Mississippi Archives: 66 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

Mississippi, whose western border is primarily the Mississippi River, was admitted into the Union as the nation’s 20th state on 10 December 1817. The 32nd largest state in the country, Mississippi is the 31st most populous.

photo of aMississippi welcome sign on Interstate 20

Photo: Mississippi welcome sign on Interstate 20. Credit: WebTV3; Wikimedia Commons.

If you are researching your ancestry from Mississippi, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online MS newspaper archives: 66 titles to help you search your family history in the “Magnolia State,” providing coverage from 1802 to Today. There are more than 5.2 million articles and records in our online Mississippi newspaper archives!

Dig deep into our online archives and search for historical and recent obituaries and other news articles about your Mississippi ancestors in these MS newspapers. Our Mississippi newspapers are divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries (obituaries only).

Note that our Mississippi archives contain many of the very first newspapers in the state from the early 1800s, many of which were published in Natchez, MS, including the Misissippi Herald and Natchez Gazette, Mississippi Messenger, Mississippian, and the Weekly Chronicle.

Search Mississippi Newspaper Archives (1802 – 1964)

Search Mississippi Recent Obituaries (1994 – Current)

illustration: state flag of Mississippi

Illustration: state flag of Mississippi. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Here is a list of online Mississippi newspapers in the historical archives. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more. The MS newspaper titles are listed alphabetically by city.

City Title Date Range * Collection
Biloxi Biloxi Herald 01/14/1888 – 11/26/1898 Newspaper Archives
Biloxi Daily Herald 08/16/1898 – 12/31/1955 Newspaper Archives
Biloxi Sun Herald 02/12/1994 – Current Recent Obituaries
Brandon Free State 01/20/1900 – 01/20/1900 Newspaper Archives
Brookhaven Daily Leader 05/03/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Clarksdale Clarksdale Press Register 11/08/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Cleveland Bolivar Commercial 11/04/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Columbia Columbian-Progress 11/03/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Columbus Columbus Packet 12/12/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Columbus Commercial Dispatch 05/07/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Corinth Daily Corinthian 06/12/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Eupora Webster Progress-Times 03/25/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Forest Scott County Times 08/05/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Greenville Delta Democrat Times 01/08/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Greenwood Greenwood Commonwealth 05/29/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Gulfport Daily Herald 01/01/1910 – 12/30/1922 Newspaper Archives
Hattiesburg Hattiesburg Post 09/22/2013 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hattiesburg Lamar Times 04/21/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hattiesburg Petal News 04/21/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Indianola Indianola Enterprise-Tocsin 09/16/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Jackson Clarion 01/06/1886 – 01/11/1888 Newspaper Archives
Jackson Clarion Ledger 01/19/1888 – 03/06/1890 Newspaper Archives
Jackson Jackson Advocate 02/23/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Jackson Mississippi Free Press 12/16/1961 – 08/01/1964 Newspaper Archives
Jackson Mississippi Weekly 05/18/1935 – 05/18/1935 Newspaper Archives
Jackson Mississippi Link 02/17/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Jackson Northside Sun 07/01/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kosciusko Star Herald 01/07/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Laurel Laurel Leader-Call 05/02/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Louisville Choctaw Plaindealer 02/08/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Louisville Winston County Journal 03/25/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Magee Magee Courier, The & Simpson County News 01/03/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
McComb Enterprise-Journal 12/24/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Meridian Meridian Star 02/17/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Mound Bayou Mound Bayou News-Digest 05/13/1950 – 05/13/1950 Newspaper Archives
Natchez Ariel 07/20/1825 – 07/19/1828 Newspaper Archives
Natchez Mississippi Free Trader 11/20/1844 – 03/28/1854 Newspaper Archives
Natchez Mississippi State Gazette 03/06/1818 – 05/14/1825 Newspaper Archives
Natchez Natchez Democrat 07/14/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Natchez Southern Clarion 05/13/1831 – 11/18/1831 Newspaper Archives
Natchez Southern Galaxy 05/22/1828 – 03/18/1830 Newspaper Archives
Natchez Statesman and Gazette 05/18/1825 – 10/24/1832 Newspaper Archives
Natchez Misissippi Herald and Natchez Gazette 08/10/1802 – 12/31/1807 Newspaper Archives
Natchez Mississippi Messenger 09/07/1804 – 07/07/1808 Newspaper Archives
Natchez Mississippi Republican 04/29/1812 – 12/22/1824 Newspaper Archives
Natchez Mississippian 12/08/1808 – 09/10/1810 Newspaper Archives
Natchez Natchez Daily Courier 11/20/1861 – 11/08/1862 Newspaper Archives
Natchez Natchez Daily Free Trader 01/30/1855 – 03/22/1861 Newspaper Archives
Natchez Natchez Gazette and Mississippi General Advertiser 06/20/1811 – 05/07/1812 Newspaper Archives
Natchez Washington Republican and Natchez Intelligencer 04/24/1816 – 06/14/1817 Newspaper Archives
Natchez Weekly Chronicle 07/06/1808 – 07/01/1812 Newspaper Archives
New Albany New Albany Gazette 11/20/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Oxford Oxford Eagle 02/09/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
PascCCagoula Mississippi Press 08/01/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Pascagoula Mississippi Press, The: Web Edition Articles 10/18/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Picayune Picayune Item 02/05/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Port Gibson Port Gibson Correspondent 01/22/1824 – 03/14/1829 Newspaper Archives
Prentiss Prentiss Headlight 11/01/2013 – Current Recent Obituaries
Starkville Starkville Daily News 03/09/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Vicksburg Daily Commercial 03/21/1877 – 12/28/1882 Newspaper Archives
Vicksburg Golden Rule 01/27/1900 – 01/27/1900 Newspaper Archives
Vicksburg Light 01/18/1900 – 01/18/1900 Newspaper Archives
Vicksburg Vicksburg Post 10/02/2014 – Current Recent Obituaries
Vicksburg Daily Citizen 07/02/1863 – 07/02/1863 Newspaper Archives
West Point Daily Times Leader 03/27/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Winona Winona Times & Conservative 04/02/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries

*Date Ranges may have selected coverage unavailable.

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Related Resource:

Historical Job Names in Newspapers: Old Careers & Occupations (Part II)

Introduction: Mary Harrell-Sesniak is a genealogist, author and editor with a strong technology background. In this guest blog post, Mary provides another fun quiz to test your knowledge of terms used in old newspapers to describe our ancestors’ occupations—and then provides illustrated definitions of those terms.

An earlier blog article of mine entitled “Job Names in Historical Newspapers: Researching Old Occupations” illustrated the origins and meanings of old occupational terms found in historical newspapers. Since then, I’ve found more of these historical job terms that you may stumble across in your family history research. Many of these old career terms are confusing, such as curriers—a term we might mistake for messengers, but actually meant one who cured hides.

Note that some of these old occupation terms are common last names, such as Smith or Wright. This can be a valuable clue to ancestral research. As populations grew, it became necessary to require surnames to distinguish residents for tax and other purposes, so many adopted their hometown or occupation as their surnames.

Test your knowledge with this handy “Early Genealogical Occupations” quiz by matching the occupational terms in the first column with the definitions in the second. If you missed any of the old job definitions, read on to see their definitions illustrated with historical newspaper articles.

early job terms quiz

Collier: Derived from the Middle English word “col” meaning coal, a collier was a quarry worker, coal miner, or a crewman on a ship that transported coal. In this 1770 newspaper article, John Bishop—who ran away from his bail—is described as a collier by trade.

John Bishop, collier, Maryland Gazette newspaper article 4 January 1770

Maryland Gazette (Annapolis, Maryland), 4 January 1770, page 3

Currier: Today we think of curriers as messengers or deliverymen, but originally the term designated a skill in hide curing. Curriers were often tanners (hide tanners) as well, as seen in this 1849 obituary for James Fleming who “was a tanner and currier by trade.”

James Fleming obituary, Trenton State Gazette newspaper article 7 March 1849

Trenton State Gazette (Trenton, New Jersey), 7 March 1849, page 3

Farrier: A farrier was a craftsman or metal worker, who often fitted and trimmed horseshoes. The term is still common today, and was derived from the French word “ferrier,” indicating a blacksmith. (See the definition of Smith below.) In this 1729 notice, the deceased Adam Tuck was a farrier “late of Boston.”

Adam Tuck, farrier, Boston Gazette newspaper article 8 December 1729

Boston Gazette (Boston, Massachusetts), 8 December 1729, page 2

Furrier: A furrier was someone who prepared or traded furs, also known as a skinner. In this 1773 newspaper ad, John Siemon, a furrier, advertised his wares—including muffs and tippets, gloves, and robes and riding dresses trimmed in fur.

