Have You Seen This Intricate Patchwork Heirloom Quilt?

In 1881 New Hampshire held its 26th Annual State Fair in Laconia, New Hampshire. The fair had not been held in Laconia since 1852.

The New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette devoted an entire page to reporting the handicrafts, food, animals and other award-winning items that were proudly displayed during this three-day event.

According to the newspaper report:

The fair of last week, although in many respects not meeting the expectations of all, was an unqualified success as far as attendance and receipts were concerned.

In reading over the description of the items on display, this brief mention of a quilt caught my eye:

Miss Jennie M. Huse a patchwork quilt of handsome pattern containing 10,368 pieces.

article about Jennie Huse and her quilt, New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette newspaper article 29 September 1881

New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette (Concord, New Hampshire), 29 September 1881, page 4

Remarkable patchwork – 10,368 pieces!

My wife and I have old heirloom quilts that have been passed down in our family, safely tucked away in the family cedar chest.

Enter Last Name

I wonder if Jennie Huse’s quilt was passed down in her family?

A quick check of her family history shows that while she never married, several of her siblings did.

screenshot of records from FamilySearch about the Huse family

Source: FamilySearch

Speaking of her family, both her father Thomas Muzzey Huse (1812-1877) and her brother David Scobey Huse (1844-1863) served in the Civil War. Her brother died during the war in Mound City, Illinois.

Genealogy Tip: Be sure to look for family photos using the Internet Archive Book Images tool. I wrote about this website before. See: Top Genealogy Websites Update: Internet Archive Book Images + Flickr

screenshot of the website Internet Archive Book Images

Source: Internet Archive Book Images

This handy site quickly lets you find photographs that were printed in the millions of books that they have digitized and put online.

In this example, you can see that this site quickly identified photographs of both Jennie’s father and her brother. Here’s an entry on her father:

screenshot from the website Internet Archive Book Images showing a photo of Thomas Huse

Source: Internet Archive Book Images

Here’s an entry on her brother:

screenshot from the website Internet Archive Book Images showing a photo of David Huse

Source: Internet Archive Book Images

Are you related to Jane “Jennie” Muzzey Huse?
Do you know where her intricate quilt is now?
If so, have you counted the pieces in her patchwork quilt? Does it really contain 10,368 pieces?

Please let us know in the comments section.

Related Articles:

ad for gift subscriptions to GenealogyBank

‘People’s Lawyer’ Louis Brandeis: 1st Jewish Supreme Court Justice

On 1 June 1916, President Woodrow Wilson achieved one of his greatest political triumphs when his controversial nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court, Louis Dembitz Brandeis, was confirmed as the first Jewish Supreme Court justice. Brandeis, whose brilliant legal mind was acknowledged by even his staunchest opponents, had built such a successful private law practice that he was able to devote himself to supporting public causes – for which he adamantly refused any compensation.

photo of Louis Brandeis, c. 1916

Photo: Louis Brandeis, c. 1916. Credit: Harris and Ewing; Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

He became a fierce legal opponent of monopolies, large corporations and public corruption; an advocate for social reform; and a protector of workers’ rights and working conditions. He also helped pioneer a concept that has become extremely important in today’s world: the right to privacy.

In a speech Brandeis gave at his alma mater Harvard University in 1905, he said:

Instead of holding a position of independence, between the wealthy and the people, prepared to curb the excesses of either, able lawyers have, to a large extent, allowed themselves to become adjuncts of great corporations and have neglected the obligation to use their powers for the protection of the people. We hear much of the ‘corporation lawyer,’ and far too little of the ‘people’s lawyer.’ The great opportunity of the American Bar is and will be to stand again as it did in the past, ready to protect also the interests of the people.

As a crusading “people’s lawyer,” Brandeis won many legal victories for working people and the general public, and worked hard to support Woodrow Wilson during the presidential campaign of 1912 – and later, helped President Wilson formulate his ideas on how to combat monopolies and regulate large corporations. As a consequence of all this judicial and political activism, Brandeis earned the enmity of conservative Republicans and powerful, wealthy businessmen.

Therefore, it was not surprising that when President Wilson nominated Brandeis for the Supreme Court on 29 January 1916, the nomination was controversial and met with a great deal of opposition. After Brandeis retired from the Supreme Court on 13 February 1939, his successor, Justice William O. Douglas, wrote of the opposition to Brandeis’s confirmation:

Brandeis was a militant crusader for social justice whoever his opponent might be. He was dangerous not only because of his brilliance, his arithmetic, his courage. He was dangerous because he was incorruptible.

Douglas also acknowledged one of the strong undercurrents in the opposition to Brandeis’s confirmation: the fact that he was a Jew. As Douglas wrote:

The fears of the Establishment were greater because Brandeis was the first Jew to be named to the Court.

Traditionally, confirmation of Supreme Court nominees had been a matter of a straightforward up-or-down vote in the Senate, usually held on the same day the president submitted the nomination. However, the controversy over Brandeis changed everything. For the first time ever, the Senate Judiciary Committee held public hearings on the nomination, and 47 witnesses testified during a confirmation process that took an unprecedented four months to complete. Bitter opposition came from such famous figures as former President William Howard Taft, who would himself go on to become Chief Justice of the Supreme Court on 11 July 1921, and former presidents of the American Bar Association.

Enter Last Name

Even the head of Brandeis’s alma mater, Harvard President Abbott Lawrence Lowell, opposed his confirmation, even though Lowell was in many ways a fellow progressive – and Brandeis had been one of the most brilliant students in Harvard University’s history, graduating in 1877 at the age of 20 as valedictorian, with the highest grade point average in the school’s history (a record that took eight decades to break). The reason for Lowell’s opposition is revealed, perhaps, when one remembers that one of his more controversial efforts was an attempt to limit Jewish enrollment at Harvard to 15% of the student body. Anti-Semitism was an unspoken but strong factor in the opposition to Brandeis.

