Arkansas & Maine Newspapers Being Added to GenealogyBank.com

To get the word out about which historical newspapers we’ll be adding in the months ahead – here is today’s list of newspapers for Arkansas and Maine.

I will research and post another two States tomorrow.

(Photo by Lewis Wickes Hine, 1874-1940. Courtesy: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, DC – Digital ID: nclc 03548).

Remember – this is an advance look at the list. Some of these titles are going live right now and some will not be added for months.

We want you to know what our plans are.

I usually hear about the new newspaper titles going live on GenealogyBank three times a month. I was posting a summary of the new content at the end of each month, but now I will post these new titles and their dates of coverage as soon as I get the word that they are being added.

Thousands of newspapers are also being considered for addition to GenealogyBank. We continue to evaluate and add more titles that are not on this list.

As soon as I know which titles are going live or have been added to the “Upcoming Titles” list – I will post the list to our blog. This way you will know which titles have been added to GenealogyBank and which titles are on the Upcoming Titles list.

CLICK HERE to see the complete list of Arkansas newspapers that are live online right now at GenealogyBank.

CLICK HERE to see the complete list of Maine newspapers that are live online right now at GenealogyBank.

Here is the advance look at the list of newspapers we will be adding in the months ahead for Arkansas and Maine.

ARKANSAS
Heber Springs, Arkansas. Jacksonian. 1890 to 1904
Jonesboro, Arkansas. Jonesboro Evening Sun. 1905 to 1916
Jonesboro, Arkansas. Jonesboro Tribune. 1911 to 1922
Little Rock, Arkansas. Arkansas Gazette. 1827 to 1922

Maybe you’ll find the stories of these “cartoners” who packed the sardine cans into cartons for the Seacoast Canning Co. in Eastport, Maine, the easternmost city in the US.

(Photo by Lewis Wickes Hine, 1874-1940. Courtesy: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, DC – Digital ID: nclc 00954).

MAINE
Augusta, Maine. Herald of Liberty. 1810 to 1815
Bangor, Maine. Bangor Register and Penobscot Advertiser. 1821 to 1831
Buckstown, Maine. Gazette of Maine. Hancock Advertiser. 1807 to 1812
Eastport, Maine. Eastport Sentinel. 1819 to 1832
Kennebunk, Maine. Annals of the Times. 1803 to 1805
Kennebunk, Maine. Weekly Visitor. 1820 to 1821
Paris, Maine. Jeffersonian. 1827 to 1831
Portland, Maine. Gazette. 1821 to 1876
Portland, Maine. Independent Statesman. 1821 to 1825

GenealogyBank Adds 126 More Newspapers

We’ve mobilized the entire crew at GenealogyBank to bring you the historical backfiles of 126 newspapers from 23 States.

(Image from Library of Congress, LC-DIG-nclc-03657)

It’s a great day for genealogy!

Titles from across the country –

Gazette-Telegraph (Colorado Springs, CO) 1/4/1873 to 10/31/1913
Norwich Aurora (Norwich, CT) 5/15/1839 to 3/10/1876
Chicago Times (Chicago, IL) 11/2/1854 to 7/3/1888
Springfield Republican (Springfield, MA) 1/1/1877 to 2/29/1908
Irish World (New York, NY) 1/11/1890 to 5/30/1903
St. Albans Daily Messenger (St. Albans, VT) 7/2/1888 to 12/30/1922

and 120 more ….
Click Here to see the list of titles that were added this week.

Your membership in GenealogyBank entitles you to read the complete text of over 230 million articles and records – search for more than 1 billion of your relatives.
Over 3,500 newspapers 1690 to today!
Sign up now and ask your friends to join with us in bringing more records online – It’s only $9.95 – click here.

GenealogyBank adds even more newspapers


Hot off the press!

I just received word that GenealogyBank began adding an additional 67 historical newspapers today.

(Image from Library of Congress – American Memory Project)

That jumps the total with yesterday’s announcement to 107 titles added this weekend!!

These titles will finish loading later this week.

These additional historical newspapers are from Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, New Mexico and Texas and cover the dates 1855 to 1977.

That’s just too many titles for me to list here – but I will put the complete list on GenealogyBank Monday morning. Click here to see the 40 titles I announced yesterday.

It’s a great day for Genealogy ….

…and a great day for GenealogyBank too.
All of GenealogyBank may be searched for free.

In the free search you will see a preview snippet of the article showing the name of your ancestor that you are searching for.

