GenealogyBank Just Added 7 Million More Genealogy Records!

Every day, GenealogyBank is working hard to digitize more newspapers and obituaries, expanding our collection to give you the largest newspaper archives for family history research available anywhere online. We just completed adding 7 million more U.S. genealogy records, vastly increasing our content coverage from U.S. coast to coast!

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Here are some of the details about our most recent U.S. newspaper additions:

  • A total of 52 newspaper titles from 21 U.S. states
  • 19 of these titles are newspapers added to GenealogyBank for the first time
  • Newspaper titles marked with an asterisk (*) are new to our online archives
  • We’ve shown the newspaper issue date ranges so that you can determine if the newly added content is relevant to your personal genealogy research

The list of our new newspaper additions is directly below. Also, see our entire list of newspaper archives by state to see all of our archived collections.

State City Title Date Range Collection
Arizona Tucson TucsonSentinel.com* 01/28/2010–Current Recent Obituaries
California Barstow Desert Dispatch* 03/16/2007–Current Recent Obituaries
California San Francisco Corriere del Popolo 09/05/1922–12/20/1945 Newspaper Archives
California San Francisco San Francisco Chronicle 9/19/1881–4/30/1915 Newspaper Archives
California San Luis Obispo San Luis Obispo Daily Telegram 4/2/1934–3/30/1937 Newspaper Archives
California Santa Monica Santa Monica Mirror* 01/07/2010–Current Recent Obituaries
Colorado Bayfield Pine River Times* 02/21/2014–Current Recent Obituaries
Colorado Denver Denver Rocky Mountain News 5/1/1908–5/31/1908 Newspaper Archives
Florida Lake City Lake City Reporter* 11/01/2013–Current Recent Obituaries
Georgia Elberton Elberton Star & Examiner, The* 08/02/2004–Current Recent Obituaries
Georgia Hartwell Hartwell Sun, The* 01/05/2012–Current Recent Obituaries
Georgia Lavonia Franklin County Citizen* 01/02/2014–Current Recent Obituaries
Georgia Marietta Marietta Journal 1/29/1964–12/13/1991 Newspaper Archives
Idaho Boise Idaho Statesman 8/16/1929–12/30/1933 Newspaper Archives
Illinois Highland Highland News Leader* 04/03/2014–Current Recent Obituaries
Kentucky Lexington Lexington Herald 10/1/1929–1/31/1930 Newspaper Archives
Louisiana Lafayette Acadiana Advocate, The* 12/13/2013–Current Recent Obituaries
Louisiana New Orleans New Orleans Item 9/19/1911–9/19/1911 Newspaper Archives
Louisiana New Orleans New Orleans States 10/25/1922–10/25/1922 Newspaper Archives
Maryland Baltimore Katholische Volkszeitung 04/08/1871–09/02/1871 Newspaper Archives
Massachusetts Hopkinton Hopkinton Independent, The* 05/16/2013–Current Recent Obituaries
Massachusetts Millbury Millbury-Sutton Chronicle* 05/03/2007–Current Recent Obituaries
Michigan Ann Arbor Ann Arbor News 4/16/1909–5/31/1917 Newspaper Archives
Michigan Detroit Herold 01/27/1911–01/27/1911 Newspaper Archives
Michigan Flint Flint Journal 1/26/1900–5/17/1920 Newspaper Archives
Michigan Muskegon Muskegon Chronicle 4/30/1880–5/26/1917 Newspaper Archives
Michigan Saginaw Saginaw News 12/23/1893–5/24/1895 Newspaper Archives
Mississippi Biloxi Daily Herald 1/1/1937–6/30/1942 Newspaper Archives
New Jersey Bridgeton Bridgeton Evening News 9/1/1896–5/7/1921 Newspaper Archives
New Jersey Egg Harbor City Egg Harbor Pilot 04/12/1862–07/27/1872 Newspaper Archives
New Jersey Jersey City Jersey Journal 7/14/1891–10/6/1922 Newspaper Archives
New Jersey Trenton Trenton Evening Times 12/30/1922–2/1/1946 Newspaper Archives
New Mexico Carlsbad Carlsbad Current-Argus* 01/28/2005–Current Recent Obituaries
New Mexico Deming Deming Headlight* 06/03/2006–Current Recent Obituaries
New York New York Cristoforo Colombo 08/28/1892–08/22/1893 Newspaper Archives
New York New York Jewish Messenger 04/29/1870–06/05/1891 Newspaper Archives
New York New York New Yorker Volkszeitung 05/25/1920–11/25/1922 Newspaper Archives
New York New York Progresso Italo-Americano* 09/21/1884–12/11/1889 Newspaper Archives
New York New York Sozialist 02/16/1889–02/16/1889 Newspaper Archives
New York New York Vorwarts 09/02/1893–12/30/1922 Newspaper Archives
North Carolina Charlotte Charlotte Observer 7/1/1927–7/31/1927 Newspaper Archives
North Carolina Spruce Pine Mitchell News-Journal* 06/12/2013–Current Recent Obituaries
Ohio Bellevue RFD News* 10/01/2013–Current Recent Obituaries
Ohio Cincinnati Catholic Telegraph, The* 03/06/2009–Current Recent Obituaries
Ohio Cleveland Cleveland Leader 9/5/1862–4/3/1885 Newspaper Archives
Ohio Cleveland Plain Dealer 1/1/1923–6/5/1923 Newspaper Archives
Ohio Fredericktown Knox County Citizen* 12/11/2013–Current Recent Obituaries
South Dakota Aberdeen Aberdeen Daily News 10/29/1925–5/19/1996 Newspaper Archives
Washington Bellingham Bellingham Herald 1/1/1935–6/30/1937 Newspaper Archives
Washington Olympia Morning Olympian 6/24/1940–12/30/1941 Newspaper Archives
Wisconsin Appleton Appleton Volksfreund 10/02/1919–02/17/1921 Newspaper Archives
Wisconsin La Crosse La Crosse Volksfreund 07/11/1906–07/11/1906 Newspaper Archives

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Old Music in Historical Newspapers: Tips for Finding Songs

Introduction: Mary Harrell-Sesniak is a genealogist, author and editor with a strong technology background. In this blog post, Mary provides newspaper search tips to find articles and musical scores about the songs our ancestors enjoyed

When doing your family history research, have you ever wondered about the old music your American ancestors enjoyed?

