6 Genealogy Projects to Interest Kids & Teens in Family History

Introduction: Duncan Kuehn is a professional genealogist with over eight years of client experience. She has worked on several well-known projects, such as “Who Do You Think You Are?” and researching President Barack Obama’s ancestry. In this guest blog post, Duncan describes six fun genealogy projects to help interest children and teenagers in family history.

Many of us want to share our passion for family history research with our children, grandchildren, nieces and nephews, and other young ones in our lives. This fulfills our innate need to leave a legacy behind, and to inform and guide the next generation. Not only is this sharing beneficial for the storyteller, it plays an important role in the life of the listener.

Why Pass Down Family Stories?

Family stories give children hope, courage, perspective, and greater understanding. They see that others have done hard things and come out the other side stronger (or at least still alive and kicking). “Uncle Bob had this exact experience and it turned out well for him.” It can provide perspective on life’s blessings and challenges. “What did people use to communicate before mobile phones and Facebook?” Sharing the stories of our ancestors can connect family members and encourage empathy and understanding for other people’s experiences. There is even evidence from recent psychological research supporting the idea that children with a better understanding of their family’s past possess more self-confidence.

But how can we have those magical moments with the young ones in our lives? Remember that when we share our passion for family history we don’t want to push others, but rather entice them and invite them to know more. While complex and in-depth genealogy research challenges may make us giddy, they aren’t nearly as exciting to “future researchers.” Start intriguing them with new ideas and family stories that will appeal to them at their level. Realize that not every effort will be a success every time. Some children are naturally more interested in family history than others. We should make an effort to reach all of the important children in our lives with genealogy in a way that makes sense to them.

1. Share Old Family Photos

Most children love pictures. Old family photos, and graphics from newspapers, are one way to interest children in family history research.

News of the World Told in Pictures, Philadelphia Inquirer newspaper article 9 August 1922

Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 9 August 1922, page 13

Smaller children have very short attention spans and are often highly visual.

2. Play Genealogy Games

They also love interactive games. When my children were young, I created two sets of cards with the pictures of their family members: themselves, siblings, parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles, cousins, great grandparents and even pets. Many of these people my children knew well, some lived far away, and others had already passed on. We would play matching, “Go Fish,” and other games with these small laminated photos. Our favorite was our own brand of the classic children’s game “Guess Who.” This taught them how to notice small details, the names of colors, and other important skills in addition to learning about family members. Eventually, we lost a few of the cards after my smallest son started sleeping with them. I didn’t mind because they had fulfilled the purpose of creating a bridge between generations.

3. Explore Old Newspaper Articles Together

Using newspaper articles about family members is another effective way to engage little children. These articles are often written in interesting and entertaining language. Even better, they are usually brief enough to accommodate children’s short attention spans. I grew up with some copies of newspaper articles featuring my grandfather. One article had a picture of my grandpa receiving a cake for his 12th birthday. I loved seeing a picture of him when he was a child and thought he must have been someone important to get his picture in the paper!  As a child, I didn’t know that many people had their picture in the paper.

In fact, I had several old newspaper articles that included pictures of my grandfather. One showed him and his beautiful sister singing together. Another picture showed his graduating class. And yet another photo was of him eating a burger covered in my grandma’s homemade barbeque sauce, recipe included.

Newspaper articles, such as those in GenealogyBank’s online Historical Newspaper Archives, add flavor to the details about our ancestors. People are more than names and dates; they have stories. These newspaper articles express that and gave me a better understanding of my grandpa even though I grew up visiting him every week.

Imagine how excited your children would be to find an old newspaper picture of their grandfather as a youth, printed long ago when he was a Boy Scout!

Named Omaha's Best (Boy) Scouts (Cezere Zampesi and Edward Brown), Omaha World Herald newspaper articles 26 August 1926

Omaha World Herald (Omaha, Nebraska), 26 August 1926, page 2

Teenagers often find old newspaper articles fascinating. I have searched for humorous or unusual articles by using the keywords “dear wife” or “dear husband” or even “funny” or “joke.”

Here are a few examples of what I found.

In this unusual example, a captured soldier in 1823 wrote his wife the day before his scheduled execution, explaining his death. She received his letter, and then decided to make the best of it by marrying another man. Well, that condemned soldier ended up being rescued, but he didn’t have the heart to go home and tell his wife the news, breaking up her new marriage!

letter written by a condemned soldier in 1823, Sentinel and Witness newspaper article 16 April 1823

Sentinel and Witness (Middletown, Connecticut), 16 April 1823, page 4

In this funny example, a husband’s practical joke on his wife backfired when he pretended he had fallen out of the bedroom window—and her response was not the scare he had hoped to cause. Hiding behind the curtain, he heard her say:

“Poor old Jim,” she quietly said. “He’s tumbled out of the window in his raggedest nightshirt. What a spectacle he’ll be when they find him in the morning!” Then she lay down again and went to sleep.

