Genealogy Humor: Unusual & Funny Names of People (Part II)

Introduction: Mary Harrell-Sesniak is a genealogist, author and editor with a strong technology background. In this guest blog post, Mary shares some of her readers’ responses to an earlier blog article she wrote about the odd and humorous names she’s run across while researching family history in old newspapers.

After publishing my Unusual & Funny Names of People blog article on 7 November 2013, readers wrote in droves, sharing additional funny—or should I say hilarious—names. Some were submitted directly to our blog, and others via Facebook pages such as the RootsWeb Genealogist page at www.facebook.com/groups/17834741205/.

We are chuckling over their submissions, and hope you will too!

Colors

Several submitters recounted tales of fun surnames reflecting colors.

“Sometimes when women get married, their new names are comical, too, like one I found recently whose last name was White, but when she married her name became Sarah White Rice.” —K. Campbell

“I encountered two families, the Browns and the Greens, who named their children various colours. I remember one of the Brown’s first names was Green. Other names were Orange, Violet, Purple, and Red but I’m sure there was another. There was another family who named their daughters Ruby and Sapphire, so when their son came along, of course they called him Emerald.” —A. Smulders

Here is an item from a “Personal and Social” column from 1897, mentioning John Green Brown (see www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=39512930). It also mentions another unusual name: Miss Scrap Wright.

Personal and Social, Macon Telegraph newspaper article 5 October 1897

Macon Telegraph (Macon, Georgia), 5 October 1897, page 5

That made me think about all the reports of men and women marrying their Miss or Mr. Wrights!

I once found a Purley Wright, and wonder if anyone has ever encountered a Purley White?

Flowers

D. Peters reported these names: “Actress Poppy Montgomery and her siblings Poppy Petal, Rosie Thorn, Daisy Yellow, Lily Belle, Marigold Sun, and their brother Jethro Tull.”

She was referring to Australian-born Poppy, who was born with a much longer name: Poppy Petal Emma Elizabeth Deveraux Donahue. If interested, be sure to read her Wikipedia bio at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poppy_Montgomery.

photo of Poppy Montgomery, Register Star newspaper article 26 March 2006

Register Star (Rockford, Illinois), 26 March 2006, page 83

Expressions

In my earlier funny names blog article, I enquired if there were ever people by the names of R. U. A. Crook and Justin Case? I didn’t discover a Crook with those initials, but just as I suspected—there really was someone by the name of Justin Case!

“In 2009 there was an individual who lived in the same area as where I was working. He was indeed named ‘Justin Case.’” —S. Moore

And A. Smulders reported: “I transcribed the name Ah Choo once.” She also reported seeing some names which sounded like profanity! She didn’t repeat them, so you’ll have to use your imagination.

Food Names

I’m wondering if this next woman’s middle initial was B?

“My favorite name on my family tree is Barbara Cue.” —Kathy

Miss Barbara Cue, Lt. Lane Engaged, Boston Herald newspaper article 29 April 1945

Boston Herald (Boston, Massachusetts), 29 April 1945, page 82

“I found Mr. FUDGE in a South Carolina census today. Still looking for the NUTS, DIVINITY and PEANUT BRITTLE.” —M. Vanderpool Gormley

Musicians and Cartoonists

Artists have long been known to adopt unusual monikers. Dizzy Gillespie, Chubby Checkers and Fats Domino are some that come to mind, but M. Kates reported a person by the name of “Octave Piano,” which is one I hadn’t heard.

There was also a Pulitzer Prize winning cartoonist, Jay Norwood Darling, who shortened his Darling surname to “Ding.” If you’ve ever visited Florida’s Captiva Island, perhaps you’ve visited the National Wildlife Refuge named after him. See http://www.fws.gov/dingdarling/.

Cartoon Award, Times-Picayune newspaper article 4 May 1943

Times-Picayune (New Orleans, Louisiana), 4 May 1943, page 6

Native American Names

The descriptive nature of Indian names, such as Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse, is always intriguing.

However, I’ve found one a bit more graphic than usual. This man from Bullhead was elected a tribal councilman of the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in 1967, and he is also recorded on line 71 of this 1940 Census. If anyone has insight on the origin of the surname Kills Pretty Enemy, please enlighten us!

Agard Is Re-Elected Chairman, Aberdeen Daily News newspaper article 22 October 1967

Aberdeen Daily News (Aberdeen, South Dakota), 22 October 1967, page 8

Double Meanings, Interchangeable Names and Relationships

One of my earlier blog articles was about someone named “B. A. Husband,” and a “Husband” reader responded: “Thanks for posting this. It was fun to see my name in there.”

