Fred Q. Bowman (1916-2009) Genealogist, Author

Fred Q. Bowman (1916-2009)
Frederick Quimby Bowman, 93, passed away in Albany, NY earlier this week. Well known genealogist and author – Fred was a relied upon source of early New York vital records. He was a genealogist who made a lasting difference.

Obituary: Times Union (Albany, NY) – November 9, 2009
See: http://bit.ly/5gmzM7

He is survived by his wife, Eleanor (Wickham) Bowman; a son, Ronald Bowman (Janice); daughter-in-law, Yvonne and her daughter Arlene; two grandchildren, Lisa Wilson (David) and Michael Bowman (Jill Tierney); four great-grandchildren, Kayley and Brenna, Cody and Kyle; also several nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by two sons, Raymond W. and Kenneth Bowman; a granddaughter, Brenda Bowman; a sister, Martha Schmidt; and a brother, William Bowman. Condolences may be sent to them c/o the A.J. Cunningham Funeral Home; 4898 SR81; Greenville, NY 12083.

He was the author of:
7,000 Hudson-Mohawk Valley (NY) vital records, 1808-1850
Index to 7,000 Hudson-Mohawk Valley New York vital records, 1808-1850

10,000 vital records of eastern New York, 1777-1834
Index to 10,000 vital records of eastern New York, 1774-1834
8,000 more vital records of eastern New York State, 1804-1850

10,000 vital records of central New York, 1813-1850
Index to 10,000 vital records of central New York, 1813-1850

10,000 vital records of western New York, 1809-1850
Index to 10,000 vital records of western New York, 1809-1850

Landholders of northeastern New York, 1739-1802
Directory to collections of New York vital records, 1726-1989, with rare gazetteer
New York’s detailed census of 1855 : Greene County

Using the Congressional Serial Set for Genealogical Research

Using the Congressional Serial Set for Genealogical Research
By Jeffery Hartley


(This article appeared in the Spring 2009 issue of Prologue. It has been excerpted and reprinted here with the permission of the author.

The Historical Documents section in GenealogyBank includes over 243,000 reports from the US Serial Set and the American State Papers).


Click here to search the American State Papers and US Congressional Serial Set in GenealogyBank.com

Genealogists use whatever sources are available to them in pursuit of their family history: diaries, family Bibles, census records, passenger arrival records, and other federal records. One set of materials that is often overlooked, however, is the Congressional Serial Set.

This large multivolume resource contains various congressional reports and documents from the beginning of the federal government, and its coverage is wide and varied. Women, African Americans, Native Americans, students, soldiers and sailors, pensioners, landowners, and inventors are all represented in some fashion. While a beginning genealogist would not use the Serial Set to begin a family history, it nevertheless can serve as a valuable tool and resource for someone helping to flesh out an ancestors life, especially where it coincided with the interests of the U.S. federal government.

Since its inception, the U.S. government has gathered information, held hearings, compiled reports, and published those findings in literally millions of pages, the majority of which have been published by the Government Printing Office (GPO).

These publications include annual reports of the various executive branch agencies, congressional hearings and documents, registers of employees, and telephone directories. Their topics cover a wide range, from the Ku Klux Klan to child labor practices to immigration to western exploration.

In 1817, the Serial Set was begun with the intent of being the official, collective, definitive publication documenting the activities of the federal government. Following the destruction of the Capitol in 1814 by the British, Congress became interested in publishing their records to make them more accessible and less vulnerable to loss.

In the early Federal period, printing of congressional documents had been haphazard, and the Serial Set was an effort designed to rectify that situation. Although initially there were no regulations concerning what should be included, several laws and regulations were promulgated over the years. The contents, therefore, vary depending on the year in question.

In 1831, 14 years after the Serial Set was begun, the printers Gales & Seaton proposed that a compilation of the documents from the first Congresses be printed. The secretary of the Senate and the clerk of the House were to direct the selection of those documents, 6,278 of which were published in 38 volumes between 1832 and 1861. This collection was known as the American State Papers.

Because it was a retrospective effort, these 38 volumes were arranged chronologically within 10 subject areas: Foreign Relations, Indian Affairs, Finance, Commerce & Navigation, Military Affairs, Naval Affairs, Post Office, Public Lands, Claims, and Miscellaneous.

Although not technically a part of the Serial Set, the volumes were certainly related, and therefore the volumes were designated with a leading zero so that these volumes would be shelved properly, i.e. before the volumes of the Serial Set. (1)

The Congressional Serial Set itself includes six distinct series: House and Senate journals (until 1953), House and Senate reports, House and Senate documents, Senate treaty documents, Senate executive reports, and miscellaneous reports. The journals provide information about the daily activities of each chamber. The House and Senate reports relate to public and private legislation under consideration during each session.

Documents generally relate to other investigations or subjects that have come to the attention of Congress. Nominations for office and military promotion appear in the Senate Executive Reports. Miscellaneous reports are just that­widely varied in subject matter and content. With the possible exception of the treaty documents, any of these can have some relevance for genealogists.

The documents and reports in the Serial Set are numbered sequentially within each Congress, no matter what their subject or origin. The documents were then collected into volumes, which were then given a sequential number within the Serial Set. The set currently stands at over 15,000 volumes, accounting for more than 325,000 individual documents and 11 million pages.

The Serial Set amounts to an incredible amount of documentation for the 19th century. Agency annual reports, reports on surveys and military expeditions, statistics and other investigations all appear and thoroughly document the activities of the federal government.

In 1907, however, the Public Printing and Binding Act provided guidelines for what should be included, resulting in many of these types of reports no longer being included as they were also issued separately by the individual agencies. The number of copies was also trimmed. With that stroke, the value of the Serial Set was lessened, but it nevertheless stands as a valuable genealogical resource for the 19th century.

So what is available for genealogists? The following examples are just some of the types of reports and information that are available.

Land Records
The Serial Set contains much information concerning land claims. These claims relate to bounty for service to the government as well as to contested lands once under the jurisdiction of another nation.

In House Report 78 (21-2), there is a report entitled “Archibald Jackson.” This report, from the House Committee on Private Land Claims, in 1831, relates to Jackson’s claim for the land due to James Gammons. Gammons, a soldier in the 11th U.S. Infantry, died on February 19, 1813, “in service of the United States.” The act under which he enlisted provided for an extra three month’s pay and 160 acres of land to those who died while in service to the United States. However, Gammons was a slave, owned by Archibald Jackson, who apparently never overtly consented to the enlistment but allowed it to continue. That Gammons was eligible for the extra pay and bounty land was not in dispute, but the recipient of that bounty was. Jackson had already collected the back pay in 1823 and was petitioning for the land as well. The report provides a decision in favor of Jackson, as he was the legal representative of Gammons, and as such entitled to all of his property. (2)

Land as bounty was one issue, and another was claims for newly annexed land as the country spread west. In 1838, the House of Representatives published a report related to Senate Bill 89 concerning the lands acquired through the treaty with Spain in 1819 that ceded East and West Florida to the United States. Claims to land between the Mississippi and the Perdido Rivers, however, were not a part of that treaty and had been unresolved since the Louisiana Purchase, which had taken the Perdido River as one of its limits. The report provides a background on the claims as well as lists of the claimants, the names of original claimants, the date and nature of the claim, and the amount of the land involved. (3)

Other land claims are represented as well. In 1820, the Senate ordered a report to be printed from the General Land Office containing reports of the land commissioners at Jackson Court House. These lands are located in Louisiana and include information that would help a genealogist locate their ancestor in this area. Included in this report is a table entitled “A List of Actual Settlers, in the District East of Pearl River, in Louisiana, prior to the 3d March, 1819, who have no claims derived from either the French, British, or Spanish, Governments.” The information is varied, but a typical entry reads: No. 14, present claimant George B. Dameson, original claimant Mde. Neait Pacquet, originally settled 1779, located above White’s Point, Pascag. River, for about 6 years. (4)

Annual Reports
Among the reports in the Serial Set for the 19th century are the annual reports to Congress from the various executive branch agencies. Congress had funded the activities of these organizations and required that each provide a report concerning their annual activities. Many of these are printed in the Serial Set, often twice: the same content with both a House and a Senate document number. Annual reports in the 19th century were very different from the public relations pieces that they tend to be today.

Besides providing information about the organization and its activities, many included research reports and other (almost academic) papers. In the annual reports of the Bureau of Ethnology, for instance, one can find dictionaries of Native American languages, reports on artifacts, and in one case, even a genealogy for the descendants of a chief. (5)

These reports can often serendipitously include information of interest to the family historian. For instance, the annual report of the solicitor of the Treasury would not necessarily be a place to expect to find family information. The 1844 report, however, does have some information that could be useful. For instance, pages 36 and 37 of this report contains a “tabular list of suits now pending in the courts of the United States, in which the government is a part and interested.”

