Funeral Sermons: How to Research Funeral Records for Genealogy

Introduction: Mary Harrell-Sesniak is a genealogist, author and editor with a strong technology background. In this guest blog post, Mary explains that in earlier times funeral sermons were published and sold—and these documents often provide a wealth of family history information.

You’re probably wondering what’s so exciting about funeral sermons, a rather sobering subject. Until recently I agreed, but then I did some genealogy research using funeral sermons and discovered that there are exciting ancestral details to be culled from them.

In fact, I urge all family historians to find and examine funeral sermons about their ancestors whenever they can.

Funeral Sermons: a Long and Honored Tradition

In earlier days, funeral sermons were often published. Authors (especially ministers) delivered inspirational and memorable sermons, often including personal family details about the deceased. Afterward, friends and bereaved family members requested copies for keepsakes; the funeral sermons were printed and sold to them.

Although published sermons are rare nowadays, the practice is a long and honored tradition.

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Newspaper Advertisements for Funeral Sermons

Early newspapers ran ads announcing the availability of funereal sermons for purchase. In order to entice sales, most of these ads include pertinent genealogical details that we as genealogists can use as proof documents for lineage society applications.

This newspaper advertisement for Hezekiah Huntington’s funeral sermon is typical. Notice that it includes his date of death, where he died, the burial date and the minister’s name.

ad for the sale of the funeral sermon for Hezekiah Huntington, Connecticut Gazette newspaper advertisement 14 May 1773

Connecticut Gazette (New London, Connecticut), 14 May 1773, page 2

By comparison, this obituary for Hezekiah Huntington is a disappointment with its dearth of details—the entire obituary is one simple line:

At New-London, the hon. Hezekiah Huntington, Esq; of Norwich.

obituary for Hezekiah Huntington, Massachusetts Spy newspaper article 25 February 1773

Massachusetts Spy (Boston, Massachusetts), 25 February 1773, page 217

Just think: the old newspaper ad for the funeral sermon—let alone the actual funeral sermon itself—provides more details than the obituary!

Where to Find Funeral Sermons

GenealogyBank’s newspaper archives are a good place to find old ads for funeral sermons. Also, the site’s Historical Books collection contains digitized funeral sermons and eulogies.

a screenshot of the search page for GenealogyBank’s Historical Books collection

Screenshot: search page for GenealogyBank’s Historical Books collection

To find genealogical information in early funeral sermons, try searching both the newspaper archives for historical advertisements about the funeral, as well as the Historical Books collection.

My Own Family History Discovery in a Funeral Sermon

When I decided to look at the funeral sermons in GenealogyBank’s Historical Books collection, I really wasn’t expecting to find anything about my own family. How wrong I was! While browsing the titles on the search results page, one heading jumped out at me: it named my 6th great grandfather, Joseph Starr, husband of Mary Benedict.

screenshot of GenealogyBank's search results page for funeral sermons

In all my years of genealogy research, I’ve never been able to find an obituary for Joseph Starr—so this 23-page funeral sermon was an exciting find. I already knew several things about my ancestor’s life, such as his occupation as a shoemaker, tanner and farmer, and military service with the 20th Regiment of Cap. Nehemiah Waterman’s Company during the American Revolutionary War.

New Details about My Ancestor Joseph Starr

photo of the cover of the funeral sermon for Captain Joseph Starr, 1802

Photo: cover of the funeral sermon for Captain Joseph Starr, 1802. Credit: GenealogyBank’s Historical Books.

This old funeral sermon confirmed some facts I already knew, but also added new details about Joseph Starr’s life. Some of these new research findings include:

  • Various vital record dates, including the year of his birth in 1726, his marriage in 1745, and his death on 3 April 1802.
  • Family details (11 children, 39 grandchildren and 24 great grandchildren—74 in all, 66 of whom were alive at the time of his death).
  • The name of the minister, as well as his church (Rev. John Ely, pastor of the 2nd Church of Danbury).
  • Joseph Starr was healthy and attended church. (“As he enjoyed a good state of health he was seldom absent from public worship.”)
  • I also learned about his personality. (“He was affable, benevolent and hospitable; being a man of but few words he was not disposed to meddle with other men’s matters, and consequently he had perhaps as many friends, and as few enemies as most men; He lived beloved, and died greatly lamented.”)
  • The publication had been requested by surviving friends.
  • There were also kind words directed to the widow, her family and attending friends.
photo of part of the funeral sermon for Captain Joseph Starr, 1802

Photo: part of the funeral sermon for Captain Joseph Starr, 1802. Credit: GenealogyBank’s Historical Books.

All in all, it was an exciting genealogy research find—and for me, a funeral sermon with so many personal life details trumps an obituary any day.

(For more information about Joseph Starr, see: the History of Danbury; a lengthy genealogy book on the Starr family; and Find A Grave memorials 21148746 and 21148747.)