When I enquired, “So, are you a wife who is a husband? (Sorry, couldn’t resist.),” she replied:

“LOL. I am a Husband who is also an ex-wife and a future wife…Us Husband women are the only women that can be both husbands and wives at the same time. I don’t mind if you use my comments at all Mary.” —S. Husband

“I ran across a woman a while back whose name was Polly Esther Cotton. I had to look at it twice to make sure it wasn’t an error. It still could have been a misspelling of the last name, I suppose…We have an artist here in town whose name is Mack Truck (real name; the local librarian told me about him).” —K. Campbell

“I went to high school with a girl named Harley Davidson…A friend’s mother was named Dimple Dottie.” —L. Boyd McLachlan

“And in the 1960s I went to grammar school with a boy named Rusty Bell.” —S. Moore

I wasn’t able to find a historical newspaper account for a Rusty Bell, but I did find three at Find-A-Grave, along with the grave of a gospel preacher named Ding Dong Bell:
(See www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=85849251)

“I knew a woman years ago named Gwen and she married a man named Gwen, so her married name was Gwen Gwen.” —D. Peters

Here Is an Assortment of Other Contributions from Readers!

“In researching the family who adopted my father-in-law, a ways back there was a marriage into the Snow line; while Fielding Snow is not so funny, other members of the lineage had a real sense of humor. One I found was Frost And Snow (‘And’ was his middle name), Mourning Snow, and Fountain Snow.” —N. Morris Boyd

“I have a Manely Peacock in my family tree. He was a captain in the Union Army. My gg-gm’s sister’s maiden name was Sarah Madara. My favorite isn’t in my family tree however. I came across this name on FamilySearch: Morris Morris, born in Morristown, Morris County, NJ. I wonder what he named his cat?!” —M. Guenther

“I found an Icy North in a census record. Went to school with the Flower sisters, Iris, Rose and Daisy.” —G. Marshall

“I have a Major Buchanan; yes she was a girl.” —S. O’wen

“In the Dutch [family] trees, you often see a difference of one letter between genders. Cornelis for male, Cornelia for female. End result: Aunt and Uncle Corny. We had a family around the corner from us whose kids were named April, May, and August.” —A. Smulders

Genealogical Challenge

Thanks to everyone who shared their findings and brightened our day! If you run across more funny names during your family history research, please share them with us.

Next on the Funny Genealogy Names series will be hysterical town names! I’ve got a whole slew of funny place names in Texas, including the town of Ding Dong. When I publish it, I’ll be sure to let you know how someone stole their bell!

50 Alabama Newspapers Now Online for Your Genealogy Research

Last Saturday Alabama celebrated the 194th anniversary of its statehood—the “Heart of Dixie” was admitted into the Union on 14 December 1819 as the 22nd state.

photo of the official state seal of Alabama

Illustration: official state seal of Alabama. Credit: Wikipedia.

If you are researching your family roots in Alabama, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online Alabama newspaper archives: 50 titles to help you search your family history in the “Yellowhammer State,” providing coverage from 1816 to Today. There are more than 21 million articles and records in this online collection.

Dig into the archives and search for obituaries and other news articles about your ancestors in these recent and historical AL newspapers online:

Search Alabama Newspaper Archives (1816-1992)

Search Alabama Recent Obituaries (1992-Today)

Here is our complete list of online Alabama newspapers, divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more.

Discover a variety of genealogy records and news stories in these 21 Alabama historical newspapers, listed alphabetically by city:

Search recent obituary records for your relatives in these 29 Alabama newspapers, listed alphabetically by city:

Alabama Newspaper Archives at GenealogyBank

Alabama Newspaper Archives at GenealogyBank

Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Jackie Robinson & Rosa Parks Obituaries

During this October week in American history three pioneering activists died who had a big impact on American society:

  • Elizabeth Cady Stanton, American women’s rights activist, died at 86 on 26 October 1902
  • Jack Roosevelt “Jackie” Robinson, American baseball player and civil rights activist, died at 53 on 24 October 1972
  • Rosa Louise McCauley Parks, American civil rights activist, died at 92 on 24 October 2005

Newspapers are filled with obituaries and profiles that help us better understand the lives of our ancestors—and the famous people who lived during their times. You can use historical newspapers to research their public careers and trace their family trees. The following old newspaper articles about these three famous Americans are good examples.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902)

An activist from an early age, Elizabeth Cady Stanton was involved in the abolitionist and temperance movements—but the cause to which she primarily devoted her considerable powers was women’s rights and their equality before the law, especially the right to vote. She was instrumental in organizing the first women’s rights convention: the Seneca Falls Convention, a two-day meeting convened on July 19, 1848, in Seneca Falls, New York.