What were the popular melodies and tunes of earlier days, what were their origins, and what musical discoveries can we find in historical newspapers?

Yankee Doodle

A fun place to start is by researching one of the more ubiquitous tunes in American history: “Yankee Doodle.” Just think—our parents, grandparents and great grandparents knew the same lyrics to this song. What a wonderful shared experience that is.

Yankee Doodle went to town
Riding on a pony;
He stuck a feather in his hat,
And called it macaroni.

To find a wide assortment of news articles about “Yankee Doodle” and amusing renditions of this popular American song, enter the title into GenealogyBank’s search engine. This search returns over 64,000 “best matches,” so you may wish to sort the results by date from the earliest to newest, or vice versa.

One of the earliest newspaper articles, from 1769, reports that the British military used the song as a type of verbal bantering or taunting of the colonists.

According to the article:

…the Officer of the Guard, in a sneering Manner, called upon the Musicians to play up the Yankee Doodle Tune, which completed the Conquest of the Military, and afforded them a temporary Triumph.

New-York Journal (New York, New York), 14 September 1769, page 2

New-York Journal (New York, New York), 14 September 1769, page 2

Limiting Music Searches by Categories

With so many search results, I looked for ways to narrow the focus. A promising option was the “Poems & Songs” category with over 1,200 historical newspaper articles to explore.

search results for "Yankee Doodle" in GenealogyBank

Adding Keywords to Your Article Search

To learn about specifics, I incorporated keywords such as “origins.”

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A newspaper article from 1861 reported that “Yankee Doodle’s” music was derived from the “Lucy Locket” nursery rhyme. I wasn’t familiar with it—but if you hum “Lucy Locket,” you’ll find it has the same musical syntax, or structure, as “Yankee Doodle.”

Lucy Locket lost her pocket
Kitty Fisher found it;
Not a bit of money in it
Only binding ’round it.

 
After the 1775 Battles of Lexington and Concord, the patriots came up with their own lyrics. An early version was titled “The Yankee’s Return from Camp,” used as a battle march.

The old song has direct references to George Washington (then a Captain) and Capt. Isaac Davis. See article on Capt. Isaac Davis at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Davis_(soldier).

Photos & Illustrations

You’ll discover a number of musical scores in the “Poems & Songs” category on GenealogyBank’s search results page, and there are others in the “Photos & Illustrations” category. By examining these, I found a promising lead from 1910 that was reprinted three years later, in 1913.

Historical Music Sheet Tab in Historical Newspapers Genealogy Bank

This sheet tab reference isn’t actually from the “Yankee Doodle” song itself, but instead a composition called “The Boys That Fight the Flames” by George M. Cohen. He composed it as part of his play, Fifty Miles from Boston.

Forgotten Old Songs

The “Photos & Illustrations” category is also a wonderful place to find musical scores of forgotten pieces. Although not familiar with “Life’s a Bumper,” I might try playing this song on my piano.

Bellows Falls Gazette (Bellows Falls, Vermont), 14 December 1839, page 1

Bellows Falls Gazette (Bellows Falls, Vermont), 14 December 1839, page 1

Search Tips for Finding Old Music

This blog post is just the tip of the iceberg on musical discoveries found in newspapers. Try these steps and be sure to share your own tips for researching the music of our ancestors in old newspapers.

  • Do a general search for a song title
  • Sort by Best Matches, Oldest Items or Newest Items
  • Narrow by the category “Poems & Songs”
  • Experiment with other categories, such as “Photos & Illustrations”
  • Repeat the previous steps by adding keywords, such as “origins” or a composer’s name

Related Music Articles:

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Weird News of Odd & Bizarre Happenings: Raining Frogs?

Census and other government records can give us dates and facts about our ancestors, but where do you turn to find their personal stories, an account of something fantastic, exciting or odd that they experienced? If you are lucky, you may possess your ancestors’ journals or family letters. Even if you don’t have these, however, you still have a great source for stories about your ancestors: an archive of historical newspapers, such as the 6,500 titles in GenealogyBank’s online Historical Newspaper Archives.

For example, if James Edward Van Voorhes is one of your ancestors, you won’t find in his census, marriage or death records an account of a truly bizarre experience he had one rainy day—but you will learn about it in the newspaper, because he wrote the following letter to the editor telling of a very bizarre happening.

A Rain of Frogs, Plain Dealer newspaper article 8 May 1922

Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 8 May 1922, page 6

Can you imagine witnessing something as astonishing as raining frogs happening? What a great family story! In thinking of James getting down from his horse, huddling under the protection of a covered bridge during a heavy rainstorm, and staring in disbelief as the clouds suddenly rained frogs onto the road before him, you’ve shared an extraordinary sight your ancestor once experienced, seen the world in one vivid moment through his eyes—and in that way brought him a little closer to you.

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Here is another account of this bizarre phenomenon of raining frogs.

