Utah Archives: 25 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

Although Utah is the 13th largest state in the nation, it is the 10th least-densely populated. The state capital, Salt Lake City, is also the world headquarters of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The LDS Church operates the nonprofit genealogy organization FamilySearch.org – which makes Salt Lake City one of the leading centers in the world for family history research, including the world famous Family History Library (open to the public free of charge).

photo of Zion Canyon at sunset, Zion National Park, Utah

Photo: Zion Canyon at sunset, Zion National Park, Utah. Credit: Diliff; Wikimedia Commons.

If you are researching your family roots in Utah, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online UT newspaper archives: 25 titles to help you search your family history in the “Beehive State,” providing news coverage, family stories and vital statistics from 1851 to Today. There are currently more than 2.5 million newspaper articles and records in our online Utah archives!

Dig deep into our archives and search for historical and recent obituaries and other news articles about your Utah ancestors in these recent and historical UT newspapers online. Our Utah newspapers are divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries (obituaries only).

Search Utah Newspaper Archives (1851 – 1945)

Search Utah Recent Obituaries (1988 – Current)

photo of a state welcome sign in Utah

Photo: Utah state welcome sign. Credit: Wikimedia Commons; Bernard Gagnon, 8 March 2009

Here is a list of online Utah newspapers in the archives. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more. The UT newspaper titles are listed alphabetically by city.

City Title Date Range* Collection
Bountiful Davis County Clipper 3/9/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Castle Dale Emery County Progress 11/27/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Logan Herald Journal 3/1/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Ogden Hilltop Times: Hill Air Force Base 10/18/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Ogden Standard-Examiner 5/22/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Park City Park Record 9/10/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Price Sun Advocate 8/2/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Provo Daily Herald 2/27/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Richfield Richfield Reaper 8/18/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Roosevelt Uintah Basin Standard 7/24/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Salt Lake City Salt Lake Telegram 1/30/1902 – 12/31/1922 Newspaper Archives
Salt Lake City Salt Lake Tribune 1/9/1875 – 12/28/1893 Newspaper Archives
Salt Lake City Deseret News 1/11/1851 – 12/29/1886 Newspaper Archives
Salt Lake City Salt Lake Daily Telegraph 1/12/1866 – 7/3/1868 Newspaper Archives
Salt Lake City Broad Ax 8/31/1895 – 6/6/1899 Newspaper Archives
Salt Lake City Deseret Evening News 7/6/1868 – 9/19/1921 Newspaper Archives
Salt Lake City Inter-Mountain Advocate 12/14/1894 – 4/30/1897 Newspaper Archives
Salt Lake City Telegraph 10/9/1865 – 10/4/1866 Newspaper Archives
Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Beobachter 4/6/1930 – 4/6/1930 Newspaper Archives
Salt Lake City Intermountain Catholic 10/5/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Salt Lake City Deseret News 4/7/1988 – Current Recent Obituaries
Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Weekly 6/11/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Salt Lake City Salt Lake Tribune 9/26/1990 – Current Recent Obituaries
Topaz Topaz Times 9/17/1942 – 8/31/1945 Newspaper Archives
Vernal Vernal Express 5/19/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries

*Date Ranges may have selected coverage unavailable.

You can either print or create a PDF version of this Blog post by simply clicking on the green “Print/PDF” button below. The PDF version makes it easy to save this post onto your desktop or portable device for quick reference—all the Utah newspaper links will be live.

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American Family Migrations & the U.S. Interstate Highway System

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this blog article, Gena explains that understanding transportation is an important part of getting to know our ancestors’ world – and focuses on the development of the Interstate Highway System.

Migration is something we must consider as we trace our ancestors’ lives. Our ancestors were mobile – maybe not nearly as much as we are today, but they traveled across seas, and then often went further inland to set up their new homes. Knowing where and how they arrived is important to finding genealogical documents and records. How they migrated is determined by the time period and modes of travel then available. As time and technology marched on, our ancestors’ opportunities to travel and move about increased.

photo of Interstate Highway 295 in New Jersey

Photo: Interstate Highway 295 in New Jersey. Credit: Famartin; Wikimedia Commons.

Just as we do now, future genealogists will also have to consider what their ancestors had available to them as they traveled. Although the first aircraft took off in the early 1900s, commercial flight didn’t become affordable and largely available until after World War II – just one of numerous considerations in looking at how 20th century ancestors migrated.

Along with airplanes, another mode of transportation we take for granted is the automobile. While motorized vehicles have been with us since the 1800s, it wasn’t until well after World War II that America became more accessible through the building of the U.S. interstate highway system. This mobility allowed families to migrate easier. The highway system also made it possible for people to travel great distances simply for pleasure, or to visit extended family members. This transportation milestone is an important part of the social history we can document in telling the story of our more recent family.

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President Eisenhower and the Building of the Interstate Highway System

While President Dwight D. Eisenhower is the man behind the building of the interstate highways, the bill making the national highway system possible was passed in 1944 under the Roosevelt administration. Unfortunately, the legislation did not specify a way to begin building it.

As the Federal Highway Administration’s website explains:

“After taking office in January 1953, President Eisenhower made revitalizing the Nation’s highways one of the goals of his first term. As an army Lieutenant Colonel in 1919, Eisenhower had accompanied a military convoy across the United States and saw the poor condition of our Nation’s roads. Later, during his World War II stint as Commander of the Allied Forces, his admiration for Germany’s well-engineered Autobahn highway network reinforced his belief that the United States needed first-class roads.” *

The 1962 newspaper article below, complete with a map showing the 41,000 miles of highways, declares enthusiastically:

…when completed in 1972, will connect all the states and link 90 per cent of the cities of 50,000 or more population…When the system is complete, it will be possible to drive from one end of the country coast to coast and border to border, without a slowdown, and without encountering a traffic light or stop sign.

