Deadwood Dick: Chasing a Cornish-American Legend

Introduction: Scott Phillips is a genealogical historian and owner of Onward To Our Past® genealogy services. In this guest blog post, Scott digs into old newspapers to see if the Wild West’s legendary character “Deadwood Dick” was a real person or just a myth.

Early in my family history and genealogy work I made, what was for me, a remarkable discovery. I found that I had a significant branch of second cousins in Cornwall in the United Kingdom.

I had not known about my Cornish relatives and they were equally unaware of me. It wasn’t long before I had the opportunity to meet this grand branch of my family and it was an extraordinary occasion! We spent several wonderful days together and those treasured family memories will now be with me forever. Given all the family photographs, stories, catching up on lifetimes, pub visits, heirlooms, and tromping around parish churches and graveyards, my head was filled with family history. I guess it should come as no surprise that I placed one item in a remote drawer of my “mental filing cabinet,” to be explored at a later date.

Not long ago this tidbit came roaring back into my consciousness and I decided I needed to investigate. The name I had filed away was “Deadwood Dick”; when I was in Cornwall many people had asked me if I was familiar with this famous Cornish-American immigrant. To begin my investigation, I opened up GenealogyBank.com and started searching for historical records containing his name. As usual, I was not disappointed!

I logged in and searched on “Deadwood Dick.” To my surprise I was greeted with more than 3,800 articles in the Newspaper Archive section of my results. I then clicked on the subcategory Obituaries. Quickly I noted that Deadwood had been reported as dead a number of times, including 1906, 1911 and 1920, along with a couple of other dates! As a genealogist I smiled when I read these different death accounts, and also found varying family histories attributed to good old Deadwood.  They ranged from Deadwood being: the nephew of the governor of Illinois; a shop owner in Belle Fourche; and a postmaster in Deadwood, the latter two places both in the Dakota Territory.

So I read on. What I discovered about this Cornish-American immigrant was quite a story! You see Deadwood was the inspiration for dime novels, or what were also known as the yellow-backed series of action books, featuring the exploits and adventures of Deadwood Dick.

But was the legendary Deadwood Dick a real person?

An old article from the Daily People newspaper proclaimed: “Deadwood Dick a Myth.” As they say in the game shows: “Buzz…wrong answer!” This newspaper article was certainly not going to establish that Deadwood was a real person.

Deadwood Dick a Myth, Daily People newspaper article 26 April 1903

Daily People (New York, New York), 26 April 1903, page 6

Soon I found a delightful old news article published by the Jackson Citizen Patriot lamenting “Dime Novels of Our Youthful Days.” Seems no matter what the time in history, we always miss things from our youth—and in this case it was the exciting stories of Deadwood Dick.

Diime Novels of Our Youthful Days, Jackson Citizen Patriot newspaper article 16 August 1922

Jackson Citizen Patriot (Jackson, Michigan), 16 August 1922, page 2

Then I discovered, from an old newspaper article published by the Sun, that Deadwood Dick was the subject of a successful stage play. But still the question remained: was he a real person? I kept on with my investigation.

"Deadwood Dick" at Blaney's, Sun newspaper article 26 November 1907

Sun (Baltimore, Maryland), 26 November 1907, page 9

I was really enjoying taking a trip into America’s past, through newspapers, trying to discern who and/or what Deadwood Dick really was. Then I found a newspaper article that answered my question: Deadwood was indeed a real person!

I found his story in an article published by the Kansas City Star, entitled: “‘Deadwood Dick’ Cashes in His Chips in Life’s Game.”

"Deadwood Dick" Cashes in His Chips in Life's Game, Kansas City Star newspaper article 16 February 1920

Kansas City Star (Kansas City, Missouri), 16 February 1920, page 20

This account confirmed that a man named Richard Bullock was the original and very real Deadwood Dick. He spent time as a guard on the gold bullion stagecoaches that carried gold ore from the mines of South Dakota to Omaha, Nebraska. The article said that Richard emigrated from “England,” the common misnomer in those times for any portion of the United Kingdom.

My additional research has confirmed that Richard Bullock, a.k.a. Deadwood Dick, was born about 20 August 1847 near Saint Columb Major in Cornwall. He was a member of the Methodist Choir before he emigrated from Cornwall in his early 20s to find his future in America.

From choirboy to a man of mythological proportions and the stuff of early action novels!

All I can say is I am sure happy I pulled that memory out of the old filing cabinet and looked for Deadwood Dick stories in GenealogyBank’s newspapers. You just never know what you will find!

