3 Genealogy Tips for Family History Month

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” As you may be aware, October is Family History Month. In this blog article, Gena celebrates this special month for family historians by suggesting three genealogy tips for you to try.

First set aside as Family History Month in 2001 via a resolution introduced by Senator Orrin Hatch, October is a time to reflect on our ancestry. Family History Month can be a busy one with genealogy society events and conferences to educate existing family historians – and encourage those who are just starting.

What are you personally doing for Family History Month? It’s the perfect time to set some goals for what you want to do with your family history research. Consider what you want to accomplish and then break those objectives down into smaller goals that can easily be achieved in a short amount of time. What might some month-long genealogy goals look like? Here are a few goals that I’ll be working on to celebrate Family History Month.

1) Catch up on your newspaper research. I’m lucky – I get to research in GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives on a daily basis. But GenealogyBank is updated monthly and I don’t always remember to rerun my searches for new-to-me articles. My plan this month is to search the latest additions to GenealogyBank for newspapers that can help me fill in some of the gaps in my family tree.


Do you have an obituary for all of your great-grandparents? Have you looked for your parent’s wedding announcements? What about notices in the legal section of the newspapers? Take some time this month to find new articles to add to your family history.

I’m starting with my great-great-grandparents’ obituaries. Below is one of my paternal great-great-grandparents. Now, only 31 more to go!

obituary for Joseph Chatham, Sacramento Bee newspaper article 16 January 1940

Sacramento Bee (Sacramento, California), 16 January 1940, page 4

2) Learn one new thing about genealogy. What’s that one thing you wish you knew about family history research? Maybe you want to know how to conduct better searches. Maybe you want to learn how to use a specific genealogy website. Maybe you would just like to better understand the World War I draft. Whatever your interest is, make a pact with yourself that you will take some time this month to enhance your genealogy research skills by learning one new thing. Whether it’s methodology, a new website, how to search a favorite website, or learning about a record set, your research will benefit from continuing education.

GenealogyBank provides many different opportunities to learn more about genealogy, including a YouTube channel, Pinterest boards, and a Learning Center. Ensure you are searching like a family history pro and invest some time in learning how to best use genealogy resources.

3) Share your family history research. How are you sharing your genealogy research? Genealogy is often seen as a solitary pursuit. While the image of someone bent over a microfilm machine in a hushed library is sometimes accurate, the new face of genealogy research is so much more. It’s through sharing that we learn from the knowledge and work of others as we seek to find answers. Sharing your genealogy research doesn’t need to be a big production.

Take some time today to tell a younger member of the family about your grandparents, or a story about a historical event you witnessed (my mom shared with my high school-age sons about the Kennedy assassination and its effect on her as a high school student). Upload some family photos to Facebook and tag your family members. Call a sibling and ask them what they remember about a grandparent or a family event, and then share your research about that person. Sharing doesn’t need to be something planned well in advance or a lot of work – it can simply mean spending a few minutes to pass on what you know about your ancestry.

As you think about sharing your family history, make plans for how you will share or gather information as the holidays approach. Many families take time out of their busy lives to meet for the holidays. Plan now to take advantage of these multigenerational family gatherings.

Family History Month is a great time to accomplish some family history goals. Take a few minutes today to decide what you will accomplish.

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Searching the Archives for Rufus, I Found Little Eugenie

Eugenie Caroline Kemp (1842-1845) was only three years old when she died – and until recently, I didn’t even know she had existed. I discovered her when I was doing a search in GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives about one of my ancestors.

I was searching for information about Rufus Crosby Kemp (1813-1856). My research notes said that he was born in Maine in 1813 and died in 1856 in New York City. So – he lived in at least two U.S. states: Maine and New York.

Looking for him in GenealogyBank’s archives, I knew by experience that typing his full name into the search box probably wouldn’t get me the record results I wanted.

But, let’s try that full name archive search anyway and see what we can find about Rufus.

screenshot of GenealogyBank’s search box showing a search for Rufus Crosby Kemp


Genealogy Search Tip:

Typing in the first name, middle name and surname was just “too much information.” In the early 19th century, newspaper editors rarely referred to individuals in print by their full names – they shortened the name to what fit the character space available in that day’s newspaper.

So – I searched for Rufus in the newspaper archives again, this time typing in his name as Rufus C. Kemp to give a wider scope of possible articles, and I limited the search date range to 1810-1870.

screenshot of GenealogyBank’s search box showing a search for Rufus C. Kemp

OK. That search returned 24 record results.

screenshot of GenealogyBank’s search results page fora search for Rufus C. Kemp

Let’s see what they tell us.

Looking at the first result…
Hmm – that’s not good news.

Business Troubles

It seems that he and his business partners Benjamin L. Mann and Albert Whitney were having a tough go in their business – “Whitney, Kemp & Co.” was insolvent.

article about the insolvency of Whitney, Kemp and Co., Boston Daily Advertiser newspaper article 22 March 1841

Boston Daily Advertiser (Boston, Massachusetts), 22 March 1841, page 3

This newspaper article gave key new information: in 1841 Rufus Kemp was living in Boston, Massachusetts, and operated a business in the area.

Enter Last Name

What did the next search result, an obituary, show?

Obituary for Rufus Kemp

obituary for Rufus C. Kemp, New York Tribune newspaper article 23 October 1856

New York Tribune (New York City, New York), 23 October 1856, page 7

OK. This is also our target Rufus Kemp.

His obituary tells us that by 1856 he was living in New York City at 259 Fourth Avenue (which is by Union Square) and that he died on Monday, 20 October 1856.

The obituary gives his age (“43d year of his age”) and tells us that he was a member of the Olive Branch Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, No. 31.

Business Ad

The next newspaper article gives us more information on his business.

ad for Rufus C. Kemp's Clothes Warehouse, Boston Daily Advertiser newspaper advertisement 2 January 1833

Boston Daily Advertiser (Boston, Massachusetts), 2 January 1833, page 1

This advertisement tells us that his business was well located, next to the Eastern Stage House – an important Boston hotel in the early 19th century.

Marriage Announcement

The next search result also gives me key information that I didn’t have: the exact date of his marriage to Ann Maria Moynihan (1815-1907).

wedding notice for Rufus C. Kemp and Ann Moynihan, Columbian Centinel newspaper article 6 September 1834

Columbian Centinel (Boston, Massachusetts), 6 September 1834, page 2

We now know that they were married on Wednesday, 3 September 1834 in Boston.
Great – I can add that information to my family tree.