What did you do?

“Stood there like a fool for a minute or two and then sneaked into bed.”

article about a practical joke a husband pulled on his wife, Morning Olympian newspaper article 13 December 1900

Morning Olympian (Olympia, Washington), 13 December 1900, page 4

Children can also search for topics that they are interested in, such as trains, UFOs, scary stories, etc., on GenealogyBank’s search page by doing a keyword search.

Everyone loves a good ghost story. Despite the best efforts of 100 police, no one could identify the thumping sounds coming out of this haunted house in Chicago.

article about a haunted house in Chicago, Augusta Chronicle newspaper article 13 October 1922

Augusta Chronicle (Augusta, Georgia), 13 October 1922, page 3

How about this eerie story, of the “horrible experience” of Mrs. Hart? She fell into a seven-hour trance and everyone thought she was dead. Although she couldn’t move or speak, she was aware of everything the entire time—heard herself pronounced dead; listened to the fading footsteps of her loved ones after saying their goodbyes and walking away from her bedside; and was aware the undertaker was about to embalm her…when she suddenly woke up!

The Horrible Experience of Mrs. Hart at East St. Louis, Alive but Believed Dead, Rockford Republic newspaper article 17 January 1900

Rockford Republic (Rockford, Illinois), 17 January 1900, page 3

4. Compile a Family Storybook or Scrapbook

You can even write your own short stories about your ancestors, and add photos, to share with your children. I created a genealogy book, with both photos and short stories, to showcase our family history. The family stories don’t need to be long or even have a moral to impart. In my book I included a letter written by a neighbor of one of my 6th great grandmother’s. It talked about how my ancestor, Ann Quick, would take a hasty dip in the nearby river every morning, ice filled or not, to strengthen her “constitution.” My kids now refer to a fast, cold shower as an “Ann Quick shower” to which we all reply, “Good for the constitution!” It is a small story, but it makes her personal to my kids. I used to read this book as bedtime stories for my children.

Children enjoy seeing pictures of their ancestors when they were little kids.

photo of the McBan twins, Baltimore American newspaper article 28 December 1922

Baltimore American (Baltimore, Maryland), 28 December 1922, page 9

5. Create a Family Recipe Book

If the children like to cook, have them collect family recipes and make a book to send out to friends and relatives. If they can’t find old family recipes, use ones that the family loves now and look through the newspaper for other recipes that sound interesting.

6. Join a Volunteer Project for Genealogy

Older children and teens that show an interest in family history can get involved in fun genealogy-related projects. For example, they can do indexing (get more information here: https://familysearch.org/indexing/). Indexing means reading original records and entering the information into a set form so that it is available for searching. This is crucial for making documents easy to find. FamilySearch’s highlighted projects for this year include obituaries, which are typically typed and fun to read. Many people I have talked to have mentioned that indexing can be a fun addiction! Other websites also have volunteer projects. One that comes to mind is BillionGraves. This site lets you download an app to your smart phone. Then you go to a local cemetery and photograph the headstones. These images and accompanying index are made free for anyone to view.

Here is an example of a recent—and lighthearted—obituary that would be fun to index.

obituary for Mary Mullaney, North Shore Now newspaper article 12 September 2013

North Shore Now (Bayside, Wisconsin), 12 September 2013, page 22

Some teens are interested in helping with genealogical research. Many of my peers began their own researching experience when 12-14 years old. Not only do they have excellent computer skills to find information, they also naturally question everything. While annoying to parents, it is actually a critical research strategy. A teen’s natural ability to question and seek to understand can help you to see your research in a different light. Guide them along by answering their questions, leading them to interesting resources, and gently nudging them to expand their thinking and learn more. Soon they will be showing you how to do things! My 15-year-old son just showed me a great new mapping tool that he found even though he insists that he “isn’t really interested in genealogy.”

Tip: Remember to Make Family History Fun!

If your goal is to interest your children in family history, then the key is keeping the activities fun and interesting. Never push them too far beyond their interest level or they will learn to dread the activity. I grew up hating history class in school, yet I graduated from college with a history degree. How did that happen? The short answer is that I loved to hear the stories my grandma told me. What impact will your family stories have on the rising generation?