When all the wrangling was done, the full Senate confirmed Brandeis by a vote of 47 to 22 on 1 June 1916. During a 23-year career as a Supreme Court justice, Louis Brandeis continued to be the “people’s lawyer,” especially in the areas of freedom of speech and the right to privacy, and he earned a legacy as one of the Court’s greatest justices.

article about the confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis, Boston Journal newspaper article 2 June 1916

Boston Journal (Boston, Massachusetts), 2 June 1916, page 1

This old newspaper article reported:

Washington, June 1.—The nomination of Louis D. Brandeis of Boston to the Supreme Court to succeed the late Joseph Rucker Lamar, was confirmed by the Senate today by a vote of 47 to 22. The vote, taken without debate, ended one of the bitterest contests ever waged against a presidential nominee. Mr. Brandeis will be the first Jew to occupy a seat on the Supreme bench.

One Democrat in Opposition

Only one Democrat, Senator Newlands, voted against confirmation. Three Republicans, Senators La Follette, Norris and Poindexter, voted with the Democratic majority, and Senators Gronna and Clapp would have done so, but were paired with Senators Borah and Kenyon. The negative vote of Senator Newlands was a complete surprise to the Senate, and the Nevada senator, recognizing that his action had aroused comment, later made public a formal explanation.

Newlands Explains Vote

“I have a high admiration for Mr. Brandeis as a publicist and propagandist of distinction,” said Senator Newlands. “I do not regard him as a man of judicial temperament, and for that reason I have voted against his confirmation.”

Throughout the fight President Wilson stood firmly behind his nominee, never wavering even when it seemed certain that an unfavorable report would be returned by the Senate Judiciary Committee. Before the committee voted he wrote a letter to Chairman Culberson, strongly urging prompt and favorable action.

The new justice was born 60 years ago in Louisville, Ky., graduated from Harvard University in 1877 and began the practice of law in Boston after admission to the bar in 1878. He probably will take the oath of office June 13, a week from Monday, just before the Court adjourns for the summer recess.

Nomination Sent in Jan. 29

The nomination of Mr. Brandeis was sent to the Senate Jan. 29. It was referred to the Judiciary Committee, and immediately a flood of protests against confirmation and memorials in favor thereof began to pour in.

A sub-committee consisting of Senators Chilton, Fletcher, Walsh, Cummins and Works was appointed to report on the nomination. It adopted the unusual course of holding public hearings. Clifford Thorns, railroad commissioner of Iowa, was the first witness, protesting against confirmation on the ground that Mr. Brandeis had been guilty of unprofessional conduct in handling the 8 per cent. rate advance case before the Interstate Commerce Commission. Sidney W. Winslow, president of the United Shoe Machinery Company, testified that Mr. Brandeis had been guilty of unprofessional conduct in relation to his company, and shortly thereafter Austin G. Fox, a New York attorney, appeared before the committee as the representative of 85 citizens of Boston, headed by A. Lawrence Lowell, president of Harvard, and took charge of the opposition. Then United States District Attorney George W. Anderson of Boston, at the request of the committee, undertook direction of the case for those favoring confirmation.

47 Witnesses Testified

In all, 47 witnesses were heard and 1,500 pages of testimony taken. William H. Taft, Simeon E. Baldwin, Francis Rawle, Joseph H. Choate, Elihu Root, Moorfield Storey and Peter W. Meldrim, all former presidents of the American Bar Association, wrote protests to the committee against confirmation, and Charles W. Eliot, president emeritus of Harvard, and many others wrote in favor of confirmation.

On April 3 the sub-committee, by a strict party vote, recommended confirmation, and on May 14 the full committee agreed to a favorable report by another strict party division.

Related Jewish American Articles:

ad for gift subscriptions to GenealogyBank

Genealogy Research with Legal Notices in Newspapers

Newspapers have long been the way that official notices of court actions, legal matters and other announcements have been communicated to the public, and researching these legal notices can help you learn more about your ancestors and fill in details on your family tree.

This blog post highlights some of the past articles we’ve published on the GenealogyBank Blog about researching legal notices in newspapers. Just click on the title of any article that interests you to read the full blog post.

divorce notices, Philadelphia Inquirer newspaper article 22 May 1914

Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 22 May 1914, page 16

screenshot of a GenealogyBank search results page showing sample “Legal/Probate/Court” records

GenealogyBank search results page showing sample “Legal/Probate/Court” records

name change notice for Max Kaplansky, Daily People newspaper article 25 September 1901

Daily People (New York, New York), 25 September 1901, page 1

How to Find Your Ancestor’s Divorce Records in the Newspaper

divorce notices, St. Louis Republic newspaper article 25 June 1889

St. Louis Republic (St. Louis, Missouri), 25 June 1889, page 12

land sale notice by Artemas Bryant, Barre Gazette newspaper article 13 February 1857

Barre Gazette (Barre, Massachusetts), 13 February 1857, page 3

article about Latin terms, Springfield Union newspaper article 5 May 1977

Springfield Union (Springfield, Massachusetts), 5 May 1977, page 19

ad for gift subscriptions to GenealogyBank

Elisha Perkins Invented Metallic Tractors – in the 1700s?

Here is the death notice of Dr. Elisha Perkins (1741-1799). It is fairly straightforward.

obituary for Elisha Perkins, Norwich Courier newspaper article 11 September 1799

Norwich Courier (Norwich, Connecticut), 11 September 1799, page 3

The death notice tells us that Perkins died in New York City on Friday morning, 6 September 1799, and that he was the inventor of “metallic tractors.”

Wait – he was the inventor of the metal tractor? In the 1700s?

Didn’t John Deere (1804-1886) or Cyrus McCormick (1809-1884) invent the metal tractor in the 1800s?

