Hunt is on for phony POW’s…

Today’s Chicago Tribune has an interesting article by Steve Mills about Mary and Chuck Schantag of the P.O.W. Network who say they have exposed close to 1,900 people who have falsely claimed to be prisoners of war. Click here to read the article “Hunt is on for Phony POW’s.

A quick check of GenealogyBank shows almost one million articles about POW’s, documenting their brutal experiences. It is an excellent source for verifying these claims.

TIP: Use GenealogyBank to search for previously published news articles that can expand on the details you find written in an obituary notice.

Remembering Carole Callard …

I paused this week to remember Carole Callard – she was a terrific genealogist, teacher, librarian and friend.

Carole passed away 3 years ago this week. Her obituary appeared in several newspapers including the Lansing State Journal (MI) – December 12, 2005

Carole Crawford Callard
Lansing, MI
Age 64, died December 10, 2005; born August 8, 1941 in Charleston, WV. Carole was a well-known and respected Librarian and Genealogist for many years, before retiring in June from the Library of Michigan. She is survived by her daughters, Susan (Martin) Philp of Tecumseh and Anne Cottongim of Northville and sister, Rosemary (William) Marquart of Hilton Head, SC. Memorial services will be celebrated Wednesday, December 14, 2005, at 10:00 a.m., at St. Mary’s Cathedral, 219 Seymour, Lansing, with the Rev. George C. Michalek officiating. The family will receive friends one hour prior to the service at the church, as well as on Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at Gorsline-Runciman Funeral Home, 900 E. Michigan Ave, Lansing. Scripture Services will be held Tuesday at 7:00 p.m. Those desiring may make contributions to the Carole Callard Endowment Fund, c/o Library of Michigan Foundation, 717 W. Allegan St., P.O. Box 30159, Lansing, MI 48909, in memory of Carole.
Copyright (c) Lansing State Journal. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Gannett Co., Inc. by NewsBank, inc., GenealogyBank.com

What the obituary doesn’t say is that Carole was a tireless worker – she lectured all over the country – instantly drawing in her audience, encouraging them and teaching them how to climb their family tree. She wore many hats in her career – she was one of the national GPO Documents Collection Inspectors, worked in Ethiopia to improve library services; Ann Arbor Public Library; University of Michigan Library; Allen County (IN) Library and the Library of Michigan.

There is an old phrase – “to waste and wear out your life” in a good cause. Carole did just that. For years she poured herself into indexing the 1870 census of Michigan – no doubt this contributed to her deteriorating eyesight. Carole didn’t let her limited vision slow her down – she was daily at her post assisting genealogists, attending every conference, giving every lecture – right up to the end.

Carole was honored in 1997 as the first recipient of the Abrams Chair of Genealogy at the Library of Michigan – one of the few endowed positions in librarianship and the only endowed chair in genealogy. She received the Filby Award (2003) and the Distinguished Service Award from the Library and Information Science Program at Wayne State University in June 2005.

Wow – I love GenealogyBank.

We routinely hear from genealogists telling about their success – “Wow, look what I found!”

We really love to hear those stories and today it is my turn.
Last week I was stunned to find that one of my cousins had posted early photographs of our family online.
There they were – the actual pictures of my third great-grandfather Isaac Garcelon (1790-1872)
and his parents William (1763-1851)
and Maria (Howe) Garcelon (1763-1850).
I could see why they were so bundled up.
They were from Lewiston, Androscoggin County, Maine. Having grown up in New England I am used to cold weather – the snow would stay on the north side of my grandparent’s home until April almost every year.
This find got me to searching in GenealogyBank to find out more about them. I simply searched the name: William Garcelon and quickly found death notices for William Garcelon (1763-1851) that were published in two newspapers, one in Massachusetts and one in Maine.
The Boston Evening Transcript 23 Jan 1851

and in the Portland Daily Advertiser (29 Jan 1851).

Then I quickly spotted the marriage announcement of William’s nephew – Captain Asa Garcelon (1796-1859) that was published in the Eastern Argus (Maine) 16 March 1825.

Notice that every one of these articles appeared in out-of-town or out-of-state newspapers.