Many on the opposite side of the case were individuals. An example is the case of Roswell Lee, late a lieutenant in the U.S. Army, against whom there has been a judgment for over $5,000 in 1838. Lee was sued in a court in Massachusetts and in 1844 still owed over $4,000. In a letter dated May 5, 1840, the district attorney informed the office (6)
that Mr. Lee is not now a resident of the district of Massachusetts, and that whether he ever returns is quite uncertain; that nothing, however, will be lost by his absence, as the United States have now a judgment against him, which probably will forever remain unsatisfied.

Another set of annual reports that appear in the Serial Set are those for the Patent Office. The annual reports of the commissioner of patents often include an index to the patents that were granted that year, arranged by subject and containing the names of the invention and the patentee and the patent number. The report included a further description of the patent, and often a diagram of it as well. Each year’s report also included an index by patentee.

Unfortunately, the numbers of patents granted in later years, as well as their complexity, led to more limited information being included in later reports. The 1910 report, for instance, simply contains an alphabetical list of inventions, with the entries listing the patentee, number, date, and where additional information can be found in the Official Patent Office Gazette. (7)

The Civil War gave rise to a number of medical enhancements and innovations in battlefield medicine, and the annual report for 1865, published in 1867, contains a reminder of that in the patent awarded to G. B. Jewett, of Salem, Massachusetts, for “Legs, artificial.” Patent 51,593 was granted December 19, 1865, and the description of the patent on page 990 provides information on the several improvements that Jewett had developed. The patent diagram on page 760 illustrated the text. (8)

This annual report relates to a report from May 1866, also published in the Serial Set that same session of Congress, entitled “Artificial Limbs Furnished to Soldiers.” This report, dated May 1866, came from the secretary of war in response to a congressional inquiry concerning artificial limbs furnished to soldiers at the government’s expense. Within its 128 pages are a short list of the manufacturers of these limbs, including several owned by members of the Jewett family in Salem, Massachusetts, New York, and Washington, D.C., as well as an alphabetical list of soldiers, detailing their rank, regiment and state, residence, limb, cost, date, and manufacturer. Constantine Elsner, a private in B Company of the 20th Massachusetts living in Boston, received a leg made by G. B. Jewett at a cost of $75 on April 8, 1865. 9 This may have been an older version of the one that Jewett would have patented later in the year, or it may have been an early model of that one. Either way, a researcher would have some idea not only of what Elsner’s military career was like, but also some sense of what elements of life for him would be like after the war.

Congress also was interested in the activities of organizations that were granted congressional charters. Many of the charters included the requirement that an annual report be supplied to Congress, and these were then ordered to be printed in the Serial Set.

One such organization is the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR). As one would expect, the DAR annual reports contain a great deal of genealogical and family history information. The 18th annual report is no exception. Among other things, it includes, in appendix A, a list of the graves of almost 3,000 Revolutionary War soldiers. The list includes not just a name and location, but other narrative information as well:
Abston, John. Born Jan. 2, 1757; died 1856. Son of Joshua Abston, captain of Virginia militia; served two years in War of the American Revolution. Enlisted from Pittsylvania County, Va.; was in Capt. John Ellis’ company under Col. Washington. The evening before the battle of Kings Mountain, Col. Washington, who was in command of the starving Americans at this point, sent soldiers out to forage for food. At a late hour a steer was driven into camp, killed, and made into a stew. The almost famished soldiers ate the stew, without bread, and slept the sleep of the just. Much strengthened by their repast and rest, the next morning they made the gallant charge that won the battle of Kings Mountain, one of the decisive battles of the American Revolution. Washington found one of the steer’s horns and gave it to Abston, a personal friend, who carried it as a powder horn the rest of the war. (10)

Another organization whose annual reports appear is the Columbia Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, which later became Gallaudet University. These reports, found in the annual reports of the secretary of the interior, contain much of what one would expect: lists of faculty and students, enrollment statistics, and other narrative. While that information can help to provide information about one’s ancestor’s time there, there are other parts of the narrative that include information one would not expect to find.

For instance, the 10th annual report for 1867 has a section entitled “The Health of the Institution.” It concerns not the fiscal viability of the institution but rather the occurrences of illness and other calamities. One student from Maryland, John A. Unglebower, was seized with gastric fever and died: “He was a boy of exemplary character, whose early death is mourned by all who knew him.” Two other students drowned that year, and the circumstances of their deaths recounted, with the hope that “they were not unprepared to meet the sudden and unexpected summons.” (11) Both the faculty and the student body contributed their memorials to these two students in the report.

Other organizations represented in the Serial Set are the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts of America, Veterans of World War I of the United States, proceedings of the National Encampment, United Spanish War Veterans, the American Historical Association, and the National Convention of Disabled American Veterans.

Lists of Pensioners
The history of pensions provided by the federal government is beyond the scope of this article. However, the Serial Set is a source of information about who was on the rolls at various times. For instance, an 1818 letter from the secretary of war was published containing a list of the persons who had been added to the pension list since May 28, 1813. The list provides information on the likes of Susanna Coyle, certificate of pension no. 9, heiress of deceased soldier William Coyle, alias Coil, a private who received pay of four dollars per month. (12)

Sundry lists of pensions appeared in 1850, related to the regulation of Navy, privateer, and Navy hospital funds. The report included four lists: those placed in the invalid list who were injured while in the line of duty; those drawing pensions from wounds received while serving on private armed vessels; widows drawing pensions from their husbands who were engineers, firemen, and coal-heavers; and orphan children of officers, seamen, and marines pensioned under the act of August 11, 1848. (13)

One of the most widely consulted lists is that for 1883, “List of Pensioners on the Roll, January 1, 1883” (Senate Executive Document 84 [47-2]). This five-volume title, arranged by state and then county of residence, provides a list of each pensioner’s name, his post office, the monthly amount received, the date of the original allowance, the reason for the pension, and the certificate number.

An example is the case of Eli G. Biddle, who served in the 54th Massachusetts. Biddle can be found on page 439 of volume 5 of the “List,” and a researcher can learn several things without even having seen his pension file: his middle name is George, he was living in Boston in 1883, and he was receiving four dollars each month after having suffered a gunshot wound in the right shoulder. His pension certificate number is also provided 99,053­ and with that one could easily order the appropriate records from the National Archives.

Registers
The Serial Set serves as a source of military registers and other lists of government personnel as well. Both Army and Navy registers appear after 1896. The Army registers for 1848–1860 and the Navy registers for 1848–1863 are transcripts of the lists that appeared the preceding January and include pay and allowances, with corrections to that earlier edition for deaths and resignations.

The Official Register, or “Blue Book,” a biannual register of the employees of the federal government, appears for 10 years, from 1883 to 1893. If one’s ancestors were employees at this time, their current location and position, place from which they were appointed, date of appointment, and annual compensation can be gleaned from this source.

The Serial Set often provides unexpected finds, and the area of registers is no exception. There is a great deal of material on the Civil War, from the 130 volumes of the Official Records of the War of the Rebellion to other investigations and the aforementioned registers and lists of pensions. There are not, however, large amounts of compiled unit histories.

One exception, however, is the report from the adjutant general of Arkansas. Shortly after the Civil War, the adjutant general offices of the various Union states prepared reports detailing the activities of the men from their states. The same was done in Arkansas, but the state legislature there, “under disloyal control,” declined to publish the report. Senator Henry Wilson of Massachusetts, chairman of the Senate Committee on Military Affairs, brought it to the committee in 1867, and it was ordered to be printed in the Serial Set so that the loyal activities of these 10,000 men would be recognized. (14) The report includes brief histories of each unit as well as a roster of the unit and rank, enlistment date, and other notes on each soldier.

Accessing Information in the Serial Set
The indexing for the Serial Set has long been troublesome to researchers. Various attempts have been made to provide subject access, with varying degrees of success. Many of the indexes in the volumes themselves are primarily title indexes to the reports from that Congress and session. The Checklist of United States Public Documents, 1789–1909, does provide information about what reports listed therein do appear in the Serial Set, but the researcher has to know the name of the issuing agency in order to access that information. The Document Index provides some subject indexing by Congress, and other efforts such as those by John Ames and Benjamin Poore can also be used, but none index the tables and contents of many of the reports that have been discussed in this article. (15)

The best comprehensive print index is the Congressional Information Service’s (CIS) U.S. Serial Set Index, produced in conjunction with their microfilming of the volumes through 1969 beginning in the mid-1970s. In this index, a two-volume subject index covers groups of Congresses, with a third volume providing an index to individual names for relief actions, as well as a complete numerical list in each report/document category. The index, however, does not index the contents of the documents. For instance, although the title given for the Archibald Jackson land claim includes James Gammons’s name, the latter does not appear in the index to private relief actions. In addition, users must often be creative in the terms applied in order to be sure that they have exhausted all possibilities. In the mid-1990s CIS released these indexes on CD-ROM, which makes them somewhat easier to use, although the contents are essentially the same.

The indexing problems have been rectified by the digitization of the Serial Set. At least two private companies, LexisNexis and Readex, have digitized it and made it full-text searchable.

