North Carolina newspapers 1719-1926, 1988-Today

(Photographer: Marion Post Wolcott.

See what’s cooking in the Wilkins family kitchen … near Tallyho, Granville County, North Carolina … and all the other news recorded in the Tar Heel State’s old newspapers.

GenealogyBank.com has North Carolina’s historical newspapers from 1719-1926, 1988-Today.

Click here to search all of North Carolina’s historical newspapers

or click on the titles below to search them individually.

Asheville, NC
Asheville Citizen-Times. 1/1/1999-Current

Chapel Hill, NC
Chapel Hill News. 5/3/2000-Current

Charlotte, NC
Charlotte News. 12/11/1888 – 9/29/1922
Charlotte Observer. 3/13/1892 – 12/31/1922
Charlotte Observer. 1/1/1992-Current

Cleveland, NC
Cleveland Post. 3/1/2007-Current

Durham, NC
Chapel Hill Herald. 1/1/2002-Current
Herald-Sun. 1/1/2002-Current
Raleigh Extra. 6/18/1995-5/25/1997

Elizabeth City, NC
Daily Advance. 11/9/2004-Current

Fayetteville, NC
American. 12/22/1719 – 12/31/1922
Fayetteville Observer. 1/18/1988-Current

Greensboro, NC
Greensboro News & Record. 1/1/1990-Current

Greenville, NC
Daily Reflector. 8/30/2004-Current

Halifax, NC
North-Carolina Journal. 8/1/1792 – 9/11/1797

High Point, NC
High Point Enterprise. 4/14/2007-Current

New Bern, NC
Carolina Federal Republican. 1/12/1809 – 4/25/1818
Morning Herald. 9/17/1807 – 4/30/1906

Newbern Herald. 1/20/1809 – 2/26/1810
Newbern Sentinel. 3/21/1818 – 12/25/1823
State Gazette of North Carolina. 8/9/1787 – 2/20/1799
True Republican. 7/4/1804 – 8/7/1811

Raleigh, NC
News & Observer. 1/1/1991-Current
Semi-Weekly Standard. 8/10/1861 – 3/8/1868
Star. 12/1/1789 – 5/12/1926

Red Springs, NC
Red Springs Citizen. 9/10/2008-Current

Rockingham, NC
Richmond County Daily Journal. 5/3/2003-Current

Rocky Mount, NC
Rocky Mount Telegram. 9/3/2002-Current

Roxboro, NC
Courier-Times. 11/22/2006-Current

St. Pauls, NC
St. Pauls Review. 9/4/2008-Current

Tryon, NC
Tryon Daily Bulletin. 5/14/2007-Current

Wadesboro, NC
Anson Record. 6/19/2003-Current

Wilmington, NC
Cape-Fear Recorder. 11/28/1818 – 4/11/1827

Star-News. 1/31/2002-Current

Winston Salem, NC
Winston-Salem Journal. 11/1/1997-Current

World’s Oldest Mom, age 110 – over 1,000 descendants

Happy Mother’s Day!

Clementine (Robicheaux) Breaux, the widow of Paul Breaux, must have set a record.

As of March 19, 1915 – she was still going strong at age 110 – the mother of 13 children and the matriarch of more than 1,000 descendants born in her lifetime. She lived in Lafourche Parish, Louisiana and her family lived there in Thibodaux and “scattered over the entire state” of Louisiana.

Even though she was 110 years old according to the article in the Duluth (MN) News Tribune (19 March 1915) she was still active.

Her eyesight was still good enough “to permit the threading of a needle” and she enjoyed “getting out in the yard and feeding the chickens and poultry.”

You learn the most amazing things about your family in these old newspapers.

GenealogyBank has over 3,800 newspapers from across the country. Give it a try right now.

So – here’s to our mothers everywhere, of all generations.

Happy Mother’s Day!
.

Warren, RI Newspaper archives 1792-1849 now online

GenealogyBank has put the Warren, Rhode Island newspaper archives: 1792-1849 online.

Click here to search Warren, RI newspaper archives 1749-1849 online

Or click on the individual titles below to search a specific Warren, RI newspaper:
Bristol County Register 1809-1810
Herald of the United States 1792-1793
Telescope 1800-1849

Find and document your ancestors in GenealogyBank

- the best source for old newspapers on the planet.
Period!

Paula Todd, Genealogist, Librarian – McIntire Library, Zanesville, OH

You will want to read this terrific article about Paula Todd, long time genealogist and volunteer librarian at the John McIntire Library in Zanesville, Ohio – part of the Muskingum County (OH) Library System.

I was at the (Family History Center in Zanesville) I walked in not knowing what I wanted to find out, except I wanted to find out about the Ethell family. I heard some woman in the back of the room say, ‘I have Ethells in my family.’ And I thought, ‘Oh, sure, that’s probably no relations of mine at all.’ But whoever was at the desk put me on a reader of some kind. A census reader to start with. And pretty soon the woman in the back came and laid this Ethell book beside me. I copied it off just to be nice to her if nothing else because she was going to such great lengths. And I got home and looked at that and there was my family laid out in front of me. Right in front of me!

Click here to read the rest of the article in the Zanesville Times Recorder. Kearns, Charlie. Genealogist Looks Back. 12 April 2009

…and there was my family laid out in front of me. Right in front of me!

Click here to search for obituaries – Zanesville Times Recorder – 2002 – Today
Click here to search Ohio’s old newspapers – 1802-1922

How to deal with heirloom, oversize portraits

This weekend’s Wall Street Journal (February 14-15, 2009 pp. R6) has a terrific article by Kathleen A. Hughes – “The Person over the Mantle”.

Hughes tells the experiences of families in preserving and displaying their old family portraits and her own change of heart in displaying the image of her 3rd Great Grandmother, Mary Plumb Fairchild.
Early on she was offered Mary’s portrait but decided that she didn’t want that “stern” looking woman over the mantle of her fireplace. Thirty years later she had a change of heart and looked into her genealogy and remembered that old family heirloom. Turns out that Mary Plumb Fairchild was “one of the first women to attend Oberlin College, and an early abolitionist. She died at 29 after giving birth to her fourth child”. Now not accepting the offer of the family portrait is one of her regrets – but the portrait is preserved and hangs in the home of a cousin across the country. (Portrait of Mary Plumb Fairchild is from the article).

We have a wall of old family portraits in our home along the landing at the top of the stairs – much like the walls at Hogwarts in a Harry Potter movie – they are hard to miss. The really oversize family portraits still hang at my uncle’s home in New Hampshire.

If you have early family portraits – be sure to make a digital copy of each one – identify them and post them online. eMail copies to members of your family. You could post them for free at Facebook.com; on Scribd.com or similar sites …. and you can join online genealogy sites like Ancestry.com and post the digital images there.

But – what do you do if you don’t have a portrait of any of your ancestors?

You could scour the Internet looking to see if a historic image of your relative is already online. You could also search sites like GenealogyToday – a terrific site that regularly posts funeral cards, early printed items and photographs etc.
Another source is old newspapers. I have found thousands of images – photos, etchings of people in 19th & 20th Century newspapers. GenealogyBank is a great source for tracking down old family photos that the family lost track of decades ago.

This image of Daniel Freeman is from the Omaha (NE) Sunday World Herald 26 June 1899.

I’ve been having a ball ….

“I’ve been having a ball finding articles about my family.

The biggest find for me … was discovering my gr-grandfather’s uncle in Congressional records as well as in newspapers.

He had left home as a child and didn’t return home again until after his father died.

It was reported in the newspapers that his elderly mother (my gr-gr-gr-grandmother!) almost went into shock after not seeing him for nearly 37 years. GenealogyBank gave me great insight into his life as a fisherman turned world traveler and the names of his children that he had with his Russian wife and his locations in Russia and Japan back in the 1800′s! How cool is that??? :)

I can’t wait to see what papers you will put up next.
Keep up the great work!

Have a great weekend!”
Sincerely,


:) Catherine “Casey” Zahn

Find and document your ancestors in GenealogyBank – the best source for old newspapers on the planet. Period!

Start searching right now — click here.
What will you find?

Wow – break out the Diet Coke – GenealogyBank hits new milestone!

Wow – what a year!

GenealogyBank now has 252 million items - adding nearly 100 million newspaper articles, records and documents since it launched two years ago.

In the last few days GenealogyBank added over 6 million items making December a record setting month.

In December we added…
- More than 30,000 issues from over 150 newspapers
- Digitial Copies of Every Page
- Spanning 1836 to 1972
- Newspapers from 22 States – from Alaska to Florida from California to Vermont
- Big City Papers and Small Town Papers
- All of this new content can be searched right now

TIP: GenealogyBank is the best source for old newspapers on the planet!
Period!

Wishing you a Merry and a Happy …..

We wish all of you the very best!

It has been a wonderful year for us here at GenealogyBank.

Everyday we receive notes and cards from genealogists sharing their appreciation for what they’ve found in GenealogyBank – like this comment we received yesterday:

Thanks also for the new additions
to the Historic Newspapers file.
You are continuing to make
the best archive of old newspapers
even better!

Wishing you all success in finding every article about your ancestors in America’s old newspapers!

If Captain James Garcelon was the first "Garcelon" to come to America – then who was Peter Garcelon?

Genealogies often begin with the comprehensive statement that “the first (insert surname here) to come to America was…”.

In our family that would be Captain James Garcelon born in 1739 on the Channel Island, Guernsey, England.

However in searching old newspapers you can find the details that just might change family traditions and supply the information you need to accurately document your family tree.

In GenealogyBank I found this article in the Pennslyvania Gazette (March 14, to March 21, 1737) – It is a list announcing the unclaimed letters at the post office.
That is two years before James was born.

So, time to track down exactly who Peter Garcelon was and just how he fits into the family tree.

Here is the entire article:

Remembering Carole Callard …

I paused this week to remember Carole Callard – she was a terrific genealogist, teacher, librarian and friend.

Carole passed away 3 years ago this week. Her obituary appeared in several newspapers including the Lansing State Journal (MI) – December 12, 2005

Carole Crawford Callard
Lansing, MI
Age 64, died December 10, 2005; born August 8, 1941 in Charleston, WV. Carole was a well-known and respected Librarian and Genealogist for many years, before retiring in June from the Library of Michigan. She is survived by her daughters, Susan (Martin) Philp of Tecumseh and Anne Cottongim of Northville and sister, Rosemary (William) Marquart of Hilton Head, SC. Memorial services will be celebrated Wednesday, December 14, 2005, at 10:00 a.m., at St. Mary’s Cathedral, 219 Seymour, Lansing, with the Rev. George C. Michalek officiating. The family will receive friends one hour prior to the service at the church, as well as on Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at Gorsline-Runciman Funeral Home, 900 E. Michigan Ave, Lansing. Scripture Services will be held Tuesday at 7:00 p.m. Those desiring may make contributions to the Carole Callard Endowment Fund, c/o Library of Michigan Foundation, 717 W. Allegan St., P.O. Box 30159, Lansing, MI 48909, in memory of Carole.
Copyright (c) Lansing State Journal. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Gannett Co., Inc. by NewsBank, inc., GenealogyBank.com

What the obituary doesn’t say is that Carole was a tireless worker – she lectured all over the country – instantly drawing in her audience, encouraging them and teaching them how to climb their family tree. She wore many hats in her career – she was one of the national GPO Documents Collection Inspectors, worked in Ethiopia to improve library services; Ann Arbor Public Library; University of Michigan Library; Allen County (IN) Library and the Library of Michigan.

There is an old phrase – “to waste and wear out your life” in a good cause. Carole did just that. For years she poured herself into indexing the 1870 census of Michigan – no doubt this contributed to her deteriorating eyesight. Carole didn’t let her limited vision slow her down – she was daily at her post assisting genealogists, attending every conference, giving every lecture – right up to the end.

Carole was honored in 1997 as the first recipient of the Abrams Chair of Genealogy at the Library of Michigan – one of the few endowed positions in librarianship and the only endowed chair in genealogy. She received the Filby Award (2003) and the Distinguished Service Award from the Library and Information Science Program at Wayne State University in June 2005.