New Hampshire Archives: 75 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

One of the original Thirteen Colonies, New Hampshire was the first of the new United States to have its own state constitution. Part of the New England region, New Hampshire is the 5th smallest state in the nation, and the 9th least populous.

photo of Lake Winnipesaukee and the Ossipee Mountains, New Hampshire

Photo: Lake Winnipesaukee and the Ossipee Mountains, New Hampshire. Credit: Don Kasak; Wikimedia Commons.

If you are researching your ancestry from New Hampshire, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online NH newspaper archives: 75 titles to help you search your family history in “The Granite State,” providing coverage from 1756 to Today. There are more than 3.5 million articles and records in our online New Hampshire archives!

Dig deep into our archives and search for historical and recent obituaries and other news articles about your New Hampshire ancestors in these NH newspapers online. Our New Hampshire newspapers are divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries (obituaries only).

Search New Hampshire Newspaper Archives (1756 – 1891)

Search New Hampshire Recent Obituaries (1989 – Current)

illustration: state flag of New Hampshire

Illustration: state flag of New Hampshire. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Here is a list of online New Hampshire newspapers in the archives. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more. The NH newspaper titles are listed alphabetically by city.

City Title Date Range* Collection
Amherst Farmer’s Cabinet 11/11/1802 – 12/29/1882 Newspaper Archives
Amherst Amherst Village Messenger 01/09/1796 – 12/05/1801 Newspaper Archives
Amherst Hillsboro Telegraph 01/01/1820 – 06/29/1822 Newspaper Archives
Amherst Amherst Journal 01/16/1795 – 01/02/1796 Newspaper Archives
Bedford Bedford Bulletin 01/08/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Candia, Auburn Candia-Auburn Post 12/04/2014 – Current Recent Obituaries
Chester, Hampstead, Sandown Tri-Town Times: Web Edition Articles 02/28/2013 – Current Recent Obituaries
Chester, Hampstead, Sandown Tri-Town Times 01/20/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Concord Republican Gazetteer 11/22/1796 – 04/04/1797 Newspaper Archives
Concord New Star 04/11/1797 – 10/03/1797 Newspaper Archives
Concord New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette 04/18/1809 – 04/10/1890 Newspaper Archives
Concord Republican Gazette 02/05/1801 – 04/28/1803 Newspaper Archives
Concord Courier of New Hampshire 02/13/1794 – 10/30/1805 Newspaper Archives
Concord New Hampshire Observer 04/01/1822 – 12/26/1834 Newspaper Archives
Concord Concord Observer 01/04/1819 – 03/25/1822 Newspaper Archives
Concord Mirrour 09/06/1792 – 09/02/1799 Newspaper Archives
Concord American Patriot 10/18/1808 – 04/11/1809 Newspaper Archives
Concord Concord Herald 01/06/1790 – 02/06/1794 Newspaper Archives
Concord Concord Gazette 07/19/1806 – 05/01/1819 Newspaper Archives
Derry Nutfield News 01/13/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Derry Derry News 01/08/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Dover Political and Sentimental Repository, or Strafford Recorder 07/29/1790 – 01/04/1792 Newspaper Archives
Dover Phoenix 02/08/1792 – 08/22/1795 Newspaper Archives
Dover Foster’s Daily Democrat 03/04/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Dover Sun 10/10/1795 – 12/26/1820 Newspaper Archives
Dover New-Hampshire Republican 01/03/1825 – 10/30/1829 Newspaper Archives
Exeter Newhampshire Gazetteer 08/18/1789 – 02/13/1793 Newspaper Archives
Exeter American Herald of Liberty 06/04/1793 – 11/18/1795 Newspaper Archives
Exeter Constitutionalist 05/21/1810 – 06/14/1814 Newspaper Archives
Exeter Exeter Journal 02/24/1778 – 05/25/1779 Newspaper Archives