[The Serial Set and American State Papers are available in GenealogyBank. Click here to search them online]

This article can only hint at some of the genealogical possibilities that can be found in the Congressional Serial Set. It has not touched on the land survey, railroad, western exploration, or lighthouse keeper’s reports or many of the private relief petitions and claims. Nonetheless, the reports and documents in the Serial Set provide a tremendous and varied amount of information for researchers interested in family history.

Author
Jeffery Hartley is chief librarian for the Archives Library Information Center (ALIC). A graduate of Dickinson College and the University of Maryland’s College of Library and Information Services, he joined the National Archives and Records Administration in 1990.

Notes
1 For a more complete description of the American State Papers, and their genealogical relevance, see Chris Naylor, “Those Elusive Early Americans: Public Lands and Claims in the American State Papers, 1789–1837,” Prologue: Quarterly of the National Archives and Records Administration 37 (Summer 2005): 54–61.
2 H. Rept. 78 (21-2), 1831, “Archibald Jackson” (Serial 210).
3 H. Rept. 818 (25-2), 1838, “Land Claims between Perdido and Mississippi” Serial 335.
4 S. Doc. 3 (16-2), 1820, “Reports of the Land Commissioners at Jackson Court House” (Serial 42).
5 H. Misc. Doc. 32 (48-2), 1882, “3rd Annual Report of the Bureau of Ethnology” (Serial 2317).
6 H. Doc. 35 (28-1), 1844, “Annual Report of Solicitor of the Treasury” (Serial 441), p. 37. 7 H. Doc. 1348 (61-3), 1911, “Annual Report of the Commissioner of Patents for the Year 1910″ (Serial 6020).
8 H. Exec. Doc. 62 (39-1), 1867, “Annual Report of the Commissioner of Patents for the Year 1865″ (Serial 1257-1259).
9 H. Exec. Doc. 108 (39-1), 1866, “Artificial Limbs Furnished to Soldiers” (Serial 1263).
10 S. Doc. 392 (64-1), 1916, “Eighteenth Report of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution, October 11, 1914, to October 11, 1915″ (Serial 6924), p.155. 11 H. Exec. Doc. 1 (40-2), “Tenth Annual Report of the Columbia Institution for the Deaf and Dumb” (Serial 1326), pp. 429–430.
12 H. Doc. 35 (15-1), 1818 (Serial 6), p. 17.
13 See H. Ex. Doc. 10 (31-2), 1850, “Sundry Lists of Pensioners” (Serial 597).
14 See S. Misc. Doc 53 (39-2), 1867, “Report of the Adjutant General for the State of Arkansas, for the Period of the Late Rebellion, and to November 1, 1866″ (Serial 1278).
15 A good discussion of how some of these indexes work can be found in Mary Lardgaard, “Beginner’s Guide to Indexes to the Nineteenth Century U.S. Serial Set,” Government Publications Review 2 (1975): 303–311.

Minnesota newspapers 1849-1922, 1986-Today online

Minnesota is 151 years old today.

Minnesota became the 32nd state on May 11, 1858.

The vote wasn’t unanimous – the New York Herald (12 May 1858) reported that the vote was 157 for and 38 against admitting Minnesota into the Union.

(Illustration is from GenealogyBank Historical Books; an advertising card by Henry Beard, printed in St. Paul, MN in 1881).

That’s the wonderful thing about GenealogyBank – we are able to read newspapers from across the country and get the details of the history of our state as that history was made. GenealogyBank has Minnesota newspapers dating from 1849 – before statehood.

Cloquet, MN
Pine Journal (Cloquet, MN). 5/17/2006-Current

Duluth, MN
Budgeteer News (Duluth, MN). 6/9/2006-Current
Duluth News-Tribune. 5/16/1881 – 12/31/1922
Duluth News-Tribune (MN). 1/1/1995-Current
Lake Superior News. 7/4/1878 – 1/27/1881
Lake Superior Review and Weekly Tribune. 1/6/1876 – 2/10/1889
Minnesotian-Herald. 4/24/1869 – 5/11/1878

International Falls, MN
Daily Journal (International Falls, MN). 8/25/2000-Current

Minneapolis, MN
Minneapolis Journal. 1/1/1895 – 12/31/1900
Star Tribune (MN). 1/21/1986-Current

St. Cloud, MN
St. Cloud Times (MN). 2/4/1999-Current

St. Paul, MN
St. Paul Daily Pioneer. 4/28/1849 – 12/29/1872
St. Paul Pioneer Press (MN). 3/25/1988-Current

Two Harbors, MN
Lake County News-Chronicle (Two Harbors, MN). 5/11/2006-Current

Obituary Reveals Identity of Homesick Boy from Orphanage – 65 years later

Genealogists want to find and document every member of a family. They don’t want even one child to be forgotten.

Thanks to genealogist Ed Hutchison of Mississippi a 78 year old Syracuse, NY man’s true identity has been uncovered.

Post-Standard (Syracuse, NY) – April 5, 2009
Case, Dick. Death Uncovers Hidden Identity
.


We called him Louie.
He told us his name was Louis Ludbeck.
Mostly, his life seemed to be a blank slate.


It wasn’t until he died March 5, that the mystery that was Louie began to unravel.
Louie died in peace at Francis House. He was 78. A stroke took him.

We know now that Louie was born Gene Rollin Poffahl, Jan.17, 1931. He came into a family of farmers in Albany County. Likely he had five siblings.

We know this because the Onondaga County Medical Examiner’s Office came into the picture after Louie died. He went to Francis House, a hospice run by the Franciscan Order of Nuns, with no past: no government health insurance, no Social Security number, no record of medical treatment or military service. Just a limp, old man ready to die.

The nuns gathered Louie into their embrace, just the way Ann O’Connor and Peter King had, more than 30 years ago. He passed restfully, among friends.

Ann and Peter are two of the founders of Unity Kitchen of the Catholic Worker of Syracuse. They run an elegant soup kitchen, offering full-course, fully served meals twice a week, as well as brunch on Sundays after Mass. The kitchen gets by on alms and the good will of a small, devoted troop of volunteers, who support Ann and Peter with donations and the good will of their help, in-person sometimes twice a week.

They live in a house on Palmer Avenue, devoted to the Catholic Worker community. Years ago, Ann and Peter set their lives aside to serve the city’s poor in a very special way. My wife, Sandy, and I have been volunteers at the kitchen several years.

Louie drifted into Unity Kitchen maybe 30 years ago. No one paid attention to the exact date. Some say it was 1978. He was part of a continuous wave of needy folks who washed across the struggling agency every week. Back then, the kitchen was a literal soup kitchen, and a flophouse, holed up in two floors of an old sash factory tucked next to the DL&W railroad tracks about where Adams and South Clinton streets meet.

Louie settled in; he seemed to have found a home among the homeless. He said little, as became his way of life. Ann and Peter accepted his silence, knowing from experience that it’s not a good idea to poke at the psyche of a homeless person. If he wanted to share a story, he would. Louie didn’t. It was as if his life began when he arrived in Syracuse. The only clue he carried was a piece of paper marked Orwell,” where the affiliated Unity Acres shelter is located.

Peter recalls that Louie settled into a helping routine, taking on small jobs that seemed to give meaning to his life. He’d often stand fire watch in the building. When others refused to do anything but soak up the founders’ charity, Louie joined up, fit in.

“He seemed to have found his place,” Peter explains.

When Ann and Peter closed the old kitchen, and moved to new quarters in Syracuse’s only co-op apartment building on West Onondaga Street, Louie went with them. He was invited to join them in their home, moving into an upstairs bedroom in the house that’s not far from Unity Kitchen.

One time, Ann and Peter tried to bring Louie into the social welfare system. He told the social worker a fantastic story about owning a house at Split Rock and a car. No, he’s not eligible for help, they were told. You’ll have to apply to be his guardian.

Leave him alone, let it be, the couple was advised. Louie is Louie. He doesn’t want to reveal himself; maybe he can’t.

Louie kept to his routine at Unity Kitchen. He worked at menial things — taking out the garbage, dusting and mopping the floor, arranging chairs — and joining the other guests for meals. Louie asked for little and earned the love and respect of the community.

Like others of our readers, Ed Hutchison, a former county legislator who now lives in Mississippi, was intrigued by Louie’s obituary, which was published in The Post-Standard and the Albany Times Union. By then, the FBI fingerprint check had given him a new name and birth date. It also revealed he had been in the Army for seven years, discharged in 1957. Ed’s a genealogist and loves a mystery. He ran an Internet search.

The search revealed a number of folks with the last name of Poffahl, which is of German origin, in the Albany area. Ed also found a newspaper story with an Albany dateline from 1944: “A homesick boy, injured in trying to escape from the Humane Society for Children, fought for his life today. Gene Poffahl, 13, suffered critical back and neck injuries last week, when police said, he lost his grip on an improvised rope strung from a third-story window and fell to the porch steps of the shelter ….”

Gene Poffahl seems to be Louie Ludbeck. His age fits the FBI record. The accident also would explain Louie’s twisted body. “He was a pretty strong little guy,” according to Peter King, “but his motor facilities were compromised. He walked as if he was drunk.”

