Ohio & Oregon: Upcoming titles being added to GenealogyBank.com

Many of you want to know – What are the upcoming newspapers that we will be adding for my state?

To get the word out I am going to begin posting the titles from the Upcoming Title list.


I will research and post two States per day.

Remember – this is an advance look at the list. Some of these titles are going live this summer and some will not be added for months. We want you to know what our plans are.

I usually hear about new newspaper titles going live on GenealogyBank three times a month. I will post those titles and their dates of coverage as soon as I get the word.

Thousands of newspapers are being considered for addition to GenealogyBank. We continue to evaluate and add more titles that are not on this list.

As soon as I know which titles are going live or have been added to the “Upcoming Titles” list – I will post it to this blog.

This way you will know which titles have been added to GenealogyBank and which titles are on the Upcoming Titles list.

CLICK HERE to see the complete list of Ohio newspapers that are live online right now at GenealogyBank.

CLICK HERE to see the complete list of Oregon newspapers that are live online right now at GenealogyBank.

Here is an advance look at the list of the historical newspapers we are adding in the months ahead for Ohio and Oregon.

OHIO
Fredonian. Chillicothe, OH. 1807 to 1813
Scioto Gazette. Chillicothe, OH. 1805 to 1818
Scioto Gazette and Fredonia Chronicle. Chillicothe, OH. 1821 to 1867
Supporter. Chillicothe, OH. 1809 o 1820
Cincinnati Daily Gazette. Cincinnati, OH. 1835 to 1845
Cincinnati Enquirer. Cincinnati, OH. 1861 to 1876
Cincinnati Times & Chronicle. Cincinnati, OH. 1871 to 1874
Cincinnati Volksfreund. Cincinnati, OH. 1863 to 1864
Saturday Evening Chronicle. Cincinnati, OH. 1827 to 1829
Spirit of the West. Cincinnati, OH. 1814 to 1815
Cincinnati Advertiser. Cincinnati, OH. 1819 to
1825
Plain Dealer. Clevelend, OH. 1842 to 1922
Columbus Gazette. Columbus, OH. 1821 to 1861
Crisis. Columbus, OH. 1865 to 1870
Ohio Monitor. Columbus, OH. 1821 to 1865
Democratic Herald. Dayton, OH. 1835 to 1837
Ohio Republican. Dayton, OH. 1813 to 1816
Elyria Republican. Elyria, OH. 1835 to 1837
Ohio Gazette & Virginia Herald. Marrietta, OH. 1806 to 1811
Western Spectator. Marrietta, OH. 1810 to 1813
Portage County Democrat. Ravenna, OH. 1854 to 1855
Daily Commercial Register. Sandusky, OH. 1851 to 1867
Daily Sanduskian. Sandusky, OH. 1848 to 1851
Ohio Federalist. St. Clairsville, OH. 1813 to 1816
Western Herald. Steubenville, OH. 1812 to 1817
Western Herald & Stubenville Gazette. Steubenville, OH. 1823 to 1829
Trump of Fame. Warren, OH. 1812 to 1814
Wooster Republican. Wooster, OH. 1862 to 1863
Greene County Journal. Xenia, OH. 1863 to 1864
Greene County Torch-Light. Xenia, OH. 1841


OREGON
Oregon State Journal. Eugene, OR. 1864 to 1875
Firebrand. Portland, OR. 1895 to 1897
Oregonian. Portland, OR. 1850 to 1922

GenealogyBank adds newspapers from 13 States

GenealogyBank announced today that it has added another 14 newspapers from 13 States to the America’s Obituaries section of GenealogyBank.

This brings the modern obituaries to nearly 28 million obituaries & death notices. There are millions more obituaries in the 2,500 newspapers in the Historical Newspaper section and in the Historical Documents section.

With data on more than 1 billion people – GenealogyBank is packed with the facts about our ancestors.

Your membership in GenealogyBank helps us to make even more records available.

Membership entitles you to read the complete text of over 230 million articles and records – search for more than 1 billion of your relatives.

Sign up now and ask your friends to join with us in bringing even more records online – It’s only $9.95 – Click Here and start right now.