Exeter Freeman’s Oracle, and New-Hampshire Advertiser 07/01/1786 – 10/07/1789 Newspaper Archives
Exeter Exeter Watchman 01/07/1817 – 12/07/1819 Newspaper Archives
Goffstown Goffstown News 01/08/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hanover Dartmouth Gazette 08/27/1799 – 02/09/1820 Newspaper Archives
Hanover Eagle 07/22/1793 – 06/01/1799 Newspaper Archives
Hanover American 02/07/1816 – 04/02/1817 Newspaper Archives
Haverhill New Hampshire Intelligencer 12/27/1820 – 11/26/1823 Newspaper Archives
Hooksett Hooksett Banner 01/08/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Keene Columbian Informer or Cheshire Journal 05/09/1793 – 04/21/1795 Newspaper Archives
Keene Cheshire Advertiser 01/19/1792 – 12/06/1792 Newspaper Archives
Keene New Hampshire Sentinel 03/23/1799 – 12/30/1891 Newspaper Archives
Keene New-Hampshire Recorder 08/21/1787 – 02/24/1791 Newspaper Archives
Keene Rising Sun 08/11/1795 – 06/23/1798 Newspaper Archives
Kingston Carriage Towne News 10/08/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Laconia Lake Village Times 01/18/1868 – 12/30/1876 Newspaper Archives
Londonderry Londonderry Times 02/10/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Manchester Weekly Union 01/24/1851 – 12/26/1871 Newspaper Archives
Manchester New Hampshire Journal of Agriculture 02/26/1850 – 10/26/1853 Newspaper Archives
Manchester Telescope 01/13/1849 – 10/13/1849 Newspaper Archives
Manchester Mirror and Farmer 01/07/1865 – 12/30/1876 Newspaper Archives
Manchester Manchester Daily Mirror 01/01/1851 – 12/31/1863 Newspaper Archives
Manchester New Hampshire Union Leader / New Hampshire Sunday News 08/15/1989 – Current Recent Obituaries
Nashua Telegraph 07/28/1998 – Current Recent Obituaries
Portsmouth War Journal 03/12/1813 – 12/10/1813 Newspaper Archives
Portsmouth New-Hampshire Gazette 10/07/1756 – 12/30/1851 Newspaper Archives
Portsmouth Federal Observer 11/22/1798 – 05/29/1800 Newspaper Archives
Portsmouth United States Oracle 01/04/1800 – 10/15/1803 Newspaper Archives
Portsmouth Intelligencer 12/04/1806 – 05/15/1817 Newspaper Archives
Portsmouth People’s Advocate 09/24/1816 – 05/17/1817 Newspaper Archives
Portsmouth Portsmouth Oracle 10/22/1803 – 06/30/1821 Newspaper Archives
Portsmouth New-Hampshire Spy 10/24/1786 – 03/02/1793 Newspaper Archives
Portsmouth Portsmouth Journal of Literature and Politics 07/07/1821 – 12/30/1876 Newspaper Archives
Portsmouth Herald of Gospel Liberty 09/01/1808 – 03/08/1816 Newspaper Archives
Portsmouth Portsmouth Herald 02/18/2015 – Current Recent Obituaries
Portsmouth Oracle Post 10/25/1803 – 06/18/1805 Newspaper Archives
Portsmouth Political Star 06/28/1804 – 11/08/1804 Newspaper Archives
Portsmouth Oracle of the Day 06/04/1793 – 12/28/1799 Newspaper Archives
Portsmouth New-Hampshire Mercury and General Advertiser 12/24/1784 – 03/12/1788 Newspaper Archives
Portsmouth Freeman’s Journal 05/25/1776 – 06/09/1778 Newspaper Archives
Portsmouth Oracle of New-Hampshire 05/22/1817 – 09/11/1817 Newspaper Archives
Salem Salem Observer 01/08/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Walpole Democratic Republican 07/04/1812 – 07/05/1813 Newspaper Archives
Walpole Newhampshire Journal, or, the Farmer’s Weekly Museum 04/11/1793 – 03/28/1797 Newspaper Archives
Walpole Farmer’s Weekly Museum 04/04/1797 – 10/15/1810 Newspaper Archives
Walpole Political Observatory 11/19/1803 – 03/20/1809 Newspaper Archives

*Date Ranges may have selected coverage unavailable.

You can either print or create a PDF version of this Blog post by simply clicking on the green “Print/PDF” button below. The PDF version makes it easy to save this post onto your desktop or portable device for quick reference—all the New Hampshire newspaper links will be live.

Related Article:

June 2015 Update: GenealogyBank Just Added 37 Million More Records!