Features of the highway that we take for granted are heralded in this article and include: “control of access” prescribed on and off ramps; “grade separations” or overpasses and underpasses; medians; and paved shoulders. All of these safety features were meant to allow a smooth flow of traffic and lessen possible accidents.

map of the U.S. Interstate Highway System, Dallas Morning News newspaper article 18 May 1962

Dallas Morning News (Dallas, Texas), 18 May 1962, section 5, page 1

National Defense a Key Consideration

While many of us consider the interstate highways a tool to get us to where we are going, the highway system wasn’t only built with the general public in mind. In the shadow of the Cold War and the belief in an imminent nuclear attack, the highways could also move military vehicles and troops across the nation easily. This 1962 article points out that the highways were built as a part of national defense.

article about the U.S. Interstate Highway System, Dallas Morning News newspaper article 18 May 1962

Dallas Morning News (Dallas, Texas), 18 May 1962, section 5, page 2

Interstate Highway System Named in Honor of President Eisenhower

Shortly after Eisenhower died, it was proposed by Rep. Glenn Cunningham (R-Neb) that the interstate system be named after him and referred to as the “Eisenhower Interstate Highway System” rather than the “National System of Interstate and Defense Highways” as it was originally known. This honor acknowledged the important role that President Eisenhower had in the creation of this most important highway system that is still vital to most of our lives today.

article about naming the U.S. Interstate Highway System in honor of President Eisenhower, Omaha World Herald newspaper article 8 May 1969

Omaha World Herald (Omaha, Nebraska), 8 May 1969, page 8

To learn more about the Interstate Highway System, see the website at http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/interstate/homepage.cfm.

How did the building of the interstate impact your family?

———————-

* Why is President Dwight D. Eisenhower called the “Father of the Interstate System”? – Frequently Asked Questions – Eisenhower Interstate Highway System website: https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/interstate/faq.htm#question2

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7 Tips on How to Find Elusive Ancestors in Newspapers

Introduction: Mary Harrell-Sesniak is a genealogist, author and editor with a strong technology background. In this blog article, Mary provides seven practical tips for searching hard-to-find ancestors in old newspapers.

While reading my mother’s Book of Ancestors recently I noticed she had little to say about one of our ancestors, because that person had kept himself out of the public records.

Forebears who didn’t hold public office, own property, or were married in churches or synagogues with lost or private records, are difficult to document. These elusive ancestors can also be difficult to find in historical newspapers, but sometimes they can be found in creative ways. This article gives seven search tips to help find those tricky ancestors in old newspapers.

illustration of Sherlock Holmes with a magnifying glass

1) Pay Attention to “Please Copy” Notices

When something noteworthy occurs such as a birth or death, news is first printed locally.

If that person has ties to other areas, then other newspapers may carry the story. Newspapers may do this either on their own accord, or at the request of the original publisher. What you want to watch out for is a “please copy” notice, which can be a valuable clue that your ancestor had ties to another part of the country where you might find additional articles or records about him or her.

In the newspaper article below from New Orleans, Louisiana, we see many examples of “please copy” notices.

  • Jesse Sands, formerly of Pittsburg, and his wife Jessie M. Olmsted, passed away within two days of each other. The end of their death notice says: “Newburg, N.Y. and Pittsburg, Pa. papers please copy.” So for these two ancestors, you want to include New Orleans, Newburg and Pittsburgh in your searches.
  • J. West Murphy died in Louisiana, but was described as “late of Philadelphia.” The end of his death notice says: “Philadelphia papers please copy.”
  • The end of Virginia B. Harrison’s death notice says: “Philadelphia and Cincinnati papers please copy.”
  • The end of John Gunderman’s death notice says: “St. Louis papers please copy.”

Because these death notices were originally published in a New Orleans newspaper, you want to search that area for more news about your ancestor. But thanks to these “please copy” notices, you are given additional locations for further searching.

death notices, Times-Picayune newspaper article 23 August 1853

Times-Picayune (New Orleans, Louisiana), 23 August 1853, page 2

2) Know Your Resource: Understanding the Differences between Small Town & Metropolitan Newspapers

Depending upon the population of a town or city, news will vary. Reasons include:

  • Unless a person was well known, there may be inadequate space to present long articles in newspapers from areas of high population.
  • In smaller towns this is not the same issue, so there is a tendency toward longer descriptions of events such as weddings and arrests.
  • In smaller towns, you may also see more “gossipy” news.
  • If a lengthy feature was carried in a hometown paper, another may feel it only deserves minimal coverage, or the opposite may be true. Minimal coverage in one newspaper may result in extended details in another.
  • Some publishers may wish to sensationalize or downplay news. Once while researching a hometown newspaper, I found that a neighboring town paper was happy to publish the lurid details of a person’s arrest. It was not published in his hometown newspaper, perhaps to protect the family.
Enter Last Name

3) Name Variations

People are usually known by a variety of monikers, both formal and informal. Keep in mind that this is the rule, rather than the exception, so don’t ever limit searches to just one version of a name. Include titles, nicknames, initials, middle names without first names, and other variations. For example:

  • John Jacob Jingleheimer Smith
  • J. J. Smith or J. J. J. Smith
  • Jacob or Jingleheimer Smith
  • Mr. Smith or simply Smith
  • Thomas Edison or Mr. Edison
  • The Wizard of Menlo Park
  • Mary Stillwell
  • Dot Stillwell (her childhood nickname)
  • Thomas Edison’s first wife
  • Mrs. Edison
  • Mina Edison or Mina Miller
  • Thomas Edison’s second wife

4) Spelling Variations and Name Changes – Consider Using a Wildcard

One of the most vexing issues occurs with spelling variations, which occur all too often.

An example can be noted with my husband’s birth surname of Szczesniak. Since others were prone to misspelling it, the family had it legally shortened to Sesniak. Unfortunately, that didn’t work as typos are frequent. One of the most common is to change the ending to “ck,” rather than “ak.”

Name changes can be informal. A woman I know was named Jane. It’s a fine name, but prone to various putdowns, including “plain Jane.” Rather than be labeled with this throughout her life, she elected to change the spelling to Jayne.

We see similar variations in the given name of Mary. I use the traditional spelling, but there are many variations including:

  • Mamie, Maria, Mariah, Marie, May, Meg, Merry, Merrie, Moll, Mollie, Molly, Pollie, Polly, etc.

If you wish to search newspapers and databases for similar spellings, sometimes a wildcard will work.

There are two types: an asterisk “*” which searches for any number of characters in a name; or a question mark “?” which replaces just one letter. For example:

  • Merr* would query the database for any name beginning with Merr, such as Merry or Merrie, followed by any combination of letters. If a woman were named Merriweather, it would also find it.
  • Sebasti?n would return both Sebastian or Sebastien.

Also see prior articles on ancestor name research tips for tips on searching for first names, surnames, name spelling variations and more.

5) Overcoming Language Barriers in Foreign-Language Newspapers

Many online collections of newspapers, such as GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives, contain foreign-language newspapers. GenealogyBank, for example, has some newspapers in French, German, Italian and Spanish.