List of new titles added:
Alabama
Valley Times-News, (Lanett, AL)
Obituaries: 04/17/1999 – Current
Death Notices: 03/18/1999 – Current

Georgia
Marietta Daily Journal (Marietta, GA)
Obituaries: 12/07/1998 – Current
Death Notices: 12/07/1998 – Current
Thomasville Times-Enterprise (Thomasville, GA)
Obituaries: 11/27/2007 – Current
Death Notices: 11/14/2007 – Current

Indiana
Decatur Daily Democrat (Decatur, IN)
Obituaries: 04/29/2008 – Current
Death Notices: 03/11/2008 – Current

Iowa
Clinton Herald (Clinton, IA)
Obituaries: 09/28/2007 – Current
Death Notices: 08/29/2007 – Current

Kentucky
Daily News, (Middlesboro, KY)
Obituaries: 02/02/2007 – Current
Death Notices: 02/01/2007 – Current

Mississippi
Daily Times Leader (West Point, MS)
Obituaries: 04/27/2008 – Current
Death Notices: 03/27/2008 – Current

North Carolina
Tryon Daily Bulletin, (Tryon, NC)
Obituaries: 09/12/2007 – Current
Death Notices: 05/14/2007 – Current

Ohio
Daily Sentinel, (Pomeroy, OH)
Obituaries: 10/17/2005 – Current
Death Notices: 10/17/2005 – Current
Evening Leader, (St. Marys, OH)
Obituaries: 04/07/2008 – Current
Death Notices: 04/02/2008 – Current

Pennsylvania
York Weekly Record (York, PA)
Obituaries: 01/23/2004 – Current
Death Notices: See York Daily Record

South Carolina
Union Daily Times, (Union, SC)
Obituaries: 01/02/2006 – Current
Death Notices: 01/02/2006 – Current

Texas
San Marcos Daily Record (San Marcos, TX)
Obituaries: 05/08/2008 – Current
Death Notices: 04/12/2008 – Current

Washington
Daily Herald, (Everett, WA)
Obituaries: 08/16/2005 – Current

Homestead Act – May 20, 1862 – Daniel Freeman 1st Homesteader

Abraham Lincoln signed the Homestead Act on May 20, 1862. It would take effect on January 1, 1863. The first homesteader to take “the required oath and [be] given the documents which made him possessor of 160 acres of land” was Daniel Freeman (1826-1908).

Daniel Freeman was born April 26, 1826 in Lewisburg, Preble County, Ohio. The son of Samuel and Phebe (Willis) Freeman.

This image of Daniel Freeman is from the Omaha (NE) Sunday World Herald 26 June 1899.

According to that newspaper he and his family moved from Ohio to Illinois when he was 9 years old. In time he enlisted in “Company H of the Seventeenth Illinois Volunteers” and was stationed in Nebraska.

Freeman “had been ordered to return to St. Louis” and would not be in town when the land record office would open on January 2nd but the Recorder of Deeds James Bedford agreed to accommodate Freeman’s situation and made an exception and administered the oath at midnight the morning of January 1st so that he could leave to report in St. Louis.

Freeman wouldn’t return to build on his land until 1865. He literally married the “girl next door” – Agnes Suiter (1843-1931) – and they built their lives together there in Brownsville, Nebraska.

The Kansas City (MO) Times 26 May 1920 carried an image of the old homestead.

What a great day for genealogists. GenealogyBank is packed with newspaper articles and historical documents – over 227 Million of them that document and give the details of our ancestor’s lives.

It’s great to have the details and the actual images of our ancestors and their homes. Who knew it would be this easy to find them after all these years.

Give it a try for 30 days for $9.95.

Birth Announcements – newspapers are packed with them

Newspapers have been announcing births since the 1700s.

It is common to see birth notices in newspapers all across the country, like this one for triplets born to “Mrs. Rust of Wolfeboro, NH” in 1796. It appeared in the Massachusetts Mercury 14 Oct 1796.
You’ll find millions of births recorded in newspapers on GenealogyBank from the colonial period right up to recent times.
Newspapers often had regular columns for all area births. Sometimes these were listed by the name of the hospital. These notices often give the names of the child, parents and even grandparents.

Some are written in a fun, familiar style – as this one from the Dallas Morning News 1 June 1967 – “She’ here…” and went on to give the details of their new daughter.

This 1918 birth notice from the Belleville (IL) Democrat 8 March 1918, gave three generations of genealogical information including the name of the grandmother, the mother’s maiden name and the name of the parents – but not the name of the baby!

Other newspapers simply gave the essential facts of their area births. Like these births from the San Francisco (CA) Daily Evening Bulletin 12 August 1856.

But no matter how much detail the newspaper included, genealogists will find GenealogyBank a practical tool for uncovering the birth notices for their relatives.

Since the name of the child is not always given, search for them by the name of the parents or simply the surname. You may limit your search by date or place to see if the birth of the children you are looking for was published in the newspaper.

For a complete list of the newspaper titles and dates of coverage click here.

Newspapers are a great source for finding the historical records that document our family tree.

Tracking down Family Bibles ….

