7, 1941, when Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor launched the U.S. into World War II. The next day Congress declared war on Japan—and Americans were riveted by the bold headlines and news stories splashed across the front pages of the nation’s newspapers.

Omaha World Journal (Omaha, Nebraska), 8 December 1941, page 1.
Newspapers tell us what happened every day of our ancestors’ lives.
From the Revolutionary War to the wars in the Middle East, newspapers let us read about our ancestors’ participation in the nation’s conflicts—and what the country as a whole went through. We volunteered, we were enlisted in the U.S. military through the draft—and when we didn’t register for the draft, the government issued “slacker lists” to encourage full participation in the war.

U.S. Military Draft Lists
Military draft lists were published in newspapers, like this one printed in the 26 July 1917 issue of the Perry Republican (Perry, Oklahoma), page 1. It is a census of the men living in Noble County, Oklahoma, in 1917—a valuable genealogical resource to help with your family history research.
Similar lists were the “slacker lists” or “draft dodger lists”: listings of those persons that tried to evade the draft. After World War I the United States War Department issued lists of those men that did not register with the military draft. These lists were widely published in newspapers across the country, like this example from the Trenton Evening Times (Trenton, New Jersey), 25 May 1921, page 1.
From the declaration of war through obituaries published decades after the conflict ended, newspapers have been a dependable source of information about our ancestors and their participation in the United States Armed Forces. Newspapers reported on the battles and covered the stories of the war every step along the way. Family historians can gather facts for their family trees and put them in the context of the war as it happened.
U.S. Military Casualty Lists
Another valuable resource for family historians are the war casualty lists many newspapers published. In this example, published in the Macon Telegraph (Macon, Georgia), 6 August 1918, page 1, the newspaper published the full casualty list and spiked out the Georgia men that died in a prominent boxed note that appeared on page one.
Most U.S. citizens do not remain in the military as a lifelong career. However, their military service was almost always mentioned in their obituary notice—as in this example, published in the Barre Gazette (Barre, Massachusetts), 31 July 1840, page 2, of the late Isaac Van Wart (1751-1840) of Tarrytown (Westchester County) and Pittstown (Rensselaer County), New York. Obituaries, birth announcements and marriage notices are some of the excellent resources newspapers provide family historians. During times of war, draft, slacker, and casualty lists are another helpful genealogical resource. In addition to information about your individual ancestors, newspapers provide the stories about what the entire United States was going through, to help you put your ancestors’ experiences in context and thereby come to understand them a little more. Digital newspaper archives online have become the core tool for modern genealogy, helping genealogists and family history researchers discover more about their family’s military past than ever before possible. Baltimore Sun (Baltimore, Maryland), 7 April 1917, page 1.

Family History Expos – Georgia 2011

Georgia Family History Expo – Duluth, Georgia 2011

Over 400 genealogists gathered in Duluth, Georgia, for the annual Family History Expo held at the Gwinnett Center on Nov. 11-12, 2011.

Now in its second year, this conference has the size and feel of a national conference. There were over 60 informative family history sessions taught by two dozen experienced national speakers. Topics covered at this premier event for genealogists ranged from “Searching Your Scottish Ancestors” to “Special Sources for Confederate Research in the National Archives.” Thanks to the conference’s solid organization and the Gwinnett Center’s well-managed layout, it was easy for genealogists to mingle with nationally-recognized speakers and take the time to ask meaningful, detailed questions.

For example, the Family History Expo made it easy for working genealogists to attend by having sessions scheduled well into the evening. Working genealogists that couldn’t make the day-time sessions could attend sessions at night as well as all day on Saturday.

The speakers and vendors each shared their latest genealogy insights and tips. One nifty new application I learned about at this conference is a free family tree software program from TreeSeek.com. This application creates a nine-generation family tree fan chart that is easy to share with relatives and other researchers, as shown below. TreeSeek pulls family data from Geni or FamilySearch.Genealogists will find this free family tree software program a terrific way to easily share some of their family discoveries with relatives over the Holidays.

In addition to traditional family tree charts this program can also create a “Name Cloud” familiar to those of us working with 21st Century genealogy computing. Tom Kemp, GenealogyBank’s Director of Genealogy Products, gave three lectures at the Expo, all focused on the value of newspapers for genealogists.

Friday, Nov. 11: “African American Newspapers”

(Beginner Level) Tom talked about the more than 270

African American newspapers in GenealogyBank’s collection, published from 1827-1999—the largest collection of African American newspapers online. He provided practical advice for genealogists, such as: methods for efficient searching; and how to clip and save newspaper articles about your family. The lecture gave practical examples of the type of information family historians can find in these old newspapers, such as this obituary of Mary Stamps that appeared in the Atlanta Age (Georgia) 13 January 1900, page 2.

Saturday, Nov. 12: “21st Century Genealogy”
(All Levels) For this lecture, Tom concentrated on the ten essential online resources that you need to research your family online, save time, and improve the accuracy of your family history. He showed his audience how to cut through the clutter on the Internet and focus on the ten core resources with the reliable, essential content that genealogists use to document and preserve their family trees.

Genealogy sites Tom discussed included:
· Ancestry
· FamilySearch
· GenealogyBank
· Google Books
· Internet Archive
· Scribd

As Tom told his audience: “It’s a great day for genealogy! Researchers need to know about these terrific online genealogy resources.” Saturday, Nov. 12: “Newspapers: Finding the Details about Your Family”
It was standing room only for this 2011 Family History Expo session, in which Tom explained how to use the more than 5,700 newspapers in GenealogyBank’s
online newspaper archives, published from 1690-Today. He taught how to search efficiently, and clip and save newspaper articles about your family—providing practical tips for searching these online newspapers published over the past three centuries.

Memorial Day

Every Memorial Day we see the familiar poppies and remember our nation’s war dead. Recalling those that died from the Revolutionary War down through today.

In Flanders fields the poppies grow

Between the crosses, row on row,

That mark our place; and in the sky

The larks, still bravely singing, fly

Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago

We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,

Loved and were loved, and now we lie,

in Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:

To you from failing hands we throw

The torch; be yours to hold it high.

If ye break faith with us who die

We shall not sleep, though poppies grow

In Flanders fields.

Click here to see the news of his death during World War I and burial there in Belgium. Printed in the Kansas City Star. 5 February 1918, page 10

Celebrate Family History Month with GenealogyBank – Special Offer

Celebrate Family History Month with GenealogyBank – ENJOY 75% OFF

In celebration of family history month, GenealogyBank has extended their
75% OFF membership savings thru this weekend!

Featuring more than 4,400 U.S. newspapers, over 1 billion names from all 50 states,
GenealogyBank is the most extensive historical online newspaper archive designed specifically for family history research. By providing access to rare and hard-to-find newspapers from 1690 to the present day, GenealogyBank gives researchers the opportunity to discover unique, long-forgotten information about their American ancestors.

In addition to over 705 million articles—each of which can be printed and preserved for your family heritage — GenealogyBank also offers over 32 million modern obituaries, more than 87 million death records, over 253,000 reports including military lists, pension requests and the largest collection of U.S. serial set documents online.

There’s never been a better time to explore your family history at GenealogyBank!

Start Now. Don’t delay, this offer expires Tuesday, October 5th, 2010.