Every day, GenealogyBank is working hard to digitize more newspapers and obituaries, expanding our collection to give you the largest newspaper archives for family history research available online. We just completed adding 37 million more U.S. genealogy records, vastly increasing our content coverage from coast to coast!

screenshot of GenealogyBank's home page showing the announcement of 37 million records recently added to GenealogyBank's archives

Here are some of the details about our most recent U.S. newspaper additions:

  • A total of 46 newspaper titles from 20 U.S. states plus the District of Columbia
  • 26 of these titles are newspapers added to GenealogyBank for the first time
  • Newspaper titles marked with an asterisk (*) are new to our online archives
  • We’ve shown the newspaper issue date ranges so that you can determine if the newly added content is relevant to your personal genealogy research

To see our newspaper archives’ complete title lists, click here.

State City Title Date Range Collection
Alaska Anchorage Arctic Sounder* 06/28/2013–Current Recent Obituaries
California San Francisco San Francisco Chronicle 2/21/1982–2/23/1982 Newspaper Archives
California San Luis Obispo San Luis Obispo Daily Telegram 11/1/1952–10/30/1954 Newspaper Archives
California Stockton Record, The* 02/20/2015–Current Recent Obituaries
District of Columbia Washington (DC) Washington Times 8/14/1984–11/1/1989 Newspaper Archives
Florida Miami Miami Herald 10/11/1928–9/22/1929 Newspaper Archives
Georgia Columbus Columbus Daily Enquirer 3/19/1941–4/5/1943 Newspaper Archives
Georgia Macon Macon Telegraph 7/1/1944–10/31/1945 Newspaper Archives
Idaho Boise Idaho Statesman 1/7/1957–10/13/1957 Newspaper Archives
Illinois Rockford Register Star 10/1/2007–4/30/2008 Newspaper Archives
Indiana Evansville Evansville Courier and Press 1/2/1931–12/31/1937 Newspaper Archives
Kentucky Lexington Lexington Herald 4/1/1939–10/15/1973 Newspaper Archives
Kentucky Lexington Lexington Leader 7/1/1901–8/27/1975 Newspaper Archives
Kentucky Lexington Lexington Leader* 3/1/1912–8/30/1975 Newspaper Archives
Louisiana Baton Rouge Advocate Extra, The* 10/09/2014–Current Recent Obituaries
Louisiana Clinton Watchman, The* 12/18/2014–Current Recent Obituaries
Louisiana Greensburg St. Helena Echo* 12/18/2014–Current Recent Obituaries
Louisiana St. Francisville St. Francisville Democrat* 12/18/2014–Current Recent Obituaries
Louisiana Zachary Zachary Advocate and Plainsman, The* 10/09/2014–Current Recent Obituaries
Maryland Baltimore Sun 2/5/1903–12/19/1917 Newspaper Archives
Minnesota Wayzata Lakeshore Weekly News* 07/17/2014–Current Recent Obituaries
Mississippi Biloxi Daily Herald 1/1/1946–3/28/1953 Newspaper Archives
National National UPI NewsTrack* 04/26/2013–Current Recent Obituaries
New Hampshire Chester, Hampstead, Sandown Tri-Town Times: Web Edition Articles* 02/28/2013–Current Recent Obituaries
New Jersey Absecon, Pleasantville Current of Pleasantville, The* 04/23/2013–Current Recent Obituaries
New Jersey Atlantic City Atlantic City Weekly* 03/10/2005–Current Recent Obituaries
New Jersey Cape May Cape May Gazette, The* 09/09/2010–Current Recent Obituaries
New Jersey Egg Harbor Current of Downbeach, The* 05/19/2010–Current Recent Obituaries
New Jersey Egg Harbor Township Current of Egg Harbor Township, The* 06/02/2010–Current Recent Obituaries
New Jersey Galloway Current of Galloway Township, The* 04/08/2010–Current Recent Obituaries
New Jersey Hamilton Current of Hamilton Township, The* 05/26/2010–Current Recent Obituaries
New Jersey Linwood, Somers Point, Northfield Current of Linwood, Somers Point, Northfield* 07/20/2010–Current Recent Obituaries
New Jersey Middle Township Middle Township Gazette, The* 01/05/2011–Current Recent Obituaries
New Jersey Ocean City Ocean City Gazette, The* 04/12/2010–Current Recent Obituaries
New Jersey Upper Township Upper Township Gazette* 11/11/2010–Current Recent Obituaries
New Jersey Wildwood Wildwood Leader, The* 05/24/2010–Current Recent Obituaries
New York Middletown Times Herald-Record, The* 02/18/2015–Current Recent Obituaries
North Carolina Charlotte Charlotte Observer 1/1/1934–12/6/1935 Newspaper Archives
North Carolina Robbinsville Graham Star* 01/28/2009–Current Recent Obituaries
Oregon Medford Mail Tribune* 02/23/2015–Current Recent Obituaries
Pennsylvania State College Centre Daily Times 10/1/1982–11/30/1983 Newspaper Archives
South Carolina Charleston Charleston News and Courier 7/12/1971–9/30/1991 Newspaper Archives
South Carolina Charleston Evening Post 3/18/1971–3/19/1971 Newspaper Archives
South Carolina Charleston Post and Courier 9/1/1984–2/29/1996 Newspaper Archives
Washington Bellingham Bellingham Herald 5/1/1947–8/31/1948 Newspaper Archives
Washington Olympia Morning Olympian 1/1/1951–4/30/1952 Newspaper Archives