Family Bibles have been treasured by families for generations, but finding them today can be difficult.

It was common for families to have a family Bible – a large bound book that was prominently displayed in the family parlor – “…a large octavo volume, with a more or less ornate binding, with blank pages inserted on which to record births, marriages and deaths, and sometimes the near-slaying of Isaac, Moses in the bulrushes, the infernal regions and other interesting dramatic and historic incidents narrated in the [Bible]“. (Boston Journal 13 May 1908).
(Image from Antique Holy Bible Item #330235937204 – Ebay.com)
I spotted quite a few newspaper articles that cited the old family Bibles and who their current owners were.

For example – Henry Peters of Trenton, NJ used his family Bible to prove that he was “sixteen years old and two months older than that” so that he could get in to the show at the Trent theater. (Fort Worth (TX) Star-Telegram. Nov 4, 1909).
An article in the Columbus (GA) Enquirer (2 Sep 1898) tells us that “Mrs. Billard, the daughter of the late Rev. Edward Oldrin, who lives on Bank Street [Stamford, CT]” … and that she got it “by inheritance from her father. … The book is in the original binding and well preserved, the Old Testament part having been printed in 1597 and the New Testament in 1596. The covers are of wood.”

This is an important point. Always check the dates that each of the Testaments was printed. Printers often printed them separately and then joined them together when they published the Bible. This is a way to date a family Bible.

“Inscribed on the yellow fly-leat are the words: Edward Oulldron owns this book and after his death to his son Edward Oulldron, given by his grandfather – 1651.” Elsewhere it states “Edward Oldrin’s [note the change in spelling] book, given by his father on is deathbed in the 1827, July 28, to be kept in the family.”

Mrs. Jennie Fairbanks Milligan of Springfield, Ohio brought the family Bible when she was called to testify in a case trying to break the will of the late Delavan Smith of Lake Forest, IL. (Dallas Morning News. 1 October 1921).

John M. Butler of Ocean Grove, NJ found out by double checking his family Bible that he was 101 and not 100 years old when he went to celebrate his birthday. He said it was a “pretty tough job trying to keep track of so many birthdays.” He said with a smile … “I must have lived two years in Brooklyn [NY, the] one year that I was there. That’s the only way I can account for the discrepancy.” (Evening Times – Pawtucket, RI – 17 jan 1901).

But you won’t find the Belin family Bible. It seems that in November 1908, Joseph Belin of Wilkes-Barre, PA “came home intoxicated and threatened [his mother] and then burned the family Bible.” There were 7 prisoners in court that day for “being drunk”. Six of them were fined $1.00 but Joseph Belin was fined $5.00. (Wilkes-Barre (PA) Times Leader – 18 Nov 1908).

Historical newspapers are packed with family history information. Research more than 3,400 newspapers and document your heritage on GenealogyBank.
Give it a try right now.

Virginia is 401 years old today!

Happy Birthday to Virginia!
The first colonists arrived in Jamestown, Virginia on May 14, 1607 and with ups and downs the Commonwealth has prospered ever since.

GenealogyBank.com is packed with early Americana – including millions of Virginia items go back to the 1700s.

Newspapers
GenealogyBank has more than 100 Virginia newspapers – containing more than 2.3 Million articles. There are multiple titles going back to the 1700s and early 1800s.
Click here for a complete list

Also – GenealogyBank has more than 4 Million Virginia obituaries and death records in the America’s Obituaries and Social Security Death Index (SSDI) sections.

Other Virginia Resources in GenealogyBank

Search for Virginia documents in:
American State Papers and US Serial Set in the Historical Documents section.
There are thousands of Virginia documents in the Historical Books section that are unique to GenealogyBank.


For example – here is a petition to Congress signed by the local Virginia residents south of the James River that were seeking improved conditions on the Turnpike to Richmond.



Here is an example of an early Virginia funeral sermon – for Mrs. Ann Boyd who died 1819.



Terrific sources.

Beyond GenealogyBank – here are other useful sites for Virginia research
Virginia Census Records
1850, 1880, 1900 – Free Online – FamilySearchLabs


Virginia Digital Books Online
American Memory Project
Documenting the American South

Google Books
Making of America

Library of Virgina – Virginia Land Records

Virginia Genealogical Society
Be sure to see the back issues of their newsletter that you can download and read online

Virginia Historical Society
Current issue of Virginia Magazine of History & Biography
Be sure to see their online research guides

Virginia Vital Records
See the collection at the Library of Virginia
Virginia Department of Vital Records

1860 Census & Civil War Pension Index – Going Online

FamilySearchLabs.org has begun putting the 1860 Federal Census and the Civil War Pension Index Cards online.

The 1860 Federal Census includes all new indexing and new digital images of the census pages. The FHL-Labs site is just beginning to put the 1860 census online – and has loaded the first 5% of the census. They are putting the index up for free but the census page images may only be viewed with a separate subscription to Footnote.com

The Civil War Pension Index Cards are 90% complete. According to the site, “each card gives the soldier’s name, unit, the application number, the certificate number and the state from which the soldier served.” This index is free on the FHL-Labs site.

FamilySearchLabs.org has changed their site so you no longer have to register to login.

You can find additional Civil War pension information in GenealogyBank. Look at the US Serial Set in the Historical Documents section. See also the example I posted earlier about the Civil War pension of Henry B. Platter and his widow Rachel (Bittinger) Platter.

Private William Christman – first burial in Arlington Cemetery May 13, 1864

The first burial on the grounds of what would become Arlington National Cemetery was on May 13, 1864.

Private William Christman was buried in the rose garden in front of General Robert E. Lee’s home in Arlington, Virginia. He was serving with Company G, 67th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. Click here to see his headstone.

In May 1863 Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton ordered the creation of the “Freedman’s Village for the protection of the Black man and his family, upon the Arlington estate, belonging to the Rebel General Lee.” The Liberator, 15 July 1864.

June 15, 1864 Secretary Stanton ordered that the grounds around the Lee home be used as a military cemetery – which would soon be known around the world as Arlington National Cemetery.

The newspapers of the day loved it that the Lee home and grounds were used to house and give the freedmen a new start and a military cemetery to honor the nation’s war dead.

“How appropriate that Lee’s lands should be dedicated to two such noble purposes – the free living Black man whom Lee would enslave and the bodies of the dead soldiers who Lee has killed in a wicked cause. Let this record stand to the everlasting credit of Secretary Stanton.”
The Liberator, 15 July 1864.

In GenealogyBank you may read many more articles about the creation of Arlington National Cemetery and the Freedman’s Village. Look for them in the Historical Newspapers and in the Historical Documents which includes the US Serial Set – where there are also numerous government reports detailing the progress of both operations.

Freedman’s Village – Robert E. Lee Estate in Arlington

There are a lot of anniversaries in May.

In May 1863 the government organized the Freedman’s Village on the grounds of General Robert E. Lee’s home in Arlington, Virginia.

It had “fourteen dwellings, and a church a hospital and a home of the aged and infirm, with streets regularly laid out and named, and a park planted in the centre.” The grounds were laid out and the village was built under the direction of Brigadier General Montgomery C. Meigs, he was named the Quartermaster of the Army in May 1861.

The Village quickly took shape and within a year had more than 3,000 residents, former slaves and their families.

By Decemeber 1865 there were 53 schools, 112 teachers and 5,618 students located at the Freedman’s Village and on government lands in Alexandria, Georgetown and Maryland.

In 1888 the Freedman’s Village was closed. Read more about the Freedman’s Village in GenealogyBank. Look for artilces in the Historical Newspapers and for the many government reports that detailed the progress and ultimate closing in the US Serial Set found in the Historical Documents section.

Tomorrow I will blog about the other May anniversary.



It’s February and Valentine’s Day is almost here.

GenealogyBank is off to a great start this month. It added 2.9 Million new records and documents – bringing the collection to well over 216 Million documents – that’s an estimated 1.5 Billion names.

GenealogyBank added content for 41 newspapers from 20 States including titles like:

Springfield (MA) Republican 1861-1909
Boston Journal (1870-1899)Philadelphia
North American (1841-1877) and another 38 titles.


It’s February and Valentine’s Day is almost here.

I found an early Valentine’s story about the second wedding of Amos Broadwater (1804-1901). It was published in the Baltimore Sun 28 Jan 1895.

Amos also lived in Garrett County, MD family – but he was more prosperous than Wooly Bittinger. He was born in Loudon County, VA and died in New Germany, Garrett County, Maryland.

His wife of more than 60 years, Sarah (Sigler) Broadwater (1809-1893) died in 1893. By that time their family had grown to 12 children; 99 grandchildren and 102 great-grandchildren.

In January of 1895 at age 91 Amos, who was “hale and hearty and looks much younger,” fell in love again and married Eliza Warwick a blushing bride of 51 years. The article went on to say “Mr. Broadwater is the oldest man in Garrett County and is quite well to do.” The new couple had no children.

GenealogyBank is packed with historical documents and vital records. With more than 2 Million records added this month it is easy to document your family tree.

Give it a try at our special low introductory rate – only $9.95 – give it a try right now.