What do you do if you find your ancestor’s name in a foreign-language newspaper, but are not sure what the article is saying about him or her?

There are a number of free online translators available, where you can type in the text from the foreign-language newspaper and receive an English translation.

For example, what if you found this article about your ancestor Georg Clifforeye?

Heiratete seine Grossmutter.

CALAIS, Me., 28 Oktober. Der 18 Jahre alte Georg Clifforeye heiratete seine Grossmutter Rebecca Louise Garnett von St. Stephen N.B., Canada, und begab sich dann mit ihr nach seiner Wohnung, aber kaum war er dort angelangt, erschien Rev. Gaucher, der has liebende Paar getraut hatte und verlangte den Trauschein, wobei er ihm die $10 Traugebühren retournierte und die Heirat für illegal erklärte, wegen der…

By plugging this text into Google Translate or Bing Translator, we uncover a startling story about the young man attempting to marry his grandmother!

wedding announcement, New Yorker Volkszeitung newspaper article 29 October 1922

New Yorker Volkszeitung (New York, New York), 29 October 1922, page 2

6) Social Notices Provide Many Clues

Many newspapers carried social notices, such as the below example from the Dallas Morning News, reporting the comings and goings of many friends and relatives.

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These social columns in newspapers provide wonderful research clues to track your ancestor’s activities as well as personal relationships.

social column, Dallas Morning News newspaper article 18 June 1904

Dallas Morning News (Dallas, Texas), 18 June 1904, page 10

7) Broaden Your Searches

Lastly, if you are in the habit of narrowing ancestor searches with specific dates, get in the habit of broadening the ranges.

Marriage details can extend for months, if not years. Look for engagement notices, bridal showers, banns notices, wedding descriptions, honeymoon reports and even “the happy couple has returned” articles.

Death reporting can also extend over long time periods. Right after passing, you’ll find death notices and obituaries, but some may be published long afterward. I’ve seen an obituary as long as one year after someone died. Also watch for legal notices pertaining to probate, which can occur many years after your ancestor died.

Don’t forget to think outside the box. Some reports are made in error. Even with their mistakes, they can contain valuable personal information. One of my favorite examples was addressed in my article The Lessons of Daniel Boone’s Obituary: Check and Double Check.

I hope these seven search tips will help you break through some brick walls and find those elusive ancestors who didn’t leave many records behind – but may well be found in the pages of old newspapers. Good luck with your family history research!

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Easter Sunrise Services: A Brief History

Easter sunrise services have been held for centuries. According to Wikipedia, the earliest recorded sunrise service was held in 1732 in Germany.

Easter sunrise services – often coupled with an early morning breakfast – have also been an American tradition since the 1700s. The Moravian Church Easter sunrise service, held annually since 1772 in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, has grown to be one of the largest Easter services held in the country.

article about Easter sunrise service, Winston-Salem Journal newspaper article 16 April 1911

Winston-Salem Journal (Winston Salem, North Carolina), 16 April 1911, page 1

In 1937, more than 35,000 braved the cold weather to attend the Easter sunrise service near Lawton, Oklahoma.

article about Easter sunrise service, Brownsville Herald newspaper article 1 April 1937

Brownsville Herald (Brownsville, Texas), 1 April 1937, page 10

Like Christmas Eve services that are often held at midnight in churches across the country on December 24th, church congregations have gathered for Easter sunrise services before dawn on Easter morning – often at beaches, parks, atop hills and even in cemeteries.

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The congregation is often positioned so that they are facing the east and will see the sun rising during the service. It is customary to erect a cross at the service, like this 2007 Easter sunrise service held by Littlefield Memorial Baptist Church in Rockland, Maine.

photo of a 2007 Easter sunrise service, Rockland, Maine

Photo: 2007 Easter sunrise service, Rockland, Maine. Credit: Jp498 at English Wikipedia; Wikimedia Commons.

GenealogyBank wishes you and yours a very happy Easter.

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Newspaper Sewing & Crafting Patterns and Our Crafty Ancestors

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this blog article, Gena searches old newspapers to find the quilt, clothing, craft and other patterns newspapers offered our ancestors for home projects.

We often think of the newspaper as a place to get news. But the newspaper offered so much more to the community it served. Newspapers were an important avenue of entertainment for generations of our families, and appealing to an entire family of readers helped ensure the ongoing success of the newspaper. In some cases the newspaper sold or gave away products, and provided readers a reason to keep the newspaper long after the news stories were old and dated.

Previously on the GenealogyBank Blog, I’ve written articles about the recipes and cookbooks printed by newspapers. Another way the newspaper appealed to women readers and subscribers was by offering sewing and crafting patterns. Patterns were provided for free, printed right in the newspaper, or offered for a minimal cost through mail-order.

Sewing Patterns Used for Newspaper Marketing

There’s no doubt that offering sewing patterns appealed to our women ancestors. The advertisement below from a 1914 newspaper is meant to flatter female readers – and the over-exaggeration of its text demonstrates that print advertising hasn’t changed much over the years. This newspaper advertisement proclaims:

Our announcement of the Big Gift to Women Readers has already made a stir. Trust the women in any community to recognize a real opportunity. They know that Embroidery Transfer Patterns cost at least ten cents each and every woman knows that a chance to secure 165 of the latest and most select patterns practically for nothing is a real opportunity. To have at hand this wonderful and complete outfit of embroidery patterns will contribute much to the happiness in the home.

embroidery patterns, Macon Telegraph newspaper article 24 April 1914

Macon Telegraph (Macon, Georgia), 24 April 1914, page 12

At the bottom of the ad, under the heading “How to Secure Your Gifts,” instructions are given making it clear why this embroidery pattern give-away was such a clever promotion for the Macon Telegraph newspaper:

Bring to this office six of the Ideal Art Pattern Coupons. (One coupon is printed each day on another page of this paper.) You must bring six of different dates (they need not be consecutive) together with the small expense items amounting to 68 cents. The 68 cents is merely to cover cost of packing and shipping the package.

That’s just one example of sewing patterns provided by newspapers to their readers. Other examples include everything from needle arts and quilting, to clothing and crafts. While pattern companies advertised their latest offerings in newspapers, newspapers themselves also offered patterns for sale.

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Bible History Quilt

One type of pattern offered by newspapers was for quilt blocks. A quilt containing numerous blocks ensured that readers would want to purchase subsequent newspapers to get each pattern. And if a reader missed a week? She could then order that quilting block pattern from the newspaper for a small fee – in the case of the pattern below, 10 cents each. The following example is the Bible History Quilt, a design by prolific quilt pattern designer Ruby McKim which included 24 blocks, each one published by the newspaper on consecutive Sundays.