27 Topeka Newspapers Online to Research Your Genealogy

Yesterday Kansas celebrated the 153rd anniversary of its statehood—Kansas Territory was admitted into the Union on 29 January 1861 as the 34th state. Throughout its state history, the capital of Kansas has been Topeka. Located alongside the Kansas River, Topeka was established in 1854 and became incorporated in 1857.

an illustration of Topeka, Kansas, in 1869, by A. Ruger

Illustration: Topeka, Kansas, in 1869, by A. Ruger. Credit: Wikipedia.

Are you researching your family history from Topeka? GenealogyBank’s online Topeka newspaper archives contain 27 titles to help you research your genealogy in this important Midwestern city, providing news coverage from 1880 to Today.

Dig in and search for obituaries and other news articles about your ancestors in these historical and recent Topeka newspapers online:

Search Topeka Newspaper Archives (1880 – 1977)
Search Topeka Recent Newspaper Obituaries (2001 – Current)

Here is our complete list of online Topeka newspapers, divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries. Each Topeka newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more.

Discover a variety of genealogy records and news stories in these 26 Topeka historical newspapers:

Search recent obituary records for your relatives in this Topeka newspaper:

Download the complete list of newspapers in Topeka by clicking on the image below. On the list itself, just click on the name of the newspaper to be taken directly to your newspaper title of interest.

Search Topeka Newspapers Online

125 Kansas Newspapers Now Online for Your Genealogy Research

Today Kansas celebrates the 153rd anniversary of its statehood—Kansas Territory was admitted into the Union on 29 January 1861 as the 34th state.

the official state seal of Kansas

Illustration: official state seal of Kansas. Credit: Wikipedia.

If you are researching your family roots in Kansas, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online Kansas newspaper archives: 125 titles to help you search your family history in “The Sunflower State,” providing coverage from 1841 to Today. There are more than 4 million articles and records in this online collection.

Dig into the archives and search for obituaries and other news articles about your ancestors in these recent and historical KS newspapers online. Our Kansas newspapers are divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries.

Search Kansas Newspaper Archives (1841 – 1981)
Search Kansas Recent Obituaries (1984 – Current)

Download the full PDF list of Kansas newspapers by clicking on the image below. Just click on the name of the newspaper to be taken directly to your newspaper title of interest.

Kansas Newspapers for Genealogy

GenealogyBank Update: 13 Million Newspaper Articles Just Added!

Every day, GenealogyBank is working diligently to digitize more U.S. newspapers and obituaries, expanding our online archives to give you the largest newspaper archives for family history research available on the web. We just completed adding 13 million more newspaper articles to the archives, vastly increasing our coverage of life in America from coast to coast!

GenealogyBank's search box

Here are the details about our most recent U.S. newspaper additions:

  • A total of 29 newspaper titles from 17 U.S. states
  • 7 of these titles are newspapers added to GenealogyBank for the first time
  • Newspaper titles marked with an asterisk (*) are brand new to our online archives
  • We’ve shown the newspaper issue date ranges so that you can determine if the newly added content is relevant to your personal genealogy research

To see our newspaper archives’ complete title lists, click here.

State City Title Start Date End Date
CA Fresno Fresno Morning Republican 12/14/1890 12/31/1893
CA San Luis Obispo San Luis Obispo Daily Telegram 6/1/1907 9/30/1914
FL Miami Nuevo Herald 3/29/1976 12/31/1982
GA Columbus Columbus Daily Enquirer 1/1/1923 2/24/1926
GA Macon Macon Telegraph 3/12/1923 11/5/1925
GA Marietta Marietta Journal 11/27/1945 11/27/1945
ID Boise Idaho Statesman 1/1/1923 2/15/1925
IL Springfield Daily Illinois State Journal 1/4/1923 7/30/1947
IN Martinsville Reporter-Times, The* 02/02/2013 Current
IN Mooresville Mooresville-Decatur Times, The* 02/02/2013 Current
KS El Dorado Butler County Times-Gazette, The* 11/05/2013 Current
KY Lexington Lexington Herald 1/1/1923 10/31/1924
LA Baton Rouge Advocate 12/1/1985 12/31/1985
LA Baton Rouge State Times Advocate 11/2/1987 10/2/1991
MA Boston Boston Herald 12/2/1951 4/15/1992
MS Biloxi Daily Herald 1/1/1926 3/31/1928
NY New York Jewish Messenger 01/02/1857 12/26/1868
NY New York New Yorker Volkszeitung 04/01/1913 04/30/1923
NY Watertown Watertown Daily Times 7/14/1880 7/27/1921
NC Charlotte Charlotte Observer 1/1/1923 10/31/1924
NC Greensboro Greensboro Daily News 7/17/1921 2/29/1968
OH Columbus Lantern, The: Ohio State University* 08/03/1998 Current
OH Sidney Sidney Daily News, The* 09/15/2013 Current
PA Clarks Summit Abington Journal, The* 10/15/2013 Current
PA Dallas Dallas Post, The* 10/05/2013 Current
PA Erie Erie Tageblatt 05/05/1913 06/05/1916
VA Richmond Richmond Times Dispatch 4/11/1971 7/15/1983
WA Bellingham Bellingham Herald 1/1/1923 12/31/1925
WA Olympia Morning Olympian 9/7/1924 11/15/1924

