Quilting & Genealogy: Treasured Family Heirlooms

Introduction: Mary Harrell-Sesniak is a genealogist, author and editor with a strong technology background. In this blog article, Mary writes about a family treasure of particular interest to genealogists: heirloom quilts.

Heirloom quilts and coverlets are comfort for the soul. They tell many a tale of family history, so it comes as no surprise that genealogists and quilting go hand in hand.

Perhaps an heirloom quilt has passed down through your family, as some have in mine.

Emalena’s Quilt

One such quilt in my home was made by Emalena, our family baby sitter.

She was a single woman who remained single until late in life. She treated us like her own children, and gave us many of her beautiful quilts. This one, fashioned in the traditional wedding ring pattern, became a present for my parents.

photo of a family quilt from the Harrell-Sesniak photo collection

Photo: family quilt from the Harrell-Sesniak photo collection

One has to assume she made a quilt for the kind widower she married. Perhaps one of her quilts “sealed the deal” with the marriage proposal. We certainly hope so!

Jacquard Coverlets

Two family treasures that came through my family were matching Jacquard coverlets.

Notice that this one, which belongs to my aunt, has the name Sophronia W. Seymour inscribed on it, along with the year 1834. Sophronia was my second great grandmother, and in 1834 would have been 20. Perhaps it was part of her trousseau, an old tradition in which items were collected for a girl to take into her marriage.

photo of a family coverlet from the Harrell-Sesniak photo collection

Photo: family coverlet from the Harrell-Sesniak photo collection

For many years, I thought that a family member had been a talented weaver – but now I know from historical research that this was probably not the case. Around 1820, a special loom was invented by Joseph Marie Jacquard which truly revolutionized the world of weaving.

article about the Jacquard loom, Evening Post newspaper article 29 October 1833

Evening Post (New York, New York), 29 October 1833, page 2

As Jacquard’s loom was programmable, it was much like an early computer. Intricate fabric patterns were made much quicker than before, and often in a double weave motif. The coverlet above, and another matching eagle and heart patterned example that also came through the family, are black on white on one side, and white on black on the other.

Not every quilt or coverlet contains names and dates – but when they do, they are wonderful genealogical gems (click this link for examples.)

Jacquard died in 1834, and it is a shame that so many people today do not realize the impact his loom had on the world.

obituary for Joseph Jacquard, Daily Atlas newspaper article 29 October 1834

Daily Atlas (Boston, Massachusetts), 29 October 1834, page 2

Textile Research

Newspapers offer a fine opportunity to research heirloom quilts and coverlets. Many of the newspaper articles are rich with detail. Not only can they help you date your treasures, but you can even find patterns to help you make your own family heirlooms.

One of the earliest newspaper reports that I could find regarding a quilt dates to 1752.

Margaret Rogers, a young girl apprenticed to Alice Dodd of Philadelphia, ran away. The runaway ad detailed Margaret’s garments, along with a light blue homespun quilt that she took with her.

runaway ad for apprentice Margaret Rogers, Pennsylvania Gazette newspaper article 12 October 1752

Pennsylvania Gazette (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 12 October 1752, page 7

Looking through 19th century newspapers you’ll find various quilting and sewing advertisements, some even detailing the machines our ancestors used.

ad for sewing machines, New Orleans Tribune newspaper advertisement 23 October 1866

New Orleans Tribune (New Orleans, Louisiana), 23 October 1866, page 3

By the 20th century, quilting had become all the rage. Quilting patterns appeared in newspaper articles, including this pretty Star Center Quilt block “stolen” from a neighbor’s laundry line. News articles frequently detailed color patterns and tips to assemble the quilts. For this one, red, white and blue were suggested:

Any house w[h]ere there are many children would be apt to furnish easily the blues and whites, and even if the red had to be bought for the purpose the cost would be very slight.

quilt block pattern for the Star Center Quilt, Broad Ax newspaper article 18 July 1903