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Genealogy Tips for Researching Published Sermons

  • The date associated with the sermon will be the publication date, not the date of death.
  • The sermon publication day and month may not be exact, but the year is correct. Many funeral sermons are recorded in the database as January 1, because the exact date of publication is not known. (For example, Joseph Starr died on 3 April 1802, yet his funeral sermon is indexed in the database as 1 January 1802 because the indexers had no way of knowing the actual date of publication.)
  • Look for other items in the publication. In the funeral sermon examples below, a copy of a will, letters, and a transcription of a tombstone were found.
  • Don’t forget to search for the newspaper advertisements that accompanied the sermons.
  • Prominent ancestors are more likely to have had published sermons than lesser known persons.
  • Others who died around the same time may be named in the body of the document, even if not included in the title. (In one of the examples below, Capt. Whittlesey passed away as the result of a hurricane, and the crew members of his ship were also named. In other instances, people who died the same week or month were also mentioned in passing.)

Funeral Sermon Examples

The following examples demonstrate the variety of genealogical and personal family information that can be found when researching published funeral sermons.

  • John Cushing: This 15-page sermon includes information about the widow and orphaned children.
photo of the funeral sermon for John Cushing, 1806

“A sermon, delivered at Ashburnham, May 22, 1806, at the interment of Mr. John Cushing, Jun. who expired at the house of his father. By Seth Payson, A.M. pastor of the church in Rindge. Published by request.”

  • Lydia Fisk: The title reveals that Mrs. Lydia Fisk was the consort of the Rev. Elisha Fisk and shows the Bible passages cited.
photo of the funeral sermon for Lydia Fisk, 1805

“A sermon, preached July 13, 1805. At the funeral of Mrs. Lydia Fisk, late consort of the Rev. Elisha Fisk, Pastor of the First Church in Wrentham. By Nathanial [i.e., Nathanael] Emmons, D.D. pastor of the church in Franklin.”

  • Alexander Hamilton: This funeral discourse includes a copy of his will, one of his papers and several letters.
photo of the funeral sermon for Alexander Hamilton, 1804

“A discourse, delivered in the city of Albany, occasioned by the ever to be lamented death of Gen. Alexander Hamilton, July 29, 1804. By Eliphalet Nott, A.M. pastor of the Presbyterian Church in said city. To which is added, a paper, written by Gen. Hamilton: containing, his motives and reflections on the causes that led to this fatal catastrophe. Also—his will, Bishop Moore’s letter—and a letter by the Rev. Mr. Mason.”

  • Mrs. Harris: On page 20, this document includes information about a family member’s gravestone.
photo of the funeral sermon for Mrs. William Harris, 1801

“A tribute of filial respect, to the memory of his mother, in a discourse, delivered at Dorchester, Feb. 8, 1801, the Lord’s day after her decease: by Thaddeus Mason Harris.”

  • Capt. William Whittlesey: The appendix mentions the tragic details of his death, along with the crew members who accompanied him.

photo of the funeral sermon for William Whittlesey, 1807

“The providence of God universal; a sermon, delivered at East Guilford, Feb. 1807. Occasioned by the death of Capt. William Whittlesey and others. By John Elliott, A.M. pastor of a church in Guilford. Published at the request of the mourners. [Two lines from Isaiah]”

Funeral sermons are an often-overlooked genealogical treasure, providing details about our ancestors’ lives perhaps not found anywhere else. Be sure to include them in your family history searches to discover more about the stories of your ancestors’ lives.

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How to Research Old Diaries & Personal Journals for Genealogy

Introduction: Mary Harrell-Sesniak is a genealogist, author and editor with a strong technology background. In this guest blog post, Mary gives examples of how your ancestors’ diaries and journals—some available online in various collections—are invaluable to your family history research.

As family historians, we turn to newspapers to corroborate vital records—but often neglect to venture further with our research by exploring charming, firsthand accounts from our ancestors’ diaries and journals. Not only do these personal writings add to the fabric of our research, they enrich genealogical studies by adding unique perspectives into specific time periods, activities and historical events.

Some entries from diaries and journals, as well as complete autobiographies and memoirs, can be found in GenealogyBank’s Historical Book Archives, and others appear as feature pages in GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives.

screenshot of GenealogyBank’s search page for its Historical Book Archives

Screenshot: GenealogyBank’s search page for its Historical Book Archives

I think you’ll enjoy reading some old-time intimate diaries.

The excerpts I’ve chosen from diaries found online present a variety of stories. Two are from brides, one is about shipwreck and imprisonment, another is about young school boys who get in trouble writing diaries, and the last is a description of the First Battle of the Marne during World War I.

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Bridal Diaries (1886 and 1921)

This 1886 article from an Illinois newspaper presents “A Leaf from a Bride’s Diary.” In her witty and entertaining diary entries, this bride recounts the story of her elopement, her impression of the justice of the peace, and her hilariously failed attempt at baking her first pie.

A Leaf from a Bride's Diary, Hyde Park Herald newspaper article 5 June 1886

Hyde Park Herald (Chicago, Illinois), 5 June 1886, page 2

She writes of her elopement with George:

We did not have dear papa’s consent, nor much of anything else.

