South Carolina Archives: 103 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

South Carolina, the 40th largest and 24th most populous of the United States, has a long history of independence. South Carolina was the first of the 13 British North American colonies to declare its independence from the British Crown (a prelude to the American Revolutionary War), the first state to ratify the Articles of Confederation, and the first state to secede from the Union (a prelude to the American Civil War).

photo of a historic home in “The Battery,” a neighborhood/park area in the downtown historic district of Charleston, South Carolina

Photo: a historic home in “The Battery,” a neighborhood/park area in the downtown historic district of Charleston, South Carolina. Credit: Evan Schmidt; Wikimedia Commons.

If you are researching your ancestry from South Carolina, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online SC newspaper archives: 103 titles to help you search your family history in “The Palmetto State,” providing coverage from 1735 to Today. There are more than 17 million articles and records in our online South Carolina archives!

Dig deep into our archives and search for historical and recent obituaries and other news articles about your South Carolina ancestors in these SC newspapers online. Our South Carolina newspapers are divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries (obituaries only).

Search South Carolina Newspaper Archives (1735 – 1970)

Search South Carolina Recent Obituaries (1987 – Current)

illustration of the state flag of South Carolina

Illustration: state flag of South Carolina. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Here is a list of online South Carolina newspapers in the archives. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more. The SC newspaper titles are listed alphabetically by city.

City Title Date Range* Collection
Aiken Aiken Standard 8/27/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Anderson Anderson Independent-Mail 1/15/1998 – Current Recent Obituaries
Beaufort Free South 1/10/1863 – 4/16/1864 Newspaper Archives
Beaufort Beaufort Today 1/25/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Beaufort Beaufort Gazette 1/10/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Belton Belton & Honea Path News-Chronicle 3/28/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bluffton Bluffton Today 7/1/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Camden Camden Gazette 4/4/1816 – 2/7/1822 Newspaper Archives
Camden Southern Chronicle 3/14/1822 – 8/13/1825 Newspaper Archives
Camden Camden Journal 4/4/1840 – 4/27/1842 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Charleston News and Courier 4/7/1873 – 12/31/1970 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Evening Post 10/1/1894 – 12/31/1923 Newspaper Archives
Charleston City Gazette 11/6/1787 – 4/13/1833 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Charleston Courier 1/10/1803 – 4/25/1872 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Southern Patriot 1/29/1831 – 12/30/1848 Newspaper Archives
Charleston South-Carolina State-Gazette 1/1/1794 – 9/20/1802 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Charleston Mercury 6/4/1831 – 11/14/1868 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Carolina Gazette 1/2/1800 – 12/31/1828 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Columbian Herald 11/23/1784 – 12/17/1796 Newspaper Archives
Charleston State Gazette of South-Carolina 3/28/1785 – 12/31/1793 Newspaper Archives
Charleston South-Carolina Gazette and General Advertiser 3/15/1783 – 7/26/1785 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Charleston Morning Post 1/18/1786 – 10/17/1787 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Charleston Evening Gazette 7/11/1785 – 10/18/1786 Newspaper Archives
Charleston South-Carolina Weekly Gazette 2/15/1783 – 1/14/1786 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Investigator 8/22/1812 – 2/9/1814 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Carolina Weekly Messenger 8/11/1807 – 11/7/1809 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Charleston Daily News 1/1/1873 – 4/5/1873 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Times 10/8/1800 – 5/25/1820 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Southern Evangelical Intelligencer 3/27/1819 – 12/29/1821 Newspaper Archives
Charleston South-Carolina Gazette 1/11/1735 – 12/29/1737 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Strength of the People 6/24/1809 – 9/6/1810 Newspaper Archives
Charleston South-Carolina and American General Gazette 3/11/1768 – 10/1/1778 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Oracle 1/1/1807 – 12/8/1807 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Evening Courier 7/31/1798 – 11/16/1798 Newspaper Archives
Charleston States Rights and Free Trade Evening Post 10/31/1831 – 2/9/1832 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Charleston Spectator 8/9/1806 – 12/5/1806 Newspaper Archives
Charleston South Carolina Leader 10/7/1865 – 5/12/1866 Newspaper Archives
Charleston South-Carolina Weekly Advertiser 2/19/1783 – 4/23/1783 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Daily Evening Gazette: and Charleston Tea-Table Companion 1/10/1795 – 2/18/1795 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Echo du Sud, Moniteur Francais 6/22/1801 – 7/15/1801 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Royal South Carolina Gazette 6/8/1780 – 7/16/1782 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Telegraphe: and Charleston Daily Advertiser 3/16/1795 – 3/20/1795 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Free Press 4/5/1868 – 4/11/1868 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Royal Gazette 2/9/1782 – 2/9/1782 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Afro-American Citizen 1/17/1900 – 1/17/1900 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Missionary Record 7/5/1873 – 7/5/1873 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Chronicle of Liberty, or the Republican Intelligencer 3/25/1783 – 3/25/1783 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Post and Courier 12/6/1994 – Current Recent Obituaries
Cheraw Cheraw Chronicle 8/23/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Chester Chester News & Reporter 11/24/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Clemson Tiger 4/14/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Columbia State 2/18/1891 – 12/31/1922 Newspaper Archives
Columbia South Carolina State Gazette 8/30/1799 – 6/20/1829 Newspaper Archives
Columbia Telescope 12/19/1815 – 7/8/1817 Newspaper Archives
Columbia Southern Indicator 2/12/1921 – 2/3/1923 Newspaper Archives
Columbia South Carolina Gazette 7/10/1792 – 9/3/1793 Newspaper Archives
Columbia Columbia Gazette 1/14/1794 – 12/9/1794 Newspaper Archives
Columbia Lighthouse and Informer 1/21/1950 – 1/21/1950 Newspaper Archives
Columbia People’s Recorder 1/13/1900 – 1/27/1900 Newspaper Archives
Columbia Carolina Panorama 1/7/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Columbia State 12/15/1987 – Current Recent Obituaries
Columbia Columbia Star 10/8/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Conway Horry Independent 4/5/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Easley Powdersville Post 4/30/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Easley Easley Progress 3/4/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Edgefield Anti-Monarchist, and South-Carolina Advertiser 9/9/1811 – 11/2/1811 Newspaper Archives
Edgefield Edgefield Advertiser 2/27/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Florence Morning News 11/1/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fort Mill Fort Mill Times 8/11/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Gaffney Gaffney Ledger 10/29/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Georgetown Winyaw Intelligencer 11/15/1817 – 6/27/1833 Newspaper Archives
Georgetown Georgetown Gazette 5/8/1798 – 10/13/1826 Newspaper Archives
Georgetown South-Carolina Independent Gazette 5/21/1791 – 9/15/1792 Newspaper Archives
Georgetown Georgetown Planet 5/31/1873 – 5/31/1873 Newspaper Archives
Georgetown Georgetown Times 8/8/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Greenwood Index-Journal 7/1/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Greer Greer Citizen 11/24/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hardeeville Hardeeville Today 3/19/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hartsville Messenger 4/20/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hemingway Weekly Observer 11/1/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hilton Head Island Packet 10/16/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lake City News & Post 11/5/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lake Wylie Lake Wylie Pilot 7/21/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lancaster Lancaster News 11/29/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lancaster Carolina Gateway 2/16/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Mullins Marion Star & Mullins Enterprise 11/2/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Murrells Inlet Waccamaw Times 5/30/2014 – Current Recent Obituaries
Myrtle Beach Sun News 5/1/1996 – Current Recent Obituaries
Newberry Newberry Observer 1/2/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Orangeburg Times and Democrat 5/30/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Pageland Pageland Progressive-Journal 1/18/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Pawleys Island Coastal Observer 11/11/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Pendleton Miller’s Weekly Messenger 3/20/1807 – 4/2/1841 Newspaper Archives
Pickens Pickens Sentinel 8/13/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Rock Hill Herald 5/1/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Seneca Journal 12/22/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Spartanburg Herald-Journal 1/4/1997 – Current Recent Obituaries
St. George Eagle-Record 12/25/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Union Union Daily Times 1/2/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Walterboro Dispatch 2/14/2007 – 11/10/2010 Recent Obituaries
Williamston Journal 10/31/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Winnsboro Herald Independent 4/25/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
York Enquirer-Herald 8/12/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries

*Date Ranges may have selected coverage unavailable.

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The ‘Confederate Column’ – a Times-Picayune Newspaper Feature

In 1902 the Times-Picayune newspaper ran this large ad on the front page of their 28 February issue.

ad seeking readers' stories for the "Confederate Column," Times-Picayune newspaper advertisement 28 February 1902

Times-Picayune (New Orleans, Louisiana), 28 February 1902, page 1

This was the start of a regular feature – the “Confederate Column” – designed:

to tell of men whose acts of individual heroism do not figure in battle reports…[and] to set in strong light the genius and courage, and other virtues of the Confederate officers and soldiers.

The ad concluded:

Confederate soldiers everywhere are invited to assist in this work. Personal recollections, conspicuous battle incidents, stories of the campfire, and, in short, everything which may serve to illustrate the life, and do justice to the achievements of that great soldiery, will be welcomed.

The Times-Picayune’s Confederate Column regularly featured Civil War stories like this one about the Battle of Fort Stedman, when Confederate Major General John Brown Gordon (1832-1904) attacked the Union fort on 25 March 1865 in a desperate attempt to break the Siege of Petersburg.

montage of "Confederate Columns" from the Times-Picayune newspaper

Times-Picayune (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Led by Gordon, the Confederate attack was initially successful.

photo of Confederate Major General John B. Gordon

Photo: Confederate Major General John B. Gordon. Source: Wikipedia.

But then Union troops pushed the Confederate attackers back and recaptured Fort Stedman.

photo of the Union Fort Stedman, taken 31 December 1865

Photo: Fort Stedman, taken 31 December 1865, by Timothy H. O’Sullivan (ca. 1840-1882). Source: The Library of Congress/American Memory (Digital ID: cwpb 02853 Source: digital file from original neg.)

Genealogists researching their Southern roots will want to check out this series that appeared in the Times-Picayune over 100 years ago.

Related Civil War Articles:

Civil War’s Last Rebel Town Finally Rejoined the Union—in 1946!

Part of the fun of doing family history research in old newspapers is the occasional strange, unusual—and even startling—story you run across. Such certainly is the case with the tiny New York town called Town Line, which joined the Rebel Cause and seceded from the Union in 1861—and did not come back to the United States until 1946, 81 years after the American Civil War ended!

a photo of the Confederate battle flag of the Army of Northern Virginia

Photo: Confederate battle flag of the Army of Northern Virginia. A flag similar to this was flown above the blacksmith shop in Town Line, NY, during the 1946 vote on whether the town would rejoin the Union. Credit: Wikipedia.

There have been thousands of books and movies produced about the Civil War, hundreds of thousands of eager visitors flock to Civil War battlefields every year, and the nation is in the midst of commemorating the sesquicentennial of this great and tragic conflict that caused more than a million casualties.

A Northern Town Joined the Rebel Cause?!

With all this interest and knowledge, however, few people know this Civil War story: the last Rebel town to rejoin the Union after the Civil War was not south of the Mason-Dixon Line, but was in the Union state of New York.

That Northern town was a tiny hamlet called Town Line, in upstate New York near Buffalo. For reasons no one seems to know anymore, the hamlet’s eligible voters (all 125 of them) met in 1861 and, after an intense debate, voted 85 to 40 to secede from the Union! Apparently the hamlet even sent five men to fight in the Confederate army in Virginia. But as the war dragged on the secessionist fever cooled, and the locals appear to have politely decided to quietly forget about their defiant stance.

However: they never officially rejoined the United States, until the patriotic fever following victory in WWII moved the residents of Town Line to rethink this matter of secession. Their surprising story is explained in this 1945 Oregon newspaper article.

article about the secession of Town Line, NY, from the Union in 1861, Oregonian newspaper article 9 September 1945

Oregonian (Portland, Oregon), 9 September 1945, page 103

This historical news article’s coverage of Town Line concludes this way:

“In the years that have come between, Town Line has not officially changed its decision. Technically, by choice of its voters in 1861, it is still not a part of the United States. But the folks that live there now feel that it is time for something to be done about it. ‘If our former allies in Mississippi and Georgia feel that the Civil War is over, so do we,’ said a prominent citizen of Town Line the other day.”

A Town Barbecue Brings about Change

Someone from the town sent President Harry Truman a letter about the situation, and he cheerfully wrote back:

“Why don’t you run down the fattest calf in Erie County, barbeque it and serve it with fixin’s in the old blacksmith shop where the ruckus started? Who can tell? The dissidents might decide to resume citizenship.”