Who Do You Think You Are? Sourcing GenealogyBank

Gather round the telly, grab some popcorn and let the kids stay up!

Special alert to our GenealogyBank members in the United Kingdom and beyond: please pay careful attention to the next television episode featuring Samantha Womack on Who Do You Think You Are? being broadcast on BBC-TV in the UK.

We received word that GenealogyBank’s newspaper archive was used to trace Womack’s family tree and is one of the sources credited in this WDYTYA episode. Yea!

Samantha Womack is the star of the UK hit television series “EastEnders.”

At the Playhouses, Evening Journal newspaper article 6 August 1904, plus photo of actress Samantha Womack

Photo of actress Samantha Womack plus newspaper article published by the Evening Journal (Jersey City, New Jersey), 6 August 1904, page 3

Tune in to BBC and watch this new WDYTYA episode on Wednesday, August 15.

To read the newspaper article used to trace the Womacks in the upcoming show, see the article “At the Playhouses” published in the Evening Journal (Jersey City, New Jersey), 6 August 1904, page 3.

 

Jamaican historical documents being rescued

The British Library’s Endangered Archives Programme reported this week that it has completed its Inventory of Archival Holdings in Jamaica – zeroing in on the records at greatest risk.

The report concentrated on manuscript genealogical resources most at risk, “specifically in the National Library of Jamaica and the Roman Catholic Chancery, as well as in the Elsa Goveia Reading Room at the University of the West Indies at Mona. Also targeted are the Jamaica Archives located in Spanish Town.

The physical condition of documents ranges from very poor to fair, with many documents crumbling and in danger of disappearing. The most urgent attention should be directed at the Chancery, which does not have a preservation department and is not a formal archive. There is concern within the Chancery at the decaying state of the documents and this initiative to digitize documents is welcomed.”

"I sank the Bismarck"

The London Daily Telegraph (9 June 2009) is reporting that it was John Moffat, an RAF pilot, who dropped the torpedo that led to the sinking of the Bismarck on May 28, 1941.

(Click here to read the entire article Dallas Morning News 31 May 1941).

The sinking of the Bismarck is a powerful story. The US was not in the war yet – but the headlines of the war in Europe and Asia had gripped the country for years. Pearl Harbor would not be attacked for another 7 months.

(Dallas Morning News 8 Dec 1961).

Songs were sung about that day.

Whether you are researching your ancestor’s in World War II or the Revolutionary War you will depend on GenealogyBank to get the job done.

Over 3,800 newspapers, all 50 States, 1690-Today
Join with us today!

Thank you to History News Network for alerting me to this story.

Passenger Lists

GenealogyBank is growing – it now has nearly 300 million items.
This morning I found this passenger list – published as a souvenir handbill that was likely given to the passengers on the steamship Silesia when it left on Tuesday November 30, 1869 bound for Plymouth, Cherbourg, London and Hamburg.

In addition to the 3,800 newspapers – GenealogyBank has over 255,000 digital books, documents and early printed items – like this one page passenger list from 1869. It’s amazing what you’ll find in GenealogyBank.

On close inspection of the newspapers I also found these articles giving more details of the passengers, the progress of the ship to the various ports of Europe and even this interesting article about the value of the gold bars that the ship was carrying.

Brief article in a Cincinnati newspaper about local residents who were passengers on the Silesia.
(Cincinnati Commerican Tribune – 5 Dec 1869)
Notice of the gold bars carried as cargo on that voyage.
(Philadelphia Inquirer – 6 Dec 1869).

Silesia arrives at the port of Le Havre, France. (Cincinnati Commercial Tribune – 11 Dec 1869).

GenealogyBank is a core tool for genealogists – packed with the practical information you’ll rely on for documenting your ancestor’s lives. Subscribe now.
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Was TV Series Who Do You Think You Are? Inspired by Minnesota Newspaper Series?

The popular British TV series – Who Do You Think You Are? is now in it’s seventh season. It has focused on tracing the family history of UK movie stars and celebrities.

In sifting through the old newspapers I found this regular column – Whom Did He Marry? by Mary Adrian. Was it the inspiration for the hit series Who Do You Think You Are? (Duluth News Tribune 13 Dec 1921).

Probably not. Just like Ralph Edward’s TV series – “This is Your Life” — the newspaper series “Whom Did He Marry?” and the TV show “Who Do You Think You Are?” all appeal to everyone’s basic interest in family history.