Broad Ax (Chicago, Illinois), 18 July 1903, page 3

A favorite of modern quilters are patterns, of which there is no shortage in newspapers. Many of the famous Laura Wheeler designs were published, including this basket applique quilt design from 1936.

quilt patterns by Laura Wheeler, Heraldo de Brownsville newspaper article 15 January 1936

Heraldo de Brownsville (Brownsville, Texas), 15 January 1936, page 3

This 1937 newspaper article detailed the activities of Miss Minnie Eldridge, a home demonstration agent from Texas. She educated various Louisiana farm women on how to fashion quilts and taught them about the flower pot pattern fashionable among the mountaineers of Tennessee.

article about quilting, State Times Advocate newspaper article 11 August 1937

State Times Advocate (Baton Rouge, Louisiana), 11 August 1937, page 13

Quilting is no lost art in Louisiana, not even a decadent one, if the enthusiasm and interest registered by hundreds of farm women at a quilting lecture Wednesday morning may serve as a basis for determining the quilting status in the state.

Other Resources for Quilting Examples

Don’t forget to explore social media, and in particular Pinterest, for quilting examples. A favorite of mine is the Library of Congress, where I found this lovely picture of quilters in Gee’s Bend, Alabama.

photo of Jorena Pettway sewing a quilt, Gees Bend, Alabama, c. 1937

Photo: sewing a quilt, Gees Bend, Alabama, c. 1937. Shown are an unidentified girl, Jennie Pettway, and quilter Jorena Pettway. Credit: Arthur Rothstein; Library of Congress.

Hope this inspires you to research your textiles, quilts and coverlets in newspapers. Be sure to share your finds in the comments.

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Connecticut Archives: 151 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

Connecticut, the southernmost state in New England, is the third smallest state in the nation—yet the fourth most densely populated. The state is named after the large river (the Connecticut River) which flows through its middle, emptying into Long Island Sound. This name comes from an Algonquian Indian word for “long tidal river.”

photo of Western Barndoor Hill, Connecticut

Photo: Western Barndoor Hill, Connecticut. Credit: Sphilbrick; Wikimedia Commons.

If you are researching your ancestry from Connecticut, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online Connecticut newspaper archives: 151 titles to help you search your family history in “The Constitution State,” providing coverage from 1755 to Today. There are more than 8 million newspaper articles and records in our online CT archives to trace your family tree!

Dig deep into the online archives and search for obituaries and other news articles about your ancestors in these recent and historical Connecticut newspapers online. Our CT newspapers are divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries (obituaries only).

Search Connecticut Newspaper Archives (1755 – 2002)

Search Connecticut Recent Obituaries (1988 – Current)

Here is our complete list of online Connecticut newspapers in the archives. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more. The CT newspaper titles are listed alphabetically by city.