Over 300 people attended the women’s rights convention, whose highlight was the reading and discussion of a statement of women’s rights called the Declaration of Sentiments, primarily written by Stanton. After much debate, the declaration (deliberately modeled after the Declaration of Independence) was signed by 100 of the participants: 68 women and 32 men.

Of the 12 resolutions debated and approved at the convention, the most controversial was the ninth, written by Stanton. It read: “Resolved, that it is the duty of the women of this country to secure to themselves their sacred right to the elective franchise.” Women’s suffrage was a divisive issue and many of the convention’s participants opposed its inclusion, fearing that an element this controversial would weaken support for women’s equality. However, others argued persuasively in favor of supporting women’s suffrage—and in the end the voting rights resolution was approved.

Stanton met another pioneering suffragist, Susan B. Anthony, in 1851, and the two women were close friends and allies in the women’s rights movement for the rest of Stanton’s life.

This obituary was published the day after Stanton died.

Woman's Rights Loses Venerable 'Mother' [Elizabeth Cady Stanton], Denver Post newspaper obituary 27 October 1902

Denver Post (Denver, Colorado), 27 October 1902, page 3

This old newspaper obituary included a tribute penned by Susan B. Anthony: “Through the early days, when the world was against us, we stood together. Mrs. Stanton was always a courageous woman, a leader of thought and new movement. She was a most finished writer and every state paper presented to Congress or the state legislatures in the early days was written by Mrs. Stanton. I cannot express myself at all as I feel, I am too crushed to say too much, but if she had outlived me she would have found fine words with which to express our friendship.”

This tribute to Stanton was published two days after she died.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Worcester Daily Spy newspaper article 28 October 1902

Worcester Daily Spy (Worcester, Massachusetts), 28 October 1902, page 6

It concluded: “Mrs. Stanton fell far short of her aim, in what she actually accomplished, just as Susan B. Anthony finds herself far short of the goal toward which she has struggled [the 19th Amendment, granting women the right to vote, was not ratified until 1920]. The world is not ready to grant their contention in its fullness, and indeed is still to a great degree hostile toward it, but the two remarkable women long ago won recognition of the principle by which they were inspired, and through that recognition extended the power of women in public affairs to a wonderful degree, and made great progress toward establishing women in a position more equitable with that of men so far as property rights are concerned.

“Work like that carried on by Mrs. Stanton cannot cease with her life, nor can it end when Miss Anthony, her illustrious co-worker, passes away. It is everlasting, and will constantly bring fresh benefits to womankind.”

Jackie Robinson (1919-1972)

A superb all-around athlete and a man of strong principles, Jackie Robinson is most remembered as the African American who broke baseball’s color barrier when he started a game for the Brooklyn Dodgers on 15 April 1947. Despite vicious racial taunts and threats, Robinson played the game with great intensity and excellence, gradually winning the respect and admiration of most of his peers and helping to advance the cause of the Civil Rights Movement in America.

During his 10-year baseball career, Robinson played in six World Series, had a lifetime batting average of .311, won the Rookie of the Year award in 1947, and was the National League Most Valuable Player in 1949. He became the first African American player inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame when he was accepted in 1962, in his initial year of eligibility.

After his professional baseball career ended, Robinson continued to break racial barriers with a series of firsts for an African American: baseball television analyst; vice-president of a major American corporation (Chock full o’Nuts); one of the co-founders of an African American-owned financial institution called the Freedom National Bank; owner of a construction company that built housing for low-income families.

Robinson died a much-respected figure on 24 October 1972 of complications from diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease at the young age (for a prime athlete) of 53. After his death tributes poured in for the man who had accomplished—and endured—so much.

This tribute, published in the newspaper the day after Robinson died, told a story about his minor league playing career with the Montreal Royals that showed how much testing Robinson had to endure.

Fear of Failure Motivated Jackie [Robinson], Springfield Union newspaper article 25 October 1972

Springfield Union (Springfield, Massachusetts), 25 October 1972, page 32

“There was the exhibition game against Indianapolis, and Paul Derringer, the one-time Cincinnati ace, was pitching against Montreal. He was a friend of [Montreal Manager Clay] Hopper’s and he said:

“‘Tell you what I’m gonna do, Clay. I’m gonna knock him (Robinson) down a couple of times and see what he’s made of.’

“Robinson had to eat dirt to avoid a high, inside pitch his first time up, but then picked himself up and singled. Derringer decked him again the next time up, but Robinson bludgeoned a screaming triple to left-center.