You can either print or create a PDF version of this Blog post by simply clicking on the green “Print/PDF” button below. The PDF version makes it easy to save this post onto your desktop or portable device for quick reference—all the newspaper links will be live.

Related Article:

Have You Seen This Intricate Patchwork Heirloom Quilt?

In 1881 New Hampshire held its 26th Annual State Fair in Laconia, New Hampshire. The fair had not been held in Laconia since 1852.

The New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette devoted an entire page to reporting the handicrafts, food, animals and other award-winning items that were proudly displayed during this three-day event.

According to the newspaper report:

The fair of last week, although in many respects not meeting the expectations of all, was an unqualified success as far as attendance and receipts were concerned.

In reading over the description of the items on display, this brief mention of a quilt caught my eye:

Miss Jennie M. Huse a patchwork quilt of handsome pattern containing 10,368 pieces.

article about Jennie Huse and her quilt, New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette newspaper article 29 September 1881

New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette (Concord, New Hampshire), 29 September 1881, page 4

Remarkable patchwork – 10,368 pieces!

My wife and I have old heirloom quilts that have been passed down in our family, safely tucked away in the family cedar chest.

I wonder if Jennie Huse’s quilt was passed down in her family?

A quick check of her family history shows that while she never married, several of her siblings did.

screenshot of records from FamilySearch about the Huse family

Source: FamilySearch

Speaking of her family, both her father Thomas Muzzey Huse (1812-1877) and her brother David Scobey Huse (1844-1863) served in the Civil War. Her brother died during the war in Mound City, Illinois.

Genealogy Tip: Be sure to look for family photos using the Internet Archive Book Images tool. I wrote about this website before. See: Top Genealogy Websites Update: Internet Archive Book Images + Flickr

screenshot of the website Internet Archive Book Images

Source: Internet Archive Book Images

This handy site quickly lets you find photographs that were printed in the millions of books that they have digitized and put online.

In this example, you can see that this site quickly identified photographs of both Jennie’s father and her brother. Here’s an entry on her father:

screenshot from the website Internet Archive Book Images showing a photo of Thomas Huse

Source: Internet Archive Book Images

Here’s an entry on her brother:

screenshot from the website Internet Archive Book Images showing a photo of David Huse

Source: Internet Archive Book Images

Are you related to Jane “Jennie” Muzzey Huse?
Do you know where her intricate quilt is now?
If so, have you counted the pieces in her patchwork quilt? Does it really contain 10,368 pieces?

Please let us know in the comments section.

Related Articles:

BOGO: Search for One Relative & Find Another One as a Bonus

I was searching for newspaper articles about my cousin Cyrus Lane (1824-1911) from Sanbornton, New Hampshire, and quickly found an announcement of his marriage

wedding announcements for Cyrus Lane and Sarah Plummer, also for Oliver Piper and Judith Lane, New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette newspaper article 30 November 1848

New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette (Concord, New Hampshire), 30 November 1848, page 3

But wait – there’s more.

Here was an added bonus.

Following the report of Cyrus’s marriage to Sarah H. Plummer on 25 October 1848, there is this next announcement: “also, Oct. 30, Mr. Oliver P. Piper to Miss Judith C. Lane, all of S.”

This refers to his sister, Judith Clifford Lane (1826-1899).
Wow – that must have been a time of family gathering and joy with two weddings within a week.