These snippets let you confirm which articles and records GenealogyBank has on your ancestors before you join. Your membership helps us to make even more records available.

Your membership in GenealogyBank entitles you to read the complete text of over 230 million articles and records – search for more than 1 billion of your relatives.

Sign up now and ask your friends to join with us in bringing more records online – It’s only $9.95 – click here.

www.GenealogyBank.com adding more historical newspapers – Alabama, Colorado, Georgia, Oregon, Pennsylvania – over 20 States


GenealogyBank is adding even more newspapers – 40 titles from 20 States!

Millions of articles are going live on the site beginning today through next week.

Here is a list of just some of the content that has been added.

All of GenealogyBank may be searched for free.

In the free search you will see a preview snippet of the article showing the name of your ancestor that you are searching for. These snippets let you confirm which articles and records GenealogyBank has on your ancestors before you join.

Your membership helps us to make even more records available.

Your membership in GenealogyBank entitles you to read the complete text of over 230 million articles and records – search for more than 1 billion of your relatives.

Sign up now and ask your friends to join with us in bringing more records online – It’s only $9.95 – click here.

This list includes the newspapers that we are adding to GenealogyBank beginning today.

Next week I will post the names of even more newspapers that we are adding.

It is a great day for genealogy!

Alabama
Montgomery. Montgomery Advertiser. 7/1/1916 to 8/31/1916

Arizona
Tucson. Tucson Daily Citizen. 5/1/1909 to 8/31/1909

California
Santa Cruz. Santa Cruz Sentinel. 2/9/2008 to Current
Santa Monica. Santa Monica Daily Press. 3/29/2005 to Current

Colorado
Colorado Springs. Gazette-Telegraph. 1/4/1873 to 10/31/1913
Denver. Denver Republican. 4/20/1906 to 4/20/1906

Connecticut
Bridgeport. Connecticut Courier. 3/8/1814 to 6/14/1826
Hartford. Religious Inquirer. 11/10/1821 to 11/07/1835
New Haven. Daily Herald. 6/4/1836 to 12/26/1836
New London. Republican Advocate. 1/2/1822 to 12/10/1828
Norwich. Canal of Intelligence. 8/22/1827 to 10/28/1829
Norwich. Norwich Aurora. 5/15/1839 to 3/10/1876
Torrington. Register Citizen. 10/25/2007 to Current

Washington, DC. Metropolitan. 8/20/1825-12/18/1835

Georgia
Conyers. Rockdale Citizen. 11/24/2007 to Current
Cumming. Forsyth County News. 2/16/2006 to Current

Hawaii
Honolulu. Pacific Commercial Advertiser. 6/2/1859 to 6/28/1873

Idaho
Coeur d’Alene. Coeur d’Alene Press. 10/1/2003 to Current

Illinois
Chicago. Chicago Times. 11/2/1854 to 7/3/1888
Nauvoo. Nauvoo Expositor. 6/7/1844 to 6/7/1844

Kansas
Shawnee. Siwinowe Kesibwi. 1/11/1811 to 1/11/1811

Louisiana
New Orleans. Jeffersonian. 5/30/1842 to 5/30/1842

Massachusetts
Boston. Boston Evening Transcript. 7/2/1855 to 12/31/1855
Boston. Daily Atlas. 1/1/1848 to 6/30/1848
Boston. Saturday Evening Gazette. 9/20/1856 to 3/26/1859
Springfield. Springfield Republican. 1/1/1877 to 2/29/1908

Missouri
Kansas City. Unfettered Letters. 9/29/2005 to Current

Montana
Anaconda. Anaconda Standard. 7/1/1920 to 8/31/1920

New York
New York City. Irish World. 1/11/1890 to 5/30/1903
New York City. New York Evangelist. 6/16/1870 to 7/26/1877
New York City. New York Ledger. 1/3/1863 to 12/26/1863
New York City. Spectator. 5/13/1831 to 4/30/1834
Syracuse. Northern Christian Advocate. 7/4/1900 to 5/28/1908

Oregon
Portland. Oregonian. 4/17/1921 to 12/9/1922

Pennsylvania
Philadelphia. Philadelphia Inquirer. 6/2/1834 to 10/31/1860

Vermont
St. Albans. St. Albans Daily Messenger. 7/2/1888 to 12/30/1922

Wisconsin
Milwaukee. Milwaukee Journal of Commerce. 3/15/1871 to 12/22/1880
Milwaukee. Wisconsin Free Democrat. 9/9/1845 to 12/26/1855
Monroe. Jeffersonian Democrat. 8/14/1856 to 3/26/1857

On, Wisconsin! – Statehood May 29, 1848

Here’s to Wisconsin!
It became a state on this day in 1848.