Well, they did just that, holding the barbeque in October of 1945—during which they agreed to hold a vote soon on the great matter at hand. Finally, January 1946 was chosen for the vote.

Town Line, NY Rejoins the Union

On 24 January 1946, by a vote of 90 to 23, the last Rebel town of the Civil War officially rejoined the Union.

New York Town [Town Line, NY] Rejoins Union, Greensboro Daily News newspaper article 25 January 1946

Greensboro Daily News (Greensboro, North Carolina), 25 January 1946, page 7

The Union was whole at last!

Are you researching your Civil War ancestry? Read more interesting blog articles about the Civil War and follow our Civil War Genealogy Pinterest board.

Abraham Lincoln: The Life of a Legend Infographic

Click the image for the even bigger full-size version of the Lincoln Infographic
Abraham Lincoln Family Tree Genealogy Infographic


Abraham Lincoln was born February 12, 1809, at Sinking Springs farm in Hodgenville, KY, inside a log cabin.



Abraham Lincoln’s father was Thomas Lincoln. He was born January 6, 1778, and died January 17, 1851. He was a carpenter, farmer and manual laborer of meager means.

Abe’s mother was Nancy (Hanks) Lincoln. She was born February 5, 1784, and died October 5, 1818. Lincoln was 9 years old when his mother died due to an illness.


Lincoln had an older sister and a younger brother. His sister Sarah (Lincoln) Grigsby was born February 10, 1807. She married Aaron Grigsby on August 2, 1826. She was 20 years old when she died January 20, 1828, during childbirth. The two were very close, sharing a deep affection for each another. A friend and brother-in-law to Abe, Nathaniel Grigsby, stated the following about his sister-in-law Sarah:

“She could, like her brother, meet and greet a person with the kindest greeting in the world, make you easy at the touch of a word, an intellectual and intelligent woman.”

Abe’s brother Thomas Lincoln Jr. was born in 1812 and only lived three days before he died.


Thomas Lincoln remarried on December 2, 1819 to Sarah Bush. She was born December 13, 1788, and died April 12, 1869. Her previous husband, Daniel Johnston, died a couple of years before Nancy (Hanks) Lincoln’s death.

After marrying Thomas, Sarah took care of his children Sarah and Abe. It is said that she was a good mother and treated Sarah and Abe as her own children. She and Abe were reportedly close.

Sarah also brought along three children from her previous marriage to Daniel, and they became Abe’s new stepsiblings: Elizabeth Johnston (13 years old), Matilda Johnston (10), and John Johnston (9). Since Abe and John were close in age they became playmates.


At the age of 33 Abe married Mary Todd, a bright belle from a wealthy family, on November 4, 1842. It was the first and only marriage for both Mary and Abe. The couple remained married 22 years until Lincoln’s death.


The couple had four sons. The first son was Robert Todd Lincoln. He was born August 1, 1843, and died July 26, 1926, at the ripe old age of 82. He was an American lawyer and served as Secretary of the War Department.

Their second son, Edward Baker Lincoln, was born March 10, 1846, and died February 1, 1850, at the age of 3. A week after Eddie’s death, Mary and Abraham wrote a poem (though authorship is sometimes questioned) entitled “Little Eddie.” It was printed in the Illinois State Journal newspaper.

Their third child, William Wallace Lincoln, was born December 21, 1850. He died February 20, 1862, at the age of 11 due to illness. Abe was deeply affected by his death and did not return to work for three weeks.

Thomas Lincoln was Abe and Mary’s youngest son. He was born April 4, 1853, and died July 15, 1871, at the age of 18. He was nicknamed “Tad” by Abe who found Thomas “as wriggly as a tadpole” when he was a baby.


Kentucky 1809-1816

From 1809-1816 Lincoln lived in Kentucky on two farms. He first resided on Sinking Spring farm where he was born, and later moved a few miles away to Knob Creek.

Indiana 1816-1830

Because of disputed titles to Thomas Lincoln’s Kentucky land, the Lincolns headed north to settle in the wilderness of southern Indiana in December of 1816. Lincoln was 7 upon his arrival in Indiana and would remain there until 1830, well into his early adulthood.

Illinois 1831-1861

In 1831 the Lincolns headed west by ox-cart teams to Illinois. This would be Lincoln’s home for the next 30 years, until 1861. However, he did take an extended leave from 1847-1849, renting out his home in Springfield, IL, while staying in Washington, D.C., to serve his term in Congress.

Washington, D.C. 1847-1849, 1861-1865

In February of 1861, after Lincoln was elected president, he and his family moved into the White House in Washington, D.C.


Abraham Lincoln was a man of many jobs. As a young man he ferried people and cargo down rivers on flatboats and steamboats. Later Abe worked as a clerk in general stores, and operated two stores he co-owned with William Franklin Berry. He was also employed as a postmaster and worked many odd jobs, including chopping wood, splitting rails, surveying, and mill working. In 1837 he began his law practice, which he continued for over 20 years.

Political Career

His career in politics began in 1834 when he was elected to the Illinois state legislature. After his initial term he was elected again in 1836, 1838, and 1840. In 1846 he was elected to the U.S. Congress as a Whig and served one term, from 1847 to 1849. On November 6th, 1860, Lincoln was elected as the 16th United States president as a Republican.



Lincoln had a soft spot for animals of all types, especially cats. When his wife Mary was asked if Abe had a hobby, she replied: “cats.” The Lincolns’ pets included a dog, cats, rabbits and two goats.


Lincoln loved to make people laugh and he was an excellent storyteller. Anyone who met him commented on his steady supply of anecdotes and jokes. His ability to charm and disarm was a key ingredient to his success in politics.


Lincoln had very limited formal education but he was self-taught and a voracious reader. He was known to walk for miles to borrow books from neighbors. Lincoln’s favorite reads as a boy included Life and Memorable Actions of George Washington, Robinson Crusoe, Pilgrim’s Progress, and Aesop’s Fables.

“The things I want to know are in books; my best friend is the man who’ll get me a book I ain’t read.”  —Abraham Lincoln


Abraham Lincoln is the only U.S. president to hold a patent for an invention. It is filed as No. 6,469. He invented a floatation system to lift riverboats that were stuck on sandbars.

Presidential Timeline

The dates below mark some of the most notable milestones during Lincoln’s presidency.

April 12, 1861: Civil War Begins

After the first Confederate shots were fired on Union forces at Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina, Lincoln declared war on the rebellious states. The bloody conflict between the North and the South lasted until June 2, 1865.