This news article shows a crude drawing of what the finished Bible quilt would look like, and includes some general directions about how to transfer the pattern to blocks of fabric.

quilt block patterns for the Bible History Quilt, Plain Dealer newspaper article 9 October 1927

Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 9 October 1927, page 61

Block 1 of this quilt, with its scroll design and the words “God, Heavens, Earth, Air, Water, Life,” symbolized the creation story in the book of Genesis. Each Sunday a new block was introduced that symbolized a well-known Bible story and characters.

quilt block pattern for the Bible History Quilt, Idaho Statesman newspaper article 16 October 1927

Idaho Statesman (Boise, Idaho), 16 October 1927, page 19

Here’s a picture of a Bible History Quilt showing the first block.

photo of a quilt block from the Bible History Quilt

Photo: quilt block from the author’s collection. Credit: Gena Philibert-Ortega.

Audubon Bird Quilt

Another example of a quilt block series is the Audubon Bird Quilt. Here is block #10 from that series.

quilt block pattern for the Audubon Bird Quilt showing an oriole, Plain Dealer newspaper article 9 December 1928

Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 9 December 1928, page 58

Clothing Patterns

Patterns for crafts and the decorative arts were plentiful in the newspaper, but they didn’t represent the only kind of pattern available. Practical clothing patterns for your family could be ordered from the newspaper as well. These patterns differ from the quilt patterns mentioned above (which were actually printed in the newspaper and didn’t have to be ordered). The clothing patterns were advertised in the newspaper for purchase, and then mailed to the reader.

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This sewing pattern, advertised under the heading “Today’s Pattern,” is for overalls and a playsuit.

sewing patterns for overalls and a playsuit, Macon Telegraph newspaper article 10 February 1944

Macon Telegraph (Macon Georgia), 10 February 1944, page 16

In some cases multiple clothing patterns can be found together, like this example from 1946 that has a slim-looking “smart-house frock” to sew and mittens to knit, tucked in between articles and the comics section.

sewing patterns for a dress and mittens, Idaho Statesman newspaper article 31 October 1946

Idaho Statesman (Boise, Idaho), 31 October 1946, page 16

While the quilt patterns shown above were offered for free, most newspaper patterns were for sale and as such they read like an advertisement. Newspapers did what they could to market these patterns for sale to their readers. Good examples of their marketing prowess are this World War II-era summer dress pattern and a “colorful new Pattern Book” for 10 cents that is touted with this advertising copy:

It’s filled with simple, fabric-saving designs for active service, for ‘on leave’ glamor, for the home front.

dress pattern, Morning Olympian newspaper article 2 June 1942

Morning Olympian (Olympia, Washington), 2 June 1942, page 2

Home Décor, Memorials & More

Newspaper patterns weren’t just limited to sewing or needlework. Craft patterns were also offered, which differed depending on the time of the year and what was happening in the world. During World War II, for example, these patriotic figures for outdoor memorials and lawn decorations were advertised for the “home craftsmen.”

craft patterns, Oregonian newspaper article 16 May 1943

Oregonian (Portland, Oregon), 16 May 1943, page 111

Did your ancestors purchase patterns from the newspaper? Do you have a family heirloom that was made from one of those patterns? Share your stories with us in the comments below.

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Bloody News: Battles of Lexington & Concord Begin April 1775

Stirring front page news – as gripping as a breaking news bulletin on television today

Bloody News – This town has been in a continual alarm since Mid-day… the attack began at Lexington (about 12 miles from Boston) by the regular troops, the 18th Inft., before sunrise… From thence they proceeded to Concord where they made a general attack…

article about the Battles of Lexington and Concord, New Hampshire Gazette and Historical Chronicle newspaper article 21 April 1775

New Hampshire Gazette and Historical Chronicle (Portsmouth, New Hampshire), 21 April 1775, page 1

The British had attacked: the Battles of Lexington and Concord began the fighting between Great Britain and its 13 American colonies that led to the Revolutionary War and the founding of a new nation.

article about the Battles of Lexington and Concord, New Hampshire Gazette and Historical Chronicle newspaper article 21 April 1775

New Hampshire Gazette and Historical Chronicle (Portsmouth, New Hampshire), 21 April 1775, page 1

The reports continued to be published in Colonial newspapers up and down the coast. The newspapers printed them all – and the New Hampshire Gazette and Historical Chronicle added: “The foregoing is the different accounts we have receiv’d, but how far and what part is authentic, presume not to determine.”

This reads like any breaking news story today – when the reporters read every detail as the “raw news” comes in over the satellite feeds.

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The British had attacked and the committees of safety from colony to colony were responding and getting the word out – through the newspapers – that it was time to act.

Thanks to GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives we can read the same newspapers our American colonial ancestors read and feel the impact of the news as they lived it. No other site has the depth of coverage found on GenealogyBank – spanning the news from 1690 to today.

Illustration: “The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere"

Illustration: “The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere.” Credit: National Archives’ Pictures of the Revolutionary War — Beginnings in New England, 1775-76; Wikimedia Commons.

In his long-famous poem, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow wrote of that day:

The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere
by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Listen my children and you shall hear
Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere,
On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-five;
Hardly a man is now alive
Who remembers that famous day and year.

He said to his friend, “If the British march
By land or sea from the town to-night,
Hang a lantern aloft in the belfry arch
Of the North Church tower as a signal light,
One if by land, and two if by sea;
And I on the opposite shore will be,
Ready to ride and spread the alarm
Through every Middlesex village and farm,
For the country folk to be up and to arm.”

Then he said “Good-night!” and with muffled oar
Silently rowed to the Charlestown shore,
Just as the moon rose over the bay,
Where swinging wide at her moorings lay
The Somerset, British man-of-war;
A phantom ship, with each mast and spar
Across the moon like a prison bar,
And a huge black hulk, that was magnified
By its own reflection in the tide.

Meanwhile, his friend through alley and street
Wanders and watches, with eager ears,
Till in the silence around him he hears
The muster of men at the barrack door,
The sound of arms, and the tramp of feet,
And the measured tread of the grenadiers,
Marching down to their boats on the shore.