She was not much impressed with the justice of the peace who married them, remarking:

He looked to me like a man who would snort around the cemetery and tear up the greensward when his wife died in the early spring, and friends would have to chain him to a tree somewhere till his grief had spent itself, and then in the early fall he would lower the top of his old concertina plug hat, and marry a red-eyed widow with a baritone voice and two sons in the penitentiary.

The young bride resolved to make the best of things:

To-day I am a wife with my joyous girlhood, my happy home and the justice of the peace behind me. Life is now real, life is earnest, for we have no girl [servant]. We will not keep a girl at first, George says, for if we did she would have to board at home, as we have only one room, and it is not a very good room either. We take our meals at a restaurant, and the bill of fare is very good.

Her first attempt at baking a pie ended in disaster. She “put in quite a lot of soda or baking powder,” put the pie in the oven, and started sewing while she waited for it to bake. Suddenly:

While thus engaged the oven door was blown off the hinges and the air was filled with subtle odor of some kind which I could not describe. We pulled the pie off the ceiling.

cartoon showing a young bride's failed attempt at baking her first pie, Hyde Park Herald newspaper article 5 June 1886

Hyde Park Herald (Chicago, Illinois), 5 June 1886, page 2

While perusing this next perfunctory diary, take note that some brides are more interested in the “haul” of their shower and wedding gifts than the feelings of friends and family, and that wedding planning has always had its challenges!

extracts from a young bride's diary, Montgomery Advertiser newspaper article 13 November 1921

Montgomery Advertiser (Montgomery, Alabama), 13 November 1921, page 4

A Tale of a Shipwreck and Imprisonment (1795)

The Diary of Donald Campbell (1751-1804) was first published in 1795 and, due to its popularity, republished several times. Follow Campbell’s fascinating story of a journey to India, where he was shipwrecked and imprisoned. Luckily, Campbell was released and wrote his story for us to enjoy centuries later.

extract from a historical book: “A Narrative of the Extraordinary Adventures, and Sufferings by Shipwreck & Imprisonment, of Donald Campbell, Esq. of Barbreck. With the Singular Humors of His Tartar Guide, Hassan Artaz.” 1801 edition, page 260.

Historical book: “A Narrative of the Extraordinary Adventures, and Sufferings by Shipwreck & Imprisonment, of Donald Campbell, Esq. of Barbreck. With the Singular Humors of His Tartar Guide, Hassan Artaz.” 1801 edition, page 260.

For more information on Campbell, see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_Campbell_(traveller).

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School Boys Get in Trouble at School over Diaries (1880)

After receiving a diary from his Uncle Joe, Robert Cummings documented how his days passed. After a friend was caught writing in his diary at school, the frustrated teacher threw it into the fire—making this activity all the more desirous to these young diarists.

In his first entry, Robert certainly sounds committed to keeping a diary:

January 1. This is New Year’s Day. Uncle Joe gave me this diary to-day. I am going to write in it every night just before going to bed. Every boy and girl ought to keep a diary so when he gets a man he can see what he did so when he was a boy. This is New Year’s Day, and there ain’t no school to-day, and I have played with Billy all day. Billy is my goat. I got up and ate breakfast, then I harnessed Billy and saw Uncle Joe and he gave me this diary. He says it is the best thing a boy can do to keep a diary, but he says it is the hardest thing a boy can do. I don’t see where the hard comes in.

extract from Robert Cummings's diary, Portland Daily Press newspaper article 20 March 1880

Portland Daily Press (Portland, Maine), 20 March 1880, page 1

An Account of WWI’s First Battle of the Marne (5-12 September 1914)

Although the author of this diary was only described as an unnamed “citizen of Crepy-en-Valois,” this gripping account from the French newspaper Petit Parisien was reprinted in papers across the world.

Diary of Battle of Marne, Idaho Statesman newspaper article 18 September 1914

Idaho Statesman (Boise, Idaho), 18 September 1914, page 2

For more information on the First Battle of the Marne, see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Battle_of_the_Marne.

As you can see from these examples, diaries and journals provide an extraordinary glimpse into our ancestors’ lives, giving us details of their everyday experiences and, occasionally, insight into important events they participated in or witnessed firsthand. Dig in and find everything from great-great grandma’s first pie to war stories from the battlefield and beyond.  Be sure to include these genealogical treasures in your family history research. True personal stories direct from your ancestors add more interest and meaning to your family tree.

Here are some online sources to locate diaries for genealogy research:

Please share reports of exciting diaries or journals you have located in your genealogy work—either within a personal family collection or online—in the comments section below.

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Tips to Get the Most Out of Your GenealogyBank Subscription

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this guest blog post Gena provides some search tips, and shows some resources available on the GenealogyBank website, to help her readers better understand how to use GenealogyBank with their family history research.

What are you doing this weekend? Have any genealogy research plans? How about spending the weekend with GenealogyBank and getting to know it better? What can you do to get the most out of your GenealogyBank subscription? Here are a few resources and tips to get you started.