January 1, 1863: Emancipation Proclamation

The Emancipation Proclamation marked an important turning point in the Civil War, transforming the Union’s goal from one of preserving the nation’s unity into a fight for human freedom. The proclamation declared that as of January 1, 1863, all slaves in the rebellious states “shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free.”

November 19, 1863: Gettysburg Address Delivered

On November 19, 1863, just four months after the Union victory at the Battle of Gettysburg, Lincoln delivered his famous Gettysburg Address speech at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Newspapers throughout the country carried accounts of the Gettysburg Address and it was widely praised in the North. The speech remains one of the most famous and oft-recited in American history.

November 8, 1864: Re-elected as President

On November 8, 1864, Lincoln won the presidential election by over 400,000 popular votes. He was the first U.S. president to be re-elected since Andrew Jackson in 1832.

April 14, 1865: Assassinated at Ford’s Theatre

Lincoln was assassinated at Ford’s Theatre on April 14, 1865. He was shot in the back of the head while watching the popular comedy Our American Cousin. The assassin was well-known stage actor John Wilkes Booth. Lincoln was the first U.S. president to be assassinated.


Lincoln died at the age of 56 on April 15, 1865, in the Peterson House at 453 10th Street, NW, Washington, D.C., from Booth’s gunshot to the back of his head.

There is so much more to the story of Abraham Lincoln’s legendary life. Discover the details of Lincoln’s life in over 1 billion historical records at


Image Credits

BerryLincolnStore.jpg by Amos Oliver Doyle / CC BY-SA 3.0

Abraham Lincoln’s U.S. Patent.jpg by David and Jessie / CC BY 2.0

Gettysburg Address, Library of Congress, Manuscript Division #cw0127p1

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Firsthand Stories of the Civil War’s 1864 Battle of Nashville

This decisive battle of the Civil War was fought in and around Nashville, Tennessee, 148 years ago, on 15-16 December 1864. Union General George H. Thomas, the “Rock of Chickamauga,” commanded the Federal troops who soundly defeated the Confederate army under the command of General John Bell Hood.

The Battle of Nashville was the last major clash in the Western Theater of the Civil War. After suffering more than 6,000 casualties the Confederate Army of Tennessee was badly weakened, no longer strong enough to threaten the much-larger Union forces in the area.

photo of the Battle of Nashville, 16 December 1864. Credit: Library of Congress.

Battle of Nashville, 16 December 1864. Credit: Library of Congress.

GenealogyBank gives you the news as your ancestors lived it, providing more context to your family story than is available from other genealogy sources. Newspaper coverage of the Civil War was extensive and vivid, with many reporters giving first-hand accounts of battles they witnessed from up close. Newspapers also published actual Civil War battle reports from the officers, and letters from the soldiers in addition to their own personal war stories.

For example, here are three first-hand accounts of the Battle of Nashville directly from the battle field.

This historical newspaper article featured General Thomas’s official report of the battle.

Battle at Nashville, Washington Reporter newspaper article 21 December 1864

Washington Reporter (Washington, Pennsylvania), 21 December 1864, page 2

“I attacked the enemy’s left this morning, the 15th, and drove it from the river below the city, very near to the Franklin pike, a distance of about eight miles. I have captured Chalmer’s headquarters and train, and a second train of about twenty wagons, with between eight hundred and one thousand prisoners, and sixteen pieces of artillery. Our troops behaved splendidly, all taking their share in assaulting and charging the enemy’s breastworks.”

Read the entire news article: Battle At Nashville Official Dispatch from General Thomas–The Enemy to be Again Attacked.

This old newspaper article included further stories from the battlefield.

Great Battle at Nashville, New York Herald-Tribune newspaper article 17 December 1864

New York Herald-Tribune (New York City, New York), 17 December 1864, page 1

“The western telegraph lines are working very badly, on account of the snowstorms prevailing. Just returned from the battle field. Battle severe and terrific. Our forces victorious…

“Hood has fallen back, and is apparently doing his best to get away, while Thomas is pressing him with great vigor, frequently capturing guns and men. Everything so far is perfectly successful, and the prospect is fair to crush Hood’s army.”

Read the entire historical newspaper article: Great Battle at Nashville. Decisive Union Victory. Rebel Army Defeated, He is Trying to Escape.

This old news article about the Civil War presented a reporter’s exciting description of the fighting.

Battle before Nashville, Plain Dealer newspaper article 19 December 1864

Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 19 December 1864, page 3

“Our own troops were disposed in the following order: Wilson’s cavalry on the extreme right; Schofield’s 23d corps consisting of Couch’s and Cox’s divisions, at first held in reserve, but before the main battle opened had taken position on the left of the cavalry thus forming the right of our infantry line; A. J. Smith’s 16th corps, consisting of the divisions of McArthur, Garrard and Moore, came next on the left of Schofield. On the left of Smith the magnificent 4th corps of T. J. Wood, consisting of the divisions of Kimball, Elliott and Sam Beatty was formed in close order of battle and partially massed. Steedman with Cruft’s division and two brigades of colored troops held the extreme left…

“Longer, perhaps, than any troops ever remained in such a position, they stood and fired fast and furiously at the enemy, but they could not remain there and live, and a few gave way and fled in disorder. The whole line staggered, and had the rebels done nothing more than keep up their deadly fire we should have been driven back, but they made a movement to shift their artillery, which our men received as an indication that they were about to abandon their line and retire. Raising a loud shout, the division, with fixed bayonets, rushed impetuously forward and, swarming over the works, captured such rebels as hadn’t fled. They had time to get away two guns, but the rest fell into our hands.”

Read the entire old newspaper article: Battle Before Nashville. Interesting Particulars. 5,000 Prisoners and 37 Cannon. Complete Route of the Enemy.

Dig into GenealogyBank’s online historical newspaper archives of more than 6,400 titles to find out more about your Civil War-era ancestors.

Dating Old Family Photographs with Civil War Revenue Stamps

Introduction: Mary Harrell-Sesniak is a genealogist, author and editor with a strong technology background. In this guest blog post, Mary shows how to determine the date of undated, Civil War-era family photographs using revenue stamps affixed to the back of the picture.

Do you have Civil War-era photographs of your ancestors that are undated? As this genealogy article explains, tax stamp legislation passed by the Union in 1864 might provide a valuable clue to help you finally assign a date to those old family photos, allowing for deeper Civil War family history research.