What exactly did Elisha Perkins invent?

Enter Last Name

Looking for more information in GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives, I found this article in the Norwich Courier reporting that Perkins’ “metallic tractors” were being used to cure people in Great Britain – including over two hundred people in Durham, England.

article about the Perkinsian Institution founded by Elisha Perkins, Norwich Courier newspaper article 10 July 1805

Norwich Courier (Norwich, Connecticut), 10 July 1805, page 3

So, Perkins’ “metallic tractors” was some sort of medical device.

Dr. Perkins’ son Benjamin Douglas Perkins wrote a booklet in 1798: The Influence of Metallic Tractors on the Human Body, in Removing Various Painful Inflammatory Diseases, Such as Rheumatism, Pleurisy, Some Gouty Affections, &c. &c. Lately Discovered by Dr. Perkins, of North America.

title page of the book written by Benjamin Perkins about the medical device "metallic tractors"

Source: Internet Archive

This booklet has been digitized and is online on the Internet Archive.

(I wrote about the Internet Archive before – see “Top Genealogy Websites, Pt. 2: Google Books & Internet Archive.” This site has digitized and put online millions of early books and manuscripts. It is one of the “Best” websites online.)

Perkins’ metallic tractors were actually just two small metal rods he used to prod and massage areas of inflammation – not the kind of tractors used in farming, as we might initially assume when reading Perkins’ death notice.

According to Wikipedia: “The Connecticut Medical Society condemned the tractors as ‘delusive quackery,’ and expelled Perkins from membership on the grounds that he was ‘a patentee and user of nostrums.’”

Genealogy Tip: Don’t assume anything during your genealogy research. At first glance it appeared that Elisha Perkins had invented an early version of the farming tractor – but by digging deeper we see that his invention was actually a quack medical device.

Related Articles:

ad for gift subscriptions to GenealogyBank

South Carolina Archives: 103 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

South Carolina, the 40th largest and 24th most populous of the United States, has a long history of independence. South Carolina was the first of the 13 British North American colonies to declare its independence from the British Crown (a prelude to the American Revolutionary War), the first state to ratify the Articles of Confederation, and the first state to secede from the Union (a prelude to the American Civil War).

photo of a historic home in “The Battery,” a neighborhood/park area in the downtown historic district of Charleston, South Carolina

Photo: a historic home in “The Battery,” a neighborhood/park area in the downtown historic district of Charleston, South Carolina. Credit: Evan Schmidt; Wikimedia Commons.

If you are researching your ancestry from South Carolina, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online SC newspaper archives: 103 titles to help you search your family history in “The Palmetto State,” providing coverage from 1735 to Today. There are more than 17 million articles and records in our online South Carolina archives!

Dig deep into our archives and search for historical and recent obituaries and other news articles about your South Carolina ancestors in these SC newspapers online. Our South Carolina newspapers are divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries (obituaries only).

Search South Carolina Newspaper Archives (1735 – 1970)

Search South Carolina Recent Obituaries (1987 – Current)

illustration of the state flag of South Carolina

Illustration: state flag of South Carolina. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Here is a list of online South Carolina newspapers in the archives. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more. The SC newspaper titles are listed alphabetically by city.