Newspapers reported the news of our ancestors.
Dig in to GenealogyBank and find your ancestors’ stories.

Start your 30-day trial now!

Related Articles:

Are You Sure That Is How to Spell Your Ancestor’s Name?

Portraits of my Starbird ancestors hang on our wall on the landing at the top of the staircase. Over the years I have chained the family back from Martha Jane (Starbird) Richmond (1836-1905) to Robert Starbird (1782- ) to Moses Starbird (1743-1815) to John Starbird (1701-1753) to Thomas Starbird (1660-1723).

photo of the Starbird family

Photo: Starbird family. Source: Thomas Jay Kemp.

All of them lived in Dover, New Hampshire, at some time in their lives, and by the 19th century several of the Starbird lines were living in Gray, Maine.

Looking in the deep Historical Newspaper Archives of GenealogyBank, I can quickly find multiple Starbird articles from across centuries of American history.

For example, here is a probate notice regarding Catharine Starbird, widow of Moses Starbird, published in 1838.

article about a probate proceeding involving Catharine Starbird, Portland Weekly Advertiser newspaper article 1 May 1838

Portland Weekly Advertiser (Portland, Maine), 1 May 1838, page 1

Here is an article about John Starbird (1742-1802), who served in the Continental Army. Both he and his brother (my ancestor) Moses Starbird (1743-1815) fought at Valley Forge during the Revolutionary War.

article about John Starbird, Massachusetts Spy newspaper article 30 December 1779

Massachusetts Spy (Worcester, Massachusetts), 30 December 1779, page 3

So far so good.

Their name was “Starbird” and I am finding “Starbird” articles in the old newspapers.
Good. This is straightforward.

FamilySearch recently added to their site the “England and Wales, Birth Registration Index, 1837-2008.” Great—an index to all of the births in England. I thought: let me search there to see if I can determine where in England the Starbird family came from.

This should be easy family tree research.


screenshot of a search on FamilySearch for the surname "Starbird"

Source: FamilySearch

What? There was only one “Starbird” birth in all of England, going all the way back to 1837?

How could that be?

Looking deeper into GenealogyBank, I found this old obituary notice.

obituary for John Starboard, Weekly Eastern Argus newspaper article 26 April 1805

Weekly Eastern Argus (Portland, Maine), 26 April 1805, page

This is for a son of John “Starboard” from Gray, Maine.
Oh—that’s it.
The name could have been spelled “Starbird” or “Starboard.”

When I think of it—I pronounce both words exactly the same way.

So—let’s do a quick double-check in the FamilySearch index to British birth records with this new spelling.

This time the search results were zero.

Zero “Starboard” births and only one “Starbird” birth—what is going on here?

I can find a ton of “Starbird” references in America but none in Britain.
Is there another spelling of the surname?

I have seen where some genealogists have suggested that Thomas Starbird (1660-1723) of Dover, New Hampshire, was the son of Edward Starbuck (1604-1690) who was also from Dover.

Would Thomas really have changed his name from Starbuck to Starbird?

Alfred A. Starbird, author of Genealogy of the Starbird-Starbard Family (Burlington, Vermont: The Lane Press), looked at this—especially since another Starbird historian said that Thomas Starbird had changed his name from Starbuck—but concluded “nothing has been found to support this claim.”

The title of his book gives us another variant spelling of this surname: “Starbard.” So, I tried that spelling in the FamilySearch—again zero references.

So—what about the spelling “Starbuck”?
I repeated the search, and that spelling produced over 5,000 English birth records.

Is it that simple—Thomas simply changed his name from Starbuck to Starbird?
Would that be a logical name change?
Is there another explanation?

Have any of our readers found a record proving who the parents of Thomas Starbird (1660-1723) of Dover, New Hampshire, were? If so, I would like to know.

Do you know any current men named Starbird or Starbuck who are willing to take a DNA test? That might be the only way we find the answer to this question.

What say you?

I’d be interested in your comments.

Related Ancestor Name Research Articles:

Remembering the Young: Children’s Death Records in the News

I was reading this old newspaper and noticed that obituary after obituary was for young children.

children's obituaries, Portsmouth Journal of Literature and Politics newspaper article 28 August 1875

Portsmouth Journal of Literature and Politics (Portsmouth, New Hampshire), 28 August 1875, page 3

So many reports of very young children dying early deaths in this old newspaper article:

  • Martha Banks, aged 1 year, 11 months and 2 days
  • Arthur Lincoln Vaughan, aged 6 months and 12 days
  • Caroline E. Hein, aged 11 months and 13 days

August 1875 was clearly a brutal month for children and their families in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

It is so tragic that their lives ended at such a young age.