Stamp Duties, New York Herald-Tribune newspaper article 13 April 1865

New York Herald-Tribune (New York, New York), 13 April 1865, page 6

In order to fund the rising costs of the Civil War, the federal government passed an act on 30 June 1864 requiring that tax stamps be affixed to various goods, including:

  • Proprietary Medicines and Preparations
  • Perfumery and Cosmetics
  • Friction Matches
  • Cigar Lights and Wax Tapers
  • Photographs, Ambrotypes and Daguerreotypes
  • Playing Cards

Although this legislation achieved the intended goal of raising revenue, it was an extremely unpopular tax—especially for those desiring photographs of family members soon to be separated by war.

explanation of stamp fees for photographs, New York Herald-Tribune newspaper article, 13 April 1865

New York Herald-Tribune (New York, New York), 13 April 1865, page 6

Fees were assessed upon the selling price of photographs, ambrotypes and daguerreotypes, with different-colored stamps for the various fees.

  • 2¢ stamps were blue or orange and assessed on images 25 cents or less
  • 3¢ stamps were green and assessed on images between 26 and 50 cents
  • 5¢ stamps were red and assessed on images 51 cents to one dollar
  • For images exceeding one dollar, in addition to the 5¢ stamp an extra 5 cents was assessed “for every additional dollar or fractional part thereof”

As with most laws, there were exceptions and specifications that had to be followed.

exceptions to the stamp tax on photographs, New York Herald-Tribune newspaper article 13 April 1865

New York Herald-Tribune (New York, New York), 13 April 1865, page 6

“Photographs and other sun pictures, which are copies of engravings or works of art, or which are used for the illustration of books, or which are so small that stamps cannot be affixed, are exempt from stamp duty. In lieu thereof, they are subject to duty of 5 per cent ad valorem.

“The price of a photograph by which the stamp duty is determined is held to be the price which is received for such photograph, including the case or frame, as well as any labor which may have been expended upon the picture.

“Imported articles, when sold in the original and unbroken package in which they were imported, are not subject to stamp duty, but they become so as soon as the packages are opened.”

The process was for a photographer to affix a stamp to the back of an image, and cancel it by adding initials and a date.

Civil War-era photograph with a revenue stamp affixed to the back

Civil War-era photograph with a revenue stamp affixed to the back

In the old photograph example above of a Carte de Visite (CDV), which shows the back and front of the image side-by-side, the picture was taken at Delong’s Gallery on Locust street in Fairbury, Illinois. The 5 cent stamp indicates that the photographer charged from 51 cents to $1 for his services.

Photographers often designed their own system of stamp cancellation. The hand-written date appears to be 11/11, but more likely was 11/4 (Nov. 1864), with the information under the numbers indicating either his initials or an internal reference. It was not 1861, as revenue stamps are only found on images 1864-1866, with the final repeal of the Stamp Act on Aug. 1, 1866.

For more information on Tax Stamps, see eBay’s Guide to Tax Stamps on Antique Photography.

Civil War Find: The “Fighting” 1st Tennessee Cavalry’s Reunion

The nice thing about newspapers is that they record everything that happens: births, deaths, and everything in-between. A lot of that “in-between stuff” are the stories of our ancestors’ lives that help us get to know them better.

In general, Americans are a social people. We form groups, make plans, organize, and hold meetings. Milestones are often celebrated with anniversary gatherings and reunions.

Fighting First, Reunion of the First Tennessee Cavalry Regiment, Knoxville Daily Journal, 01 September 1895

Knoxville Daily Journal (Knoxville, Tennessee), 1 September 1895, page 13

These reunions—like the ninth annual reunion of the First Tennessee Cavalry held in 1895—were reported in the local newspaper.

Here is one such reunion story about a gathering of former veterans from that famed Tennessee Civil War regiment that fought in the Union army. This long newspaper article was published in the Knoxville Daily Journal (Knoxville, Tennessee), 1 September 1895, page 13.

This historical news article covers the basics, such as the names of the Tennessee regiment’s officers and the order of the activities in the meeting.

Reading down the article, we find that the “secretary was ordered to prepare a complete roster of the survivors of the regiment, together with rank and post office address.”

Great! Note to self: track down a copy of that roster.

The last half of the old newspaper article is a “very brief history of the First Tennessee Cavalry.” This historical news article provides great genealogical information we can use to trace our military ancestry, gives a glimpse into these Tennessee Union soldiers’ lives, and provides some Civil War history.

brief history of the Civil War's 1st Tennessee Cavalry Regiment, Knoxville Daily Journal, 01 September 1895

Knoxville Daily Journal (Knoxville, Tennessee), 1 September 1895, page 13

Genealogy Search Tip: Did your ancestor serve in the Civil War or other American wars? Then search in GenealogyBank’s historical newspaper archives for newspaper articles and military records about the unit your veteran ancestor served with: its campaigns, reunions, history, etc.

Newspapers are packed with the stories of our ancestors’ lives.

Breaking News: More newspapers added to GenealogyBank

GenealogyBank adds another 13 million records – obituaries, news articles and more. More than 1,800 newspapers were updated and new titles added.

That’s too many titles to list here – but here are some of them:
Alabama, Mobile
Mobile Register. 1980-10-16 to 1983-05-30

Arkansas, Little Rock
Arkansas Gazette 1838-01-02 to 1871-11-25
Arkansas, White Hall
White Hall Journal* 10/2/2009 to Present

Arizona, Casa Grande
Casa Grande Dispatch* 6/19/2010 to Present
Arizona, Kearny
Copper Basin News* 6/10/2010 to Present

Colorado, Colorado Springs
Gazette-Telegraph 1904-01-17 to 1922-04-11

Connecticut, Hartford
Hartford Daily Courant. 1863-12-31 to 1866-06-27
Hartford Daily Courant. 1874-01-01 to 1876-05-27

Georgia, Augusta
Augusta Chronicle. 1843-06-12 to 1878-03-29

Hawaii, Kaunakakai
Molokai Dispatch, The* 3/1/2010 to Present

Idaho, Kellogg
Shoshone News-Press* 4/6/2007 to Present
Idaho, Sandpoint
Bonner County Daily Bee* 3/2/2004 to Present
Idaho, Twin Falls
Twin Falls News. 1919-06-20

Indiana, Aurora
Journal-Press, The* 5/13/2010 to Present

Kansas, Coffeyville
Vindicator*. 1904-12-23 to 1906-02-09
Kansas, Kansas City
Topics* . 1895-05-16 to 1895-12-07
Kansas, Parsons
Parsons Weekly Blade. 1900-03-02
Kansas, Topeka
Kansas Sentinel*. 1960-07-07 to 1960-11-26
Kansas, Topeka.