The mystery of Louie’s life continues to be peeled back. Peter’s been contacted by people who live in the Albany area who may be relatives. He’s being told his parents surrendered Louie and his brothers and sisters to an orphan home run by nuns in Troy; they couldn’t afford to raise the children. The Poffahls were vegetable farmers, supposedly.

His funeral service was held at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. Father John Schopfer, shepherd of Syracuse’s needy, presided. He was carried to his grave in St. Mary’s Cemetery by his friends from Unity Kitchen.

Louie obviously was a troubled man, hiding his history or leaving it where it fell. Peter says he sometimes overheard him “arguing with himself” in a loud voice in his room. He didn’t intrude.

I’m not sure we know how hard we should push our inquiry, either.

Dick Case writes Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday. Reach him at dcase@syracuse.com or 470-2254.
Edition: Final

Page: B1
Copyright, 2009, The Herald Company

GenealogyBank – adds 170 newspapers from 31 States – 1830 to today

In the last few weeks GenealogyBank has added a staggering 7.2 million records and documents! In all of 2008 we added 39 million records and documents

GenealogyBank hits new high: 253 million records and documents – If each document was a person – that would be more than the population of the UK, Ireland, Germany, France and Canada combined!

Specifically in the last few weeks GenealogyBank added:
170 newspapers from 31 states
Content from 1830 to the present

Here is a list of the titles added:

Alaska
Juneau. Daily Record-Miner. 3 issues. 7/16/1910 to 10/10/1910

Alabama
Jasper. *Daily Mountain Eagle. 1/22/1998 to Current

Arkansas
Benton. *Benton Courier. 5/8/2008 to Current
Carlisle. *Carlisle Independent. 6/6/2008 to Current
Jonesboro. Jonesboro Evening Sun. 120 issues. 10/3/1905 to 11/9/1921
Little Rock. Arkansas Gazette. 17 issues. 8/23/1842 to 10/11/1899
Malvern. *Malvern Daily Record. 1/1/2008 to Current

Arizona
Nogales. *Monitor. 1 issue. 9/5/1890
Tucson. Amigos. 1 issue. 2/9/1977
Tucson. Tucsonense. 159 issues. 1/2/1923 to 12/29/1923

California
Colton. Chicano. 34 issues. 3/14/1974 to 6/16/1977
Los Angeles. *Aguacero. 2 issues. 3/24/1878 to 3/31/1878
Los Angeles. Clamor Publico. 6 issues. 10/9/1855 to 4/25/1857
Los Angeles. *Con Safos. 2 issues. 3/21/1969 to 6/1/1970
Los Angeles. *Correo Mejicano. 1 issue. 10/18/1917
Los Angeles. *Cronica. 1 issue. 9/12/1874
Los Angeles. *Democrata. 6 issues. 10/14/1882 to 11/4/1882
Los Angeles. Dos Republicas. 3 issues. 10/28/1892 to 2/1/1893
Los Angeles. *Eco de la Patria. 2 issues. 2/14/1878 to 2/21/1878
Los Angeles. *Fe en la Democracia. 2 issues. 10/29/1884 to 11/3/1884
Los Angeles. Heraldo de Mexico. 145 issues. 5/20/1919 to 11/29/1928
Los Angeles. *Joven. 2 issues. 9/18/1877 to 4/12/1878
Los Angeles. *Malcriado. 1 issue. 4/17/1927
Los Angeles. *Mesazero. 1 issue. 12/21/1954
Los Angeles. *Monitor Mejicano. 10 issues. 10/26/1895 to 10/29/1898
Los Angeles. Prensa. 68 issues. 7/26/1919 to 12/22/1921
Los Angeles. *Regeneracion. 250 issues. 9/5/1910 to 10/6/1917
Los Angeles. *Union. 3 issues. 11/21/1896 to 5/15/1897
San Francisco. *Centro America. 20 issues. 2/20/1921 to 8/25/1921
San Francisco. *Hispano America. 48 issues. 1/3/1931 to 12/5/1931
San Francisco. *Imparcial. 5 issues. 11/20/1931 to 2/1/1935
San Francisco. *Jalamate. 10 issues. 1/30/1972 to 6/9/1972
San Francisco. Mefistofeles. 1 issue. 3/23/1918
San Francisco. *Seminario Imparcial. 12 issues. 8/20/1938 to 11/12/1938
San Francisco. Voz del Nuevo Mundo. 97 issues. 3/27/1865 to 9/23/1884

Colorado
Colorado Springs. Gazette-Telegraph. 3 issues. 9/29/1903 to 9/16/1922
San Luis. Adobe. 1 issue. 8/31/1975

Connecticut
New London. New London Democrat. 1 issue. 5/17/1851
Norwich. Norwich Morning Bulletin. 2 issues. 12/3/1875 to 8/13/1887
Shelton. *Fairfield Sun. 9/18/2008 to Current

Florida
Tampa. Diario de Tampa. 13 issues. 8/21/1908 to 7/10/1911
Tampa. Internacional. 16 issues. 6/30/1939 to 8/7/1942
Tampa. Revista de Cuba Libre. 1 issue. 8/27/1898
Tampa. *Traduccion Prensa. 14 issues. 4/9/1941 to 9/4/1956
Tampa. *West Tampa Leader. 1 issue. 12/8/1940
Tampa. *Ybor City Sunday News. 1 issue. 11/18/1951

Hawaii
Kailua. *West Hawaii Today. 8/31/2008 to Current

Idaho
Idaho City. Idaho Register. 3 issues. 11/17/1905 to 4/23/1915
Twin Falls. Twin Falls News. 2 issues. 4/30/1919 to 6/18/1919

Illinois
Centralia. Centralia Sentinel. 7 issues. 1/12/1865 to 6/15/1865
Chicago. Latin Times. 2 issues. 9/24/1960 to 4/6/1962
Chicago. Noticia Mundial. 2 issues. 10/9/1927 to 10/23/1927
Chicago. Vida Latina. 1 issue. 2/21/1958

Kansas
Abilene. *Abilene Reflector-Chronicle. 12/17/1999 to Current
Dodge City. *Dodge City Daily Globe. 8/9/2005 to Current

Kentucky
Corbin. *Times-Tribune. 6/17/2008 to Current

Louisiana
New Orleans. Abeja. 166 issues. 5/24/1830 to 4/25/1831
New Orleans. Times Picayune. 3,086 issues. 1/11/1861 to 10/22/1900
New Orleans. Times Picayune. 2,856 issues. 1/26/1901 to 12/30/1922

Massachusetts
Boston. Boston Journal. 2,176 issues. 7/6/1866 to 8/31/1897
Boston. *Liberator. 72 issues. 9/6/1896 to 4/15/1906
Brockton. *Enterprise. 10/9/2008 to Current
Dedham. Norfolk Democrat. 2 issues. 12/27/1850 to 12/2/1853
Stoughton. Stoughton Sentinel. 79 issues. 7/30/1864 to 11/11/1876

Maryland
Baltimore. Baltimore American. 4 issues. 7/23/1905 to 7/13/1910

Michigan
Grand Rapids. *Grand Rapids Press. 3,138 issues. 7/1/1901 to 12/30/1922
Jackson. *Jackson Citizen Patriot. 137 issues. 8/15/1849 to 12/2/1858

Missouri
Kansas City. Cosmopolita. 1 issue. 1/30/1915
Kansas City. Kansas City Times. 99 issues. 5/13/1884 to 9/20/1894

Mississippi
Vicksburg. Daily Commercial. 1 issues. 7/16/1878

Montana
Helena. Western Clarion. 1 issue. 9/30/1865

Nebraska
Nebraska City. Daily Nebraska Press. 1 issue. 3/25/1876

New Jersey
Trenton. *Trenton Evening Times. 880 issues. 5/7/1883 to 12/30/1922
Trenton. *Trenton Sunday Times-Advertiser. 497 issues. 6/1/1902 to 6/23/1918

New Mexico
Albuquerque. Indito. 1 issue. 4/4/1901
Albuquerque. Nuevo Mundo. 5 issues. 12/25/1897 to 7/28/1900
Bernalillo. *Agricultor Moderno. 1 issue. 3/23/1916
Bernalillo. *Espejo. 1 issue. 3/8/1879
Bernalillo. *Voz del Valle. 53 issues. 10/12/1899 to 1/31/1901
Deming. *Deming Headlight. 5 issues. 1/24/1891 to 2/18/1899
Deming. *Deming Tribune. 1 issue. 12/25/1884
Deming. *Democracia. 1 issue. 1/14/1906
Elizabethtown. *Mining Bulletin. 17 issues. 1/4/1900 to 8/11/1900
Estancia. *Estancia News. 4 issues. 9/1/1905 to 7/5/1907
Las Cruces. *Borderer. 1 issue. 8/16/1873
Las Cruces. Dona Ana County Republican. 2 issues. 1/19/1901 to 3/30/1901
Las Cruces. Labrador. 2 issues. 1/25/1901 to 3/10/1905
Las Vegas. *Boletin de Anuncios. 1 issue. 1/19/1878
Las Vegas. *Cachiporra. 1 issue. 10/19/1888
Las Vegas. *Campaign Bulletin. 2 issues. 8/25/1880 to 8/27/1880
Las Vegas. *Hispano Americano. 6 issues. 4/21/1892 to 10/15/1892
Las Vegas. *Las Vegas Daily Optic. 11 issues. 3/1/1890 to 7/8/1893
Las Vegas. *Las Vegas Weekly Optic. 2 issues. 10/23/1880 to 10/30/1880
Las Vegas. Revista Catolica. 54 issues. 4/1/1888 to 2/10/1895
Las Vegas. *Sol de Mayo. 8 issues. 5/1/1891 to 7/24/1891
Las Vegas. *Voz del Pueblo. 4 issues. 9/21/1895 to 12/13/1904
Maldonado. *Estrella. 1 issue. 1/30/1897
Mesilla. Mesilla News. 1 issue. 12/18/1880
Mora. *Cronica de Mora. 2 issues. 6/13/1889 to 11/2/1889
Mora. *Mora Echo. 2 issues. 9/16/1890