City Title Date Range* Collection
Aiken Aiken Standard 8/27/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Anderson Anderson Independent-Mail 1/15/1998 – Current Recent Obituaries
Beaufort Free South 1/10/1863 – 4/16/1864 Newspaper Archives
Beaufort Beaufort Today 1/25/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Beaufort Beaufort Gazette 1/10/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Belton Belton & Honea Path News-Chronicle 3/28/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bluffton Bluffton Today 7/1/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Camden Camden Gazette 4/4/1816 – 2/7/1822 Newspaper Archives
Camden Southern Chronicle 3/14/1822 – 8/13/1825 Newspaper Archives
Camden Camden Journal 4/4/1840 – 4/27/1842 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Charleston News and Courier 4/7/1873 – 12/31/1970 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Evening Post 10/1/1894 – 12/31/1923 Newspaper Archives
Charleston City Gazette 11/6/1787 – 4/13/1833 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Charleston Courier 1/10/1803 – 4/25/1872 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Southern Patriot 1/29/1831 – 12/30/1848 Newspaper Archives
Charleston South-Carolina State-Gazette 1/1/1794 – 9/20/1802 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Charleston Mercury 6/4/1831 – 11/14/1868 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Carolina Gazette 1/2/1800 – 12/31/1828 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Columbian Herald 11/23/1784 – 12/17/1796 Newspaper Archives
Charleston State Gazette of South-Carolina 3/28/1785 – 12/31/1793 Newspaper Archives
Charleston South-Carolina Gazette and General Advertiser 3/15/1783 – 7/26/1785 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Charleston Morning Post 1/18/1786 – 10/17/1787 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Charleston Evening Gazette 7/11/1785 – 10/18/1786 Newspaper Archives
Charleston South-Carolina Weekly Gazette 2/15/1783 – 1/14/1786 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Investigator 8/22/1812 – 2/9/1814 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Carolina Weekly Messenger 8/11/1807 – 11/7/1809 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Charleston Daily News 1/1/1873 – 4/5/1873 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Times 10/8/1800 – 5/25/1820 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Southern Evangelical Intelligencer 3/27/1819 – 12/29/1821 Newspaper Archives
Charleston South-Carolina Gazette 1/11/1735 – 12/29/1737 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Strength of the People 6/24/1809 – 9/6/1810 Newspaper Archives
Charleston South-Carolina and American General Gazette 3/11/1768 – 10/1/1778 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Oracle 1/1/1807 – 12/8/1807 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Evening Courier 7/31/1798 – 11/16/1798 Newspaper Archives
Charleston States Rights and Free Trade Evening Post 10/31/1831 – 2/9/1832 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Charleston Spectator 8/9/1806 – 12/5/1806 Newspaper Archives
Charleston South Carolina Leader 10/7/1865 – 5/12/1866 Newspaper Archives
Charleston South-Carolina Weekly Advertiser 2/19/1783 – 4/23/1783 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Daily Evening Gazette: and Charleston Tea-Table Companion 1/10/1795 – 2/18/1795 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Echo du Sud, Moniteur Francais 6/22/1801 – 7/15/1801 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Royal South Carolina Gazette 6/8/1780 – 7/16/1782 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Telegraphe: and Charleston Daily Advertiser 3/16/1795 – 3/20/1795 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Free Press 4/5/1868 – 4/11/1868 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Royal Gazette 2/9/1782 – 2/9/1782 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Afro-American Citizen 1/17/1900 – 1/17/1900 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Missionary Record 7/5/1873 – 7/5/1873 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Chronicle of Liberty, or the Republican Intelligencer 3/25/1783 – 3/25/1783 Newspaper Archives
Charleston Post and Courier 12/6/1994 – Current Recent Obituaries
Cheraw Cheraw Chronicle 8/23/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Chester Chester News & Reporter 11/24/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Clemson Tiger 4/14/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Columbia State 2/18/1891 – 12/31/1922 Newspaper Archives
Columbia South Carolina State Gazette 8/30/1799 – 6/20/1829 Newspaper Archives
Columbia Telescope 12/19/1815 – 7/8/1817 Newspaper Archives
Columbia Southern Indicator 2/12/1921 – 2/3/1923 Newspaper Archives
Columbia South Carolina Gazette 7/10/1792 – 9/3/1793 Newspaper Archives
Columbia Columbia Gazette 1/14/1794 – 12/9/1794 Newspaper Archives
Columbia Lighthouse and Informer 1/21/1950 – 1/21/1950 Newspaper Archives
Columbia People’s Recorder 1/13/1900 – 1/27/1900 Newspaper Archives
Columbia Carolina Panorama 1/7/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Columbia State 12/15/1987 – Current Recent Obituaries
Columbia Columbia Star 10/8/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Conway Horry Independent 4/5/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Easley Powdersville Post 4/30/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Easley Easley Progress 3/4/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Edgefield Anti-Monarchist, and South-Carolina Advertiser 9/9/1811 – 11/2/1811 Newspaper Archives
Edgefield Edgefield Advertiser 2/27/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Florence Morning News 11/1/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fort Mill Fort Mill Times 8/11/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Gaffney Gaffney Ledger 10/29/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Georgetown Winyaw Intelligencer 11/15/1817 – 6/27/1833 Newspaper Archives
Georgetown Georgetown Gazette 5/8/1798 – 10/13/1826 Newspaper Archives
Georgetown South-Carolina Independent Gazette 5/21/1791 – 9/15/1792 Newspaper Archives
Georgetown Georgetown Planet 5/31/1873 – 5/31/1873 Newspaper Archives
Georgetown Georgetown Times 8/8/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Greenwood Index-Journal 7/1/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Greer Greer Citizen 11/24/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hardeeville Hardeeville Today 3/19/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hartsville Messenger 4/20/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hemingway Weekly Observer 11/1/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hilton Head Island Packet 10/16/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lake City News & Post 11/5/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lake Wylie Lake Wylie Pilot 7/21/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lancaster Lancaster News 11/29/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lancaster Carolina Gateway 2/16/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Mullins Marion Star & Mullins Enterprise 11/2/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Murrells Inlet Waccamaw Times 5/30/2014 – Current Recent Obituaries
Myrtle Beach Sun News 5/1/1996 – Current Recent Obituaries
Newberry Newberry Observer 1/2/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Orangeburg Times and Democrat 5/30/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Pageland Pageland Progressive-Journal 1/18/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Pawleys Island Coastal Observer 11/11/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Pendleton Miller’s Weekly Messenger 3/20/1807 – 4/2/1841 Newspaper Archives
Pickens Pickens Sentinel 8/13/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Rock Hill Herald 5/1/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Seneca Journal 12/22/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Spartanburg Herald-Journal 1/4/1997 – Current Recent Obituaries
St. George Eagle-Record 12/25/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Union Union Daily Times 1/2/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Walterboro Dispatch 2/14/2007 – 11/10/2010 Recent Obituaries
Williamston Journal 10/31/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Winnsboro Herald Independent 4/25/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
York Enquirer-Herald 8/12/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries

*Date Ranges may have selected coverage unavailable.

You can either print or create a PDF version of this Blog post by simply clicking on the green “Print/PDF” button below. The PDF version makes it easy to save this post onto your desktop or portable device for quick reference—all the South Carolina newspaper links will be live.

Related Link:

ad for gift subscriptions to GenealogyBank

Sukey, I Never Knew You

This obituary caught my eye for several reasons.

obituaries, The Balance and Columbian Repository newspaper article 15 October 1801

The Balance and Columbian Repository (Hudson, New York), 15 October 1801, page 87

First is the header, with its poem and graphic.

“The Knell.”
Not “Deaths” or “Died” – which are very common headers for obituary notices even today – but instead “The Knell,” as in death knell.

Crisp. An excellent choice of words that immediately tells us this newspaper editor took time with the layout and content of each issue.

The poem also is on target to the newspaper’s audience.
It is mournful but upbeat.

Next is the illustration, centered toward the top of the article.
It evokes an image of the somber tone of the obituaries we are going to read in this newspaper article.

The tombstone, leaning to the side – the setting sun – the barren tree – all framed by the grass and the outline of the ground.

Striking.
Remember – this was published in 1801. What a memorable graphic.
This is a good example of the care that “Sampson, Chittenden and Croswell” – the newspaper’s publishers – took with this newspaper.

Enter Last Name

The other part of this obituary that caught my eye was the first death notice:

In this city, Mrs. Sukey Smith, wife of Mr. Matthew Smith, aged 35.