Kansas Watchman*. 1905-05-25 to 1905-11-17
Kansas, Wichita
Wichita Protest . 1920-08-20

Louisiana, Bossier City
Bossier Press-Tribune*. 2/4/2010 to Present
Louisiana, New Orleans
New Orleans Tribune. 1864-08-02 to 1869-02-14
Louisiana, New Orleans
Times-Picayune. 1848-01-04 to 1886-12-02 and 1973-10-02 to 1978-08-15

Massachusetts, Andover
Andover Townsman*. 4/20/2010 to Present
Massachusetts, Gloucester
Gloucester Daily Times*. 5/12/2010 to Present
Massachusetts, Greenfield
Greenfield Gazette. 1792-11-08 to 1809-07-31
Massachusetts, Newburyport
Daily News of Newburyport, The*. 5/13/2010 to Present
Massachusetts, Northampton
Hampshire Gazette. 1786-09-20 to 1843-03-28
Massachusetts, Springfield
Springfield Union. 1964-05-16 to 1969-02-20
Massachusetts, Worcester
National Aegis. 1821-01-10 to 1854-10-04

Michigan, Jackson
Jackson Citizen. 1868-10-06 to 1870-05-31
Michigan, Jackson
Jackson Citizen Patriot. 1865-07-01 to 1868-12-09

Minnesota, Virginia
Mesabi Daily News*. 3/17/1999 to Present

New Hampshire, Concord
New Hampshire Observer. 1825-01-03 to 1826-12-29
New Hampshire, Concord
New Hampshire Patriot . 1879-06-12
New Hampshire, Exeter.
Freeman’s Oracle . 1788-01-18

New Jersey, Englewood
Northern Valley Suburbanite*. 1/21/2010 to Present
New Jersey, Fort Lee
Fort Lee Suburbanite*. 11/5/2009 to Present
New Jersey, Midland Park
Midland Park Suburban News*. 10/11/2009 to Present
New Jersey, Montclair
Montclair Times, The*. 4/1/2010 to Present
New Jersey, Trenton
Trenton Evening Times. 1883-07-22 to 1885-08-02

New York, Albany
Albany Evening Journal. 1856-09-15 to 1876-12-29
New York, New York
New York Herald-Tribune. 1878-01-19 to 1896-12-07
New York, Penn Yan
Chronicle Express, The*. 3/27/2010 to Present

North Carolina, Clinton
Sampson Independent, The*. 4/18/2010 to Present
North Carolina, Pilot Mountain
Pilot, The*. 3/27/2010 to Present

Ohio, Canton
Repository, The*. 10/1/1999 to Present
Ohio, Cincinnati
Cincinnati Daily Gazette. 1868-09-07 to 1871-01-17
Ohio, Cleveland
Plain Dealer. 1858-11-02 to 1866-09-11 and 1971-01-31 to 1981-10-20

Oregon, Portland
Oregonian. 1969-09-01 to 1972-09-15

Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
Aurora General Advertiser. 1797-01-02 to 1797-12-30
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
Philadelphia Inquirer. 1829-06-01 to 1849-12-31

Rhode Island, Pawtucket
Pawtucket Times . 1920-01-10 to 1921-02-08

Tennessee, Sweetwater
Advocate and Democrat, The*. 12/8/2009 to Present

Texas, Dallas
Dallas Morning News. 1980-07-23 to 1980-12-19
Texas, Fort Worth
Bronze Texan News*. 1969-05-02 to 1969-10-16

Virginia, Alexandria
Alexandria Gazette. 1821-04-12 to 1852-06-30

Vermont, St. Albans
St. Albans Daily Messenger. 1870-02-25 to 1898-07-02 and 1869-07-16
Vermont, Windsor
Vermont Republican . 1809-01-30

Washington, Seattle
Seattle Daily Times. 1957-10-06 to 1984-04-17

Wisconsin, Ashland
Daily Press, The*. 1/2/1999 to Present
Wisconsin, Hartford.

Times Press*. 3/29/2010 to Present
Wisconsin, Madison
Wisconsin Free Press*. 1984-05-10 to 1990-01-12
Wisconsin, Mukwonago
Mukwonago Chief*. 3/28/2010 to Present
Wisconsin, Oneida
Kalihwisaks*. 3/27/2010 to Present
Wisconsin, Wauwatosa
Wauwatosa NOW*. 3/27/2010 to Present

More newspapers go online

GenealogyBank adds 40+ more newspapers

Search GenealogyBank now!

Dearborn County Register, The (Lawrenceburg, IN)
04/19/2010 – Current

Ohio County News, The – Rising Sun Recorder (Rising Sun, IN)
05/01/2010 – Current

Salem News, The (Beverly, MA)
05/12/2010 – Current:

Advocate Tribune (Granite Falls, MN)
10/02/2009 – Current

Montevideo American-News (Montevido, MN)
10/02/2009 – Current

Redwood Falls Gazette (Redwood Falls, MN)
10/03/2009 – Current

St. James Plaindealer (St. James, MN)
10/02/2009 – Current

Hackensack Chronicle (Hackensack, NJ)
10/02/2009 – Current

Mahwah Suburban News (Mahwah, NJ)
10/02/2009 – Current

News Transcript (Manalapan, NJ)
03/10/2010 – Current

Teaneck Suburbanite (Teaneck, NJ)
10/02/2009 – Current

Twin-Boro News (Bergenfield, Dumont, New Milford, NJ)
10/02/2009 – Current

Verona-Cedar Grove Times (Verona, Cedar Grove, NJ)
10/02/2009 – Current

Batavian, The (Batavia, NY)
03/28/2010 – Current

Daily Star, The (Oneonta, NY)
04/21/2010 – Current

Forward, The (New York, NY)
10/04/2009 – Current

Livingston County News (Geneseo, NY)
03/27/2010 – Current

Niagara Gazette (Niagara Falls, NY)
05/08/2010 – Current

Press-Republican (Plattsburgh, NY)
01/28/2010 – Current

Tonawanda News (North Tonawanda, Tonawanda, NY)
03/17/2010 – Current

Union-Sun & Journal (Lockport, NY)
03/23/2010 – Current

Tahlequah Daily Press (Tahlequah, OK)
05/06/2010 – Current

Waurika News Democrat (Waurika, OK)
03/27/2010 – Current

Woodward News (Woodward, OK)
05/01/2010 – Current

Keizertimes (Keizer, OR)
10/24/2009 – Current

Daily Item, The (Sunbury, PA)
04/22/2010 – Current

Tribune-Democrat, The (Johnstown, PA)
01/18/2010 – Current

Georgetown Times, The (Georgetown, SC)
10/02/2009 – Current

Crossville Chronicle (Crossville, TN)
06/09/2010 – Current

Athens Daily Review (Athens, TX)
02/04/2010 – Current

Cedar Creek Pilot (Gun Barrel City, TX)
05/12/2010 – Current

Commerce Journal (Commerce, TX)
02/17/2010 – Current

Huntsville Item, The (Huntsville, TX)
02/19/2010 – Current

Jacksonville Daily Progress (Jacksonville, TX)
02/05/2010 – Current

Mineral Wells Index (Mineral Wells, TX)
02/15/2010 – Current

Port Arthur News (Port Arthur, TX)
12/27/2009 – Current

Rockwall County Herald Banner (Greenville, TX)
03/27/2010 – Current

Royse City Herald Banner (Royse City, TX)
03/28/2010 – Current

Weatherford Democrat, The (Weatherford, TX)
02/03/2010 – Current

Wichita Falls Times Record News (Wichita Falls, TX)
02/27/2010 – Current

Stafford County Sun (Stafford, VA)
10/07/2009 – Current


Newspapers Go Online –

GenealogyBank keeps on growing! added more newspaper coverage for over 1,600 newspapers – in all 50 States this week.

Here is just a list of some of the new content that has been added.
Search GenealogyBank now!

Daily Record-Miner. 1911-01-05 to 1911-05-04

Wide-Awake*. 1900-01-24
Mobile Register. 1970-01-04 to 1978-11-30

Garden City
Jonesboro Evening Sun. 1905-12-02 to 1921-08-18
Little Rock
Arkansas Gazette. 1846-11-02 to 1872-05-19

San Manuel
San Manuel Miner, The. 03/27/2010 to Current
Amigos. 1976-08-03
Tucsonense. 1917-01-03 to 1922-12-23

California Gazette. 1851-08-23 to 1852-01-24
Los Angeles
Prensa. 1932-04-03
Los Angeles
Regeneracion. 1913-01-25 to 1914-02-14
Oakland Sunshine*. 1915-03-20 to 1922-02-25
Sacramento Weekly Union. 1851-10-31 to 1853-04-15
San Francisco
Grafico Internacional*. 1937-02-01 to 1937-04-01
San Francisco
Hispano America. 1923-08-25 to 1925-10-10
San Francisco
San Francisco Vindicator*. 1887-05-02 to 1889-02-16
San Francisco
Weekly Pacific News. 1849-12-31 to 1851-04-01

Colorado Springs
Gazette-Telegraph. 1904-09-29 to 1907-08-02

Hartford Daily Courant. 1868-04-07 to 1876-12-30
Hartford Daily Courant. 1852-02-20 to 1866-05-29
New London
New London Daily Chronicle. 1850-09-03 to 1852-06-23

Leader*. 1888-12-08 to 1889-12-21
Washington Bee. 1882-06-10 to 1920-06-26

Jasper News, The. 03/27/2010 to Current
Mayo Free Press, The. 03/17/2010 to Current
Internacional. 1941-02-27
Traduccion Prensa. 1946-05-06

Americus Times-Recorder. 2010-05-06 to Current
Augusta Chronicle. 1841-10-19 to 1860-12-30
Loyal Georgian*. 1866-01-20 to 1868-02-15
Savannah Weekly Echo*. 1883-08-26 to 1884-02-10

Afro-Hawaii News*. 1987-06-01 to 1991-12-31

Des Moines
Iowa State Bystander*. 1896-11-13 to 1900-12-28
Des Moines
Weekly Avalanche*. 1893-01-20
Oskaloosa Herald. 2010-03-24 to Current
Ottumwa Courier, The. 2010-03-05 to Current

Latin Times. 1958-10-04 to 1972-05-05
Sunday Times. 1874-07-19
Effingham Daily News. 2010-01-29 to Current

Freeman. 1899-08-17 to 1916-11-25
Recorder*. 1899-01-07 to 1900-12-29
New Albany
Weekly Review*. 1881-04-16

Baxter Springs
Southern Argus*. 1891-06-18 to 1892-02-04
Afro-American Advocate. 1891-09-02 to 1893-09-01
American*. 1898-04-23 t0 1899-04-23
Kansas Blackman*. 1894-04-20 to 1894-06-29
Historic Times*. 1891-07-11 to 1891-11-14
Leavenworth Advocate. 1888-08-18 to 1891-08-22
Leavenworth Herald*. 1894-02-07 to 1896-12-26
Nicodemus Cyclone*. 1887-12-30 to 1888-09-07
Nicodemus Enterprise*. 1887-08-17 to 1887-12-23
Parsons Weekly Blade*. 1892-09-24 to 1900-12-28
American Citizen. 1897-01-29 to 1902-05-23
American Citizen. 1889-01-11 to 1889-06-21
Benevolent Banner*. 1887-05-21 to 1887-10-22
Colored Patriot*. 1882-04-20 to 1882-06-22
Evening Call*. 1893-06-13 to 1893-07-08
Herald of Kansas*. 1880-01-30 to 1880-06-11
Plaindealer. 1900-01-26
National Baptist World*. 1894-08-31 to 1894-11-23
People’s Friend*. 1894-05-24 to 1894-05-24
Wichita Times*. 1972-01-11 to 1977-09-22

New Orleans
L’Union*. 1862-09-27 to 1864-07-19
New Orleans
Times-Picayune. 1940-06-22 to 1975-07-28
New Orleans
Times-Picayune. 1866-02-13 to 1879-12-16
New Orleans
Weekly Louisianian. 1882-01-14
New Orleans
Weekly Pelican. 1887-01-29 to 1889-08-31
St. Martinville
Echo*. 1873-03-15

Amherst Bulletin. 2009-10-02 to Current
Boston Daily Advertiser. 1874-01-01 to 1874-04-30
Eagle-Tribune, The. 2010-05-12 to Current
Provincetown Banner. 2009-10-02 to Current
Springfield Republican. 1925-02-01 to 1946-09-26
Springfield Republican. 1886-12-02
Springfield Union. 1947-04-01 to 1963-02-15
National Aegis. 1825-01-12 to 1827-12-12