List of 86 Online Boston Newspapers to Trace Your Family Roots

Founded by Puritan colonists in 1630, Boston has played a leading role throughout the history of the United States. The capital of Massachusetts and the largest city in New England, Boston was an integral part of the American Revolution—including such important events as the Boston Massacre, Boston Tea Party, Siege of Boston and the Battle of Bunker Hill.

the painting “The Destruction of the Tea at Boston Harbor” by Nathaniel Currier

Illustration: “The Destruction of the Tea at Boston Harbor” by Nathaniel Currier. Credit: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

Are you researching your family history from Boston? GenealogyBank’s online Boston newspaper archives contain 86 titles to help you research your ancestry in “Beantown,” providing coverage dating back to the Colonial Period, all the way to Today.

a photo of the official city seal of Boston, Massachusetts

Illustration: official city seal of Boston, Massachusetts. Credit: Wikipedia.

Dig in and search for obituaries, birth announcements, marriage notices and other interesting news articles about your Bostonian ancestors in these historical and recent Boston newspapers online:

Search Boston Newspaper Archives (1690-1992)

Search Boston Recent Obituaries (1997-Today)

The following complete list of our online Boston newspapers is divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more.

Discover a variety of genealogy records and news stories from Colonial and Revolutionary times that are exclusive to our extensive collection in these 81 Boston historical newspapers:

Search recent obituary records for your recently deceased relatives in these 5 Boston newspapers:

Click on the graphic below to download a PDF version of the list of our Boston Newspapers, for easy access to our online collection right from your desktop.

a graphic promoting GenealogyBank's online collection of Boston newspapers

50 Alabama Newspapers Now Online for Your Genealogy Research

Last Saturday Alabama celebrated the 194th anniversary of its statehood—the “Heart of Dixie” was admitted into the Union on 14 December 1819 as the 22nd state.

photo of the official state seal of Alabama

Illustration: official state seal of Alabama. Credit: Wikipedia.

If you are researching your family roots in Alabama, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online Alabama newspaper archives: 50 titles to help you search your family history in the “Yellowhammer State,” providing coverage from 1816 to Today. There are more than 21 million articles and records in this online collection.

Dig into the archives and search for obituaries and other news articles about your ancestors in these recent and historical AL newspapers online:

Search Alabama Newspaper Archives (1816-1992)

Search Alabama Recent Obituaries (1992-Today)

Here is our complete list of online Alabama newspapers, divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more.

Discover a variety of genealogy records and news stories in these 21 Alabama historical newspapers, listed alphabetically by city:

Search recent obituary records for your relatives in these 29 Alabama newspapers, listed alphabetically by city:

Alabama Newspaper Archives at GenealogyBank

Alabama Newspaper Archives at GenealogyBank

Looking for Your Family Roots in Chicago?

Incorporated in 1837, the city of Chicago, Illinois, has long played a leading role in the nation’s cultural and commercial life. After New York City and Los Angeles, Chicago has the third largest population of any city in the U.S.—nearly 3,000,000 residents, with almost 10 million in the greater Chicago metropolitan area.

photo of the official city seal of Chicago, Illinois

Illustration: official city seal of Chicago. Credit: Wikipedia.

Are you researching your family history from Chicago? GenealogyBank’s online Chicago newspaper archives contain 40 titles to help you search your family history in “The Windy City,” providing coverage from 1854 to Today.

Dig in and search for obituaries and other news articles about your ancestors in these historical and recent Chicago newspapers online:

Search Chicago Newspaper Archives (1854-2010)

Search Chicago Recent Obituaries (1985-Today)

Click the image below to download a PDF of the list of Chicago newspapers to save to your desktop. Just click on the newspaper name to go directly to your title of interest.