Sukey – that name sounds so familiar – but at the same time, I don’t think I’ve ever met a person named “Sukey.”

I wondered if it was an abbreviation.
No, according to the dictionary it is “a Hebrew baby name… [and means] Graceful Lily.” (Source: SheKnows.com)

Hebrew name? So I checked the Bible to see if there were any women named Sukey who were mentioned in the Bible. Nope – no one named Sukey is listed in the Bible.

A quick search of GenealogyBank showed that there are only 6 people with the name Sukey in the Social Security Death Index; there are over 150 marriages and nearly 400 obituaries involving a person named Sukey.

Maybe “Sukey” sounded familiar to me because of Sukey Tawdry from the lyrics of “Mack the Knife” by Bobby Darin.

Do you have a Sukey in your family tree?

Note: FamilySearch International (FamilySearch.org) and GenealogyBank are partnering to make over a billion records from recent and historical obituaries searchable online. The tremendous undertaking will make a billion records from over 100 million U.S. newspaper obituaries readily searchable online. The newspapers are from all 50 states and cover the period 1730 to the present.  Find out more at: http://www.genealogybank.com/family-search/

ad for gift subscriptions to GenealogyBank

My Ancestor’s Trip to America: Newspapers Tell the Story

I knew my ancestor William Kemp had come to America – but I didn’t know anything about the trip itself. What was it like for him as an immigrant traveling by passenger ship across the ocean to the new frontier?

Could GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives help me find the answer?

I knew that William came to America on board the ship Benjamin Adams, arriving 21 October 1853. He left from Liverpool, England, and arrived in New York City.

painting: “The Bay and Harbor of New York” by Samuel Waugh (1814-1885)

Painting: “The Bay and Harbor of New York” by Samuel Waugh (1814-1885). Source: Wikipedia.

Since I knew that shipping was big business, I wondered if newspapers could tell me more about the movements of the Benjamin Adams and William’s trip to America.

In testing my search I found that the name of the passenger ship appeared multiple ways in various newspaper articles – so I strategized that I needed to search every possible variation for any mention of the Benjamin Adams, from the spring to the fall of 1853, to make sure I didn’t miss any articles.

To find all of the articles I needed to search GenealogyBank’s archives using:

  • Benjamin Adams
  • Adams
  • Benj. Adams
  • Benj Adams
  • B. Adams
  • B Adams

This should give me all references to the passenger ship and William’s voyage to America.

Enter Last Name

Here’s what I found.

This Maine newspaper told me that by 23 August 1853, the passengers had boarded the Benjamin Adams and the ship was positioned “outward bound” in the Mersey River in Liverpool.

shipping news about the ship "Benjamin Adams," Portland Weekly Advertiser newspaper article 13 September 1853

Portland Weekly Advertiser (Portland, Maine), 13 September 1853, page 3

This Massachusetts newspaper gave me the critical fact that the ship sailed the next day – 24 August 1853. Wow – good to know.

shipping news about the ship "Benjamin Adams," Daily Atlas newspaper article 10 September 1853

Daily Atlas (Boston, Massachusetts), 10 September 1853, page 2

Next I looked for reports of the passenger ship arriving in America.

Here it is – this New York newspaper reported that the ship had docked in New York on 21 October 1853.

shipping news about the ship "Benjamin Adams," Weekly Herald newspaper article 22 October 1853

Weekly Herald (Albany, New York), 22 October 1853, page 344

The trip to New York took 56 days. There were 620 passengers – but here’s where the news turned more somber.

The old newspaper article reported:

Sept. 10, while laying to under a close reefed topsail in a heavy gale from the NW, lost all three topgallant masts, closed reefed mizzen topsail, foresail, mainsail, stern boat, and received other damage.

The ship was damaged in a fierce storm just 17 days after leaving Liverpool. The passengers must have been terrified – wondering if they were going to make it.

But there was more bad news:

Had 15 deaths on the passage.

Significant storm damage to the ship and 15 people died?
What?
Fifteen people died?
Wow. Was that normal on these trips? Why did so many die?

William was lucky to make it safely to America!

Enter Last Name

In a follow-up article a week later, the Weekly Herald explained why so many had died on the passage. These passengers just didn’t die of random causes – they died from an outbreak of cholera, which struck  many ships.

…it is pretty certain that the disease which carried them off was cholera. ….The sickness on the Benjamin Adams was decidedly cholera.

shipping news about the ship "Benjamin Adams," Weekly Herald newspaper article 29 October 1853

Weekly Herald (Albany, New York), 29 October 1853, page 350

This was a tough trip.

GenealogyBank’s newspapers continued to tell me more about William’s trip.

This New York newspaper mentioned that the ship Benjamin Adams had arrived “from Syria.”

shipping news about the ship "Benjamin Adams" and cholera, Albany Evening Journal newspaper article 22 October 1853

Albany Evening Journal (Albany, New York), 22 October 1853, page 2

From Syria?
I thought they left from Liverpool?

They did – but before arriving in Liverpool, the ship had been in Syria.

This Massachusetts newspaper told me that the Benjamin Adams had docked in Beirut, Syria, on 25 July 1853, before it went to Liverpool to pick up William Kemp and the other 619 passengers.

shipping news about the ship "Benjamin Adams," Daily Atlas newspaper article 1 September 1853

Daily Atlas (Boston, Massachusetts), 1 September 1853, page 2

The reason for the trip to the Holy Land was explained in this Massachusetts newspaper. The Benjamin Adams picked up artifacts there to display at the World’s Fair:  “an Arab plough and other agricultural implements for the World’s Fair…canes from the banks of the Jordan, branches from the Mount of Olives and cedars of Lebanon…” and apparently somewhere along the way it picked up cholera.

shipping news about the ship "Benjamin Adams," Springfield Republican newspaper article 25 October 1853

Springfield Republican (Springfield, Massachusetts), 25 October 1853, page 2

GenealogyBank doesn’t just give you the names, dates and places for your family tree – it gives you the stories of our ancestors’ lives.