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Tip 1: Start with the Learning Center

It’s in the Learning Center that you can find guidance for using GenealogyBank and researching your family history—there is a tab for it on the top of the GenealogyBank home page. The Learning Center page features six different sections, offering you many free resources to better understand how to do family history research—and how GenealogyBank can help you do it.

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Learn Online

From the “Learn Online—Webinars & Video Tutorials” section, I recommend the video “How to Search GenealogyBank” to start.

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GenealogyBank Blog

You can access the GenealogyBank Blog from the Learning Center, which offers hundreds of genealogy articles. Once there you can search the blog by keyword. Articles on the blog include tips, “how-tos,” and case studies. Reading the blog will give you many ideas for researching your family history.

Newsletter Archives

You can also access the extensive archives of the monthly newsletter GenealogyBank News from the Learning Center, providing hundreds more genealogy articles to help you get started tracing your family tree.

The three sections on the lower half of the Learning Center page provide even more resources for family history research.

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Download Free E-Book

Be sure to download the free e-book Getting Started Climbing Your Family Tree—this provides a great introduction.

What’s New?

I also recommend searching on the list of newspapers available under the heading “What’s New?” to get an idea of what newspapers GenealogyBank has to assist you in your genealogy research. Remember that newspapers are constantly being added to the website on a daily basis, so this list is frequently updated.

Call Our Family History Consultants

The Learning Center also provides a toll-free phone line to reach a Family History Consultant; these GenealogyBank experts will show you how to better use the site for your family history research.

Tip 2: Try Our Other Genealogy Databases

GenealogyBank is known for its historical newspaper archives, but there is so much more to the website. Besides newspapers you can find the Social Security Death Index (SSDI), historical documents, historical books, and the U.S. Congressional Serial Set. Why not take some time this weekend to look over these resources and see which ones should be explored further for your family history research?

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U.S. Congressional Serial Set

Ever use the U.S. Congressional Serial Set—a collection of the official papers and documents of Congress? Not sure how it can help your genealogy research? 19th century gems like land records, pensioners’ lists and military registers can be found in this U.S. government collection.

One of my favorite finds from this collection is the list that includes the name of my 4th great-grandmother’s husband, who was pardoned by the President for being a “Rebel Postmaster” during the Civil War.

To learn more about the U.S. Congressional Serial Set, see the article “Using the Congressional Serial Set for Genealogical Research” by Jeffery Hartley, which was excerpted and reprinted on the GenealogyBank blog. Start your search of the U.S. Congressional Serial Set by using the Historical Documents & Records search page.

Tip 3: How to Become a Search Master

Here are three steps to follow to help you become a master at searching for family records in GenealogyBank.

Step 1: Make a Keyword List

First, make a list of the keywords you will be searching on, including the names of your ancestors, places they lived, or events they were a part of. Make note of name variations, including the use of initials for the first or middle name, as well as any alternative spellings. When researching women, remember that they may not be listed by their given name, but instead by their husband’s name—as in Mrs. George Smith. Because names can be misspelled, consider using alternative search techniques like wild cards to catch any mentions that you might otherwise miss.

Step 2: Start Broad, Then Narrow

Second, cast out a wide net and then narrow your search. Techniques for narrowing your search include things like searching for newspapers in just the state that your ancestor was from, or adding other family members’ names, or the name of an organization. If a name is unusual, consider searching by just the surname and then narrowing your search by adding the given name. Casting a wide net is a good technique if your ancestor had a fairly uncommon name—but in the case of Smith, Jones or Adams, it may just result in a bigger research headache.

Step 3: Get Search Engine Savvy

Third, make sure that you understand how to best use the GenealogyBank search engine. This will assist you as you consider different search techniques. From the GenealogyBank Help page you can learn such things as how to search by collection, how to narrow your results, and advanced search techniques like phrase searching and wild cards.

Have some free time this weekend? Spend that time getting the most out of your GenealogyBank subscription and find more information to tell the story of your family history.

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Title Lists – Newspapers, Books & Documents on GenealogyBank

You can quickly see what is included in GenealogyBank by looking at the title lists.

Click on the title list for each section to see what is included in GenealogyBank

Newspaper Title Lists

Historical Books Title List

Historical Documents Title List

For example – here is part of the title list for South Carolina newspapers in GenealogyBank.

Obituaries – From Annual Reports – Congress has chartered many national associations – among them the American Instructors of the Deaf.

Minnesota newspapers 1849-1922, 1986-Today online

Minnesota is 151 years old today.

Minnesota became the 32nd state on May 11, 1858.

The vote wasn’t unanimous – the New York Herald (12 May 1858) reported that the vote was 157 for and 38 against admitting Minnesota into the Union.

(Illustration is from GenealogyBank Historical Books; an advertising card by Henry Beard, printed in St. Paul, MN in 1881).