TIP: Colonial and 19th Century Newspapers often printed out of town birth, marriage and death notices. GenealogyBank makes them easy to find because it let’s you search all 3,700 newspapers for your ancestors.

TIP: Be flexible in your searches and remember that their obituaries or marriage notices just might have been printed in out of state newspapers – like the wedding announcement of Nicholas Goodson and Sarah Matthews in Isle of Wight County, Virginia – that was published in the Maine newspaper – the Eastern Argus in 1825. Like cable news television stations today – newspapers carried news from across the country.

There were no articles telling if Nicholas Goodson was ever arrested.

It is a great day for genealogy. What an opportunity we have to find these historic artifacts, articles and documents about our family.

Tip: Search GenealogyBank now.
What will you find?

What do you have for my town?

Sometimes genealogists look at GenealogyBank‘s 3,700+ newspapers and only focus on newspapers published in their home town.

Beginning researchers often concentrate on their local newspaper or other newspapers published in their state and don’t think they need the rest of the content in GenealogyBank.

When I first began researching 43 years ago – I found an obituary about Edward Kemp (1863-1926) published in the New England Historic Genealogical Society’s Register (NEHGS Memoirs. January 1928. pp. 103-104).

The obituary said that he was born in County Cavan, Ireland. That would have been crucial information for my Kemp research at that time. But the article also said that he was born in New York City so I erroneously concluded this was not my relative. I thought our family was “only” from Stamford, Connecticut.

It would be years later that I would again find Edward’s obituary in the Register. The second time I recognized him immediately as my cousin. By then I knew that the family was from County Cavan – but I stared at that information and wondered – how was it I didn’t find this earlier? And, then I recalled that I had tossed it aside because he was from New York City.

Tip: Families move to other parts of the country. Use GenealogyBank to find your family obituaries; articles, and documents – no matter where in the country these items were published. Don’t assume you only want your hometown newspaper.

Let me give you an example – framed on the basic question researchers often ask – What do you have on Stamford, CT?

The question should be more precise. What do you have on Grace Stewart – who was born and married in Stamford, CT?

What was known?
Her name: Grace Toms
Approximate year/place of birth: born about 1896 in Stamford, CT
Spouse: She married “Charles Stewart”
Other: The rest of the “Toms” family lived/died in the Stamford area.

Problem:
Initial searches found nothing on them.
Charles Stewart and Grace Stewart are common names.

A search of GenealogyBank for Grace Stewart yielded 1,238 results – that is just too many to sort through to find her.

I narrowed the search to just the more recent America’s Obituaries section to see if I could locate her obituary notice.


That resulted in 143 hits – I could sift through those – but I first limited the search again by state – for just obituaries published in Connecticut newspapers. This time I got zero hits.

So I turned to search for her husband: Charles Stewart.

A search for him in the America’s Obituaries section for all newspapers produced 632 hits. When I limited the search to just CT newspapers I found one hit, but it was not him

I then repeated the America’s Obituaries section search for Grace Stewart but this time I added her middle name “Toms” to the extra search terms in “Include keywords” box.

Nothing.

One more try. I repeated the America’s Obituaries section search for Grace Stewart but this time I added “Stamford” to the extra search terms “Include keywords” box.

Success!

Grace Stewart
Washington Post, The (DC) – February 4, 1992
GRACE STEWART, LAWYER, ASSOCIATE JUDGE, DIES
Grace M. Stewart, 93, an associate judge of the Municipal Court in Washington in 1952 and 1953, died of pneumonia Feb. 1 at the Collingswood Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Rockville, where she was a patient for five years. She was a Washington resident off and on for 74 years.


Mrs. Stewart was appointed to the court after serving as executive assistant in the attorney general’s office. She worked for the Justice Department for 24 years.
After she left Municipal Court, she was on the staff of the Senate District Committee and later became administrative director of the Washington office of Executive Manpower Corp, a recruitment firm. She retired in 1973.


A native of Stamford, Conn., Mrs. Stewart attended American University and its law school. She was a typist with the Veterans Administration before she became a lawyer at Justice.

She belonged to the Federal and Women’s Bar associations and Phi Delta Delta legal fraternity.