You know when your ancestors arrived in America – dig in GenealogyBank and find out the rest of their stories.

Genealogy Tip: Search Wide Geo Areas

Did you notice a pattern with the newspaper articles in this blog post?

There were newspapers in Maine, New York, Massachusetts and beyond that reported on the Benjamin Adams. You want to search for this type of article and for the articles about your ancestors across all 8,000 of GenealogyBank’s newspapers. To find these articles, you cannot limit your search to only the newspapers of one or two states. If you limit your search geographically, you might miss an article critical to the telling of your ancestor’s story.

Related Articles:

ad for gift subscriptions to GenealogyBank

Wisconsin Archives: 105 Newspapers Online for Genealogy Research

Wisconsin, part of America’s Midwest, is bordered by two Great Lakes: Lake Superior on the north and Lake Michigan on the east. The nation’s 23rd largest state and 20th most populous, Wisconsin is known as “America’s Dairyland” because of all its dairy farms, milk production, and world-famous cheese.

photo of the Daniel E. Krause Stone Barn in Chase, Wisconsin, built in 1903

Photo: the Daniel E. Krause Stone Barn in Chase, Wisconsin, built in 1903. Credit: KKNiteOwl; Wikimedia Commons.

If you are researching your ancestry from Wisconsin, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online WI newspaper archives: 105 titles to help you search your family history in the “Badger State,” providing coverage from 1833 to Today. There are more than 7 million articles and records in our online Wisconsin archives!

Dig deep into our archives and search for historical and recent obituaries and other news articles about your Wisconsin ancestors in these WI newspapers online. Our Wisconsin newspapers are divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries (obituaries only).

Search Wisconsin Newspaper Archives (1833 – 1992)

Search Wisconsin Recent Obituaries (1989 – Current)

illustration of the state flag of Wisconsin

Illustration: state flag of Wisconsin. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Here is a list of online Wisconsin newspapers in the archives. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more. The WI newspaper titles are listed alphabetically by city.