“‘He’ll do, Clay,’ Derringer hollered into the Montreal dugout.”

This tribute to Robinson was penned by famed sportswriter Red Smith.

Unconquerable Spirit [Jackie Robinson] Pierces Gloom in Philly, Trenton Evening Times newspaper article 25 October 1972

Trenton Evening Times (Trenton, New Jersey), 25 October 1972, page 70

Calling Robinson the “black man’s fighter,” Smith wrote: “Jackie Robinson established the black man’s right to play second base. He fought for the black man’s right to a place in the white community, and he never lost sight of that goal. After he left baseball, almost everything he did was directed toward that goal. He was involved in foundation of the Freedom National Banks. He tried to get an insurance company started with black capital and when he died he was head of a construction company building houses for blacks. Years ago a friend, talking of the needs of blacks, said, ‘good schooling comes first.’

“‘No,’ Jackie said. ‘housing is the first thing. Unless he’s got a home he wants to come back to, it doesn’t matter what kind of school he goes to.’”

This Jackie Robinson obituary article was published the day after he died.

Hall of Famer Jackie Robinson Dead at 53, Plain Dealer newspaper obituary 25 October 1972

Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 25 October 1972, page 61

It included a tribute to Robinson from the head of baseball: “Baseball Commissioner Bowie Kuhn said Robinson was unsurpassed in contribution to sports. ‘His entire life was courage. Courage as the black pioneer of the game. Courage in the way he fought for what he believed.’”

Rosa Parks (1913-2005)

When Rosa Parks, an African American woman in Montgomery, Alabama, refused to give up her bus seat to a white person on Dec. 1, 1955, her act of resistance ignited the Montgomery Bus Boycott—which in turn accelerated the Civil Rights Movement and forever changed America. It was not that Parks was too physically tired to move that evening, though it was the end of another long day working as a seamstress in the Montgomery Fair department store. Nor was she old and infirm; at 42, she was a strong and healthy African American woman. She had simply had enough of the city’s segregation laws that gave whites more rights than blacks.

Her arrest for refusing white bus driver James Blake’s order to give up her seat on the bus galvanized the African American community in Montgomery. Thousands of leaflets were distributed calling for a boycott of the city’s buses until the Jim Crow segregation laws were changed. The boycott was led by a young minister, Martin Luther King, Jr., who soon rose to national prominence as a civil rights leader. After 381 days the segregation laws were finally changed and blacks once again rode Montgomery’s buses—but that victory was only the start of a movement much, much bigger.

The Civil Rights Movement gained momentum, and Rosa Parks went on to receive national recognition—including the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Congressional Gold Medal.

This 1955 news article reported on her arrest, fining, and the subsequent bus boycott.

Negro Woman [Rosa Parks] in Segregation Case Fined, Seattle Daily Times newspaper article 5 December 1955

Seattle Daily Times (Seattle, Washington), 5 December 1955, page 44

The newspaper article about the Montgomery bus incident reported: “The woman was taken off a bus and jailed last Thursday night after refusing to leave a section reserved for white passengers. The [Montgomery] City Code requires segregation in all forms of public transportation and gives bus drivers police powers to enforce the law.

“Meanwhile, other Negroes boycotted city buses in protest against the woman’s arrest. Police cars and motorcycles followed the busses to avert trouble.”

This obituary and appreciation was published in the newspaper two days after Parks died.

Rosa Parks Inspired Generation, Register Star newspaper article 26 October 2005

Register Star (Rockford, Illinois), 26 October 2005, page 1

It reported: “Attorney Vernita Hervey, a civil rights activist, said Parks’ defiance of Alabama’s Jim Crow laws sparked an uprising that ‘probably was the defining moment in African-American collective action.’”

To honor Parks, this drawing graced the editorial page of the Register Star.

editorial cartoon paying respects to Rosa Parks, Register Star newspaper illustration 26 October 2005

Register Star (Rockford, Illinois), 26 October 2005, page 5

Today there is even an American holiday in Rosa Parks’ honor.

Newspaper Obituaries provide personal details about someone’s life that can’t be found elsewhere—whether they are stories about our ancestors or articles about famous people we’re interested in. GenealogyBank features two collections of online obituaries:

Dig into these obituary archives today and see what you can discover about your family tree and the famous people you admire most!

Top Genealogy Websites: North Carolina Genealogy Resources for Records

It’s exciting to see the daily growth of North Carolina newspapers and genealogical resources going online.