Obituary of Rufus’s Daughter

I kept opening up each search result – and then I found this: the obituary notice of little Eugenie Caroline Kemp (1842-1845).

obituary for Eugenie Caroline Kemp, Weekly Messenger newspaper article 31 December 1845

Weekly Messenger (Boston, Massachusetts), 31 December 1845, page 3

Who was she?
I had no record of her – but there she was.
She was 3 years and 7 months old when she died on 29 December 1845.

Now I have a new member to add to our family tree!

If I had given up after my first newspaper archive search attempt, I wouldn’t have found her. Also, if I had stopped looking at the articles after finding Rufus Kemp’s obituary and marriage announcement, I wouldn’t have found her. It was by adjusting my ancestor search from her father’s full name, Rufus Crosby Kemp, to Rufus C. Kemp, and by continuing to look at every article, that I found more information – and critically – that I found Eugenie Caroline Kemp.

Genealogy Tip:

Keep searching the historical archives and be flexible in how you search for your ancestors. If you search only using your target ancestor’s full name, you might miss the key articles you need to document your family tree.

Better to search the archives using several variations: with only the surname; the first and last name; or first name, middle initial, and last name.

And – when you get your search results – be sure to open and read each one of them. You just might find a new twig on the Family Tree – like little Eugenie Caroline Kemp (1842-1845).

Related Search Tip Articles:

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How to Find Your Ancestors’ Name Abbreviations & More

Introduction: Mary Harrell-Sesniak is a genealogist, author and editor with a strong technology background. In this blog article, Mary tackles a problem many genealogists encounter: how to find newspaper articles about your ancestors when editors often abbreviated or hyphenated your ancestors’ names.

So much has been written on searching newspapers for ancestors whose names have challenging spellings (see the links at the end of this article), but little has been written on dealing with ancestor name abbreviations and hyphenations. With narrow columns, newspaper editors often made adjustments in spacing to make an article fit. A wide variety of name abbreviations, hyphenations and spelling changes were used – as a result, genealogists’ queries often miss their targets.

Ancestor Name Abbreviations

Names are often shortened to accommodate character spacing issues, and this poses a challenge for genealogists searching old newspapers.

Using abbreviations was even seen as a problem in the 19th century.

An Age of Abbreviations, New York Herald newspaper article 13 December 1891

New York Herald (New York, New York), 13 December 1891, page 26

In 1826 there was a proposed New York state amendment that would have disqualified votes if a common abbreviation was used for the name on the ballot. The examples cited were “Alexr.,” “Wm.” and “Jno.” (Alexander, William and Jonathan). If these abbreviations were used on the ballot, then the proposed amendment would require that “it would be imperative to reject all votes.”

One state legislator rose to oppose the amendment, pointing out that use of abbreviations was common on ballots.

article about legislation concerning the use of abbreviations, Albany Argus newspaper article 7 February 1826

Albany Argus (Albany, New York), 7 February 1826, page 1

On a humorous note, the debate on abbreviations fell along geographical lines. Gen. Root was opposed to the proposed amendment based on the orthography and the dilemma of the many “Yankee electors” who “might be puzzled occasionally to write correctly the name of their candidate.”

article about legislation concerning the use of abbreviations, Albany Argus newspaper article 7 February 1826

Albany Argus (Albany, New York), 7 February 1826, page 1

Resources for Finding Name Abbreviations

Several guides can be found on the web for finding name abbreviations. I recommend browsing several, since in one you may find “Abraham” abbreviated as “Ab.,” while another guide might use “Abr.” or “Abram.”

More Abbreviations for Words & Terms

Lastly, don’t forget that other words were commonly abbreviated, and they aren’t always readily apparent.

Ancestor Name Hyphenations

Let’s look at common pitfalls and techniques to overcome hyphenation issues.

  • If a name was split at the edge of the page, one portion may be on one page and the remaining on the next. When this occurs the search engine may return an unwanted result or no results at all.
  • When a word is split in two, it can result in two words which a search engine misses. For example: if the word “carnation” was split, the result would be “car” and “nation.”
  • Search Tip: If your family names (given & surnames) can be broken into two words, such as “Newcomb,” search for the individual parts.
  • Another idea is to add a Boolean wildcard, such as an asterisk (*), to the end of a shortened named. For example: you could search for “New*” instead of “Newcomb.”
obituary for H. D. Newcomb, Evening Post newspaper article 18 August 1874

Evening Post (New York, New York), 18 August 1874, page 4

Customs & Common Expressions

Keep in mind that the customs of the day may have changed.

Enter Last Name

In the 16th and early 17th centuries, births from common families were rarely published in newspapers.

When they were, sometimes just a parent’s name was recorded. This article from 1800 notes:

It is fashionable in England to announce the Births among the Nobility. As the fashion is creeping into this country, we must of course follow it.

birth announcement for the Augustus family, Impartial Register newspaper article 23 October 1800

Impartial Register (Salem, Massachusetts), 23 October 1800, page 3

Search Tip: If you notice a particular expression, such as “true American blood,” incorporate it in your query along with a date and location. By doing this, I was able to locate other notices celebrating American births.

birth announcement for the Read family, Gazette of the United States newspaper article 28 October 1800

Gazette of the United States (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 28 October 1800, page 2

Newspaper Scanning Issues

Due to technical limitations, historical newspapers cannot always be scanned flat when they’re being digitized for posting online. Occasionally small portions of the old news articles are truncated, so vary your queries by searching specific:

  • Dates
  • Locations
  • Types of Events

For example, notice that the left-hand edge of this newspaper article was not scanned.

marriage announcements, Richmond Whig newspaper article 19 January 1841

Richmond Whig (Richmond, Virginia), 19 January 1841, page 3

Try some of these genealogy search tips to overcome abbreviation and hyphenation issues, and perhaps you’ll finally find that long-sought newspaper article about your elusive ancestor!

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Civil War Nurse Mary Maxwell Featured in OGSQ

I received the latest copy of the Ohio Genealogical Society Quarterly (OGSQ) in the mail this week and was interested in the cover story about “Mary Francis (Stokes) Huddleston Maxwell, Civil War Nurse.”

photo of the cover of the Ohio Genealogical Society Quarterly magazine

Source: Ohio Genealogical Society Quarterly

The article was written by Laurel Sheppard, the Assistant Editor of the OGSQ – who was assisted by Barbara Hart, Susan Lee and Daniel Reigel.

OK – I wondered if GenealogyBank had any articles about Mary Francis (Stokes) Maxwell (1835-1924).

I quickly found her obituary in the Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio).
Lots of good data here.

obituary for Mary Maxwell, Plain Dealer newspaper article 13 January 1924

Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 13 January 1924, page 7

Mary’s obituary reports that she died “last night” – on 12 January 1924.
She died at the home of her daughter in Lakewood, Ohio, on Bonnieview Avenue.