A Rain of Frogs in Arizona, Oregonian newspaper article 8 July 1871

Oregonian (Portland, Oregon), 8 July 1871, page 4

The writer goes on to say:

Several of the party took some [frogs] from their hat-rims. Our unexpected visitors were all of one size, about a quarter of an inch long from nose to rump, very lively, and apparently in the best condition. Their fall had been broken by the springy, resilient nature of the grass. It is not probable that several hundred thousand, perhaps millions, of frogs had suddenly been hatched into life in the ground by the rain, or, if they had, that in their infantile glee they jumped five feet eleven inches from the earth to the top of our heads merely to show how the game of leap-frog should be played. Nor had they any such caudal appendages as are generally attached to juvenile rana. They came from above, in company with the rain; and this fact was made clear by holding out the hand and seeing them fall upon it, as well as finding them on our hat-rims.

Stories, wonderful stories, that “smack of the incredible.” Newspapers are filled with them—the unusual, the odd, the bizarre, the humorous.

a collage of newspaper articles reporting incidents of it raining frogsEven if the weird or humorous stories you find are not about one of your ancestors, they make interesting reading and may give you a chuckle, adding to the fun of browsing through an archive of historical newspapers while doing your family history research. Keep an eye out for such odd stories—you never know what you’ll find!

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Great-Grandmother’s Swimsuit in Vintage Fashion Articles & Photos

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this blog post, Gena searches old newspapers to find ads and stories about vintage swimsuits, giving us another glimpse into our ancestors’ lives.

It’s HOT outside and it’s the perfect time to enjoy a day at the beach. One day as I was trying to stay cool at home with the air conditioning, I was scanning family photos and came across a 1920s-era photo of my great-grandfather and his sister-in-law at the beach. Looking at the old family photo reminded me of what I love about family history research: discovering the stories of ordinary people’s lives. Our ancestors’ lives were much more than a birth, marriage, and death date. They took part in all sorts of activities, including recreations like visiting the beach during the summer.

photo of Oscar Philibert and Lillie Chatham

Photo: Oscar Philibert and Lillie Chatham. Credit: Gena Philibert-Ortega.

So what type of swimsuits did your ancestors wear? Swimsuits, like all types of fashion, have evolved through the years to reflect the morals, laws, form, and textiles of the times. According to the article “Swim Wear History” by the Vintage Fashion Guild, the bathing suits of ancient Greece resembled the bikinis of today! As time progressed, modesty and segregation between the sexes called for swim attire that lacked function. As swimming and beach visits became more popular in the 19th century, beach wear evolved to the swimsuit fashions seen today. That article goes on to say that those early Victorian suits made of wool covered everything on the human form but they also adhered to wet bodies, defeating their original purpose: modesty. This lack of function for swimsuits can be seen in photos from the early 20th century as well.

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Controversy has always followed the wearing of swimsuits. Older generations voiced their disapproval of the younger generation showing too much skin—and in some cases the law has stepped in to make sure the public is well-covered. One example of someone who tried to push the envelope in what bathing beauties wore was the Australian professional swimmer and actress Annette Kellerman (1886-1975), who was an advocate of women wearing one-piece swimsuits instead of the impractical dress and pantaloons ensembles of the time. She was even arrested for wearing one of her one-piece suits on a U.S. beach.

photo of Annette Kellermann

Photo: pictorial post card, “Miss Annette Kellermann, Champion Lady Swimmer and Diver of the World.” Credit: State Library of New South Wales; Flickr the Commons.

Swimsuit Fashions through the 20th Century

This 1916 newspaper ad offers a swimsuit that pretty much covers every part of the body except the arms and neck. In describing this more “modern” suit, the writer states “that the suit is not the same as a half dozen years ago—a simple thing good enough to swim in.” As we read more about this ensemble and all of its pieces and design, it’s funny to see how language and descriptions have changed. I’m not sure how many women today would want to wear a swimsuit described as “…striped as a porch awning.” Modern-day women may take offense at someone commenting on their fashion choice looking like something that should be hanging off someone’s porch.

swimsuit ad, Charlotte Observer newspaper advertisement 11 July 1916

Charlotte Observer (Charlotte, North Carolina), 11 July 1916, page 7

It’s easy to see the style differences from the 1916 suit featured above and this “scantier” 1923 swimsuit. Scantier certainly describes this vintage swimsuit, with its “shorter trunks, narrower shoulder hands, and no sleeves.” It’s easy to understand how this suit style would be much easier to swim in as the model, Miss Martin of the Ziegfeld Follies, is quoted as saying.

swimsuit ad, Miami District Daily News newspaper advertisement 3 January 1922

Miami District Daily News (Miami, Oklahoma), 3 January 1922, page 3

While we most associate today’s bikinis as revealing swimsuits, women did wear two-piece swimsuits decades before the bikini, like this ad from 1937 describing how “an overskirt of white jersey dotted in red matches the ‘bra’ top of the suit, and is worn over red jersey shorts.”

swimsuit ad, National Labor Tribune newspaper advertisement 10 April 1937

National Labor Tribune (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania), 10 April 1937, page 8

As younger generations look at the vintage swimsuit fashions from yesterday, they probably find amusement at past efforts to cover up on the beach, and wonder why our ancestors wore so much material. It would seem that each generation disapproves of the younger generations and their fashions—and vice versa. That’s as true for 1922 as for the bikini-wearing women of 1960, as shown in this article reporting comments from newspaper readers about the wearing of bikinis. Notice that listed with each name is also the commentators’ street address—a potentially valuable genealogy clue.

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My favorite quote is from Mrs. Nemitz who says of bikinis:

“Don’t think I’m old fashioned, because I’m not. I just don’t care for bikinis, and the men that I have talked to don’t care for them either.”

Good thing she didn’t know about what happened when the modest bathing costumes of her mother’s generation became wet—talk about revealing!