Here are two key websites you need to be familiar with and rely upon for family history information from the “Tar Heel State”: GenealogyBank and FamilySearch.

a collage of images showing North Carolina genealogy records from GenealogyBank and FamilySearch

Credit: GenealogyBank and FamilySearch

GenealogyBank’s North Carolina Newspapers Collection

GenealogyBank has North Carolina newspapers covered from 1787 to Today.

Our North Carolina newspaper archives contain more than 130 newspapers to cover the history of the Southern state and its people (see the complete list at the end of this article).

Access the North Carolina newspapers with these two links:

Search North Carolina Newspaper Archives (1787 – 1993)

Search North Carolina Recent Obituaries (1988 – Current)

You can also use the nifty map below. Just click on the dots in your NC area of interest to get a popup containing the listing information for that title. Click the hyperlink in the listing to go directly to the newspaper search page. You can also get the full screen version of the map.

Searching through these North Carolina newspapers, you can pull up a news article giving all of the details about special family occasions, such as a wedding. You’ll find information about your family tree that just can’t be found anywhere else.

This 1911 wedding announcement is a good example. It gives a detailed, personal story of the couple’s wedding, as reported that day by the family to the press.

Crutchfield-Stainback wedding announcement, Charlotte Observer newspaper article 4 August 1911

Charlotte Observer (Charlotte, North Carolina), 4 August 1911, page 7

We can learn about their wedding and celebrate it, now that it’s preserved online.

North Carolina Marriage Registers at FamilySearch

FamilySearch is adding to the celebration by putting up the old North Carolina marriage registers from 1762-1979 online. See: https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1726957

photo of North Carolina marriage registers available through FamilySearch

Credit: FamilySearch

According to FamilySearch’s website, this collection contains the “name index and images of marriage records from North Carolina county courthouses. These records include licenses, marriage applications, marriage bonds, marriage certificates, marriage packets and cohabitation registers. Currently, portions of the following counties are represented in this collection: Alamance, Alexander, Anson, Ashe, Beaufort, Bladen, Buncombe, Cabarrus, Caldwell, Camden, Carteret, Caswell, Catawba, Chatham, Cherokee, Chowan, Cleveland, Columbus, Craven, Cumberland, Currituck, Dare, Davidson, Davie, Duplin, Durham, Edgecombe, Forsyth, Franklin, Gaston, Gates, Granville, Halifax, Hanover, Hyde, Johnston, Lincoln, Macon, McDowell, Mecklenburg, Montgomery, Northampton, Pitt, Richmond, Rowan, Surry, Wilkes. This collection is 46% complete. Additional records will be added as they are completed.”

These online NC newspapers and marriage registers are powerful genealogy research tools.

It is a great day for North Carolina genealogy!

Here is the complete list of all 133 North Carolina newspapers in GenealogyBank’s online collection.

Discover a variety of genealogy records and news stories in these 26 North Carolina newspapers:

Search recent obituary records for your relatives in these 107 North Carolina newspapers:

Click on the image below to download a printable list of the North Carolina Newspapers in GenealogyBank for your future reference. You can save to your desktop and click the individual titles to go directly to your newspaper of interest. Simply go to the file tab and click print.

graphic for GenealogyBank's North Carolina newspapers collection

Rosa Parks Statue: Honoring an American Civil Rights Pioneer

When Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white person on an Alabama bus 58 years ago, her act of defiance against racist laws sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott and accelerated the Civil Rights Movement, forever changing America. In a ceremony Wednesday in Washington, D.C., which was attended by dozens of her relatives, the deceased Civil Rights pioneer was honored by the unveiling of a life-size statue in the nation’s Capitol building.

photo of Civil Rights pioneer Rosa Parks with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Civil Rights pioneer Rosa Parks with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Credit: Wikimedia Commons.

The recent statue unveiling marks an important moment in black history as Rosa Parks is the first African American woman to be honored in the Capitol’s Statuary Hall with a life-sized statue. Many congressional leaders praised her courage and example during Wednesday’s dedication ceremony, including President Obama.

During his remarks, President Obama said: “In a single moment, with the simplest of gestures, she helped change America and change the world.”

Rosa Parks & the Montgomery Bus Boycott

When Rosa Parks refused to give up her bus seat on Dec. 1, 1955, it wasn’t because she was too old or tired. Although her resistance came at the end of another long working day as a seamstress in the Montgomery Fair department store, Parks was only 42 and a strong, healthy woman.

No, what prompted her refusal that day was that Parks had simply had enough of the city’s segregation laws that gave whites more rights than blacks.