On, Wisconsin is the state song. (The image is from the Library of Congress, American Memory Project.)

GenealogyBank has millions of records for Wisconsin – even newspapers that were published before it became a state.


Capital Times, The (Madison, WI). 3/20/1989-Current
Cedarburg News Graphic (WI). 6/25/2001-Current
Central Wisconsin Sunday (Wisconsin Rapids, WI). 5/4/2003-Current
Daily News, The (West Bend, WI). 7/12/2000-Current
Daily Telegram, The (Superior, WI). 5/19/2006-Current
Daily Tribune, The (Wisconsin Rapids, WI). 1/28/2003-Current
Green Bay Press-Gazette (WI). 1/1/1999-Current
Herald Times Reporter, The (Manitowoc, WI). 6/8/2004-Current
Jeffersonian Democrat (Monroe, WI). 8/14/1856 – 3/26/1857
Marshfield News-Herald (WI). 2/1/2003-Current
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (WI). 1/22/1990-Current
Milwaukee Journal of Commerce (Milwaukee, WI). 3/15/1871 – 12/22/1880
Milwaukee Sentinel (Milwaukee, WI)
Variant titles: Daily Republican Sentinel; Daily Sentinel & Gazette; Milwaukee Daily Sentinel. 6/27/1837 – 6/13/1866
Oshkosh Northwestern (WI). 8/31/1999-Current
Post-Crescent, The (Appleton, WI). 11/18/2001-Current
Reporter, The (Fond du Lac, WI). 4/25/2002-Current
Sheboygan Press, The (WI). 1/28/2004 to Current, selected coverage from 2/22/1999-12/31/2003
Stevens Point Journal (WI). 2/3/2003-Current
Waukesha Freeman (WI). 6/12/2000-Current, currency varies
Wausau Daily Herald (WI). 8/27/1999-Current
Weekly Wisconsin Patriot (Madison, WI)
Variant title: Wisconsin Weekly Patriot. 7/8/1854 – 12/26/1863
Wisconsin Chief (Fort Atkinson, WI). 5/3/1853 – 9/29/1866
Wisconsin Daily Patriot (Madison, WI). 9/2/1863 – 3/15/1864
Wisconsin Democrat (Madison, WI). 10/18/1842 – 5/8/1852
Wisconsin Free Democrat (Milwaukee, WI). 9/9/1845 – 11/28/1860
Wisconsin Patriot (Madison, WI). 10/22/1864 – 10/22/1864
Wisconsin Populist (Madison, WI)
Variant title: The Dane County Populist . 9/10/1892 – 11/8/1892
Wisconsin State Journal (Madison, WI). 3/10/1857 – 12/27/1889
Wisconsin State Journal (WI). 3/19/1989-Current
Wiskonsan Enquirer (Madison, WI)
Variant title: Wisconsin Enquirer. 11/8/1838 – 3/27/1841

Our Honored Dead …

When Abraham Lincoln gave his stirring remarks at Gettysburg in 1863 word spread quickly across the nation.

The San Francisco (CA) Daily Evening Bulletin of 18 Dec 1863 captured the impact of Lincoln’s words that still move us today.

Newspapers report what happens every day giving each of us the emotion, context and impact of the news as it happens.

GenealogyBank with more than 3,400 newspapers over four centuries gives us the news as it happened.


Gripping accounts of the attack at Lexington & Concord appeared within days giving us the emotion and details of that day.
(NH Gazette & Historical Chronicle. 21 April 1775).

As we look back and remember our “honored dead” it is a good time to pause and reread Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address.

Four score and seven years ago
our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation,
conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition
that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether
that nation, or any nation, so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure.
We are met on a great battle-field of that war.
We have come to dedicate a portion of that field,
as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives
that that nation might live.
It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.
But, in a larger sense,
we can not dedicate—we can not consecrate—
we can not hallow—this ground.
The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here,
have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract.
The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here,
but it can never forget what they did here.
It is for us the living, rather,
to be dedicated here to the unfinished work
which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced.
It is rather for us to be
here dedicated to the great task remaining before us
—that from these honored dead
we take increased devotion to that cause
for which they gave the last full measure of devotion
—that we here highly resolve
that these dead shall not have died in vain
—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom
—and that government of the people,
by the people,
for the people,
shall not perish from the earth.
This familiar version cited from Wikipedia

Now compare that with the version published in the San Francisco (CA) Daily Evening Bulletin of 18 Dec 1863

There were in fact multiple versions of the Gettysburg Address that were written down by reporters, others at the event and Lincoln himself.