Enter Last Name

It would be easy for this information to be lost, leaving these children’s short lives forgotten. It’s comforting to know that I can find these death records in GenealogyBank, knowing that these youngest members of the family will not be lost to the family history we are compiling—that their lives, though painfully short, are permanently recorded in the family tree.

Because newspaper editors were so good about including their age in years, months and days, it is easy to compute their dates of birth from the information contained in the death records.

Make every effort to find and document every person in your family tree.

We can do this.

Related Articles about Genealogy Research and Children:

Researching Recent Obituaries to Extend My Family Tree

I was born in New Hampshire and my family has lived there for the past 350+ years. I probably have a cousin in every town in the state. This is especially true in Sanbornton, New Hampshire—I don’t think I could throw a rock there in any direction and not hit a relative.

So—I use that to my advantage in tracing my family history.

photo of the Bay Meeting House, Sanbornton, New Hampshire, built in 1836

Photo: Bay Meeting House, Sanbornton, New Hampshire, built in 1836. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

In my experience I am related to everyone in Sanbornton, so from time to time I search the Recent Obituaries in GenealogyBank to find a cousin I’d never known.

I quickly picked one from the list: Ellen (Sanborn) Merriam (1920-2010).

obituary for Ellen Merriam, Tri-Town Transcript newspaper article 23 April 2010

Tri-Town Transcript (Topsfield, Massachusetts), 23 April 2010

Here was a line that brought back memories:

Born in Laconia, N.H., she was the daughter of the late Howard W. and Elenora (Currier) Sanborn. She was raised on a rural farm in Sanbornton, N.H., and educated in Sanbornton and nearby Tilton. She loved animals especially horses, and was a graduate of the University of New Hampshire, earning her degree in Geology.

It immediately brought to mind days gone by in Sanbornton. She went to school there and lived on a rural farm. Wasn’t every home on a “rural farm” back then?

I could picture that farm: the potbellied stove in the kitchen; the snow; the view across the fields; the quiet, secure surroundings.

She attended UNH. My parents and grandparents all attended the University of New Hampshire. Some of my earliest memories are riding the back roads to Durham, New Hampshire, and seeing the University. Eating lunch along the river and getting those giant ice cream cones from the UNH Dairy.

She was “a long time member of the Maple Street Congregational Church.” When we lived in nearby Lower Gilmanton there was only one church—and of course it was a Congregational Church. It was an image you would see in every town.

Enter Last Name

I looked at Ellen’s family history and, using multiple sources, I quickly found that her parents—Howard Weaver Sanborn (1887-1957) and Elenora B. Currier (1895-1985) along with her five brothers and sisters—all lived on a farm in Sanbornton. As did her grandparents John Brewer Sanborn (1849-1940) and Asenath Quimby (1850-1891).

Sanborns had lived in Sanbornton since its founding in 1770.

Our family still owns the farm that my 5th-great-grandfather William Huse (1760-1839) purchased when he settled there after the Revolutionary War to raise his family.

I doubt I ever met Ellen Louise (Sanborn) Merriam, but by reading her obituary it feels like I’ve known her all my life.

I like to find Sanbornton obituaries so that I can document every cousin in my family tree.

Genealogy Tip: Don’t only search for specific relatives in GenealogyBank—search for the small towns where your ancestors lived. You just might discover a cousin you’ve never met before.

Note: FamilySearch International ( and GenealogyBank recently announced an agreement to make over a billion records from historical obituaries searchable online. The tremendous undertaking will make a billion records from over 100 million U.S. newspaper obituaries readily searchable online. The newspapers are from all 50 states and cover the period 1730 to the present.  Find out more about our partnership at:

Related Obituaries Articles & Resources:

Because GenealogyBank Is Growing, Be Sure to Search Again Later

Recently, I checked in GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives for a few of my Sawyer relatives in Grafton County, New Hampshire—and didn’t find them. Bummer.

When I search in GenealogyBank and do not find my target relatives, I make a quick note to try again in a few weeks to see if I can find articles about them later.