City Title Date Range* Collection
Appleton Appleton Volksfreund 9/11/1919 – 11/16/1922 Newspaper Archives
Ashland Daily Press 1/2/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Baraboo Baraboo News-Republic 1/1/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bayside North Shore NOW 1/27/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Beaver Dam Daily Citizen 1/27/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Beloit Soul City Courier 10/12/1976 – 1/18/1977 Newspaper Archives
Beloit Beloit Daily News 7/26/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Brookfield Brookfield-Elm Grove NOW 1/14/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Cedarburg News Graphic 6/25/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Chippewa Falls Chippewa Herald 1/30/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Chippewa Falls Chippewa Herald, The: Blogs 6/21/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Columbus Columbus Journal 1/26/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Dousman Kettle Moraine Index 12/2/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fond du Lac Fond du Lac Weekly Commonwealth 3/24/1858 – 12/15/1858 Newspaper Archives
Fond du Lac Fond du Lac Trade Extension 2/13/1918 – 2/13/1918 Newspaper Archives
Fond du Lac Democratic Press 6/5/1858 – 12/15/1858 Newspaper Archives
Fond du Lac Daily Fond du Lac Press 7/23/1866 – 7/25/1866 Newspaper Archives
Fond du Lac Press 6/5/1858 – 7/25/1866 Newspaper Archives
Fort Atkinson Wisconsin Chief 10/15/1856 – 9/29/1866 Newspaper Archives
Fort Atkinson Daily Jefferson County Union 1/12/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fox Lake Fox Lake Representative 12/15/1911 – 12/20/1917 Newspaper Archives
Franklin Oak Creek-Franklin-Greendale NOW 2/11/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Galesville Galesville Independent 11/5/1874 – 8/30/1889 Newspaper Archives
Germantown Germantown-Menomonee Falls NOW 1/27/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Grafton Grafton Enterprise 7/27/1927 – 8/3/1927 Newspaper Archives
Gratiot Gratiot Reporter 6/13/1912 – 10/9/1913 Newspaper Archives
Green Bay Green-Bay Intelligencer and Wisconsin Democrat 12/11/1833 – 6/1/1836 Newspaper Archives
Green Bay Wisconsin Free Press 10/3/1835 – 3/30/1836 Newspaper Archives
Green Bay Sunday Advance 6/15/1884 – 7/6/1884 Newspaper Archives
Green Bay Green Bay Spectator 2/21/1852 – 9/28/1852 Newspaper Archives
Green Bay Wisconsin Republican 1/21/1845 – 2/8/1847 Newspaper Archives
Green Bay Phoenix 10/8/1841 – 10/8/1841 Newspaper Archives
Hartford Times Press 9/18/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hartland Living Lake Country: Blogs 1/10/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hartland Lake Country Reporter 1/27/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hartland Sussex Sun 11/17/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hayward Sawyer County Record 1/11/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
La Crosse La Crosse Volksfreund 1/3/1906 – 12/28/1907 Newspaper Archives
La Crosse Wisconsin Labor Advocate 8/20/1886 – 8/6/1887 Newspaper Archives
La Crosse Nord Stern 4/10/1908 – 4/10/1908 Newspaper Archives
La Crosse La Crosse Tribune 7/11/1989 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lancaster Grant County Herald 3/18/1843 – 12/5/1850 Newspaper Archives
Madison Wisconsin State Journal 3/10/1857 – 12/27/1889 Newspaper Archives
Madison Wisconsin Daily Patriot 9/10/1859 – 11/14/1864 Newspaper Archives
Madison Weekly Wisconsin Patriot 7/8/1854 – 10/22/1864 Newspaper Archives
Madison Daily Argus and Democrat 1/3/1854 – 7/21/1854 Newspaper Archives
Madison Wisconsin Democrat 10/18/1842 – 5/8/1852 Newspaper Archives
Madison Wisconsin Enquirer 11/8/1838 – 3/27/1841 Newspaper Archives
Madison Wisconsin Free Press 4/3/1984 – 1/12/1990 Newspaper Archives
Madison Wisconsin Populist 9/10/1892 – 11/8/1892 Newspaper Archives
Madison Wisconsin State Journal 3/3/1989 – Current Recent Obituaries
Madison Capital Times 3/20/1989 – Current Recent Obituaries
Mauston Juneau County Argus 7/26/1888 – 7/26/1889 Newspaper Archives
Mauston Juneau County Star-Times 1/22/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Menomonie Dunn County News 12/9/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Milwaukee Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel 11/11/1966 – 12/31/1968 Newspaper Archives
Milwaukee Milwaukee Sentinel 12/10/1844 – 12/30/1968 Newspaper Archives
Milwaukee Milwaukee Star 7/22/1967 – 2/10/1977 Newspaper Archives
Milwaukee Wahrheit 1/7/1893 – 6/25/1910 Newspaper Archives
Milwaukee Wisconsin Free Democrat 8/23/1848 – 11/28/1860 Newspaper Archives
Milwaukee Wisconsin Weekly Advocate 5/7/1898 – 9/19/1907 Newspaper Archives
Milwaukee Milwaukee Weekly Sentinel 6/27/1837 – 6/13/1866 Newspaper Archives
Milwaukee Milwaukee Advertiser 7/14/1836 – 3/20/1841 Newspaper Archives
Milwaukee Milwaukee Journal of Commerce 3/15/1871 – 12/22/1880 Newspaper Archives
Milwaukee Soul City Times 9/14/1968 – 12/16/1971 Newspaper Archives
Milwaukee Milwaukee Defender 1/3/1957 – 2/1/1958 Newspaper Archives
Milwaukee Milwaukee American 4/8/1857 – 10/28/1857 Newspaper Archives
Milwaukee Milwaukie Democrat 8/11/1843 – 2/23/1844 Newspaper Archives
Milwaukee Guardia 10/21/1969 – 8/1/1975 Newspaper Archives
Milwaukee Jugend-Post 1/1/1895 – 12/28/1895 Newspaper Archives
Milwaukee Wisconsin Afro-American 8/13/1892 – 11/19/1892 Newspaper Archives
Milwaukee Northwestern Recorder 12/3/1892 – 3/30/1893 Newspaper Archives
Milwaukee Milwaukiean 10/28/1844 – 11/4/1844 Newspaper Archives
Milwaukee Milwaukee’r Socialist 9/22/1876 – 9/21/1877 Newspaper Archives
Milwaukee Milwaukee Herold und Seebote 1/1/1901 – 1/1/1901 Newspaper Archives
Milwaukee Milwaukee Herold 1/1/1901 – 1/1/1921 Newspaper Archives
Milwaukee Wiskonsin Banner 9/14/1844 – 9/21/1844 Newspaper Archives
Milwaukee Milwaukee Journal Sentinel 1/22/1990 – Current Recent Obituaries
Milwaukee Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Blogs 7/20/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Monroe Jeffersonian Democrat 8/14/1856 – 3/26/1857 Newspaper Archives
Mukwonago Mukwonago Chief 5/19/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
New Lisbon Juneau County Argus 11/8/1858 – 12/6/1894 Newspaper Archives
Oconomowoc Oconomowoc Focus 2/3/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Oconomowoc Oconomowoc Enterprise 4/14/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Oneida Kalihwisaks 5/13/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Oshkosh Oshkosh True Democrat 2/9/1849 – 5/12/1857 Newspaper Archives
Park Falls Price County Review 6/6/2014 – Current Recent Obituaries
Phillips Phillips Bee 3/3/1999 – 6/3/2014 Recent Obituaries
Portage Daily Register 1/7/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Portage Wisconsin Dells Events 2/26/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Racine Weekly Racine Advocate 1/8/1851 – 4/25/1866 Newspaper Archives
Racine Racine Courier 10/16/1976 – 7/25/1992 Newspaper Archives
Reedsburg Reedsburg Times-Press 1/28/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Rice Lake Chronotype 1/4/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Ripon Ripon Commonwealth Press 1/27/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sauk City Sauk Prairie Eagle 5/18/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sheboygan Sheboygan Nieuwsbode 10/6/1849 – 11/7/1850 Newspaper Archives
Spooner Spooner Advocate 9/24/1998 – Current Recent Obituaries
Superior Superior Telegram 5/19/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Washburn County Journal 4/20/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Waukesha American Freeman 9/9/1845 – 12/29/1847 Newspaper Archives
Waukesha Waukesha NOW 2/3/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Waukesha Freeman 6/12/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Wauwatosa Wauwatosa NOW 9/9/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
West Bend Washington County Daily News 7/12/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries

*Date Ranges may have selected coverage unavailable.

You can either print or create a PDF version of this Blog post by simply clicking on the green “Print/PDF” button below. The PDF version makes it easy to save this post onto your desktop or portable device for quick reference—all the Wisconsin newspaper links will be live.

Related Links:

ad for gift subscriptions to GenealogyBank

20 May 1932: Amelia Earhart’s Solo Flight across the Atlantic

Amelia Earhart quote: "Everyone has oceans to fly, if they have the heart to do it."

Amelia Earhart, the pioneering female pilot, achieved enduring fame with the many aviation records she set during the 1920s and ’30s. Early in her career she achieved an impressive feat when she became the first woman to receive a pilot’s license from the distinguished National Aeronautic Association, on 16 May 1923. In 1928 she became the first woman to cross the Atlantic by plane when she flew as part of the crew (her duty was to keep the flight log) with Wilmer Stultz and Louis Gordon.

photo of Amelia Earhart, c. 1928

Photo: Amelia Earhart, c. 1928. Source: Los Angeles Daily News; Wikimedia Commons.