A quick search of Google Street View pulls up how that home looks today.

photo of a house in Lakewood, Ohio

Source: Google Street View

Mary’s obituary tells us that she enlisted in the Civil War in 1861 and was stationed at the Civil War-era U.S. Army hospital in Keokuk, Iowa.

Click to Read: Kennedy, Gerald. U.S. Army Hospital: Keokuk, 1862-1865.” Annals of Iowa (Fall 1969), Vol. 40, No. 2, pages 118-136.

Search 1:

Search 2:

Her obituary also reports:

  • She was receiving a pension
  • She lived in Ashland, Ohio
  • She moved from Ashland to Lakewood, Ohio, to live with her daughter in 1910
  • She was buried in Ashland, Ohio, on 14 January 1924

There are hundreds of millions of obituaries in GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives – come find your ancestor’s today!

Note: FamilySearch International (FamilySearch.org) and GenealogyBank are partnering to make over a billion records from recent and historical obituaries searchable online. The tremendous undertaking will make a billion records from over 100 million U.S. newspaper obituaries readily searchable online. The newspapers are from all 50 states and cover the period 1730 to the present.  Find out more at: http://www.genealogybank.com/family-search/

If you are interested in Ohio genealogy research, then a membership in the Ohio Genealogical Society is essential. Do it!

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How to Research Hispanic Ancestors When You Don’t Speak Spanish

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” Has National Hispanic Heritage Month inspired you to research your Hispanic ancestors – yet you’re not sure how to go about it because you don’t speak Spanish? In this blog article, Gena gives practical tips and describes online resources to help you overcome this family history challenge.

What are your favorite genealogy projects to work on? Mine typically involve English-language records. Let’s face it, when you only speak/read/write English those are the genealogy records that you feel most comfortable using.

So what happens when you have to research outside of your comfort zone – such as researching Hispanic ancestors when you don’t know how to speak or read the Spanish language? Well, for one thing: it’s time to start planning your Hispanic ancestor research.

A basic genealogy tip is to start with yourself and work back through each generation. In this case, after you do that, focus on your immigrant ancestors and exhaust records in the United States, then work on records found in their homeland.

Enter Last Name

Here are three other tips to keep in mind.

1) Start your timeline. I’ve written about timelines on the GenealogyBank blog before (see: Genealogy Timelines: Helpful Research Tools), and it’s worth taking the time to re-read that article. Organize what you know about your Hispanic ancestors with a timeline, and then study it for gaps in information. Ask yourself what events you should be searching for, such as births, marriages, and deaths. Consider historical events that may have affected your ancestors on a personal level and would have resulted in records. For example: military service during a war. As you study your timeline, what events impacted your family?

You can learn more about historical events in your ancestors’ homeland by consulting online history timelines. And very important: don’t neglect to read online historical newspapers, such as those in GenealogyBank’s Hispanic American Newspapers.

a Spanish-language article about the "Familia Ochoa," Heraldo de Mexico newspaper article 12 September 1928

Heraldo de Mexico (Los Angeles, California), 12 September 1928, page 6

These Spanish-language newspapers were published in the United States, but they also report on events in other countries and can be a valuable resource for better understanding a historical era. These historical Hispanic American newspapers covered events important to the community they served, and provided a perspective not found in the larger city newspapers. GenealogyBank’s Hispanic American Newspapers collection includes newspapers from the early 19th century.

2) Read Spanish-language newspapers. It may seem strange to suggest reading Spanish-language newspapers when you don’t know how to read Spanish. Don’t let Spanish-language newspapers intimidate you. I don’t read Spanish either, but with today’s online tools it’s never been easier to “read” a foreign language.

It’s helpful to become familiar with genealogically-relevant words in the new language you’re trying to understand. What’s genealogically-relevant mean? It depends on what you’re researching, but some words to begin with include those for birth, marriage, baptism, death, and familial relationships. Combining a name and a Spanish-language keyword in the search box will help you narrow down results when researching a common name. Consult the Spanish Genealogical Word List on the FamilySearch Wiki for words to become familiar with. I would also recommend investing in a Spanish-English dictionary for quick lookups. These two tools will assist you as you research Spanish-language documents.

For example, here’s a search for Perez birth records in GenealogyBank.

screenshot of GenealogyBank's search box showing a search for the keywords "Perez" and "nacimiento"

One of my favorite resources for Spanish-to-English language translations is the website Google Translate. While not a perfect language translation tool, it can help you better understand what you are reading. You can use the Google Translate website on your computer or on the go with the Google Translate app. The translation app allows you to speak, scan, type or draw text. The app will even translate text from a photo. Translations can be saved in an online Phrasebook for future reference. Consult the web page for Google Translate Help for information on using these features.

3) Learn more. Perhaps you aren’t just researching your Hispanic ancestors’ vital statistics, but instead verifying a family story. In my family, one story involves being forcibly chased out of Mexico by Pancho Villa. You might have a similar story that you want to verify.

Huerta Plans Ruin of North Mexico as Check to Villa, Fort Worth Star-Telegram newspaper article 21 December 1913

Fort Worth Star-Telegram (Fort Worth, Texas), 21 December 1913, page 1

Good family history research is searching for records, but also learning more about a place in time so that you can find additional documents that you need. Use books and periodicals to learn more about an area and the events your Hispanic ancestors were a part of. Search on the event and read newspapers published throughout the United States archived on GenealogyBank. Join societies like the Genealogical Society of Hispanic America to learn more about research and to benefit from their publications, meetings, and conferences. Genealogy research is so much more than just doing look-ups for dates and places; it takes time to immerse yourself in the material that will help you document your ancestors’ lives.

Researching Hispanic ancestors and you don’t know how to speak or read Spanish? No problem! Take some time to formulate a genealogy research plan and learn more about what you should be researching – and you will be on your way to adding more information to your family tree!

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Court Records in Newspapers: A Gold Mine for Genealogy Research

Introduction: Duncan Kuehn is a professional genealogist with over nine years of client experience. She has worked on several well-known projects, such as “Who Do You Think You Are?” In this blog post, Duncan show how legal articles in old newspapers can tell you about some of the experiences your ancestors went through, and help steer additional research into their court cases and legal issues.

Court records are a gold mine for genealogists. A court record can be anything from a probate record, divorce decree, or guardianship case, to a criminal trial or civil action. Most of our ancestors were involved in the court system in one way or another. But how do you know what court records include your ancestors? Searching through old newspapers, such as those in GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives, is a good way to find clues.