Her husband, Charles Stewart, died in 1920. Survivors include two daughters, Barbara S. Eskey of Rockville and Patricia S. de Hoffman of La Jolla, Calif.; four grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren.
Copyright (c) 1992 The Washington Post

Tip: Don’t only concentrate on your home town newspaper. You can find articles about your family published in out of state newspapers – in this case the Washington Post.

Tip: Be sure to be creative in adding/removing search terms to fine tune your search.
Tip: Search GenealogyBank now.
What will you find?

GenealogyBank – packed with veteran’s records

Today is Veteran’s Day – I have many ancestors and cousins that served – from the days of the Colonial militia, the Revolutionary War, War of 1812 right up to today. In fact my brother and I joined the Navy when we were 17 – but that was a long time ago.

With Veteran’s Day in mind I started looking at the many resources in GenealogyBank for researching our family members that served in the military.

The Historical Documents section of GenealogyBank now has over 226,000 documents – it is packed with military records.
For example – here is one page from the published list of all lieutenants serving in the US Navy – as of 1832. The list gives their names; dates of appointment; ships they served on etc.

(US Congress. American State Papers. List of lieutenants in the Navy in 1832, and the sea service performed by each since his promotion. Communicated to the House of Representatives, June 16, 1832. American State Papers. 026, Naval Affairs Vol. 4; 22nd Congress, 1st Session Publication No. 483).

I decided to pick a name at random from this list just to see what else I could find out about him.

I selected John P. Zantzinger.

I quickly found that he was listed in multiple documents – the ships he served on – his rejected pay increase request for serving off the coast of Brazil – and other interesting details of his career.
Turning to the Historical Newspapers I found even more.
I found his marriage to Susan R. Hipkins – recorded in the Massachusetts newspaper, the Columbia Centennial (21 March 1821) even though they were married in North Carolina!

This article also filled in another detail – that his middle name was: Paul.

Then I found the sad news that 25 years later his wife died at Fauquier White Sulpher Springs, VA – an area then well known for the “restorative” powers of its natural sulpher springs.

Note that her obituary was published in the New London (CT) Morning News 18 Sep 1846 – even though her death occurred in Virginia.

TIP: Remember – a newspaper from across the country might have printed your ancestor’s marriage announcement or obituary. Don’t limit your search to just the newspapers in one state.

In all I found more than 1,500 records for Zantzinger.

GenealogyBank – makes it easy to search over 243 million records and documents for our ancestors.

Give it a try right now.
Start your 30-day introductory trial on GenealogyBank.
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Discover Your Family Story.

GenealogyBank sheds new light on the daily lives and communities of millions of American families from 1690 to today. With more than 3,700 newspapers and other core documents from all 50 states, you’ll find not only your ancestor’s names, dates, places and events, but also learn about their everyday challenges and the events that defined their lives.

Special 30 day introductory offer only $9.95.

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Change your mind and want to cancel simply call us at 800-243-7694 before your trial ends and you still only pay $9.95.

Hurry – this offer ends TODAY – Tuesday, November 11th!

So, what do you have on Long Island?

A friend of mine asked – “What do you have on Long Island?”

We started looking in GenealogyBank to see what we had – turns out we have quite a bit.

We found millions of articles, obituaries and records from the 1700s to today. There are over 330 New York newspapers in GenealogyBank – we spotted this early obituary of Mary Youngs (ca. 1784-1810) printed in the Long Island (NY) Star (22 Feb 1810).
I didn’t know that Long Island had it’s own newspaper that early in the century. GenealogyBank also includes the obituaries from Newsday right up to today’s paper.

We also found this sermon – that was preached in Hempstead, Long Island in 1813. It certainly gives the tenor of the sermons from 200 years ago.

We found many articles about the Blizzard of 1898 – including this one about Abram Decker who was saved from freezing to death in the snowstorm by the persistence of his “devoted wife”. This story was picked up and printed by the Idaho Daily Statesman, 18 Aug 1898.

Wow, what a story. His wife searching for him through 15′ snow drifts – finally spotting his foot above the snow and her efforts to rescue him by taking the railings from a fence to build a bonfire – lit by the flame in her lantern, to keep him warm. The fire got the attention of two farmers who came to their rescue. Now that’s an incredible family story.

Tip: Don’t limit your search to just one state – Remember that the articles you’re looking for may have appeared in a newspaper in another state – in this example the story was picked up and printed in a paper clear across the country in Idaho.