That successful airplane flight (and the fame it achieved—including a ticker-tape parade in New York City and a White House reception with President Calvin Coolidge) obviously whetted her appetite for aviation, and four years later Earhart made a bold attempt to fly across the Atlantic Ocean solo. This daring flight feat had only been accomplished once before, by Charles Lindbergh in 1927.

On 20 May 1932, the fifth anniversary of Lindberg’s famous flight, Earhart departed Newfoundland in her 600-horsepower Lockheed Vega to cross the vast ocean with 420 gallons of gasoline and a quart of chicken soup. Her goal destination was Paris, but after 14 hours and 56 minutes of fighting strong winds and some slight mechanical problems, she settled for landing her plane in Northern Ireland. She had done it—the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic! For this 15-hour feat of endurance and pluck she became the first woman to receive the Distinguished Flying Cross, and the flight cemented her fame.

Enter Last Name

Earhart’s departure for her historic cross-Atlantic flight 1n 1932 was reported on the front page of this Georgia newspaper.

article about Amelia Earhart flying solo across the Atlantic, Augusta Chronicle newspaper article 21 May 1932

Augusta Chronicle (Augusta, Georgia), 21 May 1932, page 1

This old newspaper article reported:

Harbor Grace, N.F., May 20 (AP)—Amelia Earhart Putnam, smiling and confident, took off from Harbor Grace tonight in her crimson, gold-striped plane, with Paris her destination.

Five years to the day after Col. Charles A. Lindbergh sped out from New York on the first solo flight to Europe, Mrs. Putnam took off at 4:51 p.m., eastern standard time, determined to be the first woman to fly over the Atlantic alone.

A message of confidence for her friends was left by Mrs. Putnam as she stepped, cool and composed, into the cockpit of her plane.

“To all my friends, far and near, you will hear from me in 15 hours,” she said. “I have sufficient fuel for 20 hours and I will go further if my gas holds out and I find I am not too fatigued.”

Weather Favorable

Her decision to start today came suddenly, influenced by favorable weather reports. Arriving here from St. John, N.B., at 11:31 a.m., eastern standard time, she previously had retired, announcing she hoped to leave early tomorrow.

The plane was warming up as she arrived at the airport. Bernt Balchen, famed flier and explorer, and Eddie Gorski, mechanic, who accompanied her from St. John, were working on it.

She was laughing excitedly as Balchen and Gorski made a rapid but thorough inspection of the craft, [but then] her attitude changed to that of grave silence.

Satisfied that the ship was fit, Balchen and Gorski joined Mrs. Putnam for a final conference before the takeoff. She gave them each a hearty handshake, said “I am confident of success,” and stepped into the plane.

Paris Is Goal

She made a perfect takeoff. Paris was her goal.

Her destination was not announced until just before the start. No reason was given for its choice.

Her plane is a 600-horsepower Wasp motored craft with a cruising speed of 140 miles an hour, a maximum speed of 180 and a cruising radius of 3,200 miles. It carried a fuel supply of 420 gallons of gasoline and 20 gallons of oil, sufficient, she was confident, to keep her aloft for fully 20 hours.

For herself, she carried a quart of chicken soup and nothing more.

A light southwest wind was blowing and the sky was cloudy as Mrs. Putnam sped eastward toward her goal, but she had the cheering promise of clear skies and friendly winds along the way.

New York, May 20 (AP)—George Palmer Putnam, husband of Amelia Earhart, tonight expressed complete confidence his wife would successfully complete her solo flight across to Paris.

Reached a few minutes after the hop-off at the United States weather bureau, where he remained much of the day checking weather reports, Putnam said briefly: “I have complete confidence in her. What else can I say?”

Ruth Nichols, society aviatrix who had hoped to be the first woman to cross the Atlantic by air, also expressed confidence Miss Earhart would reach her goal.

Related Articles & Link:

ad for gift subscriptions to GenealaogyBank

Full List of Mayflower Passengers in Gov. Bradford’s Newly-Restored Journal

Governor William Bradford’s (ca. 1590-1657) handwritten Of Plymouth Plantation is well known to genealogists as the earliest journal history of the Mayflower passengers, their voyage across the Atlantic, and the settlement in Plymouth Plantation.

According to the Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC), the Bradford Manuscript contains 580 pages, is hand sewn, “and bound in a parchment-covered binding.” It is housed in the State Library of Massachusetts.

photo of the Bradford Manuscript being restored by the Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC)

Photo: the Bradford Manuscript. Source: Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC).

Click here to read the State Library’s guide to the Bradford Manuscript.

Enter Last Name

The Northeast Document Conservation Center took on the task of conserving, repairing and restoring this historic manuscript. The NEDCC has now put a detailed article about the conservation process for this important document online.

Click here to read the NEDCC’s account of their work on the Bradford Manuscript.

screenshot of a page from the Northeast Document Conservation Center website describing the restoration of the Bradford Manuscript

Source: Northeast Document Conservation Center

The conservation work was done to prevent further deterioration of the historical journal, and to make it more accessible to the public by the creation of two facsimile volumes.

A digitized version of the Bradford Manuscript is available online.

Of special interest to genealogists, the Bradford Manuscript contains a multipage list of the passengers on the Mayflower.

photo of a page from the Bradford Manuscript showing the list of Mayflower passengers

Photo: Bradford Manuscript page showing the list of Mayflower passengers. Source: State Library of Massachusetts.

Having this invaluable historical Mayflower resource protected – and having a digital copy of the manuscript online – is a great benefit to genealogists.

Related Mayflower Articles & a Link:

ad for gift subscriptions to GenealogyBank