Mary Adrian wrote hundreds of “Whom Did He Marry?” articles, semi-genealogical vignettes about the wives of the famous and the obscure in her weekly column that appeared for years in the Duluth, MN – Duluth News-Tribune.

You can look up these articles by going to GenealogyBank’s Duluth-News Tribune search page and putting the worlds “Whom Did He Marry?” (in quotes) in the other search terms box. Your search will quickly pull up nearly 200 articles.
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NY Student History Research Contest Deadline Approaching

New York State Archives Sponsors 19th Annual Student Research Contest Albany, NY

This is a terrific opportunity to encourage students to use historical records.
The deadline for the contest is July 1st.
Awards go to individual students and to class projects.

GenealogyBank.com has over 300 New York (1719-Today) newspapers.

Click here to search all New York newspapers.

Use GenealogyBank to win this award.

The New York State Archives, a program of the State Education Department, is sponsoring the 19th annual Student Research Awards. The deadline for entry is July 1, 2009 and the contest is open to all New York students in grades 4-12 who use historical records in their research projects.

Three awards are presented each year: grades 4-5, grades 6-8, and grades 9-12. The awards consist of a framed certificate, a check for $100 from an endowment established by Regent Emerita Laura Chodos and her husband Robert Chodos, an invitation to have lunch with the Regents in Albany, and a behind-the-scenes tour of the State Archives.

Eligible projects are computer-based entries, such as websites or PowerPoint presentations; exhibits; documentaries; performances; research for a historical marker, property or district; and traditional research papers.

Student Research Award winners for 2008, Grades 4-5, were: Walden Elementary School (Orange County) students Jenalee Amundsen, Sarah Baker, Brianna Canto, Nicholas Cavallucci, Annalise Cardish, Felix Cepeda, Isaiah Skyler Chapman, Alex Clum, Frank Cook, Jr., Ilyssa Daly, Michael Daly, Brandon DiSimone, Sara Donovan, Abigail Hardy, Antonio Jackson, John lamb, Shiann Malvasi, Joshua Metzger, Jad Moumen, Sammy Moumen, Anthony Newton, Alyssa Rosario, Nyle Rose, Sarah Savasta, Brianna Sheehy, and Mary Sherman for their entry Capron, He’s My Street.

Grade 6-8 winners for 2008 were Persell Middle School (Chautauqua County) students Mark Brombacher, Jennie Gross, Taylor Estrada, Michelle Ferry, Alex Hoagland, Justin Hodges, Holly Johnson, Nick Myers, Jacob Perkins, Marisa Pope, Lucas Raak, Lindsey Rensel, Olivia Sinatra, Johnna Vanstrom, and Ben Whitney for their entry The Lost Neighborhood Project.

The Grade 9-12 Student Research Award winner for 2008 was Alexandra Rheinhardt, a student from Cooperstown Central High School (Otsego County), for the documentary, Sounds of Conflict: A Cultural Divide.

Julie Daniels, coordinator of the awards program, explained that in order for an entry to be competitive, a substantial portion of the research should be based on historical records from archives, historical newspapers, museums, historical societies, libraries, local governments, or other organizations. She offered some examples of historical records: original letters, diaries, and photographs; meeting minutes; police and court records; ledgers, census records; and wills.

For information about this year’s program, click on “Education” at www.archives.nysed.gov, call (518) 474-6926 or email archedu@mail.nysed.gov.

Elizabeth Gladys Dean (1912-2009) Last Titanic Survivor Dies

Elizabeth Gladys Dean was born on 12 Feb 1912. Her parents sold their family business in England and planned to emigrate to America like so many others from the UK before them.

Along with her mother Georgette Eva Dean, father Bertram Frank Dean and brother Bertram Dean they boarded the Titanic just a few weeks later to settle in their new home in Kansas. Her father perished in the sinking of the Titanic and the family returned to England to mourn their loss.

The newspapers of the day gave the grim listss of those that perished and those that survived.
(Boston Journal 12 April 1912)

Macon (GA) Weekly Telegraph 18 April 1912

Elizabeth Gladys Dean’s obituary appears in GenealogyBank.com

In fact GenealogyBank has the obituaries and stories of over 1,000 of the Titanic passengers that died in 1912 and the survivors that have died since.

Deseret News, The (Salt Lake City, UT) – May 31, 2009
Last survivor of the Titanic dies, aged 97

LONDON — Millvina Dean, the last survivor of the sinking of RMS Titanic, died Sunday in her sleep, her friend Gunter Babler said. She was 97.