We found millions of articles about Long Islanders from the 18th Century to today.

What will you find in GenealogyBank?

To celebrate GenealogyBank’s success over the past two years, GenealogyBank is now offering a 30-day trial for only $9.95. Give it a try right now.

Patty Barthell Myers, 1930-2008

Patty Barthell Myers died 9 October 2008, at the home of her daughter, Lucy Bonnington.

Her obituary (San Antonio Express-News (TX) – October 13, 2008; Philadelphia Inquirer, 13 Oct 2008) simply stated her “life’s work was genealogy.” Well said.

She was the author of numerous compiled genealogies and reference works including:
Female index to Genealogical dictionary of the first settlers of New England by James Savage. (Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2008).

Ancestors and descendants of Lewis Ross Freeman with related families : based partially on the work of Freeman Worth Gardner and Willis Freeman. (Camden, ME: Penobscot Press, 1995).

Cargill/Cargile/Cargal of the south and southwest : descendants of Cornelius Cargill of Virginia, John Cargile of Virginia & North Carolina, John Cargile of Virginia & Georgia, Andrew J. & John Cargal of South Carolina & Georgia. (Camden, ME: Penobscot Press, 1997).

Descendants of Joseph Barthel and his wife, Christina Lutz : who came to America 1830 on the Romulus and who settled in Erie County, New York. (Author, 1991).

The Hughes family from Virginia to Oregon. (San Antonio, TX: Burke, 1999).

Her lengthy obituary concluded by saying: “Her life was an example of overcoming enormous challenges, and making a difference in the world, patiently, quietly–and then there was the occasional wild rumpus. “

Her late husband, A.J. Myers had been a POW at the “Hanoi Hilton” at the same time John McCain was there.

San Antonio Express-News (TX) - October 13, 2008
Reprinted with permission GenealogyBank
Patty [Florence] Barthell Myers died October 9th, at the home of her daughter in suburban Philadelphia, where she was living and receiving hospice care since August.


Born in Evanston, Illinois on June 6, 1930, Patty was the third of four children of Harriet Lyon and Edward East Barthell, Jr. She grew up in Winnetka, Illinois, spending summers on Lake Michigan. She graduated from New Trier High School with honors and attended Northwestern University in Evanston.

She met her first husband, Louis Harold Cargill, Jr. on Lake Michigan and they married on Patty’s birthday in 1951. They had 3 children, Lucy, James, and Lon Cargill. Lou died in 1985 and Patty returned to San Antonio. Lon died in January of 1985. Patty married Armand J. Myers in 1988. A.J. and Patty met in 1965 when he was flying fighter jet missions over North Vietnam. He was shot down June, 1966, and was a POW in the Hanoi Hilton for 6 years. When he was re-patriated, his Air Force sponsor was Patty’s husband, Lou. Patty and A.J. married in 1988. A.J. died in 2002.

Patty’s life’s work was genealogy. In 2007, she published her FEMALE INDEX TO GENEALOGICAL DICTIONARY OF THE FIRST SETTLERS OF NEW ENGLAND, by James Savage,1860.

She is survived by her brother, John Peter Barthell of Sequim, WA, sister Polly Barthell Clark of Orlond Beach, FL, brother Edward East Barthell, III, of Appleton WI, cousin Charles Arthur Carroll, of Manhattan, and cousin Elizabeth (Betsy) Barthell of Overland Park, KS. She also leaves her daughter, Lucy, and her husband Mark Bonnington, of Malvern, PA, son James Eric Cargill of San Antonio, her grandchildren Colin Mark and Cara Ellen Bonington of Malvern, PA and John Shaw Lynch, of Williamsburg, VA and his sister Ashley Lynch Rodi, and God daughters Kemper and Edyn Rodi, of Newport Beach, CA, and sister-in-law, Sally Dulin Shaw of Mexico City.

Patty requested no memorial service. Her ashes will be scattered on Lake Michigan, the pink beaches of Bermuda, and the coast of Oregon.

Her life was an example of overcoming enormous challenges, and making a difference in the world, patiently, quietly–and then there was the occasional wild rumpus.

Friends may call at her home in Oakwell Farms, 15 Campden Circle, San Antonio, TX on Thursday, October 16th, from 2:00 to 7:00 p.m. Donations may be made in her name to the nearest public library.
Copyright (c), 2008, San Antonio Express-News. All Rights Reserved.

Woman struck blind on seeing her son …

Obituaries can give us the details of our ancestor’s lives that we just don’t find anywhere else.

Today I found this obituary in GenealogyBank for Judith Tormey (1800-1898) who died in Newark, NJ.

Baltimore Sun 4 July 1898


This obituary article gives us lots of details and clues to fill in the family tree.

1. Mrs. Judith Tormey – her name and tells us that she was married
2. Died on Friday night at her home and then gives the exact street address
3. She has “lived in Newark since 1847″
4. “She was born in County Cavan, Ireland, in 1800″
5. “Her father (not named) was 101 years old when he died and her mother was ninety-nine”
6. “A grandmother died at the age of ninety-nine”
7. “She was the mother of five children”
8. “She lost her sight in 1894″
9. “In that year her son Edward died”
10. She was blind from the final moment “she was taking a farewell look at his face in the coffin”

Incredible – we learn not only about four generations of the family – but also the dramatic story of how she became blind in the last years of her life.

GenealogyBank has millions of obituaries from over 3,700 newspapers.
We add even more every day.
Click here and search GenealogyBank right now.

What will you find?

A Good Woman Can be Hard to Find…

It can be very difficult to find women in the early 19th Century – finding sources that actually give their names and genealogical details. It was common in the 19th century for genealogical sources to be brief and give only the basic information about a household in the census – or an entry in a birth register.

The 1800 – 1840 census – only named one person in the entire family – the head of the household – while that could have been a single woman who never married or was widowed – it was most often the husband. Most American’s men and women were not named in the census.

Birth and church registers often record brief information – with entries like:

1812 July 28. A son, to Walter Hickenlooper.
What was the son’s or the mother’s name?

So researchers become experts in tracking down records that give more information – that fill in the missing details of our family trees.

Genealogists write me all the time with their success stories in finding their elusive ancestors using GenealogyBank.

GenealogyBank is particularly strong on pre-1850 newspapers – with over 1,300 titles.

GenealogyBank has over 3,700 newspapers – that range from 1690 to today ….. you can find the details about women in GenealogyBank – information that is just not in the census and often not found in other early 19th century sources. Newspapers you just won’t find on other sites.

I have been working on my Brundage line and documenting all of the grandparents; aunts and cousins in Westchester, New York and the family members that have spread across the country.

I found this Brundage obituary notice (Hudson River (NY) Chronicle 8 Oct 1839) that illustrates the point –


In the 1820 Census – John Brundage is living in Bedford, NY – with his wife (unnamed) and family. By the 1840 census – neither one of them was listed. Why?

This obituary article tells us that John has died and that his “widow” – Rachael Brundage died on 26 Sep 1839 at age “about 44 years” – well before the 1840 census. I now knew what had happened to them.
Clue #1 – Name: Rachael Brundage: a widow of John Brundage; her age; her date & place of death
Clue #2 – Name of husband: John Brundage – and that he had predeceased her

In addition to the details about Rachael & John Brundage – the article has two other obituaries.

Look at the facts that we find about these women: Harriet Sutherland and Deborah Cornwell.

Harriet Sutherland

The article tells us that Harriet Sutherland died on 25 Sep 1839 at “Middle Patent” – (North Castle, NY) – the widow of John Sutherland. It gives her age as “aged about 46 years”.

Clue #1 – Name: Harriet Sutherland: a widow of John Sutherland; her age; her date & place of death
Clue #2 – Name of husband: John Sutherland- and that he had predeceased her

And in the third obituary in this article we learn that “Miss Deborah Cornwell, daughter of the late Jonathan Cornwell” died 6 Sep 1839 in Henrietta, Monroe County, NY at the “fiftieth year of her age” and that she was “formerly of New Castle (NY).”

Clue #1 – Name: Deborah Cornwell: a daughter of Jonathan Cornwell; her age; her date & place of death; that she formerly lived in New Castle, NY.
Clue #2 – Name of father: Jonathan Cornwell- and that he had predeceased her

It can be difficult to find a good woman in the early 19th century – but newspapers are a terrific source and GenealogyBank has more of them than you will find anywere else.

Click here and search GenealogyBank right now and see what you will find.

More Newspapers Added to GenealogyBank – covering 1775-2008

GenealogyBank today added 115 newspapers from 29 States – with coverage from 1775 to today.

Wow – GenealogyBank is growing at a rapid pace. That’s over 2 million more records and documents for genealogists. What a great day for genealogists.
Here’s a great obituary I found for Mrs. Catherine Reilly (1770-1874) – it has plenty of the genealogical facts we’re looking for.

It gives her date and place of birth: 4 May 1770 – in Cootehill, County Cavan, Ireland …. and the date and place of her death: 3 Oct 1874 in Media, PA.
States that she came to America in 1840 – through the Port of Philadelphia – where she lived “for many years”.
It tells us that she had “seven children and twenty-four grandchildren” and that her aunt “recently died in Ireland at the age of one hundred and eight”.
That’s terrific - but look closer. This obituary was first published in the Philadelphia Public Ledger and was reprinted in the San Francisco Evening Bulletin (23 Oct 1874). You might just find that the obituary you are looking for also appeared in a newspaper clear across the country.

TIP: Narrowing your search to the town where your ancestor lived – could cause you to miss the articles you need. Be flexible and search all of GenealogyBank for your ancestor AND also narrow your search to the specific city or state where they lived.
GenealogyBank has more than 3,700 newspapers – click here and search it now – see what you’ll find!

Here is a list of the content just added to GenealogyBank.