Boycott Busses in Montgomery, Alabama, Crusader newspaper article 9 December 1955

Crusader (Rockford, Illinois), 9 December 1955, page 8

News of her arrest for refusing to give up her seat to a white person quickly spread throughout the African American community in Montgomery, and a protest was organized: blacks refused to ride the city’s buses until the segregation laws were changed. A young minister, Martin Luther King, Jr., led the protest and soon rose to prominence in the nation’s Civil Rights Movement.

The Montgomery Bus Boycott lasted 381 days before the segregation laws were finally changed and African Americans once again rode Montgomery’s buses.

Search More than 45 Alabama Newspapers Online in Our Archive

GenealogyBank adds new content to its U.S. newspaper archives on a daily basis—a collection of newspapers from all 50 states, currently numbering more than 5,850 titles.

Included in this online newspaper collection are more than 45 old and recent newspaper titles from Alabama, from cities and towns ranging from Albertville, AL, to Tuscumbia, AL.

These Alabama newspaper archives cover the length and breadth of AL, providing an excellent genealogy resource for this state in the heart of the South whose nicknames are “Heart of Dixie” and the “Cotton State.”

GenealogyBank has Alabama newspaper content covered from 1816 to today. We’ve got the online genealogy resources you need to document your Alabama family history.

Alabama Newspaper Archives Articles Collage

Alabama Newspaper Articles

Alabama Newspaper Titles In GenealogyBank

State Town Newspaper Coverage Notes
Alabama Albertville Sand Mountain Reporter 3/22/2001 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Anniston Anniston Star 10/1/1998 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Anniston Jacksonville News 8/27/1998 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Athens News-Courier 2/1/2006 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Birmingham Age-Herald 7/1/1894 – 3/31/1901
Alabama Birmingham Birmingham News 4/27/1993 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Birmingham Birmingham Times 4/1/2010 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Birmingham Labor Advocate 6/29/1895 – 12/20/1902
Alabama Birmingham Wide-Awake 1/24/1900 – 1/24/1900
Alabama Blakeley Blakeley Sun 12/12/1818 – 6/2/1819
Alabama Cahawba Alabama Watchman 8/8/1820 – 12/15/1820
Alabama Cahawba Cahawba Press and Alabama Intelligencer 7/10/1819 – 12/30/1820
Alabama Claiborne Alabama Courier 3/19/1819 – 10/15/1819
Alabama Cullman Cullman Times 12/27/2007 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Decatur Decatur Daily 8/1/2006 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Dothan Dothan Eagle 8/16/2005 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Enterprise Enterprise Ledger 3/26/2008 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Eufaula Eufaula Tribune 2/8/2011 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Fort Payne Times-Journal 9/13/2003 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Gardendale North Jefferson News 6/27/2007 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Grove Hill Grove Hill Herald 3/6/1850 – 12/6/1854
Alabama Grove Hill Southern Recorder 2/24/1847 – 11/7/1849
Alabama Heflin Cleburne News 2/14/1999 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Huntsville Huntsville Gazette 12/21/1816 – 12/29/1894
Alabama Huntsville Huntsville Star 1/26/1900 – 1/26/1900
Alabama Huntsville Huntsville Times 1/2/1992 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Jasper Daily Mountain Eagle 1/22/1998 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Lanett Valley Times-News 3/18/1999 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Leeds Leeds News 2/4/2009 – 8/25/2011 Obituaries Only
Alabama Mobile Mobile Evening Telegraph 11/3/1864 – 11/3/1864
Alabama Mobile Mobile Register 9/9/1858 – 12/31/1992
Alabama Mobile Press-Register 11/1/1992 – Current (10/2001-1/10/2003 unavailable) Obituaries Only
Alabama Montgomery Daily Alabama Journal 4/14/1849 – 12/31/1853
Alabama Montgomery Daily Confederation 5/1/1858 – 7/17/1860
Alabama Montgomery Montgomery Advertiser 5/11/1901 – 12/31/1922
Alabama Montgomery Montgomery Enterprise 1/26/1900 – 1/26/1900
Alabama Opelika Opelika-Auburn News 1/30/2008 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Pell City St. Clair News Aegis 7/9/2008 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Pell City St. Clair Times 7/26/2001 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Piedmont Piedmont Journal 10/2/2009 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Rainsville Weekly Post 3/15/2001 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Scottsboro Daily Sentinel 9/28/2004 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama St. Stephens Halcyon 6/2/1818 – 11/27/1820
Alabama Talladega Daily Home 1/20/1999 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Tuscaloosa Alabama Intelligencer and State Rights Expositor 3/2/1833 – 12/5/1835
Alabama Tuscumbia North Alabamian 11/17/1865 – 12/7/1866

 

Indiana wants me …

Searching for Indiana family history?
GenealogyBank has Indiana newspapers from 1817 – Today.