Babler said Dean’s longtime companion, Bruno Nordmanis, called him in Switzerland to say that Dean died at her nursing home in southern England, on the 98th anniversary of the launch of the ship that was billed as “practically unsinkable.”

He said staff discovered Dean in her room Sunday morning. Babler said she had been hospitalized with pneumonia last week but she had recovered and returned to the nursing home.

A staff nurse at Woodlands Ridge Nursing Home in Southampton said no one could comment until administrators came on duty Monday morning.

Dean was just over 2 months old when the Titanic hit an iceberg on the night of April 14, 1912. The ship sank in less than three hours.

Dean was one of 706 people — mostly women and children — who survived. Her father was among the 1,517 who died.

Babler, who is head of the Switzerland Titanic Society, said Dean was a “very good friend of very many years.”
“I met her through the Titanic society but she became a friend and I went to see her every month or so,” he said.

The pride of the White Star line, the Titanic had a mahogany-paneled smoking room, a swimming pool and a squash court. But it did not have enough lifeboats for all of its 2,200 passengers and crew.

Dean’s family were steerage passengers setting out from the English port of Southampton for a new life in the United States. Her father had sold his pub and hoped to open a tobacconists’ shop in Kansas City, Missouri, where his wife had relatives.

Initially scheduled to travel on another ship, the family was transferred to the Titanic because of a coal strike. Four days out of port and about 600 kilometers (380 miles) southeast of Newfoundland, the ship hit an iceberg. The impact buckled the Titanic’s hull and sent sea water pouring into six of its supposedly watertight compartments.

Dean said her father’s quick actions saved his family. He felt the ship scrape the iceberg and hustled the family out of its third-class quarters and toward the lifeboat that would take them to safety. “That’s partly what saved us — because he was so quick. Some people thought the ship was unsinkable,” Dean told the British Broadcasting Corp. in 1998.

Wrapped in a sack against the Atlantic chill, Dean was lowered into a lifeboat. Her 2-year-old brother Bertram and her mother Georgette also survived.

“She said goodbye to my father and he said he’d be along later,” Dean said in 2002. “I was put into lifeboat 13. It was a bitterly cold night and eventually we were picked up by the Carpathia.”

The family was taken to New York, then returned to England with other survivors aboard the rescue ship Adriatic. Dean did not know she had been aboard the Titanic until she was 8 years old, when her mother, about to remarry, told her about her father’s death. Her mother, always reticent about the tragedy, died in 1975 at age 95.

Born in London on Feb. 2, 1912, Elizabeth Gladys “Millvina” Dean spent most of her life in the English seaside town of Southampton, Titanic’s home port. She never married, and worked as a secretary, retiring in 1972 from an engineering firm.

She moved into a nursing home after breaking her hip about three years ago. She had to sell several Titanic mementoes to raise funds, prompting her friends to set up a fund to subsidize her nursing home fees. Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet, the stars of the film “Titanic,” pledged their support to the fund last month.

For most of her life Dean had no contact with Titanic enthusiasts and rarely spoke about the disaster. Dean said she had seen the 1958 film “A Night to Remember” with other survivors, but found it so upsetting that she declined to watch any other attempts to put the disaster on celluloid, including the 1997 blockbuster “Titanic.”

She began to take part in Titanic-related activities in the 1980s, after the discovery of the ship’s wreck in 1985 sparked renewed interest in the disaster. At a memorial service in England, Dean met a group of American Titanic enthusiasts who invited her to a meeting in the U.S.

She visited Belfast to see where the ship was built, attended Titanic conventions around the world — where she was mobbed by autograph seekers — and participated in radio and television documentaries about the sinking.

Charles Haas, president of the New-Jersey based Titanic International Society, said Dean was happy to talk to children about the Titanic. “She had a soft spot for children,” he said. “I remember watching as little tiny children came over clutching pieces of paper for her to sign. She was very good with them, very warm.”

In 1997, Dean crossed the Atlantic by boat on the QEII luxury liner and finally visited Kansas City, declaring it “so lovely I could stay here five years.” She was active well into her 90s, but missed the commemoration of the 95th anniversary of the disaster in 2007 after breaking her hip.

Dean had no memories of the sinking and said she preferred it that way. “I wouldn’t want to remember, really,” she told The Associated Press in 1997. She opposed attempts to raise the wreck 4,000 meters (13,000 feet) from the sea bed.

“I don’t want them to raise it, I think the other survivors would say exactly the same,” she said in 1997. “That would be horrible.”