Mora. *Mosquito. 15 issues. 12/3/1891 to 6/30/1892
Raton. *Relampago. 11 issues. 5/21/1904 to 8/6/1904
Rincon. *Rincon Weekly. 11 issues. 8/29/1895 to 5/11/1897
Rincon. *Roswell Record. 1 issue. 7/14/1893
San Acacio. *Comercio. 1 issue. 7/11/1907
San Marcial. *San Marcial Bee. 2 issues. 6/10/1893 to 3/29/1902
Santa Fe. Cachiporrota. 1 issue. 10/16/1890
Santa Fe. *Clarin Mejicano. 1 issue. 8/10/1873
Santa Fe. Daily New Mexican. 227 issues. 4/15/1871 to 3/28/1872
Santa Fe. *Gauntlet. 1 issue. 6/25/1894
Santa Fe. *Nuevo Mejicano. 2 issues. 4/25/1863 to 9/24/1881
Santa Fe. *Nuevo Mexicano. 40 issues. 8/16/1890 to 5/9/1908
Santa Fe. *Registro de Nuevo Mexico. 1 issue. 5/2/1916
Santa Fe. *Santa Fe Daily New Mexican. 23 issues. 8/8/1885 to 2/9/1887
Santa Fe. Santa Fe Weekly New Mexican and Livestock Journal. 2 issues. 3/22/1888 to 10/26/1893
Santa Fe. *Verdad. 1 issue. 9/12/1844
Santa Fe. *Voz del Pueblo. 2 issues. 4/27/1889 to 6/1/1889
Santa Fe. Weekly New Mexican.1 issue. 9/27/1919
Socorro. Defensor del Pueblo. 8 issues. 3/30/1906 to 5/24/1935
Springer. Colfax County Stockman. 1 issue. 1/6/1912
Wagon Mound. *Combate. 198 issues. 12/6/1902 to 11/2/1918

New York
Albany. Albany Evening Journal. 98 issues. 5/31/1850 to 6/1/1874
Garden City. Eco. 26 issues. 5/1/1930 to 5/15/1932
New York. *Artes y Letras. 56 issues. 10/21/1933 to 10/21/1939

New York. Cacara Jicara. 2 issues. 10/9/1897 to 12/13/1897
New York. Ecos de Nueva York. 31 issues. 2/26/1950 to 1/6/1957
New York. (Brooklyn). Espana Libre. 12 issues. 11/10/1939 to 8/14/1942

New York. *Novedades. 274 issues. 1/3/1880 to 12/21/1918
New York. Papagayo. 1 issue. 2/23/1855
New York. Patria. 1 issue. 3/14/1892
New York. Prensa. 1 issue. 8/24/1925
New York. Puerto Rico en Marcha. 1 issue. 6/21/1951

Ohio
Cincinnati. Cincinnati Commercial Tribune. 1,592 issues. 5/1/1869 to 6/30/1890
Wooster. Wooster Republican. 112 issues. 1/4/1855 to 12/30/1922
Cleveland. Plain-Dealer. 355 issues. 11/26/1914 to 12/30/1922

Oregon
Portland. Oregonian. 3,355 issues. 4/1/1861 to 7/12/1906

Pennsylvania
Philadelphia. Public Ledger. 3,364 issues. 3/25/1836 to 12/31/1873

Rhode Island
Pawtucket. Pawtucket Times. 3 issues. 1/8/1920 to 1/28/1921

South Carolina
Aiken. *Aiken Standard. 8/27/2008 to Current
Pickens. *Pickens Sentinel. 8/13/2008 to Current

Texas
Beaumont. Beaumont Enterprise and Journal. 4 issues. 4/27/1906 to 4/9/1911
Borger. *Borger News Herald. 6/11/2008 to Current
Brownsville. Cronista del Valle. 3 issues. 12/15/1924 to 9/8/1925
Brownsville. Puerto 16 issues. 7/24/1954 to 12/26/1959
Brownsville. Republican 34 issues. 10/23/1862 to 7/23/1868
Cleburne. *Cleburne Times Review. 7/18/2008 to Current
Corpus Christi. Horizonte. 2 issues. 11/26/1879 to 3/3/1880
Corpus Christi. *Progreso. 31 issues. 6/23/1939 to 3/15/1940
Corpus Christi. Verdad. 12 issues. 11/11/1955 to 9/6/1957
El Paso. Atalaya Bautista: Semanario Evangelico Bautista. 116 issues. 1/5/1911 to 6/26/1919
El Paso. *Clarin del Norte. 1 issue. 12/27/1906
El Paso. Continental. 1 issue. 6/5/1936
El Paso. *Dia. 2 issues. 2/18/1919 to 2/23/1919
El Paso. El Paso Evening Tribune. 1 issue. 6/23/1893
El Paso. Noticias. 5 issues. 10/21/1899 to 1/20/1900
El Paso. Republica. 8 issues. 11/2/1919 to 5/22/1920
Galveston. Galveston News. 6 issues. 8/20/1877 to 9/1/1881
Kingsville. Eco. 4 issues. 5/1/1934 to 12/1/1934
Kingsville. Notas de Kingsville. 29 issues. 6/29/1950 to 5/12/1960
Kingsville. Tex. Mex. Reflector. 3 issues. 5/21/1921 to 1/21/1923
Laredo. *Cronica. 95 issues. 1/1/1910 to 4/18/1914
Laredo. Evolucion. 31 issues. 7/27/1917 to 1/30/1920
San Antonio. Epoca. 4 issues. 11/24/1918 to 7/24/1927
San Antonio. Heraldo de Mexicano. 8 issues. 1/29/1928 to 9/8/1929
San Antonio. Imparcial de Texas. 45 issues. 9/19/1918 to 9/30/1920
San Antonio. Prensa. 4,781 issues. 10/1/1916 to 6/13/1957
San Antonio. Revista Mexicana. 158 issues. 5/28/1916 to 7/6/1919

Vermont
St. Albans. St. Albans Daily Messenger. 2 issues. 2/29/1916 to 7/5/1918

West Virginia
Montgomery. *Montgomery Herald. 4/1/2008 to Current
Oak Hill. *Fayette Tribune. 6/11/2008 to Current
Princeton. *Princeton Times. 4/17/2008 to Current

More Newspapers Added to GenealogyBank – covering 1775-2008

GenealogyBank today added 115 newspapers from 29 States – with coverage from 1775 to today.

Wow – GenealogyBank is growing at a rapid pace. That’s over 2 million more records and documents for genealogists. What a great day for genealogists.
Here’s a great obituary I found for Mrs. Catherine Reilly (1770-1874) – it has plenty of the genealogical facts we’re looking for.

It gives her date and place of birth: 4 May 1770 – in Cootehill, County Cavan, Ireland …. and the date and place of her death: 3 Oct 1874 in Media, PA.
States that she came to America in 1840 – through the Port of Philadelphia – where she lived “for many years”.
It tells us that she had “seven children and twenty-four grandchildren” and that her aunt “recently died in Ireland at the age of one hundred and eight”.
That’s terrific - but look closer. This obituary was first published in the Philadelphia Public Ledger and was reprinted in the San Francisco Evening Bulletin (23 Oct 1874). You might just find that the obituary you are looking for also appeared in a newspaper clear across the country.

TIP: Narrowing your search to the town where your ancestor lived – could cause you to miss the articles you need. Be flexible and search all of GenealogyBank for your ancestor AND also narrow your search to the specific city or state where they lived.
GenealogyBank has more than 3,700 newspapers – click here and search it now – see what you’ll find!

Here is a list of the content just added to GenealogyBank.