AK. Juneau. Daily Record-Miner. 875 issues. 1903-03-12 to 1911-05-06
AR. Helena. Western Clarion* 17 issues. 1865-04-01 to 1865-12-16
AR. Jonesboro. Jonesboro Evening Sun. 1554 issues. 1904-09-03 to 1921-09-29
AR. Little Rock. Arkansas Gazette. 135 issues. 1820-01-08 to 1889-03-22
CA. Colton. Chicano. 8 issues. 1968-04-21 to 1977-06-30
CA. Los Angeles. Eco de Mexico. 1 issue. 1924-10-29
CA. Los Angeles. Heraldo de Mexico. 44 issues. 1917-12-9 to 1928-12-28
CA. Los Angeles. Prensa. 143 issues. 1917-12-08 to 1937-01-01
CA. Los Angeles. Union. 6 issues. 1898-02-26 to 1898-09-10
CA. San Francisco. Voz del Nuevo Mundo* 1 issue. 1869-03-09
CO. Colorado Springs. Gazette-Telegraph. 4,051 issues. 1873-01-04 to 1922-12-31
CO. Cortez. Cortez Journal* 2008-01-05 to Current
CO. Trinidad. Anunciador. 8 issues. 1918-04-06 to 1922-11-18
CT. Danielsonville. Windham County Transcript. 3 issues. 1863-07-02 to 1890-02-12
CT. New London. New London Daily Chronicle. 166 issues. 1860-07-03 to 1864-12-31
CT. New London. New London Democrat. 107 issues. 1845-03-21 to 1852-12-25
CT. Norwich. Norwich Morning Bulletin. 7 issues. 1863-04-06 to1882-04-01
DC. Washington. Spirit of ‘Seventy-Six* 11 issues. 1808-09-20 to 1809-07-11
FL. Tampa. Internacional* 1 issue 1939-10-04
ID. Idaho City. Idaho Falls Times. 11 issues. 1891-11-26 to 1895-11-07
ID. Idaho City. Idaho Register. 281 issues. 1887-06-25 to 1916-04-18
ID. Twin Falls. Twin Falls News. 182 issues. 1918-04-22 to 1922-05-10
IL. Centralia. Centralia Sentinel. 114 issues. 1864-01-05 to 1876-03-02
IL. Chicago. Latin Times. 12 issues. 1958-02-01 to 1975-05-02
IL. Chicago. Vida Latina. 56 issues. 1952-02-21 to 1963-07-21
IL. Chicago. Vorbote* 1 issue. 1875-03-20
KY. Richmond. Richmond Register* 2008-07-15 to Current
LA. News Orleans. Times Picayune* 989 issues. 1837-01-25 to 1865-09-22
MA. Boston. Boston Courier* 198 issues. 1805-06-13 to 1809-05-04
MA. Dedham. Norfolk Democrat. 7 issues. 1839-02-09 to 1854-09-15
MA. New Bedford. New-Bedford Mercury. 2 issues. 1863-10-23 to 1877-03-16
MA. Springfield. Massachusetts Gazette* 95 issues. 1782-05-14 to 1784-07-20
MA. Springfield. Springfield Republican. 49 issues. 1877-01-01 to 1910-12-31
MA. Stoughton. Stoughton Sentinel. 222 issues. 1863-12-05 to 1876-12-23
MD. Baltimore. Baltimore American. 1826 issues. 1903-03-01 to 1922-12-31
MD. Baltimore. Dunlap’s Maryland Gazette* 84 issues. 1775-05-02 to 1779-01-05
MD. Bel-Air. National American* 4 issues. 1861-06-21 to 1865-09-29
MD. Fredericktown. Rights of Man* 14 issues. 1794-02-05 to 1800-11-05
ME. Augusta. Herald of Liberty* 85 issues. 1810-02-13 to 1815-09-02
MN. International Falls. Daily Journal* 2000-10-31 to Current
MO. Kansas City. Kansas City Times. 1392 issues. 1884-05-14 to 1896-01-31
MO. Lebanon. Lebanon Daily Record*. 2007-02-07 to Current
MS. Vicksburg. Daily Commercial. 272 issues. 1882-01-02 to 1882-12-23
NC. Raleigh. Semi-Weekly Standard. 15 issues. 1861-08-10 to 1868-03-08
NE. Nebraska City. Daily Nebraska Press. 1127 issues. 1868-09-22 to 1876-12-28
NH. Concord. Republican Gazette* 85 issues. 1801-02-05 to 1803-04-28
NH. Derry. Derry News* 2008-01-08 to Current
NH. Dover. Phoenix* 49 issues. 1792-02-08 to 1795-08-22
NM. Albuquerque. Evening Citizen. 1 issue. 1894-08-06
NM. Las Cruces. Dona Ana County Republican. 1 issue. 1902-02-15
NM. Las Cruces. Estrella. 1 issue. 1935-05-18
NM. Las Cruces. Las Cruces Democrat. 1 issue. 1899-11-29
NM. Las Vegas. Las Vegas Daily Gazette. 1 issue. 1886-01-31
NM. Mesilla. Mesilla News. 3 issues. 1879-02-08 to 1883-11-24
NM. Santa Fe. Daily New Mexican. 756 issues. 1872-04-02 to 1875-06-28
NM. Santa Fe. Gato. 3 issues. 1894-05-23 to 1894-08-24
NM. Santa Fe. New Mexican Review. 2 issues. 1885-03-30 to 1906-08-30