Then he climbed the tower of the Old North Church,
By the wooden stairs, with stealthy tread,
To the belfry chamber overhead,
And startled the pigeons from their perch
On the sombre rafters, that round him made
Masses and moving shapes of shade,–
By the trembling ladder, steep and tall,
To the highest window in the wall,
Where he paused to listen and look down
A moment on the roofs of the town
And the moonlight flowing over all.

Beneath, in the churchyard, lay the dead,
In their night encampment on the hill,
Wrapped in silence so deep and still
That he could hear, like a sentinel’s tread,
The watchful night-wind, as it went
Creeping along from tent to tent,
And seeming to whisper, “All is well!”
A moment only he feels the spell
Of the place and the hour, and the secret dread
Of the lonely belfry and the dead;
For suddenly all his thoughts are bent
On a shadowy something far away,
Where the river widens to meet the bay,–
A line of black that bends and floats
On the rising tide like a bridge of boats.

Meanwhile, impatient to mount and ride,
Booted and spurred, with a heavy stride
On the opposite shore walked Paul Revere.
Now he patted his horse’s side,
Now he gazed at the landscape far and near,
Then, impetuous, stamped the earth,
And turned and tightened his saddle girth;
But mostly he watched with eager search
The belfry tower of the Old North Church,
As it rose above the graves on the hill,
Lonely and spectral and sombre and still.
And lo! as he looks, on the belfry’s height
A glimmer, and then a gleam of light!
He springs to the saddle, the bridle he turns,
But lingers and gazes, till full on his sight
A second lamp in the belfry burns.

A hurry of hoofs in a village street,
A shape in the moonlight, a bulk in the dark,
And beneath, from the pebbles, in passing, a spark
Struck out by a steed flying fearless and fleet;
That was all! And yet, through the gloom and the light,
The fate of a nation was riding that night;
And the spark struck out by that steed, in his flight,
Kindled the land into flame with its heat.
He has left the village and mounted the steep,
And beneath him, tranquil and broad and deep,
Is the Mystic, meeting the ocean tides;
And under the alders that skirt its edge,
Now soft on the sand, now loud on the ledge,
Is heard the tramp of his steed as he rides.

It was twelve by the village clock
When he crossed the bridge into Medford town.
He heard the crowing of the cock,
And the barking of the farmer’s dog,
And felt the damp of the river fog,
That rises after the sun goes down.

It was one by the village clock,
When he galloped into Lexington.
He saw the gilded weathercock
Swim in the moonlight as he passed,
And the meeting-house windows, black and bare,
Gaze at him with a spectral glare,
As if they already stood aghast
At the bloody work they would look upon.

It was two by the village clock,
When he came to the bridge in Concord town.
He heard the bleating of the flock,
And the twitter of birds among the trees,
And felt the breath of the morning breeze
Blowing over the meadow brown.
And one was safe and asleep in his bed
Who at the bridge would be first to fall,
Who that day would be lying dead,
Pierced by a British musket ball.

You know the rest. In the books you have read
How the British Regulars fired and fled,
How the farmers gave them ball for ball,
From behind each fence and farmyard wall,
Chasing the redcoats down the lane,
Then crossing the fields to emerge again
Under the trees at the turn of the road,
And only pausing to fire and load.

So through the night rode Paul Revere;
And so through the night went his cry of alarm
To every Middlesex village and farm,
A cry of defiance, and not of fear,
A voice in the darkness, a knock at the door,
And a word that shall echo for evermore!
For, borne on the night-wind of the Past,
Through all our history, to the last,
In the hour of darkness and peril and need,
The people will waken and listen to hear
The hurrying hoof-beats of that steed,
And the midnight message of Paul Revere.

April is National Poetry Month. Did you know GenealogyBank’s newspaper collection has a special search category for Poems & Songs? Come take a look today and see what poetic gems you can find.

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Virginia Archives: 147 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

Virginia has long played a prominent role in American history. The first permanent English settlement in the New World was established in Virginia in 1607 (Jamestown), Virginia was one of the original 13 states that formed the United States, four of the nation’s first five presidents came from Virginia (George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison and James Monroe), and the state’s current capital was once capital of the Confederate States of America (Richmond).

photo of a Virginia state welcome sign featuring the state bird (cardinal) and state tree and flower (dogwood)

Photo: a Virginia state welcome sign featuring the state bird (cardinal) and state tree and flower (dogwood). Source: Wikimedia Commons.

If you are researching your family roots in Virginia, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online VA newspaper archives: 147 titles to help you search your family history in the “Old Dominion,” providing news coverage, family stories and vital statistics from 1736 to Today. There are currently more than 54 million newspaper articles and records in our online Virginia archives!

Dig deep into our archives and search for historical and recent obituaries and other news articles about your Virginia ancestors in these recent and historical VA newspapers online. Our Virginia newspapers are divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries (obituaries only).

Search Virginia Newspaper Archives (1736 – 1986)

Search Virginia Recent Obituaries (1985 – Current)

Here is a list of online Virginia newspapers in the archives. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more. The VA newspaper titles are listed alphabetically by city.