Click here and search Indiana historical newspapers 1817-1930
Click here and search recent Indiana Obituaries 1990 – 2010
Click here and search Indiana Death records 1937-2010 (SSDI)

Newspapers in GenealogyBank
American Nonconformist. 11/11/1886 – 4/2/1896
Amigo del Hogar. 11/22/1925 – 4/13/1930
Batesville Herald-Tribune. 10/2/2009-Current
Bremen Enquirer. 10/7/2009-Current
Brookville Enquirer. 2/5/1819 – 12/26/1820
Chronicle-Tribune (Marion, IN). 3/18/1999-Current
Commercial Review, The (Portland, IN). 4/10/2003-Current
Decatur Daily Democrat. 3/11/2008-Current
Elkhart Truth. 12/29/2007-Current
Evansville Courier & Press. 6/19/1991-Current
Evening News and Tribune (Jeffersonville-New Albany, IN). 6/3/2006-Current
Fort Wayne News Sentinel. 6/29/1901 – 2/22/1923
Freeman. 6/12/1897 – 2/4/1899
Goshen News, The. 10/26/2007-Current
Greensburg Daily News. 10/2/2009-Current
Herald Bulletin, The (Anderson, IN). 11/13/2008-Current
Huntington Herald-Press. 5/13/2005-Current
Indiana Centinel. 3/14/1817 – 12/30/1820
Indiana Democrat. 10/30/1830 – 3/9/1838
Indiana State Journal. 6/24/1846 – 12/27/1899
Indianapolis Ledger. 4/13/1918 – 10/28/1922
Indianapolis Sentinel. 7/2/1872 – 9/30/1882
Journal Gazette, The (Fort Wayne, IN). 2/14/1992-Current
Madison Courier, The. 5/1/2001-Current
New Albany Daily Ledger. 2/11/1854 – 9/15/1860
News-Dispatch, The (Michigan City, IN). 4/1/1997-Current
News-Sentinel, The (Fort Wayne, IN). 8/6/1990-Current
Paper of Montgomery County, The (Crawfordsville, IN). 11/26/2004-Current
Pharos-Tribune (Logansport, IN). 10/2/2009-Current
Post & Mail, The (Columbia City, IN). 10/7/2009-Current
Post-Tribune. 9/17/2000-Current
Reporter, The (Lebanon, IN). 6/18/2008-Current
Shelbyville News, The. 6/2/2009-Current
Terre Haute Express. 12/25/1878 – 3/22/1881
Times, The (Noblesville, IN). 10/22/2008-Current
Vincennes Sun-Commercial. 10/7/2002-Current
Wabash Courier. 2/18/1836 – 1/1/1853
Washington Times-Herald, The. 11/5/2007-Current
Zionsville Times Sentinel, The. 10/2/2009-Current

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More Newspapers Go Online – 41 newspapers, 23 states

GenealogyBank adds and expands 41 newspapers from 23 states.

21 new titles.

That’s nearly 14 million articles contained in 8,052 issues!

Click and search them right now!!
Connecticut. Middletown. American Sentinel. 326 issues. 1823-01-01 to 1833-04-24
Connecticut. Middletown.
Constitution. 47 issues. 1854-12-13 to 1855-12-05
Connecticut. New London.
New London Gazette. 160 issues. 1838-01-03 to 1843-03-22
Connecticut. Nor wich.
True Republican. 49 issues. 1804-06-20 to 1806-10-01

Washington, DC. Daily National Intelligencer. 3,230 issues. 1842-07-01 to 1866-06-25

Florida. Gainesville. *Gainesville Sun. 1995-01-18 to Present

Illinois. Chicago. Chicago Metro News. 118 issues. 1974-07-06 to 1990-10-06
Illinois. Freeport. *
Journal Standard. 2002-12-14 to Present

Indiana. Crawfordsville. *Paper of Montgomery County. 2004-11-26 to Present
Indiana. Noblesville. *
Times. 2008-10-22 to Present

Kentucky. Paris. *Western Citizen. 45 issues. 1808-12-24 to 1814-12-31

Louisiana. New Orleans. Orleans Gazette. 1 issue. 1817-09-27
Louisiana. New Orleans.
Times-Picayune. 30 issues. 1872-09-26 to 1900-11-15

Maine. Kennebunk. *Annals of the Times. 68 issues. 1803-01-13 to 1805-01-03
Maine. Portland. *Independent Statesman. 167 issues. 1821-07-14 to 1825-05-06

