List of Las Cruces, New Mexico Newspapers

Use this site to search Las Cruces, New Mexico newspaper archives.
Quickly find obituaries, birth and marriage notices – all articles from 20 newspapers: 1873-1938; also links to currently published Las Cruces newspapers.

TIP: Click here to search other New Mexico newspapers

List of Las Cruces, NM online newspapers – Historical Newspapers
(You can click on any title to search only that newspaper).
Borderer
Democrata
Dona Ana County Republican
Eco del Rio Grande
Eco del Valle
Empresa
Estrella
Fronterizo
Gaceta Popular
Labrador
Las Cruces Daily News
Las Cruces Daily Times
Las Cruces Democrat
Las Cruces Sun News (Obituaries)
Mesilla Valley Bulletin
Mesilla Valley Democrat
Newmans Semi-Weekly
Observador Fronterizo
Promotor Escolar
Thirty-Four
Verdad

List of Las Cruces, NM online newspapers – Current Newspapers
Las Cruces Bulletin
Las Cruces Sun News
Las Cruces Sun News (Obituaries)
Round Up (NMSU)

Do you have a favorite search? Bookmark it!

As you plan your research – genealogists often find that they are actively searching the newspapers for one state, city or a specific newspaper. You may speed up your research by bookmarking the newspaper or location you want to repeatedly search.

TIP: Say you are researching family lines in Philadelphia and that you expect to repeat a search for Philadelphia newspapers or only the Philadelphia Inquirer. Now you can bookmark that search page and with one click from your favorites list begin searching immediately.

Here’s how you do that
As you narrow your search in the Historical Newspapers move through your options, narrowing your search to the state, city or newspaper you want to search:

The Historical Newspapers – All 50 States
Select just Pennsylvania newspapers
Select just Philadelphia newspapers
Select specific newspaper(s)

At any point “save” the search page you want to repeat in the future to your favorites.
Then the next time you want to search those same newspapers simply click and the targeted search page will come right up for you.

Here are some examples you may use:
Search Philadelphia Newspapers – Click Here

Search only the (Philadelphia) Public Ledger – Click Here

Search only the Philadelphia Inquirer – Click Here

You can make as many quick links as you need.
One click and you can begin searching.

Let us know what you find!

I’ve been having a ball ….

“I’ve been having a ball finding articles about my family.

The biggest find for me … was discovering my gr-grandfather’s uncle in Congressional records as well as in newspapers.

He had left home as a child and didn’t return home again until after his father died.

It was reported in the newspapers that his elderly mother (my gr-gr-gr-grandmother!) almost went into shock after not seeing him for nearly 37 years. GenealogyBank gave me great insight into his life as a fisherman turned world traveler and the names of his children that he had with his Russian wife and his locations in Russia and Japan back in the 1800′s! How cool is that??? :)

I can’t wait to see what papers you will put up next.
Keep up the great work!

Have a great weekend!”
Sincerely,


:) Catherine “Casey” Zahn

Find and document your ancestors in GenealogyBank – the best source for old newspapers on the planet. Period!

Start searching right now — click here.
What will you find?

Wow – break out the Diet Coke – GenealogyBank hits new milestone!

Wow – what a year!

GenealogyBank now has 252 million items - adding nearly 100 million newspaper articles, records and documents since it launched two years ago.

In the last few days GenealogyBank added over 6 million items making December a record setting month.

In December we added…
- More than 30,000 issues from over 150 newspapers
- Digitial Copies of Every Page
- Spanning 1836 to 1972
- Newspapers from 22 States – from Alaska to Florida from California to Vermont
- Big City Papers and Small Town Papers
- All of this new content can be searched right now

TIP: GenealogyBank is the best source for old newspapers on the planet!
Period!

Hunt is on for phony POW’s…

Today’s Chicago Tribune has an interesting article by Steve Mills about Mary and Chuck Schantag of the P.O.W. Network who say they have exposed close to 1,900 people who have falsely claimed to be prisoners of war. Click here to read the article “Hunt is on for Phony POW’s.

A quick check of GenealogyBank shows almost one million articles about POW’s, documenting their brutal experiences. It is an excellent source for verifying these claims.

TIP: Use GenealogyBank to search for previously published news articles that can expand on the details you find written in an obituary notice.

Did you get snow? Bet it was nothing like the snow of 1898.

We got snow this weekend – lots of it.

Here’s a picture showing the snow piled on the railing of our back deck.

But, it was nothing like the Blizzard of 1898 – with 15′ high snow drifts.

We found many articles about the Blizzard of 1898 in GenealogyBank – including this one…

…about Abram Decker who was saved from freezing to death in the snowstorm by the persistence of his “devoted wife”.

This story was picked up and printed by the Idaho Daily Statesman, 18 Aug 1898.

Wow, what a story. His wife searching for him through 15′ snow drifts – finally spotting his foot above the snow and her efforts to rescue him by taking the railings from a fence to build a bonfire – lit by the flame in her lantern, to keep him warm. The fire got the attention of two farmers who came to their rescue.

Now that’s an incredible family story.

Tip: Don’t limit your search to just one state – Remember that the articles you’re looking for may have appeared in a newspaper in another state – in this example the story was picked up and printed in a paper clear across the country in Idaho.

Old Newspapers from 24 States go online

GenealogyBank adds content from 63 newspapers – from 24 States – 3.7 million records go online.

In a major upload GenealogyBank has expanded its coverage adding long runs of historical newspapers – 22,963 issues from 63 newspapers act – from 24 States.

Here’s the list:
Alaska
Juneau. Daily Record-Miner. 42 issues. 10/7/1906 to 12/30/1906

Arkansas
Jonesboro. Jonesboro Evening Sun. 1,027 issues. 6/8/1905 to 12/21/1921
Little Rock. Arkansas Gazette. 191 issues. 1/13/1820 to 8/14/1891

California
Colton. Chicano. 45 issues. 10/13/1971 to 3/3/1977
Sacramento. Prensa Libre. 56 issues. 1/15/1969 to 12/31/1970

Connecticut
New Haven. *Connecticut Gazette. 71 issues. 9/20/1755 to 1/12/1767
New London. New London Democrat. 47 issues. 9/11/1847 to 12/23/1848

Florida
Tampa. Nueva Republica. 8 issues. 5/29/1897 to 5/28/1898
Tampa. Revista de Cuba Libre. 8 issues. 1/8/1898 to 8/6/1898

Idaho
Idaho City. Idaho Falls Times. 43 issues. 1/8/1903 to 9/27/1917
Idaho City. Idaho Register. 3 issues. 11/17/1905 to 4/23/1915

Illinois
Centralia. Centralia Sentinel. 1 issue. 12/27/1866
Chicago. Latin Times. 183 issues. 9/3/1960 to 11/27/1970
Chicago. *Sol de Chicago. 1 issue. 3/21/1960

Kentucky
Frankfort. *Palladium. 32 issues. 3/2/1805 to 11/20/1813

Louisiana
New Orleans. Times Picayune. 2,852 issues. 1/23/1861 to 7/22/1901

Massachusetts
Boston. Boston Journal. 4,708 issues. 7/1/1807 to 12/31/1898
Dedham. Norfolk Democrat. 25 issues. 1/4/1850 to 9/8/1854
Springfield. Massachusetts Gazette. 92 issues. 5/14/1782 to 7/20/1784

Maryland
Baltimore. Baltimore American. 107 issues. 1/24/1904 to 2/25/1912

Missouri
Kansas City. Kansas City Times. 148 issues. 1/1/1885 to 6/25/1895

Mississippi
Natchez. *Mississippi State Gazette. 138 issues. 3/6/1818 to 5/14/1825

North Carolina
New Bern. *State Gazette of North Carolina. 52 issues. 8/9/1787 to 2/20/1799

New Mexico
Las Vegas. *Revista Catolica. 301 issues. 1/8/1888 to 2/3/1895
Santa Fe. Weekly New Mexican. 9 issues. 7/13/1919 to 12/14/1919

New York
Albany. Albany Evening Journal. 154 issues. 2/1/1850 to 6/26/1871
Brooklyn. Curioso. 14 issues. 6/16/1934 to 5/4/1935
Brooklyn. *Guamaro. 15 issues. 9/26/1895 to 1/2/1896
Brooklyn. *Long Island Weekly Intelligencer. 7 issues. 7/3/1806 to 1/1/1807
Canadaigua. Western Repository. 14 issues. 11/1/1803 to 12/8/1807
New York. Cronica. 1 issue. 1/13/1950
New York. *Kan-de-la. 1 issue. 6/3/1949
New York. Liberacion. 10 issues. 5/3/1946 to 3/20/1948
New York. *Machate Criollo. 1 issue. 2/27/1927
New York. Nueva Voz. 37 issues. 7/29/1962 to 9/1/1965
New York. Prensa. 7 issues. 6/3/1925 to 8/28/1925
New York. Pueblos Hispanos. 14 issues. 2/20/1943 to 3/4/1944
New York. *Puerto Rico en Marcha. 19 issues. 8/21/1951 to 4/21/1969
New York. *Republicas Hispanas Unidas. 1 issue. 12/18/1943
New York. *Soberania. 1 issue. 4/21/1958
New York. *Vida Hispana. 9 issues. 6/25/1953 to 9/25/1954
New York. Voz. 2 issues. 2/1/1961 to 4/1/1962
NY. Troy. Troy Gazette. 65 issues. 4/5/1808 to 3/17/1812

Ohio
Cincinnati. Cincinnati Commercial Tribune. 2,716 issues. 5/1/1871 to 9/30/1890
Wooster. Wooster Republican. 18 issues. 1/2/1862 to 5/22/1862
Cincinnati. *Spirit of the West. 21 issues. 7/26/1814 to 4/15/1815
Cleveland. Plain-Dealer. 1,445 issues. 6/17/1914 to 12/31/1922

Oklahoma
Perry. Perry Republican. 1 issue. 5/31/1917

Oregon
Eugene. Oregon State Journal. 250 issues. 4/6/1872 to 6/30/1877
Portland. Oregonian. 956 issues. 2/4/1861 to 8/22/1889

Pennsylvania
Philadelphia. *Public Ledger. 836 issues. 6/13/1838 to 11/12/1855

Texas
Brownsville. Republican. 1 issue. 7/5/1866
Cleburne. Cleburne Morning Review. 2 issues. 1/4/1911 to 1/6/1911
El Paso. Atalaya Bautista: Semanario Evangelico Bautista. 1 issue. 7/14/1910
Kingsville. Accion. 1 issue. 8/1/1932
San Antonio. Epoca. 1 issue. 4/21/1918
San Antonio. Prensa. 4,764 issues. 2/9/1916 to 5/28/1959
San Antonio. Revista Mexicana. 10 issues. 7/13/1919 to 1/25/1920
Taft. *Panamericana News. 136 issues. 9/21/1942 to 6/21/1956

Utah
Salt Lake City. Salt Lake Telegram. 331 issues. 2/4/1902 to 12/29/1914
Salt Lake City. Salt Lake Tribune. 3 issues. 5/19/1877 to 10/27/1877

Virginia
Richmond. Virginia Argus. 183 issues. 12/29/1797 to 10/19/1816

Vermont
St. Albans. St. Albans Daily Messenger. 725 issues. 1/11/1849 to 1/16/1922


Tip: GenealogyBank is a goldmine.

No other source has this many early US newspapers.

Over 3,700 newspapers – the best newspaper site on the planet.

Search GenealogyBank now.
What will you find?

Best source for old newspapers online

GenealogyBank is the best source for early US newspapers on the planet.

Last week I wrote about digging in GenealogyBank and finding articles about my early American ancestors in Maine.

I had found family death and marriage announcements – this week I kept digging for more information about William Garcelon (1763-1851) his wife Maria (Harris) Garcelon (1763-1850) and his father Sea Captain James Garcelon (1739-1813) – and I found it!

Wow – in GenealogyBank I found this article from the Maine Gazette 22 July 1799

reporting that William Garcelon lost a horse in 1799 – “a black mare, with a white face and two white hind feet, about 15 years old” – it adds the key fact that he was living in Freeport, Maine in 1799.

Looking further I found a shipping article in the Essex (MA) Gazette (1769) stating that [Captain] J[ames] Garcelon had set sail on the Schooner Alexander for Bilbao, [Spain].

By family tradition we knew that he was a sea captain but here was proof and details of this voyage in 1769 – just 10 years after he had settled in America.

__________________________________________________

Wow – A newspaper published in 1769?

I didn’t know that newspapers that old had survived – let alone that they were digitized and easily searchable online.

Tip: GenealogyBank has old newspapers going back to 1690 – easy to search, read, print and save!

___________________________________________________

Then in the 25 Feb 1811 issue of the Maine Gazette was the advertisement that James Garcelon’s farm was for sale. It gives a terrific description: 150 acres, 20 of them wooded, “handsome young orchard”, a “very pleasantly situated” two story house and more. Wow, you could almost picture the property.

Why was James Garcelon (1739-1813) selling his home and property? Were he and his wife, Deliverance (Annis) Garcelon (1735-1828), moving in with one of his children? At age 72, had he become infirm and unable to manage the property? Probably so.

We get another clue from the probate notice in the 24 Jan 1814 Maine Gazette.

Sea Captain James Garcelon had died 17 November 1813. His son [Rev.] James Garcelon was the executor.
____________________________________

Tip: GenealogyBank is a goldmine.

No other source has this many early US newspapers.

Only newspapers give this level of detail about the lives of Colonial Americans.
Wow – over 3,700 newspapers – the best newspaper site on the planet.

Search GenealogyBank now.
What will you find? _____________________________________________________

Wow – I love GenealogyBank.

We routinely hear from genealogists telling about their success – “Wow, look what I found!”

We really love to hear those stories and today it is my turn.
Last week I was stunned to find that one of my cousins had posted early photographs of our family online.
There they were – the actual pictures of my third great-grandfather Isaac Garcelon (1790-1872)
and his parents William (1763-1851)
and Maria (Howe) Garcelon (1763-1850).
I could see why they were so bundled up.
They were from Lewiston, Androscoggin County, Maine. Having grown up in New England I am used to cold weather – the snow would stay on the north side of my grandparent’s home until April almost every year.
This find got me to searching in GenealogyBank to find out more about them. I simply searched the name: William Garcelon and quickly found death notices for William Garcelon (1763-1851) that were published in two newspapers, one in Massachusetts and one in Maine.
The Boston Evening Transcript 23 Jan 1851

and in the Portland Daily Advertiser (29 Jan 1851).

Then I quickly spotted the marriage announcement of William’s nephew – Captain Asa Garcelon (1796-1859) that was published in the Eastern Argus (Maine) 16 March 1825.

Notice that every one of these articles appeared in out-of-town or out-of-state newspapers.

TIP: Colonial and 19th Century Newspapers often printed out of town birth, marriage and death notices. GenealogyBank makes them easy to find because it let’s you search all 3,700 newspapers for your ancestors.

TIP: Be flexible in your searches and remember that their obituaries or marriage notices just might have been printed in out of state newspapers – like the wedding announcement of Nicholas Goodson and Sarah Matthews in Isle of Wight County, Virginia – that was published in the Maine newspaper – the Eastern Argus in 1825. Like cable news television stations today – newspapers carried news from across the country.

There were no articles telling if Nicholas Goodson was ever arrested.

It is a great day for genealogy. What an opportunity we have to find these historic artifacts, articles and documents about our family.

Tip: Search GenealogyBank now.
What will you find?

What do you have for my town?

Sometimes genealogists look at GenealogyBank‘s 3,700+ newspapers and only focus on newspapers published in their home town.

Beginning researchers often concentrate on their local newspaper or other newspapers published in their state and don’t think they need the rest of the content in GenealogyBank.

When I first began researching 43 years ago – I found an obituary about Edward Kemp (1863-1926) published in the New England Historic Genealogical Society’s Register (NEHGS Memoirs. January 1928. pp. 103-104).

The obituary said that he was born in County Cavan, Ireland. That would have been crucial information for my Kemp research at that time. But the article also said that he was born in New York City so I erroneously concluded this was not my relative. I thought our family was “only” from Stamford, Connecticut.

It would be years later that I would again find Edward’s obituary in the Register. The second time I recognized him immediately as my cousin. By then I knew that the family was from County Cavan – but I stared at that information and wondered – how was it I didn’t find this earlier? And, then I recalled that I had tossed it aside because he was from New York City.

Tip: Families move to other parts of the country. Use GenealogyBank to find your family obituaries; articles, and documents – no matter where in the country these items were published. Don’t assume you only want your hometown newspaper.

Let me give you an example – framed on the basic question researchers often ask – What do you have on Stamford, CT?

The question should be more precise. What do you have on Grace Stewart – who was born and married in Stamford, CT?

What was known?
Her name: Grace Toms
Approximate year/place of birth: born about 1896 in Stamford, CT
Spouse: She married “Charles Stewart”
Other: The rest of the “Toms” family lived/died in the Stamford area.

Problem:
Initial searches found nothing on them.
Charles Stewart and Grace Stewart are common names.

A search of GenealogyBank for Grace Stewart yielded 1,238 results – that is just too many to sort through to find her.

I narrowed the search to just the more recent America’s Obituaries section to see if I could locate her obituary notice.


That resulted in 143 hits – I could sift through those – but I first limited the search again by state – for just obituaries published in Connecticut newspapers. This time I got zero hits.

So I turned to search for her husband: Charles Stewart.

A search for him in the America’s Obituaries section for all newspapers produced 632 hits. When I limited the search to just CT newspapers I found one hit, but it was not him

I then repeated the America’s Obituaries section search for Grace Stewart but this time I added her middle name “Toms” to the extra search terms in “Include keywords” box.

Nothing.

One more try. I repeated the America’s Obituaries section search for Grace Stewart but this time I added “Stamford” to the extra search terms “Include keywords” box.

Success!

Grace Stewart
Washington Post, The (DC) – February 4, 1992
GRACE STEWART, LAWYER, ASSOCIATE JUDGE, DIES
Grace M. Stewart, 93, an associate judge of the Municipal Court in Washington in 1952 and 1953, died of pneumonia Feb. 1 at the Collingswood Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Rockville, where she was a patient for five years. She was a Washington resident off and on for 74 years.


Mrs. Stewart was appointed to the court after serving as executive assistant in the attorney general’s office. She worked for the Justice Department for 24 years.
After she left Municipal Court, she was on the staff of the Senate District Committee and later became administrative director of the Washington office of Executive Manpower Corp, a recruitment firm. She retired in 1973.


A native of Stamford, Conn., Mrs. Stewart attended American University and its law school. She was a typist with the Veterans Administration before she became a lawyer at Justice.

She belonged to the Federal and Women’s Bar associations and Phi Delta Delta legal fraternity.

Her husband, Charles Stewart, died in 1920. Survivors include two daughters, Barbara S. Eskey of Rockville and Patricia S. de Hoffman of La Jolla, Calif.; four grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren.
Copyright (c) 1992 The Washington Post

Tip: Don’t only concentrate on your home town newspaper. You can find articles about your family published in out of state newspapers – in this case the Washington Post.

Tip: Be sure to be creative in adding/removing search terms to fine tune your search.
Tip: Search GenealogyBank now.
What will you find?