The last survivor with memories of the sinking — and the last American survivor — was Lillian Asplund, who was 5 at the time. She died in May 2006 at the age of 99. The second-last survivor, Barbara Joyce West Dainton of Truro, England, died in October 2007 aged 96.
Reprinted by permission: Copyright (c) 2009 Deseret News Publishing Company

"Family Historian" Susan Boyle wows them on UK "Idol" TV Show

“Family Historian” Susan Boyle wows them on UK “Idol” TV Show!

Susan Boyle is the woman with a dream that lives in Blackburn, in West Lothian near Edinburgh – a short distance from East Lothian, Scotland where my Kemp family hails from. Now 47, she lives at home with her cat Pebbles.

All her life, since she was twelve, she has had the dream of being a professional singer as successful as Elaine Paige and signing, performing before a large audience.

Saturday night in Glasgow she got her chance on UK’s version of the American Idol TV show - Britains Got Talent.

Her performance was stunning, overwhelming and deeply emotional.

A triumph for her and for us. She sings of the dreams, the dreams in all of us – and no doubt the dreams of our ancestors, both realized and unfulfilled. Her moving presentation has been viewed live by millions and by well over 10 million more people in just the last few days via the Internet. She captivated her audience with this haunting anthem of dreams, seemingly almost lost and for her now realized at this time in her life.

You will want to watch this – again and again
Click Here to see her performance.

Is Susan Boyle a genealogist?
I don’t know – but she made history for her family Saturday night.
:)

In the words of Susan Boyle herself, this presentation was “just so emotional; unbelievable and emotional; fantastic.”

I dreamed a dream from Les Miserables.
I dreamed a dream in time gone by
When hope was high
And life worth living
I dreamed that love would never die
I dreamed that God would be forgiving.

Then I was young and unafraid
And dreams were made and used
And wasted
There was no ransom to be paid
No song unsung No wine untasted.

But the tigers come at night
With their voices soft as thunder
As they tear your hope apart
As they turn your dream to shame.

And still I dream he’ll come to me
That we will live the years together
But there are dreams that cannot be
And there are storms
We cannot weather…

I had a dream my life would be
So different form this hell
I’m living so different now from what it seemed
Now life has killed
The dream I dreamed.

Thanks to Elaine Maddox for sending this to me.

GenealogyBank – adds 170 newspapers from 31 States – 1830 to today

In the last few weeks GenealogyBank has added a staggering 7.2 million records and documents! In all of 2008 we added 39 million records and documents

GenealogyBank hits new high: 253 million records and documents – If each document was a person – that would be more than the population of the UK, Ireland, Germany, France and Canada combined!

Specifically in the last few weeks GenealogyBank added:
170 newspapers from 31 states
Content from 1830 to the present

Here is a list of the titles added:

Alaska
Juneau. Daily Record-Miner. 3 issues. 7/16/1910 to 10/10/1910

Alabama
Jasper. *Daily Mountain Eagle. 1/22/1998 to Current

Arkansas
Benton. *Benton Courier. 5/8/2008 to Current
Carlisle. *Carlisle Independent. 6/6/2008 to Current
Jonesboro. Jonesboro Evening Sun. 120 issues. 10/3/1905 to 11/9/1921
Little Rock. Arkansas Gazette. 17 issues. 8/23/1842 to 10/11/1899
Malvern. *Malvern Daily Record. 1/1/2008 to Current

Arizona
Nogales. *Monitor. 1 issue. 9/5/1890
Tucson. Amigos. 1 issue. 2/9/1977
Tucson. Tucsonense. 159 issues. 1/2/1923 to 12/29/1923

California
Colton. Chicano. 34 issues. 3/14/1974 to 6/16/1977
Los Angeles. *Aguacero. 2 issues. 3/24/1878 to 3/31/1878
Los Angeles. Clamor Publico. 6 issues. 10/9/1855 to 4/25/1857
Los Angeles. *Con Safos. 2 issues. 3/21/1969 to 6/1/1970
Los Angeles. *Correo Mejicano. 1 issue. 10/18/1917
Los Angeles. *Cronica. 1 issue. 9/12/1874
Los Angeles. *Democrata. 6 issues. 10/14/1882 to 11/4/1882
Los Angeles. Dos Republicas. 3 issues. 10/28/1892 to 2/1/1893
Los Angeles. *Eco de la Patria. 2 issues. 2/14/1878 to 2/21/1878
Los Angeles. *Fe en la Democracia. 2 issues. 10/29/1884 to 11/3/1884
Los Angeles. Heraldo de Mexico. 145 issues. 5/20/1919 to 11/29/1928
Los Angeles. *Joven. 2 issues. 9/18/1877 to 4/12/1878
Los Angeles. *Malcriado. 1 issue. 4/17/1927
Los Angeles. *Mesazero. 1 issue. 12/21/1954
Los Angeles. *Monitor Mejicano. 10 issues. 10/26/1895 to 10/29/1898
Los Angeles. Prensa. 68 issues. 7/26/1919 to 12/22/1921
Los Angeles. *Regeneracion. 250 issues. 9/5/1910 to 10/6/1917
Los Angeles. *Union. 3 issues. 11/21/1896 to 5/15/1897
San Francisco. *Centro America. 20 issues. 2/20/1921 to 8/25/1921
San Francisco. *Hispano America. 48 issues. 1/3/1931 to 12/5/1931
San Francisco. *Imparcial. 5 issues. 11/20/1931 to 2/1/1935
San Francisco. *Jalamate. 10 issues. 1/30/1972 to 6/9/1972
San Francisco. Mefistofeles. 1 issue. 3/23/1918
San Francisco. *Seminario Imparcial. 12 issues. 8/20/1938 to 11/12/1938
San Francisco. Voz del Nuevo Mundo. 97 issues. 3/27/1865 to 9/23/1884

Colorado
Colorado Springs. Gazette-Telegraph. 3 issues. 9/29/1903 to 9/16/1922
San Luis. Adobe. 1 issue. 8/31/1975

Connecticut
New London. New London Democrat. 1 issue. 5/17/1851
Norwich. Norwich Morning Bulletin. 2 issues. 12/3/1875 to 8/13/1887
Shelton. *Fairfield Sun. 9/18/2008 to Current

Florida
Tampa. Diario de Tampa. 13 issues. 8/21/1908 to 7/10/1911
Tampa. Internacional. 16 issues. 6/30/1939 to 8/7/1942
Tampa. Revista de Cuba Libre. 1 issue. 8/27/1898
Tampa. *Traduccion Prensa. 14 issues. 4/9/1941 to 9/4/1956
Tampa. *West Tampa Leader. 1 issue. 12/8/1940
Tampa. *Ybor City Sunday News. 1 issue. 11/18/1951

Hawaii
Kailua. *West Hawaii Today. 8/31/2008 to Current

Idaho
Idaho City. Idaho Register. 3 issues. 11/17/1905 to 4/23/1915
Twin Falls. Twin Falls News. 2 issues. 4/30/1919 to 6/18/1919

Illinois
Centralia. Centralia Sentinel. 7 issues. 1/12/1865 to 6/15/1865
Chicago. Latin Times. 2 issues. 9/24/1960 to 4/6/1962
Chicago. Noticia Mundial. 2 issues. 10/9/1927 to 10/23/1927
Chicago. Vida Latina. 1 issue. 2/21/1958

Kansas
Abilene. *Abilene Reflector-Chronicle. 12/17/1999 to Current
Dodge City. *Dodge City Daily Globe. 8/9/2005 to Current

Kentucky
Corbin. *Times-Tribune. 6/17/2008 to Current

Louisiana
New Orleans. Abeja. 166 issues. 5/24/1830 to 4/25/1831
New Orleans. Times Picayune. 3,086 issues. 1/11/1861 to 10/22/1900
New Orleans. Times Picayune. 2,856 issues. 1/26/1901 to 12/30/1922

Massachusetts
Boston. Boston Journal. 2,176 issues. 7/6/1866 to 8/31/1897
Boston. *Liberator. 72 issues. 9/6/1896 to 4/15/1906
Brockton. *Enterprise. 10/9/2008 to Current
Dedham. Norfolk Democrat. 2 issues. 12/27/1850 to 12/2/1853
Stoughton. Stoughton Sentinel. 79 issues. 7/30/1864 to 11/11/1876

Maryland
Baltimore. Baltimore American. 4 issues. 7/23/1905 to 7/13/1910

Michigan
Grand Rapids. *Grand Rapids Press. 3,138 issues. 7/1/1901 to 12/30/1922
Jackson. *Jackson Citizen Patriot. 137 issues. 8/15/1849 to 12/2/1858

Missouri
Kansas City. Cosmopolita. 1 issue. 1/30/1915
Kansas City. Kansas City Times. 99 issues. 5/13/1884 to 9/20/1894