Bare Views on Bikinis, Plain Dealer newspaper article 2 July 1960

Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 2 July 1960, page 12

So what did your female ancestors wear for a swimsuit? Were they daring and tried to show more than was allowed, or did they keep all covered up? Did they enjoy just dipping their toes into the ocean or did they need swimwear that allowed them freedom as they swam? Fashion history can provide an interesting look at our ancestors’ lives, and looking at swimwear reminds us of how similar some of our attitudes are to our ancestors’ opinions.

Related Vintage Fashion Articles:

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Tracing Your Colonial & Revolutionary Ancestry in Newspapers

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this blog post, Gena shows how old newspapers provide a great opportunity to learn more about your Revolutionary War-era ancestors, especially considering that primary sources are hard to find for this time period.

Are you researching your family history all the way back to your Revolutionary War-era ancestors? Old newspapers are a great way to learn about your ancestry during America’s Colonial and Revolutionary periods.

painting: Washington Crossing the Delaware, by Emanuel Leutze

Painting: Washington Crossing the Delaware, by Emanuel Leutze (1851). Source: Wikimedia Commons.

For example, GenealogyBank’s online Historical Newspaper Archives date from 1690 to today. What does this mean for you? It means a great opportunity to learn more about your Revolutionary War-era ancestors even when primary sources are few and far between. Remember that newspapers can hold rich family history information that details a person’s life story from cradle to grave.

Limit Your Ancestry Search—but Not Too Much

It’s natural to want to go straight to the advanced genealogy search engine on GenealogyBank to start your newspaper research. The advanced search engine is where we can limit or narrow our search, broadening it beyond just names by adding dates, and by including or excluding keywords. The advanced search box is a vital tool for researching a common surname. When researching a Revolutionary War-era ancestor, limiting the search to those years the ancestor was alive can help you filter out search results that aren’t about your specific ancestor.

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However, there is a caution: remember that the more information you add to a search engine the fewer results you will receive. Keep a log of your ancestor searches and results. Try a combination of keyword searches and note your results. One important aspect in researching Colonial newspapers is that language is much different now than in those early American newspapers. Don’t add too many “modern” words to your keyword search, as these may result in poor search results. Words associated with the cost of goods are just one example of a difference that could mean finding what you are looking for or not. It can be beneficial to take some time to read the newspaper from your ancestor’s area and time to get a sense of the layout, articles, and language.

Not sure which Colonial and Revolutionary newspapers are available on GenealogyBank? Find a list in this blog article: 27 Colonial Newspapers to Trace Your Early American Ancestry.

list of Colonial and Revolutionary newspapers available in GenealogyBank

Consider the possible articles that could exist about your 18th century ancestor in these early American Colonial newspapers!

While you won’t know what specific articles your ancestor may have been mentioned in until you do an actual search, simply reading through some of these early American newspapers can help to get a sense of what news was reported during their lifetime. When researching a Revolutionary War soldier for example, look for anything that might provide some historical context (think pension laws and battle descriptions), but would not necessarily mention him by name. Of course, with a specific search you are looking for articles like a pension list or an obituary that would mention him by name.

Revolutionary War Desertions

War is hell, and in every conflict some soldiers desert for a whole host of reasons. It makes sense that during the Revolutionary War desertions would be reported in the newspapers, so that the community could read the description and help find the missing soldier.

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In this 1777 desertion ad from a Pennsylvania newspaper, two soldiers are described. These descriptions are not limited to their physical attributes. One of the soldiers is listed as “Thomas Robinson…a stout well-made Irishman, about 35 years of age, fair complexion, and short dark hair, a little bald; he is a very great drunkard, and when sober his hands tremble as if afflicted with the palsy; he is very talkative, and speaks with his native brogue; his occupation is ditching and threshing.”

article about deserters in the American Revolutionary War, Pennsylvania Packet newspaper article 25 February 1777

Pennsylvania Packet (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 25 February 1777, page 1

War Pensions

Did your ancestor receive a pension? Newspapers may include lists of those receiving pensions, such as this one from a 1796 Massachusetts newspaper. Notice it includes the name and rank of the soldiers as well as the amount of each pension.

Pension Law, Western Star newspaper article 19 September 1796

Western Star (Stockbridge, Massachusetts), 19 September 1796, page 3

Stories of Your Ancestors’ Personal Lives

The newspaper isn’t just a place to find your ancestors’ names; it’s also a great place to learn more about their personal lives and the times they lived in. In this example the invalid pension law is explained, as well as when the pension is paid and the application process.

Invalid Pensioners, Salem Gazette newspaper article 16 February 1790

Salem Gazette (Salem, Massachusetts), 16 February 1790, page 3

Don’t forget that you can narrow your newspaper search by type of article. This is a great time-saving research tool in cases when you receive numerous “hits” or are looking for something specific. To narrow your search by type of article from the results list, click on the links to the left of the list, under the heading “Newspaper Archives.”

screenshot showing the newspaper article types on GenealogyBank's search results page

Combine Original Document Finds with Newspapers

Found your ancestor’s military file or pension record? Great! Follow that up by looking for information in the newspaper.

In the case of a common name, such as my ancestor Revolutionary War soldier Benjamin Jones, a search in the newspaper may bring up numerous hits but they may not be my Benjamin Jones. For that reason, consider using what you find in original documents in conjunction with the newspaper to help you narrow your search and analyze the evidence.

What can you find in the newspaper about your Colonial and Revolutionary War ancestry? Plenty! Those genealogy records can be an important and colorful addition to your family history.

Related Colonial & Revolutionary War Ancestry Articles:

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Family History Fact Finding: True Family Stories in Newspapers

GenealogyBank has really been great for finding the personal stories of each family member.

I have been systematically going through the old newspapers looking for my Revolutionary War ancestors, and the other day I decided to look for my more recent ancestors and cousins.