City Title Date Range* Collection
Abingdon Washington County News 2/1/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Alexandria Alexandria Gazette 7/11/1808 – 12/30/1876 Newspaper Archives
Alexandria Alexandria Herald 6/3/1811 – 6/29/1825 Newspaper Archives
Alexandria Alexandria Daily Advertiser 12/8/1800 – 7/9/1808 Newspaper Archives
Alexandria Times; and District of Columbia Daily Advertiser 4/10/1797 – 7/31/1802 Newspaper Archives
Alexandria Alexandria Expositor 11/26/1802 – 6/1/1807 Newspaper Archives
Alexandria Virginia Journal and Alexandria Advertiser 2/12/1784 – 5/21/1789 Newspaper Archives
Alexandria Alexandria Expositor for the Country 12/1/1803 – 3/4/1805 Newspaper Archives
Alexandria Columbian Mirror and Alexandria Gazette 12/5/1792 – 12/6/1800 Newspaper Archives
Alexandria Columbian Advertiser and Commercial, Mechanic, and Agricultural Gazette 8/2/1802 – 11/22/1802 Newspaper Archives
Alexandria Virginia Gazette and Alexandria Advertiser 9/3/1789 – 8/1/1793 Newspaper Archives
Alexandria People’s Advocate 4/11/1876 – 9/9/1876 Newspaper Archives
Alexandria Vienna-Oakton Connection 2/26/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Alexandria Mount Vernon Gazette 2/13/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Alexandria Alexandria Gazette Packet 2/26/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Alexandria Centre View 2/21/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Altavista Altavista Journal 10/8/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Amherst Nelson County Times 3/19/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Amherst Amherst New Era Progress 3/10/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Appomattox Times-Virginian 10/8/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Arlington Arlington Catholic Herald 9/28/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Arlington Arlington Connection 2/26/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Ashburn Farm, Ashburn Village, Landsdown, Bluemont Ashburn Connection 2/26/2002 – 5/21/2009 Recent Obituaries
Bedford Bedford Bulletin 11/25/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Boydton Midland Express 3/3/1893 – 3/3/1893 Newspaper Archives
Bristol Bristol Herald Courier 12/27/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Broadway North Fork Journal 6/27/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Brookneal Union Star 10/2/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Burke Burke Connection 2/26/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Cascades, Countryside, Potomac Falls, Sterling Cascades Connection 3/26/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Charlottesville Jeffersonian Republican 4/19/1855 – 12/22/1880 Newspaper Archives
Charlottesville Daily Progress 4/17/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Chase City News-Progress 2/23/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Chatham Star-Tribune 10/2/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Culpeper Culpeper Star-Exponent 1/26/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Danville Danville Register & Bee 1/29/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Dayton Shenandoah Journal 11/13/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Dumfries Virginia Gazette and Agricultural Repository 10/13/1791 – 12/19/1793 Newspaper Archives
Elkton Valley Banner 6/28/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Emporia Independent-Messenger 7/8/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fairfax Fairfax Connection 2/26/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fairfax Station, Clifton Fairfax Station-Clifton Connection 2/26/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fincastle Fincastle Mirror 7/11/1823 – 2/18/1825 Newspaper Archives
Fincastle Herald of the Valley 9/17/1821 – 7/4/1823 Newspaper Archives
Fincastle Fincastle Weekly Advertiser 5/8/1801 – 7/10/1801 Newspaper Archives
Fincastle Herald of Virginia and Fincastle Weekly Advertiser 12/5/1800 – 12/5/1800 Newspaper Archives
Floyd Floyd Press 7/19/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Franklin Tidewater News 10/3/2014 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fredericksburg Virginia Herald 9/6/1787 – 11/25/1829 Newspaper Archives
Fredericksburg Virginia Express 11/17/1803 – 7/12/1804 Newspaper Archives
Fredericksburg Free Lance-Star 1/1/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Front Royal Warren Sentinel 9/17/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Galax Galax Gazette 11/18/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Goochland Goochland Gazette 6/4/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Great Falls Great Falls Connection 2/26/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Harrisonburg Northern Augusta Journal 11/20/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Harrisonburg Daily News-Record 6/10/1993 – Current Recent Obituaries
Herndon Herndon Connection 2/26/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hillsville Carroll News 4/30/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Independence Declaration 1/24/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
King George Journal Press 5/20/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Laurel Hill Laurel Hill Connection 2/26/2002 – 6/10/2009 Recent Obituaries
Lawrenceville Brunswick Times-Gazette 7/8/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Leesburg Genius of Liberty 1/11/1817 – 12/26/1820 Newspaper Archives
Leesburg Washingtonian 2/6/1810 – 7/16/1811 Newspaper Archives
Leesburg True American 12/30/1800 – 12/30/1800 Newspaper Archives
Leesburg Leesburg Today 8/29/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lexington Virginia Telegraphe 1/10/1804 – 2/3/1808 Newspaper Archives
Lexington Rockbridge Repository 8/21/1801 – 8/6/1805 Newspaper Archives
Lexington News-Gazette 12/10/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Luray Page News and Courier 1/13/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lynchburg Lynchburg Press 5/13/1809 – 4/24/1818 Newspaper Archives
Lynchburg Lynchburg Weekly Gazette 10/13/1798 – 7/20/1799 Newspaper Archives
Lynchburg Lynchburg Weekly Museum 8/21/1797 – 5/19/1798 Newspaper Archives
Lynchburg News & Advance 3/11/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Madison Madison County Eagle 3/26/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Manassas Prince William Today 2/21/2013 – Current Recent Obituaries
Manassas News & Messenger 5/2/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Marion Smyth County News & Messenger 1/31/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Marion Bland County Messenger 4/1/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
McLean Fairfax Sun Gazette 5/6/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
McLean McLean Connection 2/26/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Mechanicsville Mechanicsville Local 7/27/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Merrifield Arlington Sun Gazette 4/3/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Newport News Daily Press 1/1/1989 – Current Recent Obituaries
Norfolk American Beacon 8/7/1815 – 12/30/1820 Newspaper Archives
Norfolk Norfolk Gazette and Publick Ledger 7/17/1804 – 9/17/1816 Newspaper Archives
Norfolk Virginia Chronicle 7/28/1792 – 12/18/1794 Newspaper Archives
Norfolk Commercial Register 8/16/1802 – 1/11/1803 Newspaper Archives
Norfolk Norfolk and Portsmouth Journal 9/28/1787 – 5/6/1789 Newspaper Archives
Norfolk Norfolk and Portsmouth Chronicle 9/26/1789 – 6/2/1792 Newspaper Archives
Norfolk Norfolk and Portsmouth Herald 10/8/1807 – 6/19/1820 Newspaper Archives
Norfolk Norfolk and Portsmouth Gazette 9/23/1789 – 10/8/1789 Newspaper Archives
Norfolk Virginian-Pilot 4/1/1990 – Current Recent Obituaries
Orange Orange County Review 3/3/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Petersburg Petersburg Daily Courier 9/21/1814 – 6/22/1815 Newspaper Archives
Petersburg Petersburg Intelligencer 5/29/1798 – 9/22/1815 Newspaper Archives
Petersburg American Star 6/23/1817 – 12/23/1817 Newspaper Archives
Petersburg National Pilot 2/1/1900 – 2/1/1900 Newspaper Archives
Petersburg Progress-Index 10/31/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Powhatan Powhatan Today 4/2/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Reston Reston Connection 2/26/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Richlands Richlands News-Press 1/6/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Richmond Richmond Times Dispatch 1/27/1903 – 12/31/1986 Newspaper Archives
Richmond Enquirer 5/9/1804 – 8/22/1876 Newspaper Archives
Richmond Richmond Whig 6/22/1824 – 12/29/1874 Newspaper Archives
Richmond Richmond Enquirer 10/25/1844 – 4/28/1870 Newspaper Archives
Richmond Richmond Examiner 4/8/1861 – 8/29/1866 Newspaper Archives
Richmond Virginia Argus 5/9/1795 – 10/19/1816 Newspaper Archives
Richmond Virginia Patriot 12/26/1809 – 8/3/1819 Newspaper Archives
Richmond Richmond Commercial Compiler 12/18/1816 – 4/20/1820 Newspaper Archives
Richmond Southern Illustrated News 9/13/1862 – 9/10/1864 Newspaper Archives
Richmond Richmond Chronicle 5/23/1795 – 8/27/1796 Newspaper Archives
Richmond Virginia Gazette, and General Advertiser 12/7/1791 – 7/14/1809 Newspaper Archives
Richmond Impartial Observer 5/1/1806 – 7/2/1807 Newspaper Archives
Richmond Virginia Star 5/11/1878 – 12/23/1882 Newspaper Archives
Richmond Virginia Gazette and Weekly Advertiser 3/2/1782 – 3/4/1796 Newspaper Archives
Richmond Richmond Daily Whig 12/27/1833 – 2/15/1882 Newspaper Archives
Richmond Richmond Planet 2/21/1885 – 1/13/1900 Newspaper Archives
Richmond Recorder 11/10/1802 – 8/6/1803 Newspaper Archives
Richmond Spirit of ‘Seventy-Six 9/20/1808 – 7/11/1809 Newspaper Archives
Richmond Reformer 1/27/1900 – 1/27/1900 Newspaper Archives
Richmond Richmond Times-Dispatch 8/19/1985 – Current Recent Obituaries
Roanoke Roanoke Times 1/1/1990 – Current Recent Obituaries
South Hill South Hill Enterprise 1/7/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Springfield Springfield Connection 10/15/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Stafford Stafford County Sun 4/17/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Stanardsville Greene County Record 3/3/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Staunton Staunton Eagle 8/14/1807 – 10/3/1810 Newspaper Archives
Staunton Staunton Political Censor 6/22/1808 – 2/22/1809 Newspaper Archives
Staunton Staunton Spy 9/21/1793 – 2/1/1794 Newspaper Archives
Staunton Political Mirror 6/3/1800 – 8/11/1801 Newspaper Archives
Staunton Observer 8/4/1814 – 8/18/1814 Newspaper Archives
Staunton Spirit of the Press 5/18/1811 – 5/18/1811 Newspaper Archives
Strasburg Northern Virginia Daily 12/17/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Suffolk Suffolk News-Herald 10/2/2014 – Current Recent Obituaries
Warrenton Palladium of Liberty 8/23/1817 – 12/22/1820 Newspaper Archives
Waynesboro News Virginian 2/3/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Williamsburg Virginia Gazette 3/18/1736 – 12/30/1780 Newspaper Archives
Winchester Republican Constellation 7/20/1811 – 7/31/1819 Newspaper Archives
Winchester Winchester Virginian 4/18/1828 – 9/6/1836 Newspaper Archives
Winchester Winchester Gazette 6/27/1798 – 1/15/1820 Newspaper Archives
Winchester Philanthropist 3/25/1806 – 2/28/1809 Newspaper Archives
Winchester Winchester Star 4/30/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Wirtz Smith Mountain Eagle 10/6/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Woodstock Shenandoah Valley-Herald 6/24/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Wytheville Wytheville Enterprise 2/1/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries

*Date Ranges may have selected coverage unavailable.

You can either print or create a PDF version of this Blog post by simply clicking on the green “Print/PDF” button below. The PDF version makes it easy to save this post onto your desktop or portable device for quick reference—all the Virginia newspaper links will be live.

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Great Advice from an Interview with a Very Old Man

I like newspaper articles where the oldest person in town is interviewed and gives their best advice for living well to an old age. They tell it as they lived it.

Here is the advice Sam Cox (1819-1922) gave on his 102nd birthday as “he sat in his home yesterday afternoon smoking a cigar and shaking hands with those who called.”

interview with Samuel Cox, Sunday Herald newspaper article 28 August 1921

Sunday Herald (Boston, Massachusetts), 28 August 1921, page B1

He said:

“…A man ought to live as long as he can and do all the good possible for his neighbors.”

“Live moderately, work hard, but don’t overdo.”

“Be moderate in the use of tobacco and intoxicants.”

“Eat plenty of good, hearty food.”

“Abstain from sweets.”

“Keep out in the open air; take long walks and don’t be afraid to expand the lungs in song.”

“Above all, don’t worry.”

“Be happy and make others happy.”

“Get plenty of sleep, and be up early in the morning for the day’s work.”

Enter Last Name

Great advice.

Newspapers are not only a great way to find your ancestors’ vital statistics – they are a tremendous resource for discovering great advice and the stories of their lives as well. Dig into GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives and find your ancestors’ stories. Start your 30-day trial now!

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Solve the Robert ‘Believe It or Not!’ Ripley Ancestry Brick Wall (Part II)

Introduction: Mary Harrell-Sesniak is a genealogist, author and editor with a strong technology background. In this blog article, Mary follows up on an article she wrote back in January 2013 and, thanks to helpful suggestions from some of her readers, tries to uncover more of the Robert Ripley genealogy mystery.

Early in 2013, the GenealogyBank Blog published my article on Robert L. Ripley (see Solve the Robert ‘Believe It or Not!’ Ripley Ancestry Brick Wall), and – believe it or not – we’re still working on his ancestry. Knowing that Ripley’s family history was a mystery, in that 2013 article I asked readers to help break through a brick wall in the Ripley family tree. Their answers were informative, although much of his ancestry continues to be elusive.

What I want to do now is provide an update to this genealogical quest to uncover Ripley’s family history. First, I suggest you click on the link to read my previous Ripley article, to see what clues I could present to my readers at that time. Next, read the comments several readers left at the end of that article, providing additional clues. Let’s look at some of those follow-up clues now, to make what progress we can in smashing through this Ripley brick wall.

photo of Robert "Believe It or Not!" Ripley, c. 1940

Photo: Robert Ripley, c. 1940. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

The Ripley Brick Wall

As I explained in my 2013 article about the Ripley genealogy mystery:

I can’t seem to crack the brick wall in his genealogy. He left no descendants and was only married briefly to actress Beatrice Roberts. I can’t discover his family history any further back than his maternal grandmother.