Afro-American*. 1893-04-29 to 1898-03-26
Baltimore American. 1905-06-18 to 1910-04-24
Race Standard*. 1897-01-02 to 1897-01-16

Plaindealer. 1889-09-27 to 1892-11-18
Grand Rapids
Grand Rapids Press, The. 2010-05-12 to Current
Holland Sentinel, The. 2009-10-02 to Current

Afro-American Advance*. 1899-05-27 to 1900-11-17
Sleepy Eye
Sleepy Eye Herald Dispatch. 2009-10-02 to Current
St. Paul
Broad Axe. 1894-02-01 to 1902-06-12
St. Paul
Negro World*. 1900-03-10 to 1900-06-09
St. Paul
St. Paul Daily Pioneer. 1855-11-01 to 1855-12-22
St. Paul
Western Appeal*. 1885-06-13 to 1888-12-29

Kansas City
Cosmopolita. 1917-12-08 to 1919-11-15
Kansas City
Kansas City Times. 1891-12-23 to 1895-10-16
Kansas City
Rising Son*. 1903-01-16 to 1907-12-28
Sedalia Times*. 1901-08-31 to 1903-12-19
St. James
St. James Leader Journal. 2009-10-02 to Current
St. Louis
St. Louis Palladium*. 1903-01-10 to 1907-10-05

Courier-Tribune, The. 2010-04-06 to Current
Watauga Democrat, The. 2009-10-02 to Current
True Reformer*. 1900-07-25
Nashville Graphic, The. 2010-01-28 to Current
Gazette*. 1893-12-16 to 1898-02-19

Afro-American Sentinel. 1896-04-25 to 1899-03-25
Enterprise*. 1895-08-10 to 1897-07-03
Progress*. 1890-03-22 to 1891-03-07

New Hampshire Patriot. 1879-06-26 to 1881-02-17
Freeman’s Oracle. 1786-07-01 to 1789-07-28

Hunterdon County Democrat. 2009-10-02 to Current
Wayne Today. 2009-10-14 to Current

Bandera Americana. 1903-10-01 to 1903-11-06
Daily Citizen. 1887-03-16 to 1892-12-31
Daily Times*. 1893-06-14
Evening Citizen. 1893-06-29 to 1893-06-29
Las Cruces
Labrador. 1904-12-30
Las Cruces
Tiempo. 1885-04-30 to 1902-04-02
Las Vegas
Misionero Bautista: Organo Oficial de la Convencion Bautista Hispano-Americana de Nuevo Mexico. 1943-12-21 to 1951-08-21
Mesilla News. 1879-04-19 to 1884-02-09
Independent. 1918-02-02 to 1920-09-25
Santa Fe
Daily New Mexican. 1871-04-15 to 1875-06-30
Santa Fe
Santa Fe Weekly New Mexican and Livestock Journal. 1888-05-31 to 1895-09-26
Defensor del Pueblo. 1924-12-19 to 1938-02-11
Colfax County Stockman. 1910-07-23 to 1911-06-10

Albany Evening Journal. 1857-07-23 to 1876-12-13
Colonia Latina*. 1938-01-08
Garden City
Eco. 1930-11-15
New York
Morning Telegraph. 1877-12-09
New York
New York Herald-Tribune. 1874-11-02 to 1888-11-02
New York
Cosas*. 1931-12-03
New York
Doctrina de Marti. 1897-04-30 to 1897-08-31
New York
Ecos de Nueva York. 1954-10-10
New York
New York Age*. 1889-11-02 to 1892-11-19
New York
New York Freeman*. 1886-01-02 to 1887-10-08
New York
Western Star*. 1900-01-27

Cincinnati Daily Gazette. 1867-04-13 to 1881-02-03
Cleveland Gazette*. 1883-12-01 to 1941-08-09
Plain Dealer. 1947-11-23 to 1975-12-10
Plain Dealer. 1846-02-27 to 1858-10-30

Oregonian. 1917-07-03 to 1918-08-12
New Age*. 1900-01-27 to 1902-09-20
Oregonian. 1925-08-22 to 1971-11-20
Portland New Age*. 1905-12-23 to 1907-03-30

State Journal*. 1883-12-13 to 1885-01-24
Aurora General Advertiser. 1796-03-24
Philadelphia Inquirer. 1830-01-08 to 1831-12-28

South Carolina Leader*. 1865-10-07 to 1866-05-12
Southern Indicator*. 1921-02-21 to 1923-02-03

Negro World*. 1887-10-15 to 1887-11-26

Beaumont Enterprise and Journal. 1906-04-11 to 1911-09-23
Cronista del Valle. 1925-01-23 to 1929-09-06
Daily Cosmopolitan. 1884-09-10 to 1885-07-11
Heraldo de Brownsville. 1937-12-30 to 1940-02-28
Puerto. 1959-03-21
Dallas Morning News. 1979-11-11 to 1980-07-20
Defensor. 1931-07-10
El Paso
Clarin del Norte. 1906-08-11 to 1906-10-06
El Paso
Continental. 1935-12-31 to 1960-03-08
El Paso
Defensor*. 1894-09-24 to 1895-03-03
El Paso
Sunday Herald. 1888-10-28 to 1889-05-18
Fort Worth
Torchlight Appeal*. 1890-01-17 to 1890-02-22
Gaceta Mexicana. 1928-05-15
Notas de Kingsville*. 1957-05-16 to 1960-08-18
Tex. Mex. Reflector. 1922-04-21 to 1939-01-21
Evolucion. 1917-06-30 to 1918-08-11
San Antonio
Epoca. 1919-03-23 to 1927-05-08
San Antonio
Pan American Labor Express. 1918-08-28 to 1918-11-13
San Antonio
Regidor. 1913-08-14 to 1915-06-30

Salt Lake City
Broad Ax. 1897-02-06 to 1899-12-23
Salt Lake City
Salt Lake Telegram. 1907-10-04 to 1922-11-12

Reformer*. 1900-01-27
Richmond Planet*. 1895-03-02 to 1900-01-13

Seattle Daily Times. 1936-10-20 to 1984-12-31
Seattle Republican*. 1900-01-19
World*. 1899-01-04

Guardia. 1969-10-21 to 1975-08-01
Wisconsin Afro-American*. 1892-08-13 to 1892-11-19