SSDI – Free on GenealogyBank

GenealogyBank has the most comprehensive; the most complete version of the SSDI online and now it is free online for genealogists to search.

We are celebrating Ida May Fuller’s birthday – she would have been 134 years old this year – and we’re getting a jump on celebrating our own birthday – GenealogyBank will be two years old – next month – on October 18th.

Ida May Fuller was the nation’s first Social Security benefit recipient and was a native of Vermont and lived all of her life there. In fact she lived for many years in nearby Ludlow, VT – a neighboring town to Chester, VT where GenealogyBank has its offices.

To celebrate both events we are giving back to the genealogical community and putting the most complete and up-to-date version of the SSDI free online.

So – here’s to a happy birthday to Ida May Fuller (1874-1975) – who was born September 6, 1874 and to GenealogyBank – born Oct 18th, 2006!!

GenealogyBank has not only the most complete SSDI online – it has expanded & enhanced the data – adding the day of the week when the person’s birth or death occurred and the GPS coordinates that many genealogists like to have for their records.

No other site updates the SSDI weekly.
Give it a try – search it right now – click here!

SSDI – By the Numbers

Social Security Death Index has:
82,637,474 – Death records
17,125,521 – Persons born in the 19th Century
1,040,516 – Persons that died between 1937 – 1962
5,983,919 – Persons who died in New York
191,268 – Persons named “Ida” in the SSDI
1 – Person who died in Palau

It’s a great day for genealogy!

Newspapers are a good source for birth records – family details

The Duluth News Tribune (13 Jan 1918) reported that more than half of the births registered for Duluth were simply listed as “male” or “female” child. This can be a problem for genealogists today but it was also a problem for one Minnesotan in 1918 who was trying to establish he was the legal heir to a family estate.

Per the article the local health department was going to begin to routinely follow-up with parents to have them file ammended birth certificates so that the names of the children would be permanently recorded.

Newspapers regularly published birth announcements which included the names of the new child; date/place of birth; names of the parents and often the names of siblings, grandparents and other genealogical information.

In this example from the Columbus (GA) Enquirer Sun (22 Sept 1922) you can find the core information – names of the new children, their parents and the dates of birth.

Note that the announcements also give the maiden names of the mother and that Porterdeat Golden Smith was named for his maternal grandfather.

Newspapers are a terrific source to get the details we need to document our families.

Search GenealogyBank and see what you’ll find.
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