City Title Date Range Collection
Ansonia, Derby, and Seymour Valley Gazette 12/6/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bethany, Orange and Woodbridge Amity Observer: Web Edition 11/5/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bethany, Orange and Woodbridge Amity Observer 12/6/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bridgeport Connecticut Post 5/21/2001 – 6/30/2002 Newspaper Archives
Bridgeport Republican Farmer 4/25/1810 – 8/11/1876 Newspaper Archives
Bridgeport American Telegraphe 4/8/1795 – 6/6/1804 Newspaper Archives
Bridgeport Connecticut Courier 8/3/1814 – 6/14/1826 Newspaper Archives
Bridgeport Spirit of the Times 10/6/1830 – 9/26/1832 Newspaper Archives
Bridgeport Bridgeport Herald 3/7/1805 – 1/9/1806 Newspaper Archives
Bridgeport Bridgeport Advertiser 6/5/1806 – 1/5/1809 Newspaper Archives
Bridgeport Bridgeport Gazette 6/27/1810 – 1/9/1811 Newspaper Archives
Bridgeport Bridgeport News 3/15/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bridgeport Connecticut Post 9/18/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bridgeport Bridgeport News, The: Web Edition 3/14/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bristol Bristol Press 12/28/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Cheshire Cheshire Herald 10/22/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Danbury Danbury Gazette 8/3/1813 – 4/19/1814 Newspaper Archives
Danbury Republican Journal 7/1/1793 – 1/6/1800 Newspaper Archives
Danbury Connecticut Intelligencer 1/31/1810 – 11/7/1810 Newspaper Archives
Danbury Day 5/19/1812 – 12/15/1812 Newspaper Archives
Danbury News-Times 3/14/1996 – Current Recent Obituaries
Darien Darien Daily Voice 5/28/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Darien Darien Times 6/19/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Darien Darien News-Review 10/15/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Easton Easton Daily Voice 6/30/2010 – 6/7/2012 Recent Obituaries
Easton Easton Courier 12/1/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fairfield Fairfield Gazette 10/26/1786 – 9/23/1789 Newspaper Archives
Fairfield Fairfield Citizen News 1/17/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fairfield Fairfield Daily Voice 5/3/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fairfield Fairfield Sun 9/18/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Glastonbury Rivereast News Bulletin 9/4/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Greenwich Greenwich Post 10/2/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Greenwich Greenwich Daily Voice 6/30/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Greenwich Greenwich Citizen 11/8/2002 – 4/17/2013 Recent Obituaries
Greenwich Greenwich Time 8/8/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hamden Hamden Journal 12/7/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hartford Connecticut Courant 10/29/1764 – 12/28/1876 Newspaper Archives
Hartford Hartford Daily Courant 2/3/1840 – 10/25/1914 Newspaper Archives
Hartford American Mercury 7/12/1784 – 6/25/1833 Newspaper Archives
Hartford Connecticut Mirror 7/10/1809 – 12/15/1832 Newspaper Archives
Hartford Times 1/1/1817 – 9/2/1876 Newspaper Archives
Hartford Religious Inquirer 11/10/1821 – 11/7/1835 Newspaper Archives
Hartford Patriot and Eagle 3/7/1835 – 12/30/1837 Newspaper Archives
Hartford Hartford Gazette 1/13/1794 – 3/19/1795 Newspaper Archives
Hartford Times and Weekly Advertiser 1/12/1829 – 12/28/1829 Newspaper Archives
Hartford Hartford Times 2/6/1832 – 8/16/1864 Newspaper Archives
Hartford Connecticut Observer 1/11/1825 – 10/3/1831 Newspaper Archives
Hartford Commercial Record 1/25/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hartford Hartford News 4/4/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hartford Hartford Courant 7/9/1991 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hartford Hartford Advocate 11/7/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kensington Berlin Citizen 6/2/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Litchfield Litchfield Monitor 12/21/1784 – 7/1/1807 Newspaper Archives
Litchfield Litchfield Republican 5/19/1819 – 6/13/1856 Newspaper Archives
Litchfield Witness 8/14/1805 – 6/24/1807 Newspaper Archives
Litchfield Litchfield Gazette 3/16/1808 – 5/17/1809 Newspaper Archives
Litchfield Litchfield Journal 4/8/1818 – 10/20/1818 Newspaper Archives
Litchfield Sun 4/25/1835 – 4/13/1839 Newspaper Archives
Manchester Journal Inquirer 3/8/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Meriden Record-Journal 12/8/1997 – Current Recent Obituaries
Meriden North Haven Citizen 3/18/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Middlefield Town Times 6/30/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Middletown Middlesex Gazette 11/8/1785 – 1/23/1834 Newspaper Archives
Middletown Constitution 12/29/1841 – 12/30/1879 Newspaper Archives
Middletown Sentinel and Witness 1/1/1823 – 8/7/1833 Newspaper Archives
Middletown Daily Constitution 7/10/1872 – 8/5/1876 Newspaper Archives
Middletown Connecticut Spectator 4/20/1814 – 4/10/1816 Newspaper Archives
Milford Milford Mirror 11/30/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Monroe Monroe Courier 3/8/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Mystic Mystic Pioneer 3/12/1859 – 3/2/1867 Newspaper Archives
Mystic Mystic River Press 1/11/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
New Britain Herald 12/1/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
New Canaan New Canaan Daily Voice 5/28/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
New Canaan New Canaan News-Review 11/5/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