Enter Last Name

Americans were just as litigious in grandma’s time as they are now. Many people owned land, and that property would have to be distributed upon their death through a will (testate) or letters of administration in the absence of a will (intestate). Our ancestors were also called as witnesses in cases involving their neighbors. And so on.

These court records add a tremendous amount of texture to our understanding of our ancestors’ lives. Knowing more about who our ancestors were and what they were doing can increase our attachment and understanding of them. In addition, court records can also solve brick wall situations. For example, you may find that great-grandpa Connors and his son Jacob were sued for poaching on their neighbor’s property. If you were trying to connect Jacob to his father with documentation, you would have direct evidence of their relationship.

Information Contained in Court Records

Court documents will vary in what information is found within. For example, a probate record might include the names of the decedent’s heirs, what property they owned, clues about their lifestyle, etc. A divorce decree may list the minor children of a couple, the cause of the divorce, etc.

Not all of the records within each type of court document will have the same kind of information. For example, not all wills mention the names of all the heirs. One will I found simply left the decedent’s property “to be divided equally among my children.” However, other wills are highly detailed and informative. Some court document files can be hundreds of pages long!

Court records use legal verbiage, which can be confusing at times. Don’t let this deter you. There are many resources available to work through this challenging legal language. After a while, your comfort level with legal terms will increase and reading the court documents will become easier.

You will also begin to notice that certain phrases are repeated in court records. For example, a will often starts with the phrase, “In the name of God, Amen.” These types of phrases are called boilerplate, and recognizing them can help in reading the court documents. Becoming familiar with these common phrases and how they were used will increase your understanding of what the court document actually says. In the case of the beginning of a will, the phrase “In the name of God, Amen” does not indicate that your ancestor was highly religious; it was just a legal phrase used to begin a will. However, it does mean that your ancestor did not object to such language – which would mean they were not a Quaker or staunch atheist, for example.

Old Newspapers & Court Documents in the News

The main challenge researching your ancestors’ court records is finding them. You may not know a court case existed at all. You may not know in which jurisdiction to begin searching. You may not know what date to search. Unfortunately, most court records are not indexed. You can search through docket books and/or court minute books, but this can be a time consuming venture – especially if you aren’t sure a court case even existed.

Fortunately, there is an effective alternative: searching historical newspaper archives. Old newspapers often listed the cases seen before the court each week or term. Digitized newspapers online are easily searchable, and this often makes finding the court case a breeze!

The legal notices in a newspaper can take several forms. Here is one newspaper that organized the trial list by day:

article about court trials, Washington Reporter newspaper article 27 December 1876

Washington Reporter (Washington, Pennsylvania), 27 December 1876, page 1

This newspaper organized its legal list by type of case, court, and room. It even included the case number (bless them!).

article about court trials, Plain Dealer newspaper article 20 May 1897

Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 20 May 1897, page 8

This newspaper gave a short synopsis of what happened during the hearing:

article about court trials, Cleveland Leader newspaper article 7 June 1897

Cleveland Leader (Cleveland, Ohio), 7 June 1897, page 8

Why were newspapers reporting this information? There are a number of reasons for making court case info public; three come immediately to mind. The first reason being that there was a legal requirement, in many cases, to publish the date of a hearing so that those who were affected could come to the courthouse and participate. Second, it has always been a part of the American justice system to have an open court, except in unusual circumstances. And lastly, before the advent of TV, this was actually a form of entertainment.

How to Find Court Records in GenealogyBank

To find legal information relating to your ancestors in the newspaper, some exceptional search techniques are required. For most genealogy research, you should not narrow a newspaper search down to just one paper. Searching for legal notices in the newspaper is the exception to this general research rule because the cases are often listed just by last name. Entering in “Robertson” without narrowing your search by a newspaper or region would yield far too many results to be practical.

Here are instructions for narrowing your results to a town or specific newspaper when searching GenealogyBank’s records. From the home page, go ahead and enter the last name only of the ancestor you’re researching.

screenshot of the search box on GenealogyBank's home page

Once the results page appears, select “Newspaper Archive (1690-2010).” Scroll down to the bottom of the page and select the state. Once the new results page has loaded, scroll down to the bottom of the page and select the city. If you still need to narrow it further, scroll down to the bottom of the page and enter the keyword “court,” a date range, or select a single newspaper. (Chose one, not all three.)

Once you find the correct jurisdiction, date, and possibly even case number from various newspaper articles, you can go search through the original case files to find the valuable information you are seeking. Some of these files have been digitized and are available on FamilySearch.org. Others you will need to track down by contacting the court in question and asking where their archives are kept.

Note that GenealogyBank also has a category dedicated to court records, case files and legal news that can help you narrow your search.

I hope you take advantage of court records in your family history research. The information found therein is exceptionally beneficial. Using newspapers to aid your search can make the process much simpler and more likely to yield positive results. Happy searching!

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Old Classified & Personal Ads Reveal Our Ancestors’ Love Lives

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this blog article, Gena shows a surprising source of family history information: marriage ads placed by our ancestors in their local newspapers.

Are you married? Dating your partner for years? How did you meet your lover? That’s a question most people ask of couples who’ve been together a long time. Some couples meet through work, school or friends, others may take a perceived modern route. In today’s world there are all kinds of ways to meet a prospective mate; some are more traditional and others are truly a sign of the times – like online dating.

It might surprise you to know that those looking for love have always found answers in the newspaper. While today you may go to an online forum such as Craig’s List to scan the personals, advertising for a partner is not a new idea; our 19th and 20th century ancestors used the Personals in their local newspapers to facilitate long-term love matches.

a personal ad containing a love poem, San Jose Mercury News newspaper advertisement 4 September 1915

San Jose Mercury News (San Jose, California), 4 September 1915, page 10

Marry for Money or Love?

It’s that age-old marriage question: Do you marry for love or money? While passionate arguments could ensue over the benefits of either marital choice, the newspaper classifieds of yesteryear make it fairly clear which was more often preferred.