That’s the wonderful thing about GenealogyBank – we are able to read newspapers from across the country and get the details of the history of our state as that history was made. GenealogyBank has Minnesota newspapers dating from 1849 – before statehood.

Cloquet, MN
Pine Journal (Cloquet, MN). 5/17/2006-Current

Duluth, MN
Budgeteer News (Duluth, MN). 6/9/2006-Current
Duluth News-Tribune. 5/16/1881 – 12/31/1922
Duluth News-Tribune (MN). 1/1/1995-Current
Lake Superior News. 7/4/1878 – 1/27/1881
Lake Superior Review and Weekly Tribune. 1/6/1876 – 2/10/1889
Minnesotian-Herald. 4/24/1869 – 5/11/1878

International Falls, MN
Daily Journal (International Falls, MN). 8/25/2000-Current

Minneapolis, MN
Minneapolis Journal. 1/1/1895 – 12/31/1900
Star Tribune (MN). 1/21/1986-Current

St. Cloud, MN
St. Cloud Times (MN). 2/4/1999-Current

St. Paul, MN
St. Paul Daily Pioneer. 4/28/1849 – 12/29/1872
St. Paul Pioneer Press (MN). 3/25/1988-Current

Two Harbors, MN
Lake County News-Chronicle (Two Harbors, MN). 5/11/2006-Current

Breaking News – GenealogyBank adds 219 newspapers from 37 States

In one of our largest releases ever GenealogyBank today added 219 newspapers from 37 States.

You can search them right now.

With well over 3,500 newspapers on GenealogyBank it has never been easier to find birth records, wedding announcements, obituaries and the biographical details of more than 1 billion of our ancestors and cousins.

(Photo courtesy: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, DC – LC-USW3-F104-009104-E [P&P].


From Lanett, Alabama to Everett, Washington – Los Angeles, California to Nantucket, Massachusetts – GenealogyBank has the facts to help you fill-in the branches on your family tree.

Your membership in GenealogyBank gives you unlimited access to search these 3,500 newspapers as well as the more than 150,000 historical books and documents that we have online. We are the only site to have the most comprehensive version of the SSDI online!

Sign up now and ask your friends to join with us in bringing more records online.

We’ve accomplished a lot already this year – and with your help we can put even more records online.

Give it a try right now - It’s only $9.95 – click here and sign-up now.