List of Chicago Newspapers Online at GenealogyBank

List of Chicago Newspapers Online at GenealogyBank

Here is our complete list of online Chicago newspapers, divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more.

Discover a variety of genealogy records and news stories in these 28 Chicago historical newspapers:

Search recent obituary records for your relatives in these 12 Chicago newspapers:

Perfect Holiday Gift for Genealogists: GenealogyBank Membership

Christmas is two weeks from today; are you looking for last minute Christmas gifts? Perhaps you’re looking for that perfect Christmas gift for the genealogist on your shopping list? Maybe a Christmas gift for grandma…or something for the whole family?

ad promoting GenealogyBank gift memberships

Here’s a great genealogy gift to give this holiday: GenealogyBank is now offering Gift Memberships!

It’s quick and easy to give a GenealogyBank Gift Membership: just click here to get started.

Vital records give you the names and dates to fill in your family tree—but newspapers give you the stories to get to know your ancestors: the lives they led and the times they lived in. Our Gift Membership lets you give an annual ALL-ACCESS pass to more than 6,500 online newspapers, with over 220 million obituaries and more than 1 billion articles and records!

And there’s more: our genealogy website’s expansive online archives also contain rare books, personal writings, military records, official government documents and more rich material for in-depth ancestry research.

With a gift membership to our website, your loved one can trace their family tree back in time over three centuries, with historical records that are exclusively available in GenealogyBank’s ever-growing digital archive collections.

Questions about our genealogy Gift Memberships? We’re here to help. Call a member of our friendly support staff toll free at 1-866-641-3297 Mon-Fri 10am-7pm U.S. EST or email us anytime at gbsupport@genealogybank.com.

339 Illinois Newspapers Now Online for Your Genealogy Research

Today Illinois celebrates the 195th anniversary of its statehood—the “Prairie State” was admitted into the Union on 3 December 1818 as the 21st state. The date on the official state seal, 26 August 1818, commemorates the adoption of Illinois’ first constitution that paved the way for statehood.

photo of the official state seal of Illinois

Illustration: official state seal of Illinois. Credit: Wikipedia.

If you are researching your family roots in Illinois, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online Illinois newspaper archives: 339 titles to help you search your family history in the “Land of Lincoln,” providing coverage from 1818 to Today.

Dig in and search for obituaries and other news articles about your ancestors in these recent and historical IL newspapers online:

Search Illinois Newspaper Archives (1818 – 2010)

Search Illinois Recent Obituaries (1985 – Today)

Do you research your Illinois ancestry frequently? Download the PDF version of our Illinois newspaper list by clicking on the graphic below and save the file locally on your computer. Whenever you are ready to start researching your genealogy in the archives, simply click on the newspaper name (in blue) to go directly to your newspaper title of interest at GenealogyBank.

Illinois Newspaper List for GenealogyHave a blog or website? Use the embed code below to share our list with your visitors.

Here is our complete list of online Illinois newspapers, divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more.

Discover your family’s story in a variety of genealogy records and news stories in these 62 Illinois historical newspapers, listed alphabetically by city:

Search recent obituary records for your relatives in these 277 Illinois newspapers, listed alphabetically by city:

How to Find Descendants of Mayflower Pilgrims in Recent Obits

Genealogists love their ancestors—as well as the fact that important family history connections are often mentioned in recent obituaries.

Have you ever noticed how common it is for these recent obituaries to describe the name of their ancestor who came over on the Mayflower ship or fought in the American Revolutionary War?

screenshot of recent obituaries from GenealogyBank

Credit: GenealogyBank

Use those names in obituaries to your advantage in your genealogy research. If you’re searching for someone whose ancestry goes all the way back to the Mayflower and Plymouth Colony, then include the keyword “Mayflower” and that Pilgrim ancestor’s name in your search.

screenshot of a search in GenealogyBank for descendants of Mayflower passenger Samuel Fuller

Credit: GenealogyBank

For example, if you were looking for the recent obituary of someone descended from Mayflower passenger Samuel Fuller in the Recent Obituaries search page, you could type in: Mayflower, Samuel Fuller. This search will find all obituaries that mention this Mayflower ship passenger.

This particular search found 51 obituaries.

screenshot of search results in GenealogyBank for descendants of Mayflower passenger Samuel Fuller

Credit: GenealogyBank

Since each person in these 51 obituaries is the descendant of a common ancestor, Mayflower ship passenger Samuel Fuller, we know that all of them are relatives.

You will then want to research and document each generation back to this Mayflower Pilgrim ancestor to confirm these new members of your family tree.