See a discussion of this on the Library of Congress website loc.gov including a copy of the only known photo of Lincoln taken that day.

1st genealogy published in America – 7 May 1724

The first genealogy published in America appeared in a newspaper 284 years ago – today – May 7, 1724.

It appeared in the American Weekly Mercury. It was a genealogy of King Philip V of Spain. Genealogy articles routinely appeared in colonial newspapers.

The first genealogy published in book form was in 1771 – the Stebbins Genealogy and by 1876 and the nation’s first centennial there were less than 1,000 genealogies published.

With a push from President Ulysses S. Grant the idea really took off. It was 132 years ago on May 25th that he issued a “Proclamation” to the American people asking them to remember their history, write it down and distribute it widely.

He wrote that he wanted to see “a complete record” of our history … be kept and placed in each county and in the Library of Congress”. If the Internet were available then I am sure he would have suggested that they be put online too.


According to the 16 Mar 1912 issue of the San Jose Mercury “Genealogy Study Rapidly Growing. In Recent Years Americans Have Been Making Great Study of the Family Tree”. By the year 1920 there were 2,000 published genealogies and by 1972 there were 50,000 family histories in print.

With the publication of Roots in 1976 genealogy really took off.

By the late 90s the Internet was becoming a common tool for genealogists. By 1998 there were over 90,000 published genealogies. Today, just ten years later that number has jumped to over 150,000 published genealogies.

GenealogyBank was launched in 2005 and is also growing at a rapid pace. Now we are adding over 4 million items per month.

This month we added 4.3 million records; included 78 newspapers from 23 States. Click here for the complete list.
Amazing.
What a great day for genealogy!

Finding People with Common Names

Finding people with unusual names can be very difficult but it is easy to find them on GenealogyBank.

Today I was looking for Henry B. Platter and his good wife, Rachel (Bittinger) Platter. The Bittingers are my cousins and many of them are from Garrett County, Maryland.

Now, Platter is an unusual name. It would be easy for a search online to bring back every record that spoke about cooking, kitchens, plates or platters.

On GenealogyBank, I was able to instantly zero in on records
about them.

With just a few clicks I was able to find a dozen documents
about the Platter family. I began opening them one by one.
The first hit came from the historical documents and was a pension request by Henry’s wife, Rachel Platter. I quickly discovered Henry had served in the Civil War, a private in Company A, Second Regiment, P.H.B. Maryland Infantry and received a pension of $72 a month (certificate No. 1045070). (This is from: Pensions and increase of pensions for certain soldiers and sailors of the Civil War. Feb 5, 1925: Serial Set Vol. No. 8392, Session Vol. No.A68th Congress, 2nd SessionH.Rpt. 1385).

This is a terrific document – it gave me a lot of details about the family. The record showed that he and Rachel had married on March 12, 1867. That would have been hard to find anywhere else.

It also states that he died on October 4, 1923 leaving her in need of assistance; how long he had served in the Civil War and that his disability was caused during the war.

This document showed that she owned her own home, the value was $500. Perhaps her house looked like this one. It is a picture of her nephew Charles “Wooly” Henry & Sarah (Hoover) Bittinger and their family in front of the family home in New Jerusalem, Garrett County, MD.

It was taken in 1937 just a few years after Rachel Platter had requested a pension. Perhaps Rachel had a similar home.
(Photo by Arthur Rothstein; Library of Congress Photo LC-USF34- 026095-D).

Wow. It’s great that
GenealogyBank has been digitizing so many documents. I never would have found this one on my own. It was easy to find it online at GenealogyBank.

Their names, marriage and death dates, military service; details about their house, their income – bingo, there it was – all this family history in one document.

GenealogyBank added over 42.5 Million family history records last year and added another 2 million just this week. It now has over 216 million historical newspaper articles, obituaries, government and historical documents online. records and documents online.

Give it a try right now. It’s available at a great “get acquainted” rate – only $9.95 for 30 days.

I found documents that gave me the details I needed for my cousins in the back hills of Maryland ….. what will you find?