AK. Juneau. Daily Record-Miner. 875 issues. 1903-03-12 to 1911-05-06
AR. Helena. Western Clarion* 17 issues. 1865-04-01 to 1865-12-16
AR. Jonesboro. Jonesboro Evening Sun. 1554 issues. 1904-09-03 to 1921-09-29
AR. Little Rock. Arkansas Gazette. 135 issues. 1820-01-08 to 1889-03-22
CA. Colton. Chicano. 8 issues. 1968-04-21 to 1977-06-30
CA. Los Angeles. Eco de Mexico. 1 issue. 1924-10-29
CA. Los Angeles. Heraldo de Mexico. 44 issues. 1917-12-9 to 1928-12-28
CA. Los Angeles. Prensa. 143 issues. 1917-12-08 to 1937-01-01
CA. Los Angeles. Union. 6 issues. 1898-02-26 to 1898-09-10
CA. San Francisco. Voz del Nuevo Mundo* 1 issue. 1869-03-09
CO. Colorado Springs. Gazette-Telegraph. 4,051 issues. 1873-01-04 to 1922-12-31
CO. Cortez. Cortez Journal* 2008-01-05 to Current
CO. Trinidad. Anunciador. 8 issues. 1918-04-06 to 1922-11-18
CT. Danielsonville. Windham County Transcript. 3 issues. 1863-07-02 to 1890-02-12
CT. New London. New London Daily Chronicle. 166 issues. 1860-07-03 to 1864-12-31
CT. New London. New London Democrat. 107 issues. 1845-03-21 to 1852-12-25
CT. Norwich. Norwich Morning Bulletin. 7 issues. 1863-04-06 to1882-04-01
DC. Washington. Spirit of ‘Seventy-Six* 11 issues. 1808-09-20 to 1809-07-11
FL. Tampa. Internacional* 1 issue 1939-10-04
ID. Idaho City. Idaho Falls Times. 11 issues. 1891-11-26 to 1895-11-07
ID. Idaho City. Idaho Register. 281 issues. 1887-06-25 to 1916-04-18
ID. Twin Falls. Twin Falls News. 182 issues. 1918-04-22 to 1922-05-10
IL. Centralia. Centralia Sentinel. 114 issues. 1864-01-05 to 1876-03-02
IL. Chicago. Latin Times. 12 issues. 1958-02-01 to 1975-05-02
IL. Chicago. Vida Latina. 56 issues. 1952-02-21 to 1963-07-21
IL. Chicago. Vorbote* 1 issue. 1875-03-20
KY. Richmond. Richmond Register* 2008-07-15 to Current
LA. News Orleans. Times Picayune* 989 issues. 1837-01-25 to 1865-09-22
MA. Boston. Boston Courier* 198 issues. 1805-06-13 to 1809-05-04
MA. Dedham. Norfolk Democrat. 7 issues. 1839-02-09 to 1854-09-15
MA. New Bedford. New-Bedford Mercury. 2 issues. 1863-10-23 to 1877-03-16
MA. Springfield. Massachusetts Gazette* 95 issues. 1782-05-14 to 1784-07-20
MA. Springfield. Springfield Republican. 49 issues. 1877-01-01 to 1910-12-31
MA. Stoughton. Stoughton Sentinel. 222 issues. 1863-12-05 to 1876-12-23
MD. Baltimore. Baltimore American. 1826 issues. 1903-03-01 to 1922-12-31
MD. Baltimore. Dunlap’s Maryland Gazette* 84 issues. 1775-05-02 to 1779-01-05
MD. Bel-Air. National American* 4 issues. 1861-06-21 to 1865-09-29
MD. Fredericktown. Rights of Man* 14 issues. 1794-02-05 to 1800-11-05
ME. Augusta. Herald of Liberty* 85 issues. 1810-02-13 to 1815-09-02
MN. International Falls. Daily Journal* 2000-10-31 to Current
MO. Kansas City. Kansas City Times. 1392 issues. 1884-05-14 to 1896-01-31
MO. Lebanon. Lebanon Daily Record*. 2007-02-07 to Current
MS. Vicksburg. Daily Commercial. 272 issues. 1882-01-02 to 1882-12-23
NC. Raleigh. Semi-Weekly Standard. 15 issues. 1861-08-10 to 1868-03-08
NE. Nebraska City. Daily Nebraska Press. 1127 issues. 1868-09-22 to 1876-12-28
NH. Concord. Republican Gazette* 85 issues. 1801-02-05 to 1803-04-28
NH. Derry. Derry News* 2008-01-08 to Current
NH. Dover. Phoenix* 49 issues. 1792-02-08 to 1795-08-22
NM. Albuquerque. Evening Citizen. 1 issue. 1894-08-06
NM. Las Cruces. Dona Ana County Republican. 1 issue. 1902-02-15
NM. Las Cruces. Estrella. 1 issue. 1935-05-18
NM. Las Cruces. Las Cruces Democrat. 1 issue. 1899-11-29
NM. Las Vegas. Las Vegas Daily Gazette. 1 issue. 1886-01-31
NM. Mesilla. Mesilla News. 3 issues. 1879-02-08 to 1883-11-24
NM. Santa Fe. Daily New Mexican. 756 issues. 1872-04-02 to 1875-06-28
NM. Santa Fe. Gato. 3 issues. 1894-05-23 to 1894-08-24
NM. Santa Fe. New Mexican Review. 2 issues. 1885-03-30 to 1906-08-30
NM. Santa Fe. Santa Fe Weekly New Mexican & Livestock Journal. 11 issues. 1885-10-08 to 1895-12-26
NM. Springer. Estandarte de Springer. 190 issues. 1889-06-27 to 1893-06-15
NM. Springer. Sentinel. 1 issue. 1901-12-27
NY. Albany. Albany Evening Journal. 4813 issues. 1834-06-12 to 1873-07-23
NY. Auburn. Cayuga Tocsin. 1812-03-12 to 1814-06-08
NY. Ballston Spa. Saratoga Advertiser* 103 issues. 1804-11-12 to 1812-03-10
NY. Balston Spa. Saratoga Journal. 3 issues. 1814-02-01 to 1817-06-11
NY. Brooklyn. Espana Libre. 9 issues. 1939-11-03 to 1942-12-25
NY. Canandaiqua. Western Repository* 13 issues. 1804-01-24 to 1807-12-08
NY. Herkimer. Farmer’s Monitor* 37 issues. 1805-01-29 to 1807-05-19
NY. Lansingburgh. American Spy* 62 issues. 1791-06-17 to 1798-02-27
NY. New York. Ebenezer* 2 issues. 1945-03-01 to 1945-0601
NY. New York. Eco de Cuba. 2 issues. 1855-06-22 to 1856-02-01
NY. New York. Ecos de Nueva York* 8 issues. 1952-03-30 to 1954-09-26
NY. New York. Exito* 1 issue. 1954-01-21
NY. New York. Grafico. 55 issues. 1915-10-21 to 1917-08-21; 1928-11-11 to 1931-01-03
NY. New York. Mundo Latino* 1 issue. 1948-05-15
NY. New York. Nosotros* 1 issue. 1953-11-21
NY. New York. Papagayo. 2 issues. 1855-02-15 to 1855-04-16
NY. New York. Pasatiempo* 3 issues. 1951-03-21 to 1951-05-21
NY. New York. Patria* 1 issue. 1895-06-25
NY. New York. Pueblos Hispanos. 3 issues. 1944-03-26 to 1944-07-29
NY. New York. Puerto Rico y Nueva York* 1 issue. 1954-11-21
NY. New York. Republican Watch-Tower* 363 issues. 1800-03-19 to 1810-11-16
NY. New York. Royal American Gazette* 112 issues. 1777-04-10 to 1783-08-07
NY. Troy. Troy Gazette* 67 issues. 1802-09-15 to 1808-03-29
NY. Troy. Troy Post* 10 issues. 1812-09-29 to 1823-03-18
NY. Whitestown. Western Centinel* 57 issues. 1794-03-26 to 1797-04-19
NY. Whitestown. Whitestown Gazette* 20 issues. 1796-07-05 to 1803-02-21
OH. Steubenville. Western Herald* 11 issues. 1812-11-05 to 1822-05-11
OH. Wooster. Wooster Republican* 166 issues. 1862-05-29 to 1872-12-26
OR. Eugene. Oregon State Journal. 185 issues. 1868-01-04 to 1879-02-22
PA. Philadelphia. National Gazette* 139 issues. 1820-04-05 to 1841-04-08
RI. Pawtucket. Pawtucket Times. 16 issues. 1898-01-01 to 1921-02-23
TX. Beaumont. Beaumont Enterprise & Journal. 350 issues. 1906-03-28 to 1911-09-18
TX. Brazoria. Texas Republican. 1 issue. 1835-10-17
TX. Brownsville. Cronista del Valle. 1 issue. 1930-02-28
TX. Brownsville. Daily Metropolitan* 4 issues. 1893-10-23 to 1893-11-20
TX. Brownsville. Puerto. 1 issue. 1961-12-30
TX. Brownsville. Republican* 89 issues. 1862-09-25 to 1868-07-30
TX. Cleburne. Cleburne Morning Review. 37 issues. 1911-07-02 to 1916-05-31
TX. Corpus Christi. Verdad. 2 issues. 1950-05-02 to 1959-12-13
TX. Edinburg. Defensor. 1 issue. 1931-12-25
TX. El Paso. Atalaya Bautista: Semanario Evangelico Bautista. 7 issues. 1908-01-02 to 1930-12-21
TX. El Paso. Continental. 57 issues. 1934-12-12 to 1960-03-11
TX. Galveston. Galveston News. 246 issues. 1877-01-01 to 1883-12-27
TX. San Antonio. Epoca. 7 issues. 1918-03-03 to 1927-12-25
TX. San Antonio. Prensa. 2,560 issues. 1918-10-11 to 1999-12-15
UT. Salt Lake City. Salt Lake Telegram. 15 issues. 1902-02-22 to 1922-12-31
VA. Lexington. Rockbridge Repository* 9 issues. 1801-08-21 to 1805-08-06
VA. Lynchburg. Lynchburg Press* 23 issues. 1809-05-13 to 1818-04-24
VA. Petersburg. Petersburg Intelligencer* 158 issues. 1798-05-29 to 3/29/1914
VA. Richmond. Richmond Commercial Compiler* 302 issues. 1816-12-18 to 1820-04-20
VA. Richmond. Virginia Argus* 445 issues. 1799-07-23 to 1814-07-25
VA. Winchester. Winchester Gazette* 14 issues. 1798-06-27 to 1820-01-15
VT. Putney. Argus* 42 issues. 1797-03-16 to 1799-02-12
VT. St. Albans. St. Albans Daily Messenger. 1,548 issues. 1843-12-06 to 1922-01-31

Titles with the asterisk * are new on GenealogyBank

More Florida Resources Go Online – State Census & Newspapers

FamilySearchLabs has put the 1885, 1935 and 1945 Florida State census records online.

These state census records are not indexed – but can be easily searched online geographically.

The process is simple. Click on the year you want to search; then select the county where your ancestor’s lived. Then click through each page of the census as if you were looking at a roll of microfilm.

Click here to search the 1885 Florida State Census

Click here to search the 1935 Florida State Census

Click here to search the 1945 Florida State Census

GenealogyBank has also announced that it is adding:
Pensacola Gazette and West Florida Advertiser. Pensacola, FL. 1824 to 1856

GenealogyBank already has the following Florida newspapers online:
Banner. (Bonita Springs, FL). 1/27/1996-Current
Biscayne Boulevard Times (Miami, FL). 8/1/2005-Current
Boca Raton News (FL). 3/2/2006-Current
Bonita Daily News (FL). 5/23/2006-Current
Bradenton Herald (FL). 1/19/1991-Current
Charlotte Sun (Port Charlotte, FL). 8/3/1996-Current
Collier Citizen (FL). 7/6/2007-Current
Daily Commercial (Leesburg, FL). 12/1/2000-Current
Daytona Beach News-Journal (FL). 3/27/1996-Current
DeLand-Deltona Beacon (FL). 11/17/2000-Current
DeSoto Sun (Arcadia, FL). 4/14/1996-Current
Diario de Tampa (Ybor City, FL). 6/6/1908 – 7/14/1911
East County Observer (Sarasota, FL). 8/17/2006-Current
Ecos (Tampa, FL). 7/21/1959 – 7/21/1959
El Nuevo Herald (Miami, FL). 1/1/1983-Current
Englewood Sun (FL). 3/5/1996-Current
Florida Herald and Southern Democrat (St. Augustine, FL). 1/4/1823 – 9/13/1828
Variant titles: East Florida Herald
Florida Keys Keynoter (Marathon, FL). 11/6/2002-Current
Florida Times-Union (Jacksonville, FL). 1/12/1996-Current
Florida Today (Melbourne, FL). 1/1/1999-Current
Floridian & Advocate (Tallahassee, FL). 10/24/1831 – 4/2/1842
Floridian and Journal (Tallahassee, FL). 1/6/1849 – 12/22/1860
Variant titles: Floridian; Floridian and Advocate; Weekly Floridian
Fort Pierce News (FL). 5/2/1997-6/16/2000
Fort Pierce Tribune (FL). 8/13/2002-Current
Jupiter Courier (FL). 9/3/2000-Current
Key West Citizen (FL). 10/31/1999-Current
Longboat Observer (Longboat Key, FL). 11/2/2006-Current
Manatee River Journal (Manatee, FL). 9/5/1889 – 12/31/1922
Variant titles: Manatee River Journal and Bradenton Herald; Manatee River Journal-Herald
Marco Island Eagle
(FL). 6/7/2006-Current
Miami Herald Record (Miami, FL). 1/1/1911 – 12/31/1922
Miami Herald (FL). 1/1/1983-Current
Naples Daily News (FL). 1/3/1998-Current
News-Press (Fort Myers, FL). 5/2/1999-Current
News-Sun (Sebring, FL). 4/14/2005-Current
North Port Sun (FL). 5/3/1996-Current
Ocala Star-Banner (FL). 1/1/1991-Current
Orlando Sentinel (FL). 4/1/1985-Current
Orlando Weekly (FL). 1/5/2006-Current
Palm Beach Daily News (FL). 1/2/2000-Current
Palm Beach Post (FL). 1/1/1989-Current
Pensacola News Journal (FL). 1/1/1999-Current
Reporter (Tavernier, FL). 2/27/2004-Current
Sarasota Herald-Tribune (FL). 1/1/1996-Current
Sebastian Sun (FL). 3/19/1999-Current
South Florida Sun-Sentinel (Ft. Lauderdale, FL). 1/1/1986-Current
South Lake Press (Clermont, FL). 7/13/2005-Current
St. Augustine Record (FL). 9/25/2006-Current
St. Petersburg Times (FL). 1/1/1987-Current
Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News (FL). 9/2/2000-Current
Tallahassee Democrat (FL). 1/1/1994-Current
Tampa Tribune (FL). 8/13/1990-Current
Venice Gondolier Sun (FL). 7/1/1996-Current
Vero Beach Press Journal (FL). 12/2/1997-Current

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Allen County Library (IN) receives $10 Million Gift

The Genealogy Center of the Allen County Library (Ft. Wyane, IN) has received a $10 million gift from the Edward D. and Ione Auer Foundation. The funds will be given to the library as $1 million payments each year over 10 years. The announcement is in the Ft Wayne News Sentinnel 1 August 2008

This landmark library has been active in genealogy for decades.

The Center will host a Military Records Symposium
Friday & Saturday, September 26 & 27, 2008

Speaker: Marie Varrelman Melchiori, CG, CGL

Friday, September 26, 20083:00 PM “Using Records at the National Archives: A Researcher’s View”
This session will cover National Archive records, some that have been microfilmed or digitized, from a researcher’s point of view. The session will explain how and why the records are arranged the way they are. Ms. Melchiori will also discuss “archijive,” the short-cut phrases used by archivists that genealogists need to know in order to understand what they are being told.

6:30 PM Dinner, speaker Curt Witcher, Genealogy Center Manger, “Our Military Heritage Website: Record, Recall, & Revere”

Saturday, September 27, 2008
9:30 AM “If Grandpa Wore Blue: Union Records in the National Archives”This session will be a look at commonly used records as well as some of the lesserused records for researching an ancestor who was a Union soldier. Some of the records covered will include correspondence, carded medical files, and the investigative records of Baker and Turner.

11:00 AM “If Grandpa Wore Gray: Confederate Records in the National Archives”
This session will be a look at Confederate records, both microfilmed and original, at the National Archives. Records created by the Union Army may help locate information on your Southern soldier as well as male and female civilians.

1 – 6 PM: Individual consultationsGenealogy Center staff and other researchers will be available to assist one with specific research challenges, and recommend sources and methodologies to find more records and data.

Click here to register for this important conference.

GenealogyBank adds 63 newspapers from 21 States

GenealogyBank announced today that added 63 historical newspapers from 21 States – including 33 more Spanish language newspapers.

With well over 3,500 newspapers on GenealogyBank it has never been easier to find birth records, wedding announcements, obituaries and the biographical details of more than 1 billion of our ancestors and cousins.

These titles are live on GenealogyBank right now. Give it a try.

Arkansas
Jonesboro, AR: Jonesboro Evening Sun. 10/8/1904 to 12/27/1916

Arizona
Tucson, AZ: Tucsonense. 3/17/1915 to 11/1/1931

California
Berkeley, CA: Grito. 9/1/1967
Colton, CA: Chicano. 4/21/1968
Los Angeles. CA: Heraldo de Mexico. 12/9/1917 to 12/28/1928

Colorado
Colorado Springs, CO: Gazette-Telegraph. 1/1/1903 to 12/31/1908
San Luis, CO: Adobe 3/1/1974


Connecticut
New London, CT: New London Democrat. 1845-04-26 to 1851-01-25

Georgia
Savannah, GA: Savannah Tribune. 1/6/1912 to 12/28/1912

Idaho
Idaho City, ID: Idaho Falls Times. 1891-07-09 to 9/16/1920
Idaho City, ID: Idaho Register. 2/17/1908 to 8/7/1908
Twin Falls, ID: Twin Falls News. 4/22/1921


Illinois
Chicago, IL: Latin Times. 2/1/1958 to 5/2/1975
Chicago, IL: Vida Latina. 10/21/1954 to 12/21/1959

Louisiana
New Orleans, LA: Abeja. 1829-01-03

Massachusetts
Boston, MA: Boston Evening Transcript. 1850-03-01 to 1850-12-31
Nantucket, MA: Nantucket Inquirer. 1821-09-20 to 1830-04-24
Springfield, MA: Springfield Republican. 1886-01-01 to 1891-12-31

Missouri
Kansas City, MO: Kansas City Times. 1884-05-14 to 1896-01-31

Nebraska
Nebraska City, NE: Daily Nebraska Press. 1870-05-27

New Mexico
Las Cruces, NM: Dona Ana County Republican. 1897-03-11 to 2/15/1902
Las Cruces, NM: Labrador. 1896-09-08
Las Cruces, NM: Las Cruces Democrat. 1892-02-03 to 1899-11-29
Las Cruces, NM: Mesilla Valley Bulletin. 4/30/1937
Las Cruces, NM: Newmans Semi-Weekly. 1881-04-13
Las Cruces, NM: Thirty-Four. 1879-04-16 to 1880-11-03
Las Vegas, NM: Las Vegas Daily Gazette. 1880-07-27 to 1886-01-31
Las Vegas, NM: Misionero Bautista: Organo Oficial de la Convencion Bautista Hispano-Americana de Nuevo Mexico. 7/1/1948
Mesilla, NM: Mesilla News. 1879-02-08 to 1883-11-24
Santa Fe, NM: Daily New Mexican. 1872-04-02 to 1875-06-28
Santa Fe, NM: Santa Fe Weekly New Mexican and Livestock Journal. 1885-10-08bto
1895-12-26
Silver City, NM: Silver City Independent. 1897-08-03
Springer, NM: Colfax County Stockman. 1893-07-08
Springer, NM: Sentinel. 2/15/1901 to 12/27/1901

New York
Albany, NY: Albany Evening Journal. 1834-06-12 to 1849-03-22
Cazenovia, NY: Pilot. 1808-08-10 to 1821-09-06
Cazenovia, NY: Union Herald. 1838-05-11 to 1840-04-11
New York, NY: Grafico. 11/11/1928 to 1/3/1931
New York, NY: Jewish Daily News. 1/2/1916 to 12/31/1922
New York, NY: True Sun. 1847-05-24 to 1848-02-25
Oxford, NY: Times. 1838-10-10 to 1839-12-25
Schoharie, NY: Schoharie Observer. 1818-11-25 to 1823-05-07
Troy, NY: Times. 1885-07-09 to 1886-06-24

Ohio
Chillicothe, OH: Supporter. 1809-01-05 to 1818-01-20
Dayton, OH: Democratic Herald. 1835-05-07 to 1837-08-12
Xenia, OH: Greene County Torch-Light. 1841-07-01 to 1842-01-20

Rhode Island
Pawtucket, RI: Pawtucket Times. 1/1/1920 to 2/28/1921

Tennessee
Nashville, TN: Tennessee Gazette. 1800-02-25 to 1807-05-30

Texas
Austin, TX: Texas Gazette. 1829-09-25 to 1832-02-18
Beaumont, TX: Beaumont Enterprise & Journal. 3/28/1906 to 9/30/1911
Brazoria, TX: Texas Republican. 1834-07-05 to 1835-10-17
Brownsville, TX: Heraldo de Brownsville. 1/12/1936 to 2/29/1940
Cleburne, TX: Cleburne Morning Review. 7/4/1911 to 5/30/1916
El Paso, TX: Atalaya Bautista: Semanario Evangelico Bautista. 1/2/1908
El Paso, TX: Continental. 12/12/1934 to 3/11/1960
El Paso, TX: Evening Tribune. 1889-04-03
Kingsville, TX: Eco. 4/1/1931
Kingsville, TX: Tex. Mex. Reflector. 1/21/1921
San Antonio, TX: Pan American Labor Express. 9/4/1918 to 12/4/1918
San Antonio, TX: Prensa. 10/11/1918 to 2/19/1935

Utah
Salt Lake City, UT: Salt Lake Telegram. 2/3/1902

Virginia
Winchester, VA: Winchester Virginian. 1828-04-18 to 1836-09-06

Vermont
St. Albans, VT: St. Albans Daily Messenger. 1853-01-13 to 12/31/1922

GenealogyBank adding newspapers from 22 States

In a major release GenealogyBank today announced that it is adding 67 historical newspapers from 22 States – including 32 more Spanish language newspapers.

With well over 3,500 newspapers on GenealogyBank it has never been easier to find birth records, wedding announcements, obituaries and the biographical details of more than 1 billion of our ancestors and cousins.

Photo courtesy: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, DC – LC-USW3-F104-009104-E [P&P].
Alaska
AK. Juneau. Daily Record-Miner. 1903 to 1911

Arkansas
AR. Helena. Western Clarion. 1864 to 1865
AR. Jonesboro. Jonesboro Evening Sun. 1905 to 1916
AR. Heber Springs. Jacksonian. 1890 to 1904

California
CA. Sacramento. Prensa Libre. 1969 to 1970

Connecticut
CT. Danielsonville. Windham County Transcript. 1863 to 1890
CT. New London. New London Daily Chronicle. 1849 to 1861
CT. New London. New London Democrat. 1846 to 1873
CT. Norwich. Norwich Morning Bulletin. 1860 to 1887

Florida
FL. Tampa. Revista de Cuba Libre. 1897 to 1898

Georgia
GA. Savannah. Georgia Republican & State Intelligencer. 1803 to 1807

Idaho
ID. Twin Falls. Twin Falls Daily News. 1918 to 1922

Illinois
IL. Chicago. Sol de Chicago. 1960
IL. Centralia Marion Co. Centralia Sentinel. 1863 to 1867
IL. Chicago. Vorbote. 1974 to 1876

Kansas
KS. Topeka. Colored Citizen. 1978 to 1904

Massachusetts
MA. Stoughton. Stoughton Sentinel. 1863 to 1874

Maryland
MD. Bel-Air. National American. 1861 to 1865
MD. Chestertown. Chestertown Transcript. 1866 to 1876
MD. Fredrick. Republican Gazette & General Advertiser. 1822 to

Minnesota
MN. St. Paul. Daily Minnesota Pioneer. 1854 to 1855
MN. St. Paul. Saint Paul Daily Press. 1868 to 1872

Missouri
MO. Kansas City.
Kansas City Times. 1884 to 1895

Mississippi
MS. Vicksburg. Daily Commercial. 1877 to 1882

Nebraska
NE. Nebraska City. Daily Nebraska Press. 1868 to 1876
North Carolina
NC. Raleigh. Semi-Weekly Standard. 1861 to 1863

New York
NY. Bronx. Republicas Hispanas Unidas. 1943
NY. Bronx. Vida Hispana. 1953 to 1954
NY. Brooklyn. Curioso. 1934 to 1935
NY. Cazenovia. Union Herald. 1838 to 1840
NY. New York. Ahora. 1950
NY. New York. Alba de Nueva York. 1954
NY. New York. America Continental. 1956
NY. New York. Americana. 1947 to 1948
NY. New York. Artistas Hispanos. 1948
NY. New York. Ateneo. 1934
NY. New York. Cascabeles. 1934
NY. New York. Crisol. 1949
NY. New York. Cronica. 1950 to 1950
NY. New York. Eco Antillano. 1941 to 1942
NY. New York. Guaimaro. 1895 to 1896
NY. New York. Kan-de-la. 1949
NY. New York. Liberacion. 1946 to 1959
NY. New York. Machete Criollo. 1927
NY. New York. New Yorker Volkszeitung. 1886 to 1898
NY. New York. Nueva Republica. 1897 to 1898
NY. New York. Nueva Voz. 1962 to 1965
NY. New York. Nueva York al Dia. 1945
NY. New York. Pueblos Hispanos. 1953 to 1944
NY. New York. Puerto Rico en Marcha. 1951 to 1969
NY. New York. Semanario. 1955
NY. New York. Seminario Hispano. 1946
NY. New York. Soberania. 1958
NY. New York. Voz. 1960 to 1962

Ohio
OH. Cincinnati. Cincinnati Weekly Herald and the Philantropist. 1936 to 1840
OH. Ravenna. Portage County Democrat. 1854 to 1855
OH. Wooster. Wooster Republican. 1862 to 1863
OH. Xenia. Greene County Journal. 1863 to 1864
OH. Cincinnati. Cincinnati Volksfreund. 1863 to 1864
OK. Miami. Miami Record-Herald. 1899 to 1903

Pennsylvania
PA. Philadelphia. Sunday Mercury. 1864 to 1865

Texas
TX. Cleburne. Cleburne Morning Review. 1911 to 1916
TX. Galveston. Galveston News. 1877 to 1893
TX. Kingsville. Accion. 1931 to 1932
TX. San Antonio. Revista Mexicana. 1916 to 1920
TX. Taft. Pan Americana News. 1942 to 1956

Utah
UT. Salt Lake City. Inter-Mountain Advocate. 1894 to 1897