John Siemon, furrier, New-York Journal newspaper ad 9 December 1773

New-York Journal (New York, New York), 9 December 1773, page supplement 1

Indentured Servant: Indentured servants were obliged by work contracts to repay their debt (typically for travel costs) over a number of years. Most did not receive wages, but learned a skill and were provided room, board, clothing and other basic needs. Many families signed agreements with ship captains, who—upon arrival in America—sold the indentures to persons looking for workers. This 1716 advertisement reports that Capt. Nicholas Oursell had transported a variety of persons of varying occupations, such as coopers (barrel makers), joiners, smiths and washer women.

ad offering indentured servants, Boston News-Letter newspaper advertisement 18-25 June 1716

Boston News-Letter (Boston, Massachusetts), 18-25 June 1716, page 2

The life of an indentured servant was not easy and advertisements looking for run-aways were common, such as this 1776 reward offer for run-away Richard Trusted, who had learned the trade of gun-stocker (a weapon maker).

Ten Pounds Reward, Pennsylvania Ledger newspaper notice 9 March 1776

Pennsylvania Ledger (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 9 March 1776, page 4

Joiner or Joyner: A joiner worked in construction, particularly attaching wooden components to buildings such as doors, window frames and staircases. In this 1770 run-away notice, apprentice David Cox ran away from his employer. The old newspaper notice warns that Cox worked as a carpenter and joiner, but was likely to pass himself off as a mill-wright—one who built or maintained machinery at a mill.

Three Pounds Reward, New-York Gazette, or Weekly Post-Boy newspaper notice 29 January 1770

New-York Gazette, or Weekly Post-Boy (New York, New York), 29 January 1770, page 4

Marquis or Margrave: Based upon the term “mark,” which designated a British county or earldom, a marquis (or count of the mark or mark-count) was more of a title than an occupation, although they typically oversaw workers of lower rank. The term was later shortened to marquis, and came to indicate a nobleman with a rank above a duke. The German equivalent was “margrave” or “margravine” (male and female equivalents). This 1772 death notice was printed for Margrave Augustus George of Baden-Baden.

Margrave Augustus George obituary, Pennsylvania Chronicle newspaper death notice 3-10 February 1772

Pennsylvania Chronicle (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 3-10 February 1772, page 12

Sawyer: A sawyer earned his living by cutting (sawing) timber, as seen in this 1770 notice about John Wilmington, a sawyer by trade, running away from bail.

John Wilmington, sawyer, New-York Gazette, and Weekly Mercury newspaper notice 8 January 1770

New-York Gazette, and Weekly Mercury (New York, New York), 8 January 1770, page 4

Selectman: Chosen by townsmen, a selectman (similar to an alderman) was a member of a three- or five-member governing board of a New England town. In this 1810 news article about a ballot challenge, Nathan Prentiss of Petersham was accused of casting two votes for his choice of selectman.

Nathan Prentiss voting challenge, Berkshire Reporter newspaper article 9 May 1810

Berkshire Reporter (Pittsfield, Massachusetts), 9 May 1810, page 3

Smith: A smith was a metal forger or iron worker. One of the more common smith occupations is a blacksmith, who created and fit horseshoes. Some synonyms for smith are farrier, hammersmith and smithy. This 1786 obituary mentions that James Hays, by trade a cooper (barrel or cask maker/repairer) was the son of Thomas Hays, by trade a smith.

James Hays obituary, Norwich Packet newspaper death notice 13 July 1786

Norwich Packet (Norwich, Connecticut), 13 July 1786, page 3

Tanner: A tanner tanned or processed animal hides, and is similar to a currier or one who cured hides. The following anecdote occurred in 1826, when James Brown, a tanner by trade, disappeared and was assumed to be drowned. He turned out to be a prankster wishing to gain publicity.

James Brown, tanner, National Advocate newspaper article 28 February 1826

National Advocate (New York, New York), 28 February 1826, page 2

Wright: A wright was a skilled worker, and a repairer or manufacturer of wooden objects. (See also Joiner.) This 1872 obituary reports that Mr. Frederick Friend learned the trade of wheelwright beginning at the age of twelve.

Frederick Friend obituary, New York Herald newspaper death notice 31 January 1872

New York Herald (New York, New York), 31 January 1872, page 5

Yeoman (yeman, yoman, yoeman, yonge man or young man): Over time, the title yeoman had varying connotations, from a non-commissioned military officer or soldier who rendered specific duties to the crown, to a freeman who owned his own farm, or one who farmed but also provided military protection. As an adjective, it indicates a duty requiring great effort, as in this 1915 news photo of firemen rendering “yeoman service.”

Boston firemen, Boston Journal newspaper photo 23 September 1915

Boston Journal (Boston, Massachusetts), 23 September 1915, page 6