A quick search found this article.

article about an accident at the St. John Wood Working Company, Stamford Advocate newspaper article 12 November 1886

Stamford Advocate (Stamford, Connecticut), 12 November 1886, page 2

The historical newspaper article reports:

A young man named Kemp, employed at St. John, Hoyt & Co.’s planing mill, got his right arm badly injured by an accident on Tuesday last [9 November 1886]. It got caught in a dove-tailing machine, which lacerated the flesh and broke the bone. It is said the arm will be saved, though perhaps in a more or less disabled condition.

I recognized that this was my cousin George Andrew Kemp (1864-1935) even though the article did not give his full name.

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illustration of the St. John Wood Working Company, Hardwood and Cabinet Department

Image: St. John Wood Working Company, Hardwood and Cabinet Department. Source: “Picturesque Stamford – 1892,” Stamford Historical Society.

Digging deeper I found this follow-up newspaper article.

article about an accident by George Kemp at the St. John Wood Working Company, Stamford Advocate newspaper article 18 February 1887

Stamford Advocate (Stamford, Connecticut), 18 February 1887, page 2

According to the 1800s news article:

George A. Kemp, who about three months ago had his arm badly lacerated, has through the surgical treatment of Drs. Hungerford and A. M. Hurlbutt, and under the skillful care of Dr. Geib, come out with a magnificent arm, with a new joint which will answer for an elbow. He is now able to resume his work at the same place—the St. John Wood-Working Co.

Confirmation.

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Great—it was George Andrew Kemp, and the second article gave information about the surgical procedure and the physicians who performed it.

We have a family story that George had hurt his arm and was handicapped for the rest of his life.

Thanks to these articles in old newspapers, we have confirmation and more of the details of his personal story. We did not know that he was only 22 years old at the time of the accident, or that this handicap would last for the rest of his adult life.

Family history also tells us that while he was no longer able to work in the wood shop, the accident didn’t slow him down. He opened his own business and sold goods as a traveling salesman, delivering kerosene and doughnuts with his horse and wagon for the next 49 years. He died in 1935 at age 71 years of age.

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Florida Newspaper Archives: 116 Titles for Genealogy Research

When the first European—Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de Leon—arrived in Florida in 1513, he named it “La Florida” (Flowery Land) because of the floral beauty he found everywhere. With its tropical climate, long coastline adorned with many beaches—on both the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean—and varied vegetation, Florida is a beautiful place to live and one of America’s most popular vacation destinations.

photo of Bahia Honda Beach, Florida Keys, Florida

Photo: Bahia Honda Beach, Florida Keys, Florida. Credit: Mwanner; Wikimedia Commons.

If you are researching your ancestry from Florida, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online Florida newspaper archives: 116 titles to help you search your family history in “The Sunshine State,” providing coverage from 1823 to Today. There are more than 15.2 million newspaper articles and records in our online FL archives.

Dig deep into the online archives and search for obituaries and other news articles about your ancestors in these recent and historical FL newspapers online. Our Florida newspapers are divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries (obituaries only).

Search Florida Newspaper Archives (1823 – 1984)

Search Florida Recent Obituaries (1983 – Current)

Here is our complete list of online Florida newspapers in the archives. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more. The FL newspaper titles are listed alphabetically by city.