Prefers “Robert” to “Leroy”

Leroy Robert Ripley (c.1890-1949), (who went by “Robert” or “Robert L.”), did many things in his career, including work as a cartoonist, a sportswriter and amateur anthropologist.

article by Robert Ripley about Honus Wagner and Larry Lajoie, Evening Star newspaper article 18 October 1914

Evening Star (Washington, D.C.), 18 October 1914, page 64

Conflicting Birth Dates

Ripley’s World War I draft registration reports that he resided at 136 W. 65 Street in New York. He was 25 and recorded his birth on the registration form as 15 February 1892 in Santa Rosa, California. What is interesting about this is that, at other times, he reported his birth date as 25 December 1890 and 26 December 1890 (thought by some genealogists to be his real date of birth). Wikipedia reports Ripley’s birth date as 22 February 1890.

Enter Last Name

Ripley described himself as an artist, writer and cartoonist working for associated newspapers at 170 Broadway. As his mother had died several years earlier, he reported that he supported a brother and was single. He signed his name as Robert LeRoy Ripley. Although recording errors are common, it would be interesting to find his birth record to confirm the actual day and year on which he was born.

article about Robert Ripley, Oregonian newspaper article 29 November 1936

Oregonian (Portland, Oregon), 29 November 1936, page 62

No Descendants

Ripley was married briefly to Beatrice Roberts in 1919. She was only 14 at the time of their marriage, and the couple separated after just three months. They finally divorced in 1926, and had no children. Ripley never remarried, and died childless.

obituary for Robert Ripley, San Diego Union newspaper article 28 May 1949

San Diego Union (San Diego, California), 28 May 1949, page 1

Ripley’s Parents

Robert Ripley was the son of Isaac Davis Ripley (1854-1904) and Lillie Belle Yoka, Yocka or Yocke (1868-1915). His parents married on 3 October 1889 in Sonoma, California (California County Marriages 1850-1952, database at familysearch.org) and are buried at Odd Fellows Lawn Cemetery in Santa Rosa, California (see findagrave.com).

Ripley’s Father

In 1870, the Belpre (Washington County) Ohio Census reports that Isaac was possibly residing in the household of Jason and Phelia A. Stubs (or Stubbs or Stutes). Isaac was 16 at that time and attended school. (See http://ohgen.net/ohwashin/OMP-2.htm, Ohio Historical Society, Newspaper Microfilm Reel # 38487 – marriage license for Jason Stubbs and Phelia A. Hunter of Belpre on 8 May 1865.)

Once he reached California, various Great Registers (see familysearch.org) report that Isaac Davis Ripley worked as a carpenter. His birth place is consistently reported as Ohio, which is confirmed by the 1900 Santa Rosa (California) Census reporting him being born in Ohio in September of 1854.

His Mother and Maternal Grandparents

Lillie Belle was the daughter of Nancy Yocke (1828-?) and an unknown father from Germany.

In 1880, Lillie lived with her widowed mother, according to the Analy (Sonoma County) California Census. Her mother was listed as a housekeeper. She had been born in Tennessee and her parents were both from North Carolina. Lillie was the only child in the household. Her birth was shown as Missouri and her parents as having been born in Tennessee and Germany.

At the time of Lillie’s marriage to Isaac Davis Ripley in 1889, he was 35 and she was 20.

One of the readers of my 2013 article, Donna Bailey, wrote:

Well, this article [Miami News (Miami, Florida), 13 May 1962, from Google News Archives] helps explain a little. It states that Lillie Belle was born on the Santa Fe Trail in a covered wagon on the way to California. And Isaac ran away from home at age 14, which explains why he is at the Stutes home in 1870 already on his way to California, which he does show up in voter lists in Yuba in 1874.

Donna later wrote again, adding more information:

Some more clues. There is a marriage record for a Phillip Yoka and a Nancy A. Card, married in Washington Township, Johnson County, MO, on 4 Dec. 1870. According to her grave at Find a grave [Sebastapol Memorial Lawn Cemetery], Nancy’s middle name was Ann, so this could be our Nancy.

I checked the marriage record and it seems consistent with other records. It does note that the officiant was Justice of the Peace William Fisher, so it is unlikely that a church record exists. I also checked the Miami News article. It gives us the clue that Isaac Davis Ripley was born of old American stock in West Virginia, which differs from records reporting Ohio. Perhaps his roots were from that state.

His Two Siblings

When Robert Ripley died on 27 May 1949, he left the bulk of his estate in trust to his two siblings, Douglas and Ethel “Effie” Ripley. Effie (1885-1965) married Fred Marion Davis (1884-1957) and is buried at Golden Gate National Cemetery in San Francisco next to her husband, who was a veteran of World War II. We still have not located the final resting place of Douglas.

Enter Last Name

His Sister

Another reader named Mallory wrote:

Ethel (Effie) Davis was married to Fred Davis – she was alive in 1947 and apparently in 1949 when she and her husband flew back to NY from the funeral of her brother [Robert Ripley]. She and her other brother Douglas inherited the majority of the estate. Effie was dead before 1971. The family home still exists… Ethel was born in 1893, her brother Douglas in 1904. The father Isaac died in 1905. Robert (Leroy) had to work to help support his mom and sister. There are two nephews named Robert and Douglas (not sure who their parents were) – they show up in local newspaper clippings.

The Renewed Ripley Brick Wall Challenge

So readers, there you have it.

With the genealogy research we’ve done since my 2013 article was posted, we have learned that Robert Ripley’s father, Isaac Davis Ripley, ran away from home – and we have learned the probable identity of his Yocke grandfather, a German named Philip.

But that’s about it – so I am opening up the Ripley brick wall challenge again. Can any of our readers help us get back further on Ripley’s family tree?

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BOGO: Search for One Relative & Find Another One as a Bonus

I was searching for newspaper articles about my cousin Cyrus Lane (1824-1911) from Sanbornton, New Hampshire, and quickly found an announcement of his marriage

wedding announcements for Cyrus Lane and Sarah Plummer, also for Oliver Piper and Judith Lane, New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette newspaper article 30 November 1848

New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette (Concord, New Hampshire), 30 November 1848, page 3

But wait – there’s more.

Here was an added bonus.

Following the report of Cyrus’s marriage to Sarah H. Plummer on 25 October 1848, there is this next announcement: “also, Oct. 30, Mr. Oliver P. Piper to Miss Judith C. Lane, all of S.”

Enter Last Name

This refers to his sister, Judith Clifford Lane (1826-1899).
Wow – that must have been a time of family gathering and joy with two weddings within a week.

Newspapers reported the news of our ancestors.
Dig in to GenealogyBank and find your ancestors’ stories.

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