List of Titles in Today’s Release
AL Lanett, AL. Valley Times-News 3/18/1999 to Today
AZ Tucson, AZ. Alianza 8/23/1900 to 10/18/1900
AZ Tucson, AZ. Amigos 8/7/1975 to 12/21/1977
AZ Tucson, AZ. Ferrocarril 5/17/1885 to 5/17/1885
AZ Tucson, AZ. Fronterizo 1/16/1892 to 12/17/1892
AZ Tucson, AZ. Iris 6/19/1886 to 6/19/1886
AZ Tucson, AZ. Tucsonense 3/17/1915 to 11/1/1931
CA Berkeley, CA. Grito 9/1/1967 to 6/1/1974
CA Colton, CA. Chicano 4/21/1968 to 6/30/1977
CA Los Angeles, CA. Clamor Publico 6/19/1855 to 6/27/1857
CA Los Angeles, CA. Dos Republicas 3/15/1892 to 9/3/1898
CA Los Angeles, CA. Eco de Mexico 10/3/1924 to 10/27/1924
CA Los Angeles, CA. Heraldo de Mexico 12/9/1917 to 12/28/1928
CA San Francisco, CA. Imparcial 11/20/1931 to 2/1/1935
CA San Francisco, CA. Mefistofeles 3/9/1918 to 7/20/1918
CA San Francisco CA Mercantile Gazette and Prices Current, Shipping List and Register 10/2/1863 to 10/18/1867
CA San Francisco, CA. San Francisco Evening Journal 5/31/1852 to 5/13/1854
CA Santa Monica, CA. Aguila 3/21/1971 to 3/21/1973
CA Stanford, CA. Atisbos 6/1/1975 to 6/1/1978
CO Colorado Springs, CO. Gazette-Telegraph 1/1/1900 to 6/30/1911
CO Trinidad, CO. Anunciador 4/6/1918 to 11/18/1922
CT Bridgeport, CT. Republican Farmer 1/5/1847 to 12/25/1849
CT New Haven, CT. New Haven Palladium 7/19/1861 to 12/31/1863
CT New London, CT. Republican Advocate 1/9/1822 to 1/29/1823
DC Washington, DC. United States Telegraph 8/28/1827 to 1/29/1831
DE Dover, DE. Delaware State News 5/13/2008 to Today
FL Tampa, FL. Ecos 7/21/1959 to 7/21/1959
FL Ybor City, FL. Diario de Tampa 6/6/1908 to 7/14/1911
GA Louisville, GA. Louisville Gazette 5/12/1802 to 3/2/1811
GA Marietta, GA. Marietta Daily Journal 12/7/1993 to Today
GA Savannah, GA. Savannah Republican 9/4/1802 to 10/22/1805
GA Savannah, GA. Southern Banner 3/23/1833 to 12/9/1837
GA Thomasville, GA. Thomasville Times-Enterprise 11/14/2007 to Today
HI Hilo, HI. Hawaii. Tribune Herald 5/30/2008 to Today
IA Bettendorf, IA. Bettendorf News 2/5/2004 to Today
IA Clinton, IA. Clinton Herald 8/29/2007 to Today
IA Davenport, IA. Quad City Business Journal 3/1/2004 to Today
ID Blackfoot, ID. Blackfoot Register 7/10/1880 to 7/31/1886
ID Idaho City, ID. Idaho Falls Times 7/9/1891 to 9/16/1920
ID Idaho City, ID. Idaho Register 10/13/1899 to 1/17/1908
IL Chicago, IL. Latin Times 2/1/1958 to 5/2/1975
IL Chicago, IL. Sunday Times 1/12/1873 to 12/31/1876
IL Chicago, IL. Vida Latina 12/21/1959 to 12/21/1959
IL Rock Island, IL. Rock Island News 4/29/2007 to Today
IL Shawneetown, IL. Illinois Gazette 1/9/1819 to 9/18/1819
IL Vandalia, IL. Illinois Advocate 11/2/1833 to 8/5/1835
IN Decatur, IN. Decatur Daily Democrat 3/112008 to Today
IN Indianapolis, IN. Indiana Democrat 10/30/1830 to 3/9/1838
IN Vincennes, IN. Indiana Centinel 3/14/1817 to 12/30/1820
KS Topeka, KS. Adelante 6/10/1972 to 6/19/1977
KS Topeka, KS. Kansas Semi-Weekly Capital 1/1/1897 to 8/31/1897
KY Henderson, KY. Gleaner 4/14/2006 to Today
KY Lexington, KY. Kentucky Gazette 3/15/1794 to 12/28/1837
KY Middlesboro, KY. Daily News 2/1/2007 to Today
LA New Orleans, LA. Abeja 1/3/1829 to 12/26/1831
LA New Orleans, LA. Mississippi 10/12/1808 to 10/12/1808
LA New Orleans, LA. New Orleans Daily Creole 7/1/1856 to 1/10/1857
MA Beverly, MA. Saturday Morning Citizen 10/13/1858 to 2/24/1893
MA Boston, MA. Trumpet & Universalist Magazine 10/17/1829 to 3/8/1834
MA Cambridge, MA. Daily Banner 3/1/2007 to Today
MA Dedham, MA. Norfolk Advertiser 7/13/1832 to 2/2/1839
MA Dedham, MA. Norfolk Democrat 2/9/1839 to 12/28/1849
MA Lowell, MA. Lowell Daily Citizen and News 8/1/1871 to 1/31/1872
MA Lowell, MA. Lowell Mercury 11/13/1830 to 12/6/1833
MA Lowell, MA. Lowell Patriot 3/27/1835 to 6/29/1837
MA Lynn, MA. Daily Item 9/23/2005 to Today
MA Nantucket, MA. Nantucket Inquirer 3/13/1811 to 12/1/1832
MA New Bedford, MA. New Bedford Gazette 9/5/1831 to 1/25/1838
MA New Bedford, MA. New Bedford Register 1/22/1840 to 1/6/1846
MA New Bedford, MA. New-Bedford Mercury 6/29/1821 to 6/27/1851
MA Springfield, MA. Springfield Republican 3/23/1861 to 12/31/1910
MD Baltimore, MD. Sun 1/8/1844 to 7/3/1844
MD Fredrick, MD. Republican Citizen & State Advertiser 9/28/1827 to 9/23/1831
MD Fredericktown, MD. Republican Gazette & General Advertiser 7/6/1822 to 11/16/1822 MD La Mesilla, MD. Defensor del Pueblo 3/7/1891 to 3/14/1891
MN St. Paul, MN. St. Paul Daily Pioneer 4/28/1849 to 12/29/1872
MO St. Louis, MO. Missouri Gazette and Public Advertiser 3/23/1808 to 9/18/1818
MS Natchez, MS. Southern Clarion 5/13/1831 to 11/18/1831
MS Natchez, MS. Southern Galaxy 5/22/1828 to 2/26/1829
MS Natchez, MS. Statesman & Gazette 5/1/1828 to 2/7/1829
MS Starkville, MS. Starkville Daily News 3/9/2008 to Today
MS West Point, MS. Daily Times Leader 3/27/2008 to Today
NC Tryon, NC. Tryon Daily Bulletin 4/14/2007 to Today
NE Omaha, NE. Danske Pioneer 10/17/1895 to 10/10/1901
NH Manchester, NH. Telescope 1/13/1849 to 10/13/1849
NM Albuquerque, NM. Albuquerque Journal 9/1/1913 to 12/31/1913