City Title Date Range Collection
Arcadia Arcadian 12/9/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Arcadia DeSoto Sun 4/14/1996 – 9/2/2010 Recent Obituaries
Bartow Polk County Democrat 7/17/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Belle Glade Sun 5/1/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Boca Grande Boca Beacon 5/31/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Boca Raton Boca Raton News 3/2/2006 – 8/26/2009 Recent Obituaries
Bonita Springs Banner 1/27/1996 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bonita Springs Bonita Daily News 5/23/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bradenton Manatee River Journal 9/5/1889 – 9/20/1923 Newspaper Archives
Bradenton North Manatee Observer 11/24/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bradenton Bradenton Herald 1/19/1991 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bradenton East County Observer 8/17/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Branford Branford News 7/25/2007 – 5/4/2009 Recent Obituaries
Brooksville Hernando Today 10/3/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bushnell Sumter County Times 12/27/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Callahan Nassau County Record 10/4/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Chiefland Cedar Key Beacon 11/20/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Chiefland Chiefland Citizen 11/19/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Clermont South Lake Press 7/13/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Clewiston Clewiston News 1/4/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Crawfordville Wakulla News 6/24/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Crystal River Citrus County Chronicle 10/14/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Daytona Beach Daytona Beach News-Journal 3/27/1996 – Current Recent Obituaries
DeLand West Volusia Beacon 11/17/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Dunnellon Riverland News 5/1/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Englewood Englewood Sun 3/5/1996 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fernandina Beach News Leader 3/15/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fort Lauderdale Sun Sentinel 1/1/1986 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fort Meade Fort Meade Leader 12/31/2002 – 8/14/2013 Recent Obituaries
Fort Myers Fort Myers Florida Weekly 5/31/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fort Myers Beach Island Sand Paper 5/14/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fort Pierce St. Lucie News Tribune 8/13/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fort Pierce Hometown News 2/9/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fort Pierce Fort Pierce News 5/2/1997 – 6/16/2000 Recent Obituaries
Frostproof Frostproof News 3/23/2011 – 8/14/2013 Recent Obituaries
Ft. Lauderdale South Florida Times 12/31/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Gainesville Gainesville Sun 2/18/1995 – Current Recent Obituaries
Immokalee Immokalee Bulletin 1/4/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Jacksonville Florida Tattler 12/1/1934 – 9/29/1945 Newspaper Archives
Jacksonville Florida Sentinel 1/26/1900 – 1/26/1900 Newspaper Archives
Jacksonville Florida Times-Union 1/12/1996 – Current Recent Obituaries
Jacksonville Florida Times-Union, The: Web Edition Articles 11/28/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Jacksonville Beach Beaches Leader 1/2/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Jasper Jasper News 1/2/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Jupiter Jupiter Courier 9/3/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Key West Key West Citizen 10/31/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
LaBelle Caloosa Belle 1/4/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
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Lakeland Ledger 12/19/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lakeland Ledger, The: Blogs 7/17/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Leesburg Daily Commercial 12/1/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Live Oak Suwannee Democrat 11/21/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Longboat Key Longboat Observer 11/2/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Marathon Florida Keys Keynoter 11/6/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Marco Island Marco Island Eagle 6/7/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Marianna Jackson County Floridan 4/22/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Mayo Mayo Free Press 1/19/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Miami Miami Herald 1/1/1911 – 3/31/1926 Newspaper Archives
Miami Nuevo Herald 3/29/1976 – 4/30/1984 Newspaper Archives
Miami Miami Herald 1/1/1983 – Current Recent Obituaries
Miami Miami Herald, The: Blogs 3/10/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Miami El Nuevo Herald 1/1/1983 – Current Recent Obituaries
Miami Shores Biscayne Boulevard Times 8/1/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Moore Haven Glades County Democrat 4/26/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Naples Naples Florida Weekly 10/16/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
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North Port North Port Sun 5/3/1996 – Current Recent Obituaries
Ocala Ocala Star-Banner 1/1/1991 – Current Recent Obituaries
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Orlando Orlando Weekly 1/5/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
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Orlando Valencia Voice: Valencia Community College 11/9/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Palatka Palatka Daily News 1/1/2014 – Current Recent Obituaries
Palm Beach Palm Beach Daily News 1/2/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Palm Coast Palm Coast Observer 7/15/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Pensacola Pensacola Gazette 5/15/1824 – 3/29/1856 Newspaper Archives
Pinecrest Pinecrest Tribune 10/22/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Plant City Plant City Times & Observer 7/12/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Pompano Beach Pelican 3/23/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Port Charlotte Charlotte Sun 8/3/1996 – Current Recent Obituaries
Quincy Gadsden County Times 1/15/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sarasota Pelican Press 8/12/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sarasota Sarasota Herald-Tribune 1/1/1996 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sebastian Sebastian Sun 3/19/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sebring News-Sun 4/14/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sebring Highlands Today 3/21/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
St. Augustine Florida Herald and Southern Democrat 1/4/1823 – 12/20/1842 Newspaper Archives
St. Augustine St. Augustine Record 2/16/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
St. Petersburg Tampa Bay Times 1/1/1987 – Current Recent Obituaries
Stuart Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News 9/2/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Stuart YourNews.com 7/18/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Tallahassee Floridian and Journal 1/6/1849 – 12/22/1860 Newspaper Archives
Tallahassee Floridian and Advocate 10/24/1831 – 4/2/1842 Newspaper Archives
Tampa Tampa Tribune 1/2/1895 – 7/20/1936 Newspaper Archives
Tampa Traduccion Prensa 4/9/1941 – 9/4/1956 Newspaper Archives
Tampa Internacional 6/30/1939 – 8/7/1942 Newspaper Archives
Tampa Revista de Cuba Libre 12/25/1897 – 8/27/1898 Newspaper Archives
Tampa Nueva Republica 5/29/1897 – 5/28/1898 Newspaper Archives
Tampa Ecos 7/21/1959 – 7/21/1959 Newspaper Archives
Tampa Ybor City Sunday News 11/18/1951 – 11/18/1951 Newspaper Archives
Tampa Informacion 10/31/1958 – 10/31/1958 Newspaper Archives
Tampa Comite Consulto Conjuto 4/30/1941 – 4/30/1941 Newspaper Archives
Tampa Boletin 3/12/1941 – 3/12/1941 Newspaper Archives
Tampa Tampa Tribune 8/13/1990 – Current Recent Obituaries
Tavernier Reporter 2/27/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Venice Venice Gondolier Sun 7/1/1996 – Current Recent Obituaries
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West Tampa West Tampa Leader 12/8/1940 – 12/8/1940 Newspaper Archives
Williston Williston Pioneer Sun News 12/11/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Ybor City Diario de Tampa 6/6/1908 – 7/14/1911 Newspaper Archives

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History of Fireworks in America: News from 1700s Forward

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this blog post, Gena searches old newspapers to find stories about the history of fireworks and their use for celebrations in America.

With the recent Fourth of July celebrations for Independence Day in America, we all have been seeing and hearing a lot of fireworks lately.

photo of Fourth of July fireworks over the nation’s Capitol

Photo: Fourth of July fireworks over the nation’s Capitol. Source: Library of Congress.

Letter from John Adams

It seems that the idea to celebrate our nation’s independence has always included fireworks. In a 3 July 1776 letter to his wife Abigail, future President John Adams declared:

The Second Day of July 1776, will be the most memorable Epocha, in the History of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated, by succeeding Generations, as the great anniversary Festival. It ought to be commemorated, as the Day of Deliverance by solemn Acts of Devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized with Pomp and Parade, with Shews, Games, Sports, Guns, Bells, Bonfires and Illuminations from one End of this Continent to the other from this Time forward forever more.*

(Note: Adams was referring to the unanimous vote by the Continental Congress on 2 July 1776 in support of a resolution of independence from Great Britain. The formal Declaration of Independence was ratified 4 July 1776, which is why we celebrate Independence Day on the Fourth of July.)