Because GenealogyBank updates its archives and keeps adding millions of articles—in fact we update over 3,000 newspapers every day. What is not there today might be added to GenealogyBank tomorrow.

Case in point: Not finding my Sawyer family, I next decided to recheck GenealogyBank for the Schell family of North Adams, Massachusetts.

I had searched for them in the past, but found nothing.

Bang—this time I found them.

I discovered quite a few articles about H. Horton Schell’s business and fraternal association activities, several obituaries and this wedding announcement.

wedding announcement for Marion Spencer and Harlan Schell, Springfield Republican newspaper article 12 February 1935

Springfield Republican (Springfield, Massachusetts), 12 February 1935, page 7

Great. This article gives me the details of the wedding of my cousin Harlan Horton Schell (1907-2001) along with a photograph of his wife Marion Rudman Spencer (1908-1992).

Enter Last Name

Digging deeper, I found the obituary of her father, Albert Edmund Spencer (1876-1965). Good catch, as this gives me his middle name: “Edmund.” That’s a good clue for further searches.

obituary for Albert Spencer, Boston Herald newspaper article 5 February 1965

Boston Herald (Boston, Massachusetts), 5 February 1965, page 29

Continuing to search, I found this much longer obituary with many more details about his life and family.

obituary for Albert Spencer, Springfield Union newspaper article 5 February 1965

Springfield Union (Springfield, Massachusetts). 5 February 1965, page 7


Genealogy Search Tip: If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again. GenealogyBank’s search page includes an “Added Since” feature with a drop-down menu that lets you search on content added in the past one, two or three months.

screenshot of GenealogyBank's search page for its newspaper archives

Good luck with your own genealogy searches!

New Family Story Find: My 18th Century Uncle Jonathan Dore

Last year I wrote about my relative Elizabeth (Meader) Hanson (1684-1737) who, along with her children, was kidnapped by Abenaki Indians on 7 September 1724 and taken to the Indians’ village along the St. Francis River in Canada. They were held there for over two years. (See: Find & Preserve Your Family’s Stories.)

Powerful. Memorable. That story has been told and retold in our family for the past 290 years. Every night when we were young we asked our grandfather to tell us that story. We loved it. It was real—it was our family story.

Indian Raids Continued

Recently I found this 1749 newspaper article with a report from Timothy Brown about his attempts to learn more about—and to free—captives still held by the Indians.

He was able to get in and around the Abenaki village and learned about multiple captives, including this specific reference:

There is also a Boy who was taken from Rochester in New Hampshire, with the Indians at St. Francois, his Name is Jonathan Dore.

article about Jonathan Dore being taken captive by Abenaki Indians, Boston Post Boy newspaper article 10 July 1749

Boston Post Boy (Boston, Massachusetts), 10 July 1749, page 2

Jonathan Dore?
Rochester, New Hampshire?
St. Francis Indians?

This is sounding just like the story of my relative Elizabeth Hanson, who was also taken prisoner by the Abenaki Indians from St. Francis.

This Jonathan Dore has to be one of my relatives, too—the same Jonathan Dore who was my 5th-great uncle.

Enter Last Name

New England Had Had Enough

The Abenaki and the French were taking American women and children captive so that they could sell them back to their families.

It was time to stop these atrocities—and that was one of the reasons the French & Indian War was launched (1754-1763).

Attack on Fort William Henry

During the war there was an attack on Fort William Henry in August of 1757.

The following account comes from Terror in Rochester by Linda Sargent, 2008:

“The fort was manned by the British, including many New Hampshire men. The siege had ended and the British had surrendered the fort to the French who were being aided by the Indians. There are various accounts of what happened next, but British soldiers were massacred after they had surrendered.

“One man who managed to escape from the fort was from Dover, NH. When he returned to Dover, he told how he had been pursued by Indians. One of them had caught up to him and lifted his tomahawk.

“When their eyes met, under the war paint and Indian dress he recognized the eyes of a young boy he had known well when he worked as a teamster logging on the Salmon Falls River and visiting at the Dore’s home in Rochester. He knew this white Indian was Jonathan Dore. Jonathan recognized him, as well, and dropped his tomahawk to his side and left. No one believed the man’s story when he returned to Dover.”


Jonathan Dore had been sighted again, 11 years after he was taken by the Abenaki.