NM. Santa Fe. Santa Fe Weekly New Mexican & Livestock Journal. 11 issues. 1885-10-08 to 1895-12-26
NM. Springer. Estandarte de Springer. 190 issues. 1889-06-27 to 1893-06-15
NM. Springer. Sentinel. 1 issue. 1901-12-27
NY. Albany. Albany Evening Journal. 4813 issues. 1834-06-12 to 1873-07-23
NY. Auburn. Cayuga Tocsin. 1812-03-12 to 1814-06-08
NY. Ballston Spa. Saratoga Advertiser* 103 issues. 1804-11-12 to 1812-03-10
NY. Balston Spa. Saratoga Journal. 3 issues. 1814-02-01 to 1817-06-11
NY. Brooklyn. Espana Libre. 9 issues. 1939-11-03 to 1942-12-25
NY. Canandaiqua. Western Repository* 13 issues. 1804-01-24 to 1807-12-08
NY. Herkimer. Farmer’s Monitor* 37 issues. 1805-01-29 to 1807-05-19
NY. Lansingburgh. American Spy* 62 issues. 1791-06-17 to 1798-02-27
NY. New York. Ebenezer* 2 issues. 1945-03-01 to 1945-0601
NY. New York. Eco de Cuba. 2 issues. 1855-06-22 to 1856-02-01
NY. New York. Ecos de Nueva York* 8 issues. 1952-03-30 to 1954-09-26
NY. New York. Exito* 1 issue. 1954-01-21
NY. New York. Grafico. 55 issues. 1915-10-21 to 1917-08-21; 1928-11-11 to 1931-01-03
NY. New York. Mundo Latino* 1 issue. 1948-05-15
NY. New York. Nosotros* 1 issue. 1953-11-21
NY. New York. Papagayo. 2 issues. 1855-02-15 to 1855-04-16
NY. New York. Pasatiempo* 3 issues. 1951-03-21 to 1951-05-21
NY. New York. Patria* 1 issue. 1895-06-25
NY. New York. Pueblos Hispanos. 3 issues. 1944-03-26 to 1944-07-29
NY. New York. Puerto Rico y Nueva York* 1 issue. 1954-11-21
NY. New York. Republican Watch-Tower* 363 issues. 1800-03-19 to 1810-11-16
NY. New York. Royal American Gazette* 112 issues. 1777-04-10 to 1783-08-07
NY. Troy. Troy Gazette* 67 issues. 1802-09-15 to 1808-03-29
NY. Troy. Troy Post* 10 issues. 1812-09-29 to 1823-03-18
NY. Whitestown. Western Centinel* 57 issues. 1794-03-26 to 1797-04-19
NY. Whitestown. Whitestown Gazette* 20 issues. 1796-07-05 to 1803-02-21
OH. Steubenville. Western Herald* 11 issues. 1812-11-05 to 1822-05-11
OH. Wooster. Wooster Republican* 166 issues. 1862-05-29 to 1872-12-26
OR. Eugene. Oregon State Journal. 185 issues. 1868-01-04 to 1879-02-22
PA. Philadelphia. National Gazette* 139 issues. 1820-04-05 to 1841-04-08
RI. Pawtucket. Pawtucket Times. 16 issues. 1898-01-01 to 1921-02-23
TX. Beaumont. Beaumont Enterprise & Journal. 350 issues. 1906-03-28 to 1911-09-18
TX. Brazoria. Texas Republican. 1 issue. 1835-10-17
TX. Brownsville. Cronista del Valle. 1 issue. 1930-02-28
TX. Brownsville. Daily Metropolitan* 4 issues. 1893-10-23 to 1893-11-20
TX. Brownsville. Puerto. 1 issue. 1961-12-30
TX. Brownsville. Republican* 89 issues. 1862-09-25 to 1868-07-30
TX. Cleburne. Cleburne Morning Review. 37 issues. 1911-07-02 to 1916-05-31
TX. Corpus Christi. Verdad. 2 issues. 1950-05-02 to 1959-12-13
TX. Edinburg. Defensor. 1 issue. 1931-12-25
TX. El Paso. Atalaya Bautista: Semanario Evangelico Bautista. 7 issues. 1908-01-02 to 1930-12-21
TX. El Paso. Continental. 57 issues. 1934-12-12 to 1960-03-11
TX. Galveston. Galveston News. 246 issues. 1877-01-01 to 1883-12-27
TX. San Antonio. Epoca. 7 issues. 1918-03-03 to 1927-12-25
TX. San Antonio. Prensa. 2,560 issues. 1918-10-11 to 1999-12-15
UT. Salt Lake City. Salt Lake Telegram. 15 issues. 1902-02-22 to 1922-12-31
VA. Lexington. Rockbridge Repository* 9 issues. 1801-08-21 to 1805-08-06
VA. Lynchburg. Lynchburg Press* 23 issues. 1809-05-13 to 1818-04-24
VA. Petersburg. Petersburg Intelligencer* 158 issues. 1798-05-29 to 3/29/1914
VA. Richmond. Richmond Commercial Compiler* 302 issues. 1816-12-18 to 1820-04-20
VA. Richmond. Virginia Argus* 445 issues. 1799-07-23 to 1814-07-25
VA. Winchester. Winchester Gazette* 14 issues. 1798-06-27 to 1820-01-15
VT. Putney. Argus* 42 issues. 1797-03-16 to 1799-02-12
VT. St. Albans. St. Albans Daily Messenger. 1,548 issues. 1843-12-06 to 1922-01-31

Titles with the asterisk * are new on GenealogyBank