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Adams’ letter was reprinted in various newspapers well into the 19th century. It was even recalled in this 1893 California advertisement which proclaims: “Boys, how are you going to celebrate the glorious Fourth? With Fireworks of course, like true and patriotic little Americans.” Adams’ letter ran across the top of the ad, above a cartoon of Uncle Sam handing fireworks to little boys, promising them a supply of fireworks “with every Boy’s Suit sold in the Juvenile Department, no matter what price suit it may be.” More than one company used the award of fireworks as a motivator to get kids to sell or buy their product.

ad for fireworks, San Francisco Chronicle newspaper advertisement, 25 June 1893

San Francisco Chronicle (San Francisco, California), 25 June 1893, page 14

While we celebrate the 4th of July and not the 2nd as stated in Adams’ letter, the spirit is still the same: revelries including fireworks are all part of the holiday festivities.

The History of Fireworks

The history of fireworks predates those first July celebrations here in the United States of America. Most historians believe that fireworks originated in China prior to 1000 A.D., when bamboo would be heated until it exploded. Fireworks evolved to include ingredients used for gunpowder.**  No matter when they were actually discovered, fireworks have long been a part of various celebrations in the United States.

Do you think that our ancestors had plain, not-so-exciting fireworks? Well you would be wrong. Fireworks makers have always been creative. Consider this 1901 newspaper article’s description of fireworks: balloon fireworks that, when released into the air, pop and leave behind

elephants and fish and as many animals as Noah had in the ark to float around, with rockets and roman candles shooting out of them. They can be bought with attachments which will make music too.

This old newspaper article further describes fireworks

rising like the Eiffel tower of fire to an immense height, with a grand explosion, from a gorgeous veil of feathery plumes reaching nearly to the ground, embellished with topaz and emerald comets intertwining in their flight. Amid the clouds they display a broad, swelling spread of liquid gold in streamers of glittering radiance, with feathery edges gradually spreading and dissolving into a cloud of sparkling mist. Bursting in midheaven, they form an aurora…shower of electric jewels of emeralds and sapphire tints falling slowly to the earth.

What a great fireworks show!

Fireworks for 1901, Jackson Citizen Patriot newspaper article 3 July 1901

Jackson Citizen Patriot (Jackson, Michigan), 3 July 1901, page 3

Explosive Danger

There’s no doubt fireworks are dangerous. Reading late 19th and early 20th century newspapers, it becomes clear that some of the concerns still held today by city officials and firefighters existed during our ancestors’ time. While the dangers of fireworks are many—everything from the manufacture to the handling, storage and subsequent igniting of the device—fireworks have been known to result in fires, injuries, and even death.

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Because of this associated danger, various laws including the banning of displays have been a part of fireworks history in the United States. Even in my lifetime, here in California we have gone from setting off fireworks in our driveways, to fireworks being banned for individual sale, to municipalities cancelling fireworks displays because of budget shortfalls and drought conditions. Reading through historical newspapers, it seems that life hasn’t changed too much.

Consider this newspaper article about an explosion at a fireworks factory in 1904. The explosion killed three people and injured six.

Three Lives Lost in a Fire Following Explosion of Fireworks, Jackson Citizen Patriot newspaper article 28 June 1904

Jackson Citizen Patriot (Jackson, Michigan), 28 June 1904, page 1

While the explosion occurred on the building’s first floor where the fireworks factory was located, two of the victims killed were actually working on the third floor for a hat company. A newspaper article appearing a few days later provided information from the coroner’s inquest including drawings of some of the witnesses.

Inquest Fails to Determine Cause of Fireworks Horror, Philadelphia Inquirer newspaper article 3 July 1904

Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 3 July 1904, page 5

Fireworks Aren’t Just for the 4th of July

While fireworks are probably most associated with the Fourth of July, then as now they are set off for other celebratory occasions or events. State fairs, amusements parks and baseball stadiums all use fireworks as a way to make a day out more memorable.

fireworks ad for the Utah State Fair, Salt Lake Telegram newspaper advertisement 27 September 1917

Salt Lake Telegram (Salt Lake City, Utah), 27 September 1917, page 13

Our ancestors even used fireworks to commemorate Christmas. In this advertisement for Christmas trees, fireworks feature prominently—a combination many of us would find odd today.

ad for Christmas trees and fireworks, Charleston News and Courier newspaper advertisement 3 January 1895

Charleston News and Courier (Charleston, South Carolina), 3 January 1895, page 4

Fireworks have helped us celebrate occasions throughout our country’s history. Read more about how your ancestor’s hometown celebrations played out by searching in GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives.

_________

*From the National Park Service webpage “National Mall Independence Day Celebration” at http://www.nps.gov/foju/historyandculture.htm. Accessed 2 July 2014.
**From the A&E History webpage “Fireworks’ Vibrant History” by Jennie Cohen at http://www.history.com/news/fireworks-vibrant-history. Accessed 2 July 2014.

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News from Soccer’s Previous World Cups in Old Newspapers

Introduction: Duncan Kuehn is a professional genealogist with over eight years of client experience. She has worked on several well-known projects, such as “Who Do You Think You Are?” and researching President Barack Obama’s ancestry. In this blog post, Duncan shows some of soccer’s most famous and infamous moments from previous World Cups, as reported in newspapers.

To celebrate this year’s exciting World Cup, let’s relive some of the most talked-about moments in World Cup history, as shown in old newspaper articles.

Even though it is known worldwide as the “Beautiful Game,” soccer unfortunately sometimes makes headlines because of violent incidents, cheating and other unsavory elements that make news around the globe.