New Englanders Settle the Score

The Abenaki had been terrorizing New Englanders for decades. The old scores were settled on 4 October 1759 when Robert Rogers and his Rangers attacked the Indians’ village.

The following account comes from Wikipedia:

“Rogers and about 140 men entered the village, which was reportedly occupied primarily by women, children, and the elderly, early that morning, slaughtered many of the inhabitants where they lay, shot down many who attempted to flee, and then burned the village. Rogers and his men endured significant hardships to reach the village from the British base at Fort Crown Point in present-day New York, and even more hardship afterwards. Chased by the French and vengeful Indians, and short on rations, Rogers and his men returned to Crown Point via the Connecticut River valley.”

Jonathan Dore Witnessed Rogers’ Attack on the Abenaki Village

Digging deeper into GenealogyBank’s archives, I found out more of the story.

Jonathan Dore, Aberdeen Daily News newspaper article 5 January 1905

Aberdeen Daily News (Aberdeen, South Dakota), 5 January 1905, page 2

The above historical newspaper clipping is only part of the long account about Jonathan Dore that appeared in the Aberdeen Daily News. The whole article gives a good overview of what had happened to Jonathan Dore.

Enter Last Name

According to the article, Jonathan Dore (1734-1797)—my 5th-great uncle—was kidnapped on “Salmon Falls Road in Rochester [New Hampshire]” by the Abenaki on 26 June 1746, when he was only 12 years old!

Jonathan Dore married an Abenaki Indian woman and they had two children. When Major Robert Rogers attacked their village in 1759 to avenge the attack on Fort William Henry, Jonathan Dore “witnessed the massacre.”

Everyone in the village was killed and it was set on fire. “Among the ruins he found the bodies of his wife and children. He buried them in one grave and with them his attachment to the Indians.”

In 1760 Jonathan Dore returned home to Rochester, New Hampshire. His family had moved across the Salmon Falls River to Lebanon, Maine, where he also settled.

The newspaper article concluded:

He settled in Lebanon, Me., married again and spent there the remainder of his days, famous for his marksmanship, especially with the bow and arrow, and known to every one as “Indian Dore.”

Wow—we would have loved to have heard that family story as kids!

Our “uncle” was not much older than we were when he was captured by the Indians, and then held captive for over 13 years—what a great story.

Preserve your family’s stories.

Find them in the old newspapers in GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives—preserve those stories and pass them down to the rising generation.

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Tax Lists in Newspapers for Genealogy

Most genealogists use newspaper birth notices, marriage announcements, and obituaries in their family history research—but there are many other good sources of family information in newspapers, such as tax lists.

For example, the town of Tamworth, New Hampshire, took out this ad in the Sun (Dover, New Hampshire), an area newspaper, in 1816. It was an advertisement to publish their local real estate tax list as a public notice that taxes were due, who the taxpayers were and how much each person owed. In addition to all that, this list describes the property owned and the buildings thereon.

tax list, Sun newspaper article 10 February 1816

Sun (Dover, New Hampshire), 10 February 1816, page 3

Click here to see the original newspaper article:

This is a great find for family historians.

Enter Last Name

For example: we see that John Ames owned “73 acres of land adjoining land of James Stephenson, and others.”

That is good—now we know the name of one of his neighbors. This is a helpful clue that could come in handy, since it is very true that young men and women did marry the girl/boy next door.

The property description continues, stating that Ames had “1 dwelling-house 21 ft. by 26 [feet], and 1 barn.”

Amazing—now we can really start to visualize life there in Tamworth.

The dimensions of each home are given, and we are told if each family had a barn or other out buildings on their property.

  • John Ames’ home was 21’ x 26’ and he had a barn, all on 73 acres of land.
  • Andrew Brier had 30 acres of land, a 15’ x 16’ home and a barn.
  • Isaac Medar had 100 acres of land, a 30’ x 40’ home and a barn.

You can quickly get a sense that they lived a rural life there in Tamworth. They lived on large parcels of land. We know how big the homes were. We can see whether or not they had a barn or other buildings on the property. Notice too that both men and women are listed as land owners.

Every landowner in the town is listed.

The list of property owners is so long it is printed on pages 3 and 4.

Bottom Line: These published tax lists are an extra census of the town, with the bonus that it describes each home, other buildings and acreage owned.

Related Articles about Tax Records for Genealogy: