Archivist of the US to speak at FGS Conference

Breaking News:

The Federation of Genealogical Societies has announced that Archivist of the US David Ferriero, will be speaking at the annual FGS Conference – on Wednesday August 18th in Knoxville, TN.

He will be the luncheon speaker at the Focus on Societies Luncheon. His topic will be The Citizen-Archivist. He will also speak about the War of 1812 Digitization Project and have a question and answer period.

That same day he will also give remarks at the Librarian’s Day conference.

The FGS Annual Conference takes place in Knoxville, Tennessee from August 18-21, 2010. “Rediscovering America’s First Frontier” is the conference theme and it is co-hosted by the East Tennessee Historical Society and the Kentucky Historical Society.

Click here for more information on the annual FGS Conference.

Faith and Begorrah – Ireland 1901 Census is now live online.

Breaking News!
The National Archives of Ireland has just put the complete Irish 1901 Census online.

More Irish genealogy resources:
GenealogyBank – is packed with Irish American newspapers as well as birth announcements, marriage notices and obituaries.

GenealogyBank keeps on growing.

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Remembering Sgt. Baller

There is a nice story in today’s Wall Street Journal: A Final Farewell to Arms: Remains of vets left at funeral homes to be buried.

It is about a group of volunteer veterans that are giving the final salute to veterans – whose cremains have been left and long forgotten at funeral homes across America.
Among those vets to be buried on Memorial Day are Sgt. First Class Carl J. Baller who died in 1947.

Click here to read the entire article.


GenealogyBank keeps on growing.

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GenealogyBank adds 1,800+ Newspapers

This has been a landmark month for GenealogyBank.

It has added more content for over 1,800 newspapers – including more than 100 new newspaper titles not previously in GenealogyBank.

That’s over 17.6 million articles – including obituaries, marriage announcements and more. New content was added for all 50 States.

And we’re not done yet!

That is just too many titles to list all of them here.
So, here is a tip.

To see what new historical newspapers have been added that document your family tree – use the drop down menu and narrow your search to only the newspapers “added since April 2010″.


This handy feature lets you search only the recently added content saving you time.

GenealogyBank keeps on growing.

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More newspapers go online

GenealogyBank keeps on growing.
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Cambrian, The (Cambria, CA)
Obituaries: 12/20/2001 – Current
Death Notices: 05/10/2001 – Current

Manteca Bulletin, The (Manteca, CA)
Obituaries: 11/19/2009 – Current
Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current


Galva News (Galva, IL)
Obituaries: 12/30/2009 – Current
Death Notices: 10/03/2009 – Current


Ogle County Newspapers (Oregon, IL)

Obituaries: 12/17/2009 – Current
Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current

Spokesman, The (Herrin, IL)
Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current


Teutopolis Press (Teutopolis, IL)
Death Notices: 10/24/2009 – Current

Kiowa County Signal (Pratt, KS)
Obituaries: 02/01/2010 – Current
Death Notices: 10/05/2009 – Current


Avoyelles Journal, Marksville Weekly News, Bunkie Record (Marksville, LA)
Obituaries: 11/04/2009 – Current
Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current


Bastrop Daily Enterprise (Bastrop, LA)
Obituaries: 07/12/2008 – Current


Gueydan Journal (Gueydan, LA)
Obituaries: 10/27/2009 – Current
Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current

Kaplan Herald (Kaplan, LA)
Obituaries: 02/22/2010 – Current
Death Notices: 10/06/2009 – Current


Ville Platte Gazette (Ville Platte, LA)
Obituaries: 11/25/2009 – Current
Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current


Whitman Express (Hanson, MA)
Death Notices: 03/29/2010 – Current

Blue Springs Journal (Blue Springs, MO)
Obituaries: 10/29/2009 – Current
Death Notices: 03/27/2010 – Current


Warren Reporter, The (Warren, NJ)
Obituaries: 06/28/1997 – Current
Death Notices: 06/28/1997 – Current

Westfield Record-Press, The (Westfield, NJ)
Obituaries: 06/17/2005 – 08/22/2008
Death Notices: 06/10/2005 – 09/26/2008

Brunswick Beacon, The (Shallotte, NC)
Death Notices: 04/21/2010 – Current


Daily Southerner, The (Tarboro, NC)
Death Notices: 03/18/2010 – Current


Independent Tribune (Concord, Kannapolis, NC)
Death Notices: 02/20/2010 – Current

Claremore Daily Progress, The (Claremore, OK)
Obituaries: 03/12/2010 – Current
Death Notices: 10/03/2009 – Current


News Eagle, The (Hawley, PA)
Obituaries: 10/05/2010 – Current
Death Notices: 10/02/2010 – Current


Easley Progress, The (Easley, SC)
Obituaries: 03/04/2009 – Current

Death Notices: 03/30/2010 – Current

Breaking News: Ireland 1901 Census Going Online

Breaking News

The National Archives of Ireland has announced that they will be putting the complete Irish 1901 Census online. It is expected to go live within the next two weeks.
The National Archives of Ireland already has the Ireland 1911 census online.

The census gives the name of each person in the household, age, sex, their relationship to head of the household, religion, occupation, marital status, town, county or country of birth.

Other essential Irish genealogical resources:
Ireland Civil Registration Indexes – 1845-1958

This handy, free online resource is an index to Irish births, 1864-1958, marriages, 1845-1958, and deaths, 1864-1958.

Notice in this example that it gives the citation so you can quickly obtain copies of the original marriage certificate.
GenealogyBank – is packed with Irish American newspapers as well as birth announcements, marriage notices and obituaries.
GenealogyBank keeps on growing.
Search it now!

Newspapers are crucial to documenting your family history

Genealogists rely on multiple sources to document a family tree.
One source does not give all of the facts – so researchers must look at multiple family history records to gather the details for each family.

For example – James Edwin Ayres (1817-1893) and his wife Ann (Ford) Ayres (1817-1901) are listed in the 1850 census for Greenburgh, Westchester County, New York.
TIP: You may search the census for free at FamilySearch.org

On closer inspection we see that there is an age gap between the children. James H. Ayres – born about 1842

Sarah Ayres – born about 1844

and Frederica Ayres born about 1849

It appears that there might be another child that was probably born in 1846 and who died before 1850.
A quick search of GenealogyBank shows that was the case.
In the Hudson River Chronicle (Sing Sing, New York) – 12 December 1848 we find an obituary notice for Lovina Ayres stating that she was born 7 August 1846 and died 26 November 1848.
TIP: Newspapers are essential for finding and documenting every person on your family tree.
GenealogyBank keeps on growing.
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Search the census for free at FamilySearch.org
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GenealogyBank adds more newspapers – 4 states

GenealogyBank keeps on growing.

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Kansas
St. Johns News (St. John, KS)
Obituaries: 02/01/2010 – Current
Death Notices: 10/06/2009 – Current

Massachusetts
Herald News, The (Fall River, MA)
Obituaries: 11/15/2009 – Current
Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current

Missouri
West Side Star (Laurie, MO)
Obituaries: 10/05/2009 – Current
Death Notices: 03/30/2010 – Current

New Jersey
Glen Ridge Voice (Glen Ridge, NJ)
Obituaries: 10/12/2009 – Current
Death Notices: 11/05/2009 – Current

Nutley Sun, The (Nutley, NJ)
Obituaries: 10/09/2009 – Current
Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current

GenealogyBank adds 51 titles from 28 States

GenealogyBank keeps on growing.
If you haven’t searched the historical newspapers – try it again – now!

AK
Juneau
Daily Record-Miner
1903-02-24
1907-05-25


AL
Mobile
Mobile Register
1972-07-01
1974-11-15


AL
Piedmont
Piedmont Journal, The*
10/2/2009
Current


AR
Little Rock
Arkansas Gazette
1820-04-08
1836-10-18


AZ
Tucson
Dos Republicas*
1879-08-23
1879-10-18


CA
Coachelia
Ideal*
1969-11-02
1977-11-01


CA
Mount Shasta
Mt. Shasta Herald*
10/2/2009
Current


CA
Oakdale
Oakdale Leader, The*
10/2/2009
Current


CT
New London
New London Daily Chronicle
1848-10-13
1849-12-31


DC
Washington
Colored American
1902-01-04
1903-01-03


DC
Washington
Washington Bee
1896-03-04
1913-12-27


GA
Augusta
Augusta Chronicle
1793-06-15
1841-10-16


IL
Harrisburg
Harrisburg Daily Register *
10/2/2009
Current


IN
Avon
Hendricks County Flyer*
10/2/2009
Current


IN
Indianapolis
Freeman
1890-08-30
1893-11-04


KS
Kansas City
American Citizen*
1805-01-27
1907-09-21


KS
Kansas City
Plaindealer
1935-01-04
1946-08-30


KS
Topeka
Kansas Whip
1934-11-02

KS
Topeka
Plaindealer
1927-11-04
1931-12-25


KY
Grayson-Olive Hill
Journal-Times*
10/2/2009
Current


LA
New Orleans
Times-Picayune
1962-06-11
1975-10-15

span style=”font-family:trebuchet ms;font-size:130%;”>
LA
New Orleans
Times-Picayune
1863-07-26
1899-02-11


LA
New Orleans
Times-Picayune
1901-07-23
1904-12-26


LA
New Orleans
Weekly Louisianian*
1870-12-18
1882-06-17


MA
Attleboro
Sun Chronicle, The*
10/11/2009
Current


MA
Springfield
Springfield Union
1949-08-16
1959-04-17


MD
Westminster
Community Times*
12/15/2009
Current


MI
Grand Rapids
Grand Rapids Press
1915-01-01
1917-01-04


MI
Kalamazoo
Kalamazoo Gazette
1920-10-02
1922-12-31


ND
Wahpeton
Daily News, The*
10/2/2009
Current


NJ
Kinnelon
Argus*
10/2/2009
Current


NJ
Milburn, Short Hills
Item of Millburn and Short Hills, The*
12/3/2009
Current


NJ
Trenton
Sentinel*
1880-06-26
1882-11-04


NY
Baldwin
Baldwin Herald*
10/9/2009
Current


NY
Brooklyn
Caribe*
1923-10-06

NY
Massena
Daily Courier-Observer*
10/8/2009
Current

NY
New York
Boricua*
1948-06-23

NY
New York
Frente Hispano*
1937-06-26

NY
New York
Illustracion*
1945-03-01

NY
New York
New York Globe*
1883-01-06
1884-11-08


NY
Ogdensburg
Journal, The*
10/13/2009
Current


OH
Cleveland
Cleveland Gazette*
1893-09-02
1945-05-20


OH
Cleveland
Plain Dealer
1972-01-01
1972-09-30


OH
Cleveland
Plain Dealer
1845-04-07
1846-06-30


OK
Moore
American, The*
10/8/2009
Current


OR
Portland
Oregonian
1964-06-01
1965-01-31


OR
Portland
Oregonian
1916-12-01
1917-10-05


PA
Philadelphia
Aurora General Advertiser
1796-01-01
1796-12-29


TX
Dallas
Dallas Morning News
1979-06-05
1980-01-20


TX
Laredo
Laredo Times*
1929-01-02
1929-06-30


UT
Salt Lake City
Salt Lake Telegram
1902-01-30
1905-01-23


VT
Windsor
Vermont Republican
1810-05-21
1818-10-26


WA
Seattle
Seattle Daily Times
1971-10-11
1978-01-18


WI
Milwaukee
Milwaukee Star
1967-07-22
1972-05-18


WI
Racine
Racine Courier
1976-10-16
1982-12-25

Listen my children and you shall hear…

“Bloody News – This town has been in a Continental Alarm since Mid-day ….. the attack began at Lexington (about 12 miles from Boston) by the regular troops, the 18th Infantry before sunrise…From thence they proceeded to Concord where they made a general attack…”

Stirring news – as gripping as a bulletin on TV.

Thanks to GenealogyBank we can read the same newspapers our ancestors read and feel the impact of the news as they lived it. No other site has the depth of coverage found on GenealogyBank. Sign-up now.
April 19, 1775 – Attack on Lexington & Concord

The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere
by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Listen my children and you shall hear
Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere,
On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-five;
Hardly a man is now alive
Who remembers that famous day and year.

He said to his friend, “If the British march
By land or sea from the town to-night,
Hang a lantern aloft in the belfry arch
Of the North Church tower as a signal light,
One if by land, and two if by sea;
And I on the opposite shore will be,
Ready to ride and spread the alarm
Through every Middlesex village and farm,
For the country folk to be up and to arm.”

Then he said “Good-night!” and with muffled oar
Silently rowed to the Charlestown shore,
Just as the moon rose over the bay,
Where swinging wide at her moorings lay
The Somerset, British man-of-war;
A phantom ship, with each mast and spar
Across the moon like a prison bar,
And a huge black hulk, that was magnified
By its own reflection in the tide.

Meanwhile, his friend through alley and street
Wanders and watches, with eager ears,
Till in the silence around him he hears
The muster of men at the barrack door,
The sound of arms, and the tramp of feet,
And the measured tread of the grenadiers,
Marching down to their boats on the shore.

Then he climbed the tower of the Old North Church,
By the wooden stairs, with stealthy tread,
To the belfry chamber overhead,
And startled the pigeons from their perch
On the somber rafters, that round him made
Masses and moving shapes of shade,–
By the trembling ladder, steep and tall,
To the highest window in the wall,
Where he paused to listen and look down
A moment on the roofs of the town
And the moonlight flowing over all.

Beneath, in the churchyard, lay the dead,
In their night encampment on the hill,
Wrapped in silence so deep and still
That he could hear, like a sentinel’s tread,
The watchful night-wind, as it went
Creeping along from tent to tent,
And seeming to whisper, “All is well!”
A moment only he feels the spell
Of the place and the hour, and the secret dread
Of the lonely belfry and the dead;
For suddenly all his thoughts are bent
On a shadowy something far away,
Where the river widens to meet the bay,–
A line of black that bends and floats
On the rising tide like a bridge of boats.

Meanwhile, impatient to mount and ride,
Booted and spurred, with a heavy stride
On the opposite shore walked Paul Revere.
Now he patted his horse’s side,
Now he gazed at the landscape far and near,
Then, impetuous, stamped the earth,
And turned and tightened his saddle girth;
But mostly he watched with eager search
The belfry tower of the Old North Church,
As it rose above the graves on the hill,
Lonely and spectral and somber and still.
And lo! as he looks, on the belfry’s height
A glimmer, and then a gleam of light!
He springs to the saddle, the bridle he turns,
But lingers and gazes, till full on his sight
A second lamp in the belfry burns.

A hurry of hoofs in a village street,
A shape in the moonlight, a bulk in the dark,
And beneath, from the pebbles, in passing, a spark
Struck out by a steed flying fearless and fleet;
That was all! And yet, through the gloom and the light,
The fate of a nation was riding that night;
And the spark struck out by that steed, in his flight,
Kindled the land into flame with its heat.
He has left the village and mounted the steep,
And beneath him, tranquil and broad and deep,
Is the Mystic, meeting the ocean tides;
And under the alders that skirt its edge,
Now soft on the sand, now loud on the ledge,
Is heard the tramp of his steed as he rides.

It was twelve by the village clock
When he crossed the bridge into Medford town.
He heard the crowing of the cock,
And the barking of the farmer’s dog,
And felt the damp of the river fog,
That rises after the sun goes down.

It was one by the village clock,
When he galloped into Lexington.
He saw the gilded weathercock
Swim in the moonlight as he passed,
And the meeting-house windows, black and bare,
Gaze at him with a spectral glare,
As if they already stood aghast
At the bloody work they would look upon.

It was two by the village clock,
When he came to the bridge in Concord town.
He heard the bleating of the flock,
And the twitter of birds among the trees,
And felt the breath of the morning breeze
Blowing over the meadow brown.
And one was safe and asleep in his bed
Who at the bridge would be first to fall,
Who that day would be lying dead,
Pierced by a British musket ball.

You know the rest. In the books you have read
How the British Regulars fired and fled,
How the farmers gave them ball for ball,
From behind each fence and farmyard wall,
Chasing the redcoats down the lane,
Then crossing the fields to emerge again
Under the trees at the turn of the road,
And only pausing to fire and load.

So through the night rode Paul Revere;
And so through the night went his cry of alarm
To every Middlesex village and farm,
A cry of defiance, and not of fear,
A voice in the darkness, a knock at the door,
And a word that shall echo for evermore!
For, borne on the night-wind of the Past,
Through all our history, to the last,
In the hour of darkness and peril and need,
The people will waken and listen to hear
The hurrying hoof-beats of that steed,
And the midnight message of Paul Revere