Massachusetts. Boston. *American Traveller. 19 issues. 1825-07-26 to 1836-03-25
Massachusetts. Gloucester. *
Gloucester Democrat. 362 issues. 1834-08-19 to 1838-02-16
Massachusetts. Springfield.
Federal Spy. 133 issues. 1800-01-07 to 1805-12-31
Massachusetts. Springfield. *
Hampden Whig. 2 issues. 1831-05-11 to 1836-06-08

Maryland. Baltimore. *Baltimore Bulletin. 93 issues. 1872-04-20 to 1876-09-23

Michigan. Grand Rapids. Grand Rapids Press. 330 issues. 1893-01-19 to 1920-10-25

Mississippi. Columbia. *Columbian Progress. 2008-11-03 to Present

Montana. Great Falls. Montana Herold. 1 issue. 1896-09-03

New Hampshire. Concord. New Hampshire Patriot. 2 issues. 1881-02-24 to 1884-01-10

New Jersey. Trenton. Trenton State Gazette. 293 issues. 1847-01-12 to 1847-12-31

New York. Albany. Albany Evening Journal. 83 issues. 1850-09-19 to 1874-06-10
New York. Catskill. *
Catskill Recorder. 143 issues. 1807-04-07 to 1833-04-18
New York. Goshen. *Goshen Repository. 37 issues. 1797-03-21 to 1798-12-25
New York. New York.
Hodge’s Banknote Reporter. 4 issues. 1861-06-01 to 1861-06-22
New York. New York.
New York Herald. 1,121 issues. 1864-01-28 to 1871-11-04; 1874-10-04 to 1888-01-05
New York. New York.
New York Herald-Tribune. 962 issues. 1856-10-30 to 1879-03-27
New York. Poughkeepsie. *
Country Journal. 136 issues. 1785-12-15 to 1789-07-07

North Carolina. Forest City. *Daily Courier. 2005-01-01 to Present

Ohio. Cincinnati. *Advertiser and Journal. 9 issues. 1819-01-26 to 1827-09-26
Ohio. Cincinnati. *
Cincinnati Daily Gazette. 722 issues. 1835-01-01 to 1845-06-25
Ohio. Warren. *Trump of Fame. 15 issues. 1812-11-05 to 1814-07-27

Rhode Island. Pawtucket. *Valley Breeze. 2009-08-19 to Present

South Carolina. Charleston. City Gazette. 206 issues. 1824-01-01 to 1824-08-31

Texas. Beaumont. Beaumont Enterprise & Journal. 14 issues. 1906-05-30 to 1911-09-01

Utah. Salt Lake City. Salt Lake Tribune. 1 issue. 1881-06-11

Vermont. Newport. *Newport Daily Express. 2008-07-24 to Present
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Funerals

I attended a funeral today for an old family friend that we have known for over 44 years, Axel Ohrn. Seeing people I have not seen in decades Axel’s funeral was a reunion as family and friends gathered from around the state of Connecticut to remember and honor him. He was 98 years old.


Newspapers over the past three centuries routinely carry obituaries and death notices that alert us that a person has died. They also routinely carry news accounts of the funerals themselves. GenealogyBank has more than 130 million obituaries, death notices, published funeral news accounts and sermons.
Here are some examples from the 29 May 1905 Montgomery (AL) Advertiser.





In the 1700s and 1800s it was common for families to print a copy of the funeral sermon as a keepsake and remembrance of the deceased.

GenealogyBank has many funeral sermons online like this one printed in 1804 on the death of Jonathan Homer, Jr. (1783-1804).
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William Montgomery Clemens (1860-1931)

Genealogists who made a difference

William Montgomery Clemens (1860-1931)
was a prolific genealogist and writer. Nephew to the more famous Samuel Clemens (1835-1910) – he was also a newspaper man and author. William M. Clemens started writing for the Pittsburgh Leader in 1879 and continued his research & writing for more than five decades.

(Illus. Samuel Clemens/Mark Twain – 2nd from right).

(Click here to see original Obituary – Trenton Evening Times 25 Nov. 1931)


A prolific writer, he was the author of well over 100 books and hundreds of essays and newspaper articles.


His regular column – “Notes on American Ancestry and Revolutionary Records” regularly appeared as the “Genealogical Department” in the Columbia, SC newspaper – the State.


Click Here to search all of the back issues of the State (Columbia, SC) newspaper 1891-1922

Over 80 of Clemens’ genealogy columns appeared in the Star.

Each one has genealogical details & information for families from across the country.

He regularly received questions from his readers and posted them to this column.

GenealogyBank has added a new feature – Ask the Genealogist!

Have a question about GenealogyBank or hit a brick wall with your family history research? Write us and let us know.

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