This old newspaper advertisement in the Business Personals section of an Ohio newspaper initially seems out of place and sounds, appropriately, more like a business proposition. Interestingly enough the gentleman placing the advertisement is casting a fairly large net looking for his love connections, advertising in Ohio when he’s living in New York.

personal ad from D. Rengaw, Plain Dealer newspaper article 4 July 1911

Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 4 July 1911, page 14

Scrolling down the same page, we find another personal ad from a businessman who is interested in a marriage partner “with some money.”

personal ad from Frank Felman, Plain Dealer newspaper advertisement 4 July 1911

Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 4 July 1911, page 14

In some cases, a dowry may have been what was required to meet with some potential suitors. At times, advertisers for potential marriage partners laid all their proverbial cards on the table, stating their assets and asking for specific goods (money, a home, etc.) that the potential bride had to bring in return. What may appear as a desirable commodity – a successful business man or farmer who owned his farm or home – meant requesting that the woman have cash to add to the assets, such as in this advertisement request from a Pennsylvania newspaper.

personal ad, Philadelphia Inquirer newspaper advertisement 8 April 1900

Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 8 April 1900, page 10

Situations Wanted

Sometimes I read the classifieds and wonder if the advertisements are a thinly disguised effort to secure a job and a marriage partner. Consider these old want ads found in a California newspaper. In the first advertisement a “refined lady” is looking for a housekeeping job with an older gentleman or an invalid. Another advertisement is placed by a mother who wants a housekeeping job working with men. Not sure who could turn down such a request that ends with the words “work cheap.”

personal ad, San Jose Mercury News newspaper advertisement 4 September 1915

San Jose Mercury News (San Jose, California), 4 September 1915, page 10

personal ad, San Jose Mercury News newspaper advertisement 4 September 1915

San Jose Mercury News (San Jose, California), 4 September 1915, page 10

Matchmaker, Matchmaker

Individuals were not the only ones placing these advertisements; sometimes a love matchmaking service was trying to attract clients. Consider this example that promises “…lovely women and honorable men. Many rich.” For a small investment of only 2 cents (about 58 cents in today’s money), you could obtain a “big list” of names. I’m sure having a large catalog of potential mates would sound potentially promising.

ad from a matchmaking service, Omaha World Herald newspaper advertisement 14 January 1900

Omaha World Herald (Omaha, Nebraska), 14 January 1900, page 10

Love in the Wild West

Requests for partners started popping up in newspaper advertisements as more single men traveled west looking for adventure or to try their hand at homesteading, and women found they were widowed or unable to find a mate after the Civil War. By 1898, the federal government even got in the act by publishing a chart showing where eligible men and women could be found. This demographic information was printed in the newspaper for those readers curious about which state likely held a potential marriage partner.

Enter Last Name

In this personal ad, a woman is seeking her love out west. I like how she encourages both rich and poor to write, but makes it clear that she is not wealthy.

personal ad, Omaha World Herald newspaper advertisement 14 January 1900

Omaha World Herald (Omaha, Nebraska), 14 January 1900, page 10

Need a Spouse? Try Advertising in the Newspaper!

Using online dating services may seem like a new idea – but even our ancestors used the technology of the day looking for someone to love. Not all men married the girl next door, and while traditional opportunities to meet someone outside of your community may have been limited, there were alternative love-seeking options including placing an ad in the newspaper. As you research your family tree and wonder where your great-great grandparents met, don’t neglect to search the newspaper for a possible answer.

Genealogy Tip: Remember that when searching for your ancestors in newspaper ads, try variations of their name including just their initials and surname. Advertisements may have required payment per word – as well as each time they ran – so they needed to be brief and to the point.

Related Newspaper Advertisements Articles:

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Arizona Archives: 73 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

Arizona became a state on 14 February 1912 – the 48th state to join the Union, and the last of the nation’s contiguous states. AZ is the country’s sixth largest state and the 15th most populous. One of the Four Corners states (it touches Colorado), Arizona has borders with four other states (New Mexico, Utah, Nevada & California) as well as a 389-mile border with Mexico.

Arizona’s ethnic diversity is as varied as its beautiful natural terrain, given its unique history. Our AZ archives are a premier resource to research your Native American, Mormon, and Hispanic ancestry, as well as explore the California Gold Rush, O.K. Corral and other interesting people, places and events of the Old American West.

photo of the North Rim of the Grand Canyon, Arizona

Photo: North Rim of the Grand Canyon, Arizona. Credit: Staplegunther at English Wikipedia; Wikimedia Commons.

If you are researching your ancestry from Arizona, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online AZ newspaper archives: 73 titles to help you search your family history in “The Grand Canyon State,” providing coverage from 1859 to Today. There are more than 1.5 million articles and records in our online Arizona newspaper archives!

Dig deep into our online archives and search for historical and recent obituaries and other news articles about your Arizona ancestors in these AZ newspapers. Our Arizona newspapers are divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries (obituaries only).

Search Arizona Newspaper Archives (1859 – 1977)

Search Arizona Recent Obituaries (1991 – Current)

illustration: state flag of Arizona

Illustration: state flag of Arizona. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Here is a list of online Arizona newspapers in the historical archives. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more. The AZ newspaper titles are listed alphabetically by city.