New Canaan New Canaan Advertiser 8/8/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
New Haven New Haven Register 10/23/1878 – 12/31/1900 Newspaper Archives
New Haven Columbian Register 1/5/1813 – 12/30/1876 Newspaper Archives
New Haven Connecticut Journal 10/23/1767 – 2/24/1835 Newspaper Archives
New Haven Connecticut Herald 11/1/1803 – 3/30/1889 Newspaper Archives
New Haven Daily Herald 3/12/1836 – 12/30/1843 Newspaper Archives
New Haven New Haven Palladium 7/19/1861 – 12/31/1863 Newspaper Archives
New Haven New-Haven Gazette, and Connecticut Magazine 2/15/1786 – 6/18/1789 Newspaper Archives
New Haven New-Haven Gazette 5/13/1784 – 2/9/1786 Newspaper Archives
New Haven Visitor 10/30/1802 – 10/25/1803 Newspaper Archives
New Haven New-Haven Chronicle 4/25/1786 – 9/11/1787 Newspaper Archives
New Haven Connecticut Gazette 9/20/1755 – 1/12/1767 Newspaper Archives
New Haven Black Coalition Weekly 3/6/1972 – 9/14/1972 Newspaper Archives
New Haven Fairfield County Weekly 2/17/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
New Haven New Haven Register 1/3/1988 – Current Recent Obituaries
New Haven New Haven Advocate 11/5/1998 – Current Recent Obituaries
New London Connecticut Gazette 11/18/1763 – 5/29/1844 Newspaper Archives
New London New London Daily Chronicle 4/26/1848 – 12/31/1864 Newspaper Archives
New London Morning News 11/8/1844 – 4/25/1848 Newspaper Archives
New London New London Democrat 3/21/1845 – 4/12/1873 Newspaper Archives
New London People’s Advocate 8/26/1840 – 4/26/1848 Newspaper Archives
New London Bee 6/14/1797 – 6/23/1802 Newspaper Archives
New London Weekly Oracle 10/22/1796 – 12/30/1799 Newspaper Archives
New London Republican Advocate 1/2/1822 – 12/10/1828 Newspaper Archives
New London New London Daily Star 1/5/1857 – 8/16/1860 Newspaper Archives
New London New-London Summary 9/29/1758 – 9/23/1763 Newspaper Archives
New London True Republican 7/1/1807 – 2/24/1808 Newspaper Archives
New London Day, The: Archive 7/24/2003 – 12/29/2006 Recent Obituaries
New Milford New Milford Spectrum 10/10/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Newtown Newtown Bee 1/1/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Norwalk Independent Republican 6/17/1802 – 4/6/1803 Newspaper Archives
Norwalk Norwalk Citizen News 12/13/2002 – 11/11/2013 Recent Obituaries
Norwalk Norwalk Daily Voice 4/1/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Norwich Norwich Courier 11/30/1796 – 8/16/1876 Newspaper Archives
Norwich Norwich Aurora 5/15/1839 – 9/29/1876 Newspaper Archives
Norwich Norwich Packet 11/11/1773 – 2/9/1802 Newspaper Archives
Norwich Connecticut Centinel 2/16/1802 – 10/13/1807 Newspaper Archives
Norwich Norwich Republican 10/1/1828 – 4/15/1835 Newspaper Archives
Norwich Weekly Register 11/29/1791 – 8/19/1795 Newspaper Archives
Norwich Norwich Morning Bulletin 10/16/1860 – 8/13/1887 Newspaper Archives
Norwich Native American 3/4/1812 – 6/23/1813 Newspaper Archives
Norwich True Republican 6/20/1804 – 11/5/1806 Newspaper Archives
Norwich Religious Messenger 6/11/1831 – 9/8/1832 Newspaper Archives
Norwich Canal of Intelligence 2/21/1827 – 10/28/1829 Newspaper Archives
Norwich Bulletin 1/28/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Oxford Oxford Gazette 3/6/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Redding Redding Pilot 1/1/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Ridgefield Ridgefield Press 6/12/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sharon Rural Gazette 6/9/1800 – 7/13/1801 Newspaper Archives
Shelton Shelton Extra 3/6/2008 – 3/17/2011 Recent Obituaries
Shelton Shelton Herald 12/6/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Southbury Voices 8/2/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Southington Plainville Citizen 8/27/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Southington Southington Citizen 5/14/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Stamford Stamford Advocate 4/5/1829 – 9/24/1903 Newspaper Archives
Stamford Advocate 1/17/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Stamford Stamford Daily Voice 6/30/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Stonington Impartial Journal 10/8/1799 – 3/6/1804 Newspaper Archives
Stonington Journal of the Times 10/10/1798 – 9/17/1799 Newspaper Archives
Stonington-Port Patriot 7/24/1801 – 2/11/1803 Newspaper Archives
Stratford Stratford Star 12/6/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Suffield Impartial Herald 6/14/1797 – 6/11/1799 Newspaper Archives
Torrington Register Citizen 10/25/2007 – 8/2/2009 Recent Obituaries
Trumbull Trumbull Times 12/6/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Waterbury Republican-American 6/25/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Watertown Town Times 8/31/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Weston Weston Forum 12/17/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Weston-Easton Weston-Easton Daily Voice 5/28/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Westport Westport News 9/17/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Westport Westport Daily Voice 5/11/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Willimantic Willimantic Journal 10/5/1865 – 12/13/1866 Newspaper Archives
Wilton Wilton Daily Voice 5/28/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Wilton Wilton Bulletin 10/2/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Windham Windham Herald 3/12/1791 – 12/31/1812 Newspaper Archives
Windham Advertiser 5/7/1818 – 3/11/1819 Newspaper Archives
Windham Register 3/13/1817 – 1/1/1818 Newspaper Archives
Windham Political Visitant 5/15/1820 – 5/15/1820 Newspaper Archives

You can either print or create a PDF version of this Blog post by simply clicking on the green “Print/PDF” button below. The PDF version makes it easy to save this post onto your desktop or portable device for quick reference—all the Connecticut newspaper links will be live.

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I Met Abraham Lincoln: True Stories in Historical Newspapers

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this guest blog post—in honor of today being Presidents’ Day—Gena searches old newspapers to find amazing stories about people who were still alive in the 1930s, ’40s and ’50s who had met Abraham Lincoln.

Did your ancestor meet a famous person? Maybe they had occasion to hear a great orator or speak with an author. Did they rub elbows with someone infamous? I’m always fascinated by the history that our ancestors, even our more recent ancestors, witnessed.

Do you have an ancestor who met, heard or saw Abraham Lincoln? There could be a variety of reasons a 19th century ancestor encountered the 16th president of the United States. As president during the American Civil War, Lincoln gave speeches and visited the troops so it’s possible that a person living in the 1860s may have had an encounter with him.

photo of President Abraham Lincoln, 8 November 1863

Photo: President Abraham Lincoln, 8 November 1863, by Alexander Gardner. Credit: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

But did you ever consider that some of those same people may have lived into the20th century and had occasion to tell their story about meeting Lincoln? Many Civil War soldiers or contemporaries of Lincoln would have been at least middle-aged to quite elderly when the 20th century rolled in. There were some alive at the beginning decades of the 20th century who were able to boast about meeting Lincoln.

So what if we up the ante? What about people who were still alive in the mid-20th century? The chances of someone who had met or personally saw Lincoln would have dwindled by then. However, a search in GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives shows that there were still people at that late date who could tell of meeting what many believe is the greatest president who ever lived.