Mississippi
Vicksburg. Daily Commercial. 1 issues. 7/16/1878

Montana
Helena. Western Clarion. 1 issue. 9/30/1865

Nebraska
Nebraska City. Daily Nebraska Press. 1 issue. 3/25/1876

New Jersey
Trenton. *Trenton Evening Times. 880 issues. 5/7/1883 to 12/30/1922
Trenton. *Trenton Sunday Times-Advertiser. 497 issues. 6/1/1902 to 6/23/1918

New Mexico
Albuquerque. Indito. 1 issue. 4/4/1901
Albuquerque. Nuevo Mundo. 5 issues. 12/25/1897 to 7/28/1900
Bernalillo. *Agricultor Moderno. 1 issue. 3/23/1916
Bernalillo. *Espejo. 1 issue. 3/8/1879
Bernalillo. *Voz del Valle. 53 issues. 10/12/1899 to 1/31/1901
Deming. *Deming Headlight. 5 issues. 1/24/1891 to 2/18/1899
Deming. *Deming Tribune. 1 issue. 12/25/1884
Deming. *Democracia. 1 issue. 1/14/1906
Elizabethtown. *Mining Bulletin. 17 issues. 1/4/1900 to 8/11/1900
Estancia. *Estancia News. 4 issues. 9/1/1905 to 7/5/1907
Las Cruces. *Borderer. 1 issue. 8/16/1873
Las Cruces. Dona Ana County Republican. 2 issues. 1/19/1901 to 3/30/1901
Las Cruces. Labrador. 2 issues. 1/25/1901 to 3/10/1905
Las Vegas. *Boletin de Anuncios. 1 issue. 1/19/1878
Las Vegas. *Cachiporra. 1 issue. 10/19/1888
Las Vegas. *Campaign Bulletin. 2 issues. 8/25/1880 to 8/27/1880
Las Vegas. *Hispano Americano. 6 issues. 4/21/1892 to 10/15/1892
Las Vegas. *Las Vegas Daily Optic. 11 issues. 3/1/1890 to 7/8/1893
Las Vegas. *Las Vegas Weekly Optic. 2 issues. 10/23/1880 to 10/30/1880
Las Vegas. Revista Catolica. 54 issues. 4/1/1888 to 2/10/1895
Las Vegas. *Sol de Mayo. 8 issues. 5/1/1891 to 7/24/1891
Las Vegas. *Voz del Pueblo. 4 issues. 9/21/1895 to 12/13/1904
Maldonado. *Estrella. 1 issue. 1/30/1897
Mesilla. Mesilla News. 1 issue. 12/18/1880
Mora. *Cronica de Mora. 2 issues. 6/13/1889 to 11/2/1889
Mora. *Mora Echo. 2 issues. 9/16/1890

Mora. *Mosquito. 15 issues. 12/3/1891 to 6/30/1892
Raton. *Relampago. 11 issues. 5/21/1904 to 8/6/1904
Rincon. *Rincon Weekly. 11 issues. 8/29/1895 to 5/11/1897
Rincon. *Roswell Record. 1 issue. 7/14/1893
San Acacio. *Comercio. 1 issue. 7/11/1907
San Marcial. *San Marcial Bee. 2 issues. 6/10/1893 to 3/29/1902
Santa Fe. Cachiporrota. 1 issue. 10/16/1890
Santa Fe. *Clarin Mejicano. 1 issue. 8/10/1873
Santa Fe. Daily New Mexican. 227 issues. 4/15/1871 to 3/28/1872
Santa Fe. *Gauntlet. 1 issue. 6/25/1894
Santa Fe. *Nuevo Mejicano. 2 issues. 4/25/1863 to 9/24/1881
Santa Fe. *Nuevo Mexicano. 40 issues. 8/16/1890 to 5/9/1908
Santa Fe. *Registro de Nuevo Mexico. 1 issue. 5/2/1916
Santa Fe. *Santa Fe Daily New Mexican. 23 issues. 8/8/1885 to 2/9/1887
Santa Fe. Santa Fe Weekly New Mexican and Livestock Journal. 2 issues. 3/22/1888 to 10/26/1893
Santa Fe. *Verdad. 1 issue. 9/12/1844
Santa Fe. *Voz del Pueblo. 2 issues. 4/27/1889 to 6/1/1889
Santa Fe. Weekly New Mexican.1 issue. 9/27/1919
Socorro. Defensor del Pueblo. 8 issues. 3/30/1906 to 5/24/1935
Springer. Colfax County Stockman. 1 issue. 1/6/1912
Wagon Mound. *Combate. 198 issues. 12/6/1902 to 11/2/1918