Unsportsmanlike Conduct

There will always be some dirty soccer playing, like this year when Uruguay’s Luis Suarez bit Italy’s Giorgio Chiellini during the World Cup in Brazil. Similar behavior was seen when France’s Zinedine Zidane headbutted Italian defender Marco Materazzi in his career-ending game during the final of the 2006 World Cup in Germany.

article about Italy winning soccer's 2006 World Cup, Register Star newspaper article 10 July 2006

Register Star (Rockford, Illinois), 10 July 2006, page 25

No Butts about It--Zidane Song Tops French Charts, Register Star newspaper article 3 August 2006

Register Star (Rockford, Illinois), 3 August 2006, page 18

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Occasionally there are fights between players, such as during the 1990 World Cup in Italy when the Netherlands’ Frank RijKaard spat at Germany’s Rudi Voeller and the two had an altercation.

article about the 1990 World Cup in Italy when the Netherlands’ Frank RijKaard spat at Germany’s Rudi Voeller, State Times Advocate newspaper article 27 June 1990

State Times Advocate (Baton Rouge, Louisiana), 27 June 1990, page 45

Cheating

Lamentably, there is even cheating in soccer sometimes. What he later called the “hand of God” goal by Diego Maradona is one example. It happened during the 1986 World Cup in Mexico, when the Argentine forward illegally used his hand to score an infamous goal against England.

Soccer Player (Maradona) Admits Cheating, Plain Dealer newspaper article 17 November 1986

Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 17 November 1986, page 52

Injuries

Very rarely, there are horrific accidents like this year’s injury to Brazilian star Neymar da Silva Santos Jr., who was kneed in the back and suffered a broken vertebra—such incidents, of course, make it into the newspapers. Another accident happened during the 1982 World Cup in Spain, when Germany’s goalkeeper Toni Schumacher ran full speed into French defender Patrick Battiston, breaking his jaw, damaging vertebrae, and knocking out several teeth. The unfortunate Frenchman nearly died on the field due to “improper medical attention.”

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article about French defender Patrick Battiston being injured in soccer's 1982 World Cup, Oregonian newspaper article 25 June 1986

Oregonian (Portland, Oregon), 25 June 1986, page 87

Game Drama

There can be other drama with the players besides cheating or their hurting each other on the field. During the 1998 World Cup final in France, Brazil’s superstar Ronaldo was mysteriously missing from the team roster until just before the game with France. The rumor was that he had experienced a seizure in the locker room.

Reports--Ronaldo Did Not Have Convulsions, Register Star newspaper article 18 July 1998

Register Star (Rockford, Illinois), 18 July 1998, page 24

Soccer Winners & Losers

In addition to news about the soccer players, the World Cup results often make it into the headlines. For example, there are the shocking upsets—such as Brazil’s defeat to Uruguay during the 1950 World Cup in Brazil, and West Germany’s upset win over the powerful Hungarian team during the 1954 World Cup in Switzerland.

Uruguay Edges Brazil for Title, Oregonian newspaper article 17 July 1950

Oregonian (Portland, Oregon), 17 July 1950, page 23

West Germans (Reds, Too) Celebrate Soccer Triumph, Omaha World Herald newspaper article 6 July 1954

Omaha World Herald (Omaha, Nebraska), 6 July 1954, page 13

Gunned Down by Gamblers?!

The most shocking event in World Cup history is of course the murder of Colombian defender Andres Escobar in 1994. He was gunned down by gamblers back home in Colombia just days after the Americans beat Colombia during the 1994 World Cup in the U.S. due to an accidental goal Escobar knocked into his own net.

article about Colombian defender Andres Escobar being killed after soccer's 1994 World Cup, Aberdeen Daily News newspaper article 3 July 1994

Aberdeen Daily News (Aberdeen, South Dakota), 3 July 1994, page 7

Most of the time, the World Cup makes the news because of the exciting games, the fantastically athletic players, the cultural treats provided by the home country, and the rapturous reactions of the devoted fans. But occasionally, as this article has shown, there is a darker side to the World Cup—and that of course makes it into the newspapers.

Hope you enjoyed this year’s World Cup and that your team did well!

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260k+ Wyoming Newspaper Records for Your Genealogy Research

Wyoming became the Union’s 44th state on 10 July 1890. The 10th largest state in the United States, Wyoming is the least populated. Wyoming is proud of some of the “firsts” in its history as a territory. In 1872 Yellowstone National Park was established, the world’s first national park. Three years prior to that Wyoming achieved another first that women suffragists were especially proud of: on 10 December 1869 Wyoming women were given the right to vote—the first U.S. state or territory to grant women suffrage. In applying for statehood, Wyoming’s state constitution specifically sanctioned women suffrage. Because of this fact Wyoming’s official state nickname is the “Equality State.”

photo of Castle Geyser, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Photo: Castle Geyser, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

If you are researching your ancestry from Wyoming, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online Wyoming newspaper archives: 9 titles containing more than 260,000 digitized historical records from the 1800s to today to help you search your family history in this large, mountainous Western state.

Dig deep into the Wisconsin archives and search for obituaries and other news articles about your ancestors in these recent and historical WY newspapers online. Our Wyoming newspapers are divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries (obituaries only).

Search Wyoming Newspaper Archives (1868 – 1921)

Search Wyoming Recent Obituaries (1997 – Current)

Here is our complete list of online Wyoming newspapers in the online archives. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more. The WY newspaper titles are listed alphabetically by city.

City Title Date Range Collection
Casper Star-Tribune 11/26/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Cheyenne Wyoming State Tribune 1/1/1917 – 12/31/1921 Newspaper Archives
Cheyenne Wyoming Commonwealth 7/20/1890 – 11/14/1891 Newspaper Archives
Cheyenne Wyoming Tribune-Eagle 10/1/1997 – Current Recent Obituaries
Knight Frontier Index 4/14/1868 – 4/14/1868 Newspaper Archives
Laramie Daily Boomerang 1/2/1890 – 6/30/1890 Newspaper Archives
Laramie Laramie Boomerang 2/9/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Riverton Riverton Ranger 4/3/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Worland Northern Wyoming Daily News 1/3/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries

You can either print or create a PDF version of this Blog post by simply clicking on the green “Print/PDF” button below. The PDF version makes it easy to save this post onto your desktop or portable device for quick reference—all the Wyoming newspaper links will be live.

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