Samuel J. Seymour, Last Living Witness to Lincoln’s Assassination

In 1956 an elderly man appeared on the television game show I’ve Got a Secret. This TV show featured a celebrity panel who, when presented with a special guest, tried to guess what secret the person held. The featured guests’ secrets included things that were amazing or unusual about that person. Those who stumped the panel received a cash prize. Samuel J. Seymour spent about five minutes on the show while two of the panelists asked questions that led them to guessing his secret. (A side note: while many younger readers wouldn’t recognize most of the celebrities that appeared on the show, on the day of Seymour’s guest spot there was a very recognizable face—that of famous actress and comedian Lucille Ball—who was on the panel, but she didn’t get a chance to question Mr. Seymour.)

Seymour was a 5-year-old boy when he was taken to Ford’s Theatre on 14 April 1865—the night that President Lincoln was shot. While he did not know initially that Lincoln was shot, and did not see the actual shooting, he did remember years later the fear he felt that night. He also remembered feeling concerned about the man (John Wilkes Booth) that he saw fall onto the stage. In the chaos of the moment—and because he was so young—Seymour didn’t realize that Booth had in fact shot the President when he saw the actor suddenly leap down onto the stage.

Of the lasting effect of being at Ford’s Theatre that night, Mr. Seymour said: “…I sometimes still relive the horror of Lincoln’s assassination, dozing in my rocker as an old codger like me is bound to do.”

Imagine that—a man in the 1950s carrying the memory of President Lincoln’s assassination!

I Saw Lincoln Shot, Plain Dealer newspaper article 7 February 1954

Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 7 February 1954, page 192

You can view the actual portion of this episode of I’ve Got a Secret featuring Samuel Seymour on YouTube.

Richard R. Davis, Civil War Soldier

The following 1936 newspaper article, written just three years shy of Mr. Davis’s 100th birthday, tells of his Civil War career and his meeting Abraham Lincoln one day when the president came and spoke to the troops. Of that talk, Mr. Davis remembered that Lincoln “told us then that we were fighting to preserve the Union of States and of our sacrifice.” After speaking, Lincoln walked amongst the troops with his son.

Davis recounts that when he tussled the hair of Lincoln’s son the boy grinned and said: “Do you think I’m a child? Say, I’m a pretty big fellow.”

Richard Davis: Civil War Veteran Who Met Lincoln, Druid newspaper article 1 December 1936

Druid (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania), 1 December 1936, page 1

Davis actually saw Lincoln several times, and also met other noteworthy figures of the time such as Generals Grant and Hooker. The reporter writes that it’s obvious that Lincoln was a hero to Davis and that his time serving in the Civil War was a “highlight of his journey along life’s highways.”

Meeting Presidential Candidate Lincoln

Because some young people who met Lincoln went on to live long lives, we do have stories of the Great Emancipator told by witnesses well after most who knew Lincoln had died. For example, Perry Green Brock—who died in 1949 at the age of 105 years—told of meeting candidate Lincoln in 1856 in Kentucky when he was a boy. Brock later fought for the Confederacy during the Civil War but doesn’t mention what he thought of Lincoln during that time. He was quoted in the following newspaper article as saying that the South would have won if “us rebels hadn’t run out of shells.”

Perry G. Brock, Who Met Lincoln, Passes at 105, Dallas Morning News newspaper obituary 24 November 1949

Dallas Morning News (Dallas, Texas), 24 November 1949, section III, page 6

Did your ancestor meet Abraham Lincoln or another famous person? If so, research the encounter in GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives, then write the story and preserve it for future generations. If your ancestor did indeed meet Abraham Lincoln, please share the details about the encounter with us in the comments. We’d love to hear your family story.

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102 Year Old Ex-Slave Once Shook Abraham Lincoln’s Hand

Abraham Lincoln: The Life of a Legend Infographic