NM Albuquerque, NM. Bandera Americana 8/10/1901 to 5/13/1909
NM Albuquerque, NM. Daily Citizen 2/10/1887 to 8/13/1891
NM Albuquerque, NM. Defensor del Pueblo 6/27/1891 to 5/28/1892
NM Albuquerque, NM. Estrella Mejicana 10/11/1890
NM Albuquerque, NM. Estrella Mexicana 10/4/1890
NM Albuquerque, NM. Evening Citizen 12/24/1892 to 8/6/1894
NM Albuquerque, NM. Hormiga de Oro 11/7/1903 to 11/7/1903
NM Albuquerque, NM. Indito 11/24/1900 to 4/4/1901
NM Albuquerque, NM. News 1/23/1886 to 12/6/1886
NM Albuquerque, NM. Opinion Publica 7/2/1892 to 3/2/1907
NM Albuquerque, NM. Pueblo 2/17/1900 to 2/17/1900
NM Albuquerque, NM. Revista 12/5/1881 to 12/5/1881
NM Albuquerque, NM. Union de Albuquerque 1/20/1893 to 1/20/1893
NM Albuquerque, NM. Voz de Nuevo Mexico 9/1/1894 to 9/1/1894
NM Columbus, NM. Columbus News 7/9/1909 to 5/26/1911
NM Las Cruces, NM .Doña Ana County Republican 3/11/1897 to 2/15/1902
NM Las Cruces, NM. Grito del Norte 8/24/1968 to 6/1/1973
NM Las Cruces, NM. Labrador 9/8/1896 to 6/14/1912
NM Las Cruces, NM. Las Cruces Daily News 3/5/1889 to 11/23/1889
NM Las Cruces, NM. Las Cruces Democrat 2/3/1892 to 11/29/1899
NM Las Cruces, NM. Las Vegas Daily Gazette 7/27/1880 to 1/31/1886
NM Las Cruces, NM. Mesilla Valley Democrat 9/2/1886 to 12/2/1890
NM Las Cruces, NM. Misionero Bautista: Organo Oficial de la Convencion Bautista Hispano-Americana de Nuevo Mexico 9/15/1948 to 6/21/1951
NM Las Cruces, NM. Newmans Semi-Weekly 4/2/1881 to 4/20/1881
NM Las Cruces, NM. Thirty-Four 4/16/1879 to 10/27/1880
NM Mesilla, NM. Mesilla News 2/8/1879 to 11/24/1883
NM Raton, NM. Union 7/16/1898 to 7/16/1898
NM Raton, NM. Weekly News 5/6/1904 to 6/24/1904
NM San Marcial, NM. Libertad 4/15/1896 to 4/15/1896
NM Santa Fe, NM. Boletin Popular 4/1/1886 to 5/30/1895
NM Santa Fe, NM. Cachiporrota 10/8/1890 to 10/28/1890
NM Santa Fe, NM. Capitol 9/14/1901 to 9/14/1901
NM Santa Fe, NM. Daily New Mexican 4/2/1872 to 6/28/1875
NM Santa Fe, NM. Gato 5/23/1894 to 7/27/1894
NM Santa Fe, NM. Guia de Santa Fe 10/2/1886 to 10/16/1886
NM Santa Fe, NM. New Mexican Review 3/30/1885 to 8/30/1906
NM Santa Fe, NM. Santa Fe Weekly New Mexican and Livestock Journal 10/8/1885 to 12/19/1895
NM Santa Fe, NM. Santa Fe Weekly Sun 6/17/1893 to 6/17/1893
NM Santa Rosa, NM. Santa Rosa Sun 10/31/1919 to 5/28/1920
NM Silver City, NM. Grant County Herald 6/15/1878 to 6/15/1878
NM Silver City, NM. Herald 4/1/1876 to 4/1/1876
NM Silver City, NM. New Southwest 1/7/1882 to 1/7/1882
NM Silver City, NM. Silver City Enterprise 10/22/1886 to 8/23/1895
NM Silver City, NM. Silver City Independent 8/3/1897 to 11/5/1901
NM Socorro, NM. Defensor del Pueblo 12/26/1913 to 4/9/1943
NM Socorro, NM. Estrella de Nuevo Mexico 8/7/1896 to 3/26/1897
NM Socorro, NM. Golondrina 2/12/1898 to 2/12/1898
NM Socorro, NM. Industrial Advertiser 6/10/1893 to 8/24/1895
NM Socorro, NM. Progreso 5/24/1887 to 7/26/1887
NM Socorro, NM. Republicano 3/16/1901 to 3/16/1901
NM Socorro, NM. Socorro Bullion 4/24/1886 to 9/11/1886
NM Springer, NM. Colfax County Stockman 7/8/1893 to 12/20/1913
NM Springer, NM. Estandarte de Springer 12/5/1889 to 2/9/1893
NM Springer, NM. Sentinel 2/22/1901 to 12/27/1901
NM Taos, NM. Revista de Taos 2/20/1904 to 2/20/1904
NM White Oaks, NM. Lincoln County Leader 6/24/1893 to 6/24/1893
NM White Oaks, NM. New Mexico Interpreter 11/15/1889 to 11/15/1889
NY New York, NY. Cacara Jicara 10/30/1897 to 12/6/1897
NY New York, NY. Cubano 4/26/1890
NY New York, NY. Doctrina de Marti 7/25/1896 to 5/6/1898
NY New York, NY. Eco de Cuba 6/22/1855 to 2/1/1856
NY New York, NY. Grafico 11/25/1928 to 1/3/1931
NY New York, NY. Mulato 3/11/1854 to 6/17/1854
NY New York, NY. Papagayo 2/15/1855 to 4/16/1855
NY New York, NY. Sociale Republik 4/24/1858 to 4/16/1859
NY New York, NY. Spectator 5/4/1840 to 5/29/1841
NY New York, NY. Statesman 9/11/1821 to 10/14/1825
NY Plattsburgh, NY. Plattsburgh Herald 1/20/1815 to 7/21/1815
OH Cincinnati, OH. Cincinnati Daily Gazette 1/1/1867 to 1/3/1883
OH Elyria, OH. Elyria Republican 2/12/1835 to 12/27/1837
OH Painesville, OH. Painesville Telegraph 9/25/1822 to 2/19/1845
OH Pomeroy, OH. Daily Sentinel 10/17/2005 to Today
OH St Marys, OH. Evening Leader 4/2/2008 to Today
OH Wapakoneta, OH. Wapakoneta Daily News 3/10/2008 to Today
OK Hobart, OK. Hobart Republican 1/4/1907 to 6/30/1920
OK McAlester, OK. McAlester News – Capital & Democrat 5/5/2008 to Today
OK Perry, OK Perry. Journal 10/3/1901 to 9/1/1904
OK Perry, OK Perry. Republican 1/1/1914 to 12/28/1922
OR Portland, OR. Oregonian 10/15/1916 to 11/4/1916
PA Philadelphia PA. Philadelphia Inquirer 1/1/1845 to 10/31/1860
PA Philadelphia PA. Weekly Aurora 2/28/1815 to 12/27/1819
PA York PA. York Weekly Record 1/23/2004 to Today
RI Pawtucket RI. Pawtucket Times 9/3/1901 to 2/28/1921
SC Georgetown SC. Winyaw Intelligencer 1/1/1825 to 6/27/1833
SC Union SC. Union Daily Times 1/2/2006 to Today
TX Austin TX. Austin City Gazette 11/6/1839 to 8/17/1842
TX Austin TX. Gaceta de Texas 5/25/1813