City Title Date Range* Collection
Apache Junction East Mesa Independent 11/13/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Apache Junction Chandler Independent 10/20/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Apache Junction Apache Junction-Gold Canyon Independent 11/13/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Apache Junction Queen Creek Independent 01/30/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Arizona City Arizona City Independent 05/31/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Benson San Pedro Valley News-Sun 01/27/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bullhead City Mohave Valley Daily News 10/16/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Casa Grande Tri-Valley Dispatch 11/15/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Casa Grande Casa Grande Dispatch 05/13/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Cave Creek Sonoran News 09/01/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Coolidge Coolidge Examiner 01/09/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Coolidge Florence Reminder and Blade-Tribune 06/14/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Douglas Douglas Dispatch 09/24/1998 – Current Recent Obituaries
Eloy Eloy Enterprise 01/09/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Flagstaff Arizona Daily Sun 05/01/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Gilbert Gilbert Independent 10/20/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Glendale Peoria Times 01/17/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Glendale Glendale Star 12/13/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Green Valley Sahuarita Sun 02/08/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Green Valley Green Valley News & Sun 05/09/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kearny Copper Basin News 09/12/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kingman Mohave County Miner 10/30/1897 – 10/30/1897 Newspaper Archives
Maricopa Maricopa Monitor 12/23/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Maricopa Communicator 10/17/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Nogales Monitor 09/05/1890 – 09/05/1890 Newspaper Archives
Nogales Nogales International 12/18/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Phoenix Arizona Informant 05/04/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Phoenix Town of Paradise Valley Independent 01/16/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Phoenix North Scottsdale Independent 01/16/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Phoenix Weekly Republican 06/29/1899 – 03/07/1901 Newspaper Archives
Phoenix Weekly Phoenix Herald 01/02/1896 – 06/22/1899 Newspaper Archives
Phoenix Phoenix New Times 01/29/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Poston Poston Chronicle 12/22/1942 – 10/23/1945 Newspaper Archives
Prescott Arizona Weekly Journal-Miner 01/10/1866 – 12/26/1900 Newspaper Archives
Prescott Prescott Morning Courier 01/05/1891 – 06/30/1908 Newspaper Archives
Queen Creek Southeast Valley Ledger 01/29/2013 – Current Recent Obituaries
Rivers Gila News Courier 09/12/1942 – 09/05/1945 Newspaper Archives
Safford Eastern Arizona Courier 02/27/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
San Manuel Pinal Nugget 03/05/2013 – Current Recent Obituaries
San Manuel San Manuel Miner 03/26/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sierra Vista Sierra Vista Herald 04/11/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sonoita Bulletin 01/20/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sun City Sun City West Independent 01/02/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sun City Peoria Independent 01/16/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sun City Surprise Independent 01/02/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sun City Sun City-Youngtown Independent 01/02/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Superior Superior Sun 09/12/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Tombstone Tombstone Daily Epitaph 07/20/1880 – 11/30/1890 Newspaper Archives
Tombstone Arizona Kicker 12/06/1893 – 02/28/1894 Newspaper Archives
Tombstone Weekly Tombstone Epitaph 05/01/1880 – 06/25/1899 Newspaper Archives
Tombstone Tombstone Epitaph Prospector 07/24/1880 – 08/12/1895 Newspaper Archives
Tombstone Tombstone Daily Prospector 01/01/1889 – 06/30/1899 Newspaper Archives
Tombstone Daily Tombstone 03/21/1885 – 12/07/1886 Newspaper Archives
Tubac Weekly Arizonian 05/26/1859 – 04/12/1860 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Fronterizo 01/09/1892 – 12/17/1892 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Arizona Weekly Star 05/03/1877 – 10/07/1882 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Iris 06/19/1886 – 06/19/1886 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Arizona Daily Star 01/03/1991 – Current Recent Obituaries
Tucson Tucsonense 03/17/1915 – 11/01/1931 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Arizona Citizen 10/15/1870 – 07/29/1876 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Explorer 01/16/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Tucson Tucson Citizen 07/05/1882 – 12/31/1922 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Ferrocarril 05/17/1885 – 05/17/1885 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Amigos 05/08/1975 – 12/21/1977 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Dos Republicas 08/23/1879 – 10/18/1879 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Alianza 08/23/1900 – 10/18/1900 Newspaper Archives
Tucson TucsonSentinel.com 01/28/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Vail Vail Sun 03/24/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Wickenburg Wickenburg Sun 11/17/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Willcox Arizona Range News 01/10/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Window Rock Navajo Times 04/01/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Yuma Sun 05/30/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Yuma Arizona Sentinel 09/27/1873 – 07/15/1876 Newspaper Archives

*Date Ranges may have selected coverage unavailable.

You can either print or create a PDF version of this Blog post by simply clicking on the green “Print/PDF” button below. The PDF version makes it easy to save this post onto your desktop or portable device for quick reference – all the Arizona newspaper links will be live.

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Genealogy Humor: 7 Funny and Odd Inheritances & Bequests

Introduction: Mary Harrell-Sesniak is a genealogist, author and editor with a strong technology background. In this blog article, Mary reminds us that humor can be a fun part of family history research by sharing seven strange bequests she ran across in old newspapers.

They say that in order to be remembered long after you’re gone, make an unusual bequest in your will.

Writers and editors love to feature oddities, and genealogists love to read them – so go ahead and enjoy these odd and unusual inheritances and bequests. Search GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives to find boatloads of these news stories to tickle your funny bone. You’ll be sure to have a good laugh.

Here are seven of my favorite funny “final requests.”

1) A Dollar in Four Monthly Payments

In 1908, the appropriately-named Catherine E. Heckler of Portland, Oregon, left her husband a dollar payable in four monthly installments of 25 cents. She didn’t call him her husband, but rather “the individual who married me in 1905 in San Diego, Cal., and who got from me thousands of dollars and when he could get no more deserted me.”

article about Catherine E. Heckler's bequest, Aberdeen Daily News newspaper article 2 November 1908

Aberdeen Daily News (Aberdeen, South Dakota), 2 November 1908, page 7

Hope Mr. Heckler didn’t spend his inheritance all in one place!

2) Home for Non-Smoking Clergymen

Philanthropist Ann Jane Mercer, who died in 1886, left her residence to establish a home for Presbyterian clergymen who were “decayed by age, or disabled by infirmity and who do not use tobacco in any form or shape.”

article about Ann Jane Mercer's bequest, Plain Dealer newspaper article 14 April 1886

Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 14 April 1886, page 1

This wonderful cause doesn’t sound that odd, but as this 1909 newspaper article reports, there were some strange aspects to the bequest. For one, it says of Ann Mercer’s insistence that the home only be used by clergymen who were nonsmokers:

This provision was the more singular because the bulk of the Mercer fortune was made on raising tobacco.

Another thing: it turned out that nonsmoking clergymen were scarce.

In the twenty-one years since the institution’s foundation four clergymen have entered its portals.

By 1909 only one clergyman was using the home, and the board of managers decided to put him up in a hotel at their expense.

Finally Rev. Mr. Jones was left alone, so he was sent to the hotel, where thoughtless young men, summer visitors, have been blowing cigaret smoke around his aged head.

article about Ann Jane Mercer's bequest, Plain Dealer newspaper article 3 September 1909

Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 3 September 1909, page 5

3) An Astronomical Challenge

Mrs. Gruzman was interested in the planets. Her big idea was to bequeath a prize of 100,000 francs to the Institute of France (science section) for the person who could discover interplanetary or astral communications.

article about Mrs. Gruzman's bequest, Macon Telegraph newspaper article 24 January 1892

Macon Telegraph (Macon, Georgia), 24 January 1892, page 2

A ten-year limit was set to collect the prize, with the other stipulation that a reply from outer space was necessary. If the Institute of France did not accept the legacy, the price would divert to the Institute of Milan or the Institute of New York.

What do you suppose happened to the money when nobody collected?

4) She Left Her Body to Favorite Nephew

One has to wonder what Charles Brower of Downingtown thought of his aunt’s will.

He was literally to inherit her body. By reading this newspaper article you’ll get her intent, but the wording was strange. Her will instructed the nephew to bring a double team of horses to Pottstown to fetch her. Apparently she didn’t want her estranged husband to bury her, so her nephew returned her body to Downingtown as requested.