New York
Albany. Albany Evening Journal. 98 issues. 5/31/1850 to 6/1/1874
Garden City. Eco. 26 issues. 5/1/1930 to 5/15/1932
New York. *Artes y Letras. 56 issues. 10/21/1933 to 10/21/1939

New York. Cacara Jicara. 2 issues. 10/9/1897 to 12/13/1897
New York. Ecos de Nueva York. 31 issues. 2/26/1950 to 1/6/1957
New York. (Brooklyn). Espana Libre. 12 issues. 11/10/1939 to 8/14/1942

New York. *Novedades. 274 issues. 1/3/1880 to 12/21/1918
New York. Papagayo. 1 issue. 2/23/1855
New York. Patria. 1 issue. 3/14/1892
New York. Prensa. 1 issue. 8/24/1925
New York. Puerto Rico en Marcha. 1 issue. 6/21/1951

Ohio
Cincinnati. Cincinnati Commercial Tribune. 1,592 issues. 5/1/1869 to 6/30/1890
Wooster. Wooster Republican. 112 issues. 1/4/1855 to 12/30/1922
Cleveland. Plain-Dealer. 355 issues. 11/26/1914 to 12/30/1922

Oregon
Portland. Oregonian. 3,355 issues. 4/1/1861 to 7/12/1906

Pennsylvania
Philadelphia. Public Ledger. 3,364 issues. 3/25/1836 to 12/31/1873

Rhode Island
Pawtucket. Pawtucket Times. 3 issues. 1/8/1920 to 1/28/1921

South Carolina
Aiken. *Aiken Standard. 8/27/2008 to Current
Pickens. *Pickens Sentinel. 8/13/2008 to Current

Texas
Beaumont. Beaumont Enterprise and Journal. 4 issues. 4/27/1906 to 4/9/1911
Borger. *Borger News Herald. 6/11/2008 to Current
Brownsville. Cronista del Valle. 3 issues. 12/15/1924 to 9/8/1925
Brownsville. Puerto 16 issues. 7/24/1954 to 12/26/1959
Brownsville. Republican 34 issues. 10/23/1862 to 7/23/1868
Cleburne. *Cleburne Times Review. 7/18/2008 to Current
Corpus Christi. Horizonte. 2 issues. 11/26/1879 to 3/3/1880
Corpus Christi. *Progreso. 31 issues. 6/23/1939 to 3/15/1940
Corpus Christi. Verdad. 12 issues. 11/11/1955 to 9/6/1957
El Paso. Atalaya Bautista: Semanario Evangelico Bautista. 116 issues. 1/5/1911 to 6/26/1919
El Paso. *Clarin del Norte. 1 issue. 12/27/1906
El Paso. Continental. 1 issue. 6/5/1936
El Paso. *Dia. 2 issues. 2/18/1919 to 2/23/1919
El Paso. El Paso Evening Tribune. 1 issue. 6/23/1893
El Paso. Noticias. 5 issues. 10/21/1899 to 1/20/1900
El Paso. Republica. 8 issues. 11/2/1919 to 5/22/1920
Galveston. Galveston News. 6 issues. 8/20/1877 to 9/1/1881
Kingsville. Eco. 4 issues. 5/1/1934 to 12/1/1934
Kingsville. Notas de Kingsville. 29 issues. 6/29/1950 to 5/12/1960
Kingsville. Tex. Mex. Reflector. 3 issues. 5/21/1921 to 1/21/1923
Laredo. *Cronica. 95 issues. 1/1/1910 to 4/18/1914
Laredo. Evolucion. 31 issues. 7/27/1917 to 1/30/1920
San Antonio. Epoca. 4 issues. 11/24/1918 to 7/24/1927
San Antonio. Heraldo de Mexicano. 8 issues. 1/29/1928 to 9/8/1929
San Antonio. Imparcial de Texas. 45 issues. 9/19/1918 to 9/30/1920
San Antonio. Prensa. 4,781 issues. 10/1/1916 to 6/13/1957
San Antonio. Revista Mexicana. 158 issues. 5/28/1916 to 7/6/1919

Vermont
St. Albans. St. Albans Daily Messenger. 2 issues. 2/29/1916 to 7/5/1918

West Virginia
Montgomery. *Montgomery Herald. 4/1/2008 to Current
Oak Hill. *Fayette Tribune. 6/11/2008 to Current
Princeton. *Princeton Times. 4/17/2008 to Current