Enter Last Name

Let’s hope she left some money for his corpse-carrying troubles.

article about Mrs. Steele's bequest, Philadelphia Inquirer newspaper article 1 June 1896

Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 1 June 1896, page 4

5) Don’t Miss the Banquet

If your ancestors were heirs of Albert Karutz, let’s hope they attended his funeral when he passed in 1909. As an inducement, he offered in his will a $500 funeral banquet with “liquid refreshments” – but heirs who failed to show up were to be disinherited!

article about Albert Karutz's funeral banquet, Times-Picayune newspaper article 26 August 1909

Times-Picayune (New Orleans, Louisiana), 26 August 1909, page 3

6) Dinner on the House

One has to wonder if Karutz’s 1909 bequest inspired Ratke Siedenburg in 1910. He set aside $500 for friends to dine together within three months after his death. The executor was to choose the location as well as the lucky dozen diners.

article about Ratke Siedenburg's funeral banquet, Oregonian newspaper article 8 November 1910

Oregonian (Portland, Oregon), 8 November 1910, page 1

7) Delayed Support for Kitties & Puppies

This next bequest left $1,100 to found a homeless shelter for cats and dogs, but the money wasn’t to be touched until the year 2163. Wonder how much the trust is worth today, if it even still exists?

article about a bequest to establish a cat and dog shelter, St. Albans Daily Messenger newspaper article 18 July 1918

St. Albans Daily Messenger (St. Albans, Vermont), 18 July 1918, page 3

So there you have it. Strange and odd bequests are not that unusual. Have any of you encountered any funny or odd bequests in your ancestry research? If so, we’d love to hear about it; tell us in the comments section.

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North Carolina Archives: 169 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

One of America’s original 13 states, North Carolina’s state flag has two dates that commemorate NC’s drive for independence from Britain. On 20 May 1775 citizens of Mecklenburg County, NC, approved the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence – supposedly the first declaration of independence made in the Thirteen Colonies. Then on 12 April 1776, North Carolina instructed its delegates to the Continental Congress to vote for independence from Britain – the first former colony to do so.

photo of the Blue Ridge Mountains, North Carolina

Photo: Blue Ridge Mountains, North Carolina. Credit: Ken Thomas; Wikimedia Commons.

If you are researching your ancestry from North Carolina, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online NC newspaper archives: 169 titles to help you search your family history in “The Tar Heel State,” providing coverage from 1775 to Today. There are more than 78 million articles and records in our online North Carolina newspaper archives!

Dig deep into our online archives and search for historical and recent obituaries and other news articles about your North Carolina ancestors in these NC newspapers. Our North Carolina newspapers are divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries (obituaries only).

Search North Carolina Newspaper Archives (1775 – 1993)

Search North Carolina Recent Obituaries (1988 – Current)

illustration of the state flag of North Carolina

Illustration: state flag of North Carolina. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Here is a list of online North Carolina newspapers in the historical archives. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more. The NC newspaper titles are listed alphabetically by city.

City Title Date Range* Collection
Ahoskie Roanoke-Chowan News Herald 07/10/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Albemarle Stanly News and Press 01/02/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Andrews Andrews Journal 12/04/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Apex Apex Herald 01/04/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Apex, Holly Springs Southwest Wake News 06/01/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Asheboro Randolph Guide 04/06/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Asheboro Courier-Tribune 04/06/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Belhaven Beaufort-Hyde News 07/27/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Blowing Rock Blowing Rocket 05/06/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Boone Mountain Times 02/04/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Boone Watauga Democrat 01/14/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bryson City Smoky Mountain Times 02/06/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Burgaw Pender Chronicle 10/28/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Burgaw Pender-Topsail Post & Voice 11/10/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Cary Cary News 02/13/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Cashiers Crossroads Chronicle 03/18/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Chapel Hill Chapel Hill News 05/03/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Chapel Hill Chapel Hill Herald 01/27/1995 – Current Recent Obituaries
Charlotte Charlotte Semi-Weekly Observer 12/15/1916 – 12/15/1916 Newspaper Archives
Charlotte Africo-American Presbyterian 12/21/1899 – 12/21/1899 Newspaper Archives
Charlotte Charlotte Observer 01/01/1992 – Current Recent Obituaries
Charlotte Charlotte Observer 03/13/1892 – 12/31/1935 Newspaper Archives
Charlotte Charlotte News 12/11/1888 – 09/29/1922 Newspaper Archives
Charlotte Carolina Israelite 02/01/1944 – 12/01/1958 Newspaper Archives
Charlotte Charlotte Post 02/03/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Charlotte Charlotte Observer, The: Blogs 11/09/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Clayton Clayton News-Star 08/10/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Clemmons Clemmons Courier 01/06/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Cleveland Cleveland Post 01/18/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Clinton Sampson Independent 07/07/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Davidson Davidsonnews.net 01/01/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Durham Herald-Sun 01/01/1995 – Current Recent Obituaries
Durham Chronicle, The: Duke University 01/25/1994 – Current Recent Obituaries
Durham Durham News 09/03/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Edenton Chowan Herald 07/12/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Edenton Edenton Gazette 02/26/1806 – 02/26/1821 Newspaper Archives
Edenton State Gazette of North Carolina 05/11/1793 – 02/20/1799 Newspaper Archives
Elizabeth City Daily Advance 11/09/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Elizabethtown Bladen Journal 03/05/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Elkin Tribune 09/19/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Farmville Farmville Enterprise 07/13/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fayetteville Fayetteville Observer 01/18/1988 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fayetteville Carolina Observer 12/09/1824 – 02/23/1863 Newspaper Archives
Fayetteville North Carolina Chronicle or Fayetteville Gazette 02/01/1790 – 07/19/1790 Newspaper Archives
Fayetteville American 04/26/1816 – 04/26/1816 Newspaper Archives
Forest City Daily Courier 01/01/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Franklin Franklin Press 02/19/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fremont Wayne-Wilson News Leader 07/06/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fuquay-Varina Fuquay-Varina Independent 10/14/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Garner Garner News 10/21/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Garner, Cleveland Garner-Cleveland Record 01/05/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Greensboro News & Record: Blogs 01/24/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Greensboro News & Record 01/01/1990 – Current Recent Obituaries
Greensboro Greensboro Record 03/17/1906 – 03/16/1984 Newspaper Archives
Greensboro Greensboro News and Record 03/19/1984 – 11/10/1989 Newspaper Archives
Greensboro Greensboro Daily News 01/03/1906 – 12/31/1982 Newspaper Archives
Greensboro Yes! Weekly 03/16/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Greenville Daily Reflector 08/30/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Grifton Times-Leader 07/20/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Halifax North-Carolina Journal 08/01/1792 – 09/11/1797 Newspaper Archives
Hampstead Topsail Voice 09/10/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hayesville Clay County Progress 09/19/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Henderson Daily Dispatch 04/10/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hertford Perquimans Weekly 07/13/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hickory Hickory Daily Record 02/10/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
High Point High Point Enterprise 04/14/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Highlands Highlander 02/28/2013 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hillsborough Hillsborough Recorder 03/10/1824 – 05/10/1865 Newspaper Archives
Hillsborough News of Orange County 08/27/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Holly Springs Holly Springs Sun 07/10/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Jamestown Jamestown News 01/12/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kannapolis Independent Tribune 05/27/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kannapolis Kannapolis Citizen 04/01/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kenansville Duplin Times 09/29/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kenansville Duplin Today – Pink Hill Review 03/08/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Laurinburg Laurinburg Exchange 01/02/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lenoir News-Topic 11/12/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lincolnton Lincoln Republican 01/23/1840 – 05/25/1842 Newspaper Archives
Lincolnton Lincoln Courier 05/02/1846 – 02/15/1851 Newspaper Archives
Littleton Lake Gaston Gazette-Observer 07/08/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Littleton True Reformer 07/25/1900 – 07/25/1900 Newspaper Archives
Louisburg Franklin Times 12/19/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lumberton Robesonian 01/01/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Marion McDowell News 02/12/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Mebane Mebane Enterprise 09/17/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Milton Milton Gazette and Roanoke Advertiser 05/03/1822 – 04/21/1825 Newspaper Archives
Monroe Enquirer-Journal 10/01/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Mooresville Mooresville Tribune 02/16/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Morehead City Carteret County News-Times 04/16/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Morganton News Herald 01/12/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Mount Olive Mount Olive Tribune 10/06/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Mt. Airy Mt. Airy News 11/02/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Murfreesboro Hornets’ Nest 10/01/1812 – 07/22/1813 Newspaper Archives
Murphy Cherokee Scout 04/20/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Nashville Nashville Graphic 01/06/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
New Bern True Republican, and Newbern Weekly Advertiser 04/02/1810 – 08/07/1811 Newspaper Archives
New Bern Newbern Sentinel 03/21/1818 – 12/21/1836 Newspaper Archives
New Bern North-Carolina Gazette 03/24/1775 – 07/14/1775 Newspaper Archives
New Bern Newbern Herald 01/20/1809 – 02/26/1810 Newspaper Archives
New Bern Morning Herald 09/17/1807 – 12/30/1808 Newspaper Archives
New Bern Carolina Federal Republican 01/12/1809 – 04/25/1818 Newspaper Archives
New Bern State Gazette of North Carolina 08/09/1787 – 02/07/1788 Newspaper Archives
Newton Observer News Enterprise 09/06/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Pilot Mountain Pilot 02/20/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Princeton Princeton News-Leader 05/30/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Raleigh Star 11/03/1808 – 09/29/1852 Newspaper Archives
Raleigh Midtown Raleigh News 01/16/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Raleigh Raleigh Register 06/04/1819 – 12/28/1821 Newspaper Archives
Raleigh Raleigh Extra 06/18/1995 – Current Recent Obituaries
Raleigh North Raleigh News 07/21/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Raleigh Gazette 12/16/1893 – 02/19/1898 Newspaper Archives
Raleigh Observer 02/24/1877 – 09/11/1880 Newspaper Archives
Raleigh Semi-Weekly Standard 01/14/1852 – 03/08/1868 Newspaper Archives
Raleigh Dispatch 12/21/1991 – 04/10/1993 Newspaper Archives
Raleigh News & Observer, The: Web Edition Articles 05/06/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Raleigh News & Observer, The: Blogs 12/07/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Raleigh North-Carolina Minerva 11/26/1799 – 12/31/1804 Newspaper Archives
Raleigh News & Observer 01/01/1991 – Current Recent Obituaries
Red Springs Red Springs Citizen 09/10/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Reidsville Eden Daily News 02/13/2013 – Current Recent Obituaries
Reidsville Reidsville Review 03/25/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Richlands Richlands-Beulaville Advertiser News 10/28/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Roanoke Rapids Daily Herald 08/15/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Robbinsville Graham Star 01/28/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Rockingham Richmond County Daily Journal 05/05/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Rocky Mount Rocky Mount Telegram 09/03/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Roxboro Courier-Times 11/22/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Salisbury Salisbury Post 12/01/1998 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sanford Sanford Herald 02/17/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Shallotte Brunswick Beacon 05/18/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Smithfield Smithfield Herald 01/19/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Snow Hill Standard Laconic 07/13/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Southern Pines Pilot 10/08/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Spring Hope Spring Hope Enterprise & The Bailey News 08/03/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Spruce Pine Mitchell News-Journal 06/12/2013 – Current Recent Obituaries
St. Pauls St. Pauls Review 09/04/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Statesville Statesville Record & Landmark 02/06/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Swansboro Tideland News 09/03/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sylva Sylva Herald & Ruralite 10/21/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Tabor City Tabor-Loris Tribune 03/14/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Tarboro Daily Southerner 01/23/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Tarboro Tarboro Press 01/04/1840 – 03/02/1844 Newspaper Archives
Thomasville Thomasville Times 01/01/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Troy Montgomery Herald 06/20/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Tryon Tryon Daily Bulletin 05/14/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Wadesboro Anson Record 06/19/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Wallace Wallace Enterprise 01/06/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Walnut Cove Stokes News 12/20/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Warrenton Warren Record 07/08/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Warsaw Warsaw-Faison News 01/06/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Washington Washington Daily News 10/02/2014 – Current Recent Obituaries
Washington American Recorder 04/28/1815 – 05/27/1825 Newspaper Archives
Weaverville Weaverville Tribune 04/30/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
West Jefferson Jefferson Post 09/25/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Whiteville News Reporter 04/22/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Williamston Martin County Enterprise and Weekly Herald 07/14/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Wilmington StarNews 01/31/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Wilmington Wilmington Gazette 01/01/1801 – 01/13/1816 Newspaper Archives
Wilmington Wilmington Centinel and General Advertiser 06/18/1788 – 06/18/1788 Newspaper Archives
Wilmington True Republican or American Whig 01/03/1809 – 11/07/1809 Newspaper Archives
Wilmington Cape-Fear Recorder 11/28/1818 – 04/11/1827 Newspaper Archives
Wilson Wilson Daily Times 10/10/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Windsor Bertie Ledger-Advance 07/13/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Winston-Salem Winston-Salem Journal 11/14/1997 – Current Recent Obituaries
Winston-Salem Twin City Sentinel 12/27/1906 – 12/27/1906 Newspaper Archives
Winston-Salem Winston-Salem Journal 08/30/1898 – 12/31/1929 Newspaper Archives
Yadkinville Yadkin Ripple 09/19/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Yanceyville Caswell Messenger 08/27/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Zebulon Eastern Wake News 11/12/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries

*Date Ranges may have selected coverage unavailable.

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