TX Austin TX. Telegraph and Texas Register 10/10/1835 to 3/12/1836
TX Austin, TX. Texas Gazette 11/7/1829 to 2/18/1832
TX Barzoria, TX. Advocate of Peoples Rights 6/15/1833 to 2/22/1834
TX Beaumont, TX. Beaumont Enterprise and Journal 8/1/1910 to 8/31/1910
TX Beeville TX. Beeville Bee 6/12/1896 to 5/25/1900
TX Brownsville, TX. Cronista del Valle 10/8/1924 to 2/28/1930
TX Brownsville, TX. Daily Cosmopolitan 8/19/1881 to 8/18/1885
TX Brownsville, TX. Heraldo de Brownsville 1/12/1936 to 2/29/1940
TX Brownsville, TX. Progreso 1/4/1876 to 12/31/1876
TX Brownsville, TX. Zaragoza 12/20/1865 to 12/27/1865
TX Clarksville, TX. Standard 4/29/1848 to 12/29/1882
TX Corpus Christi, TX. Horizonte 11/5/1879 to 11/13/1880
TX Corpus Christi, TX. Nueces County News 5/12/1938 to 6/29/1939
TX Corpus Christi, TX. Verdad 6/2/1950 to 12/13/1959
TX Corpus Christi, TX. Weekly Labor Herald 8/1/1840 to 12/26/1857
TX El Paso, TX. Atalaya Bautista: Semanario Evangelico Bautista 1/2/1908 to 12/21/1930
TX El Paso, TX. Buena Prensa : Organo del Comite de la Asociacion del Mismo Nombre 9/15/1923
TX El Paso, TX. Continental 12/12/1934 to 12/26/1959
TX El Paso, TX. Correo del Bravo 3/13/1913 to 5/19/1913
TX El Paso, TX. El Paso del Norte 3/12/1904 to 11/18/1904
TX El Paso, TX. Latino Americano 1/14/1891 to 3/28/1891
TX El Paso, TX. Los Dos Americas 3/7/1888 to 7/25/1898
TX El Paso, TX. Monitor 1/30/1897 to 1/26/1900
TX El Paso, TX. Noticias 10/14/1899 to 12/30/1899
TX El Paso, TX. Observador Fronterizo 4/4/1886 to 10/24/1886
TX El Paso, TX. Opinion Publica 5/11/1895 to 5/11/1895
TX El Paso, TX. Patria 6/18/1919 to 8/12/1923
TX El Paso, TX. Renacimiento 5/28/1923 to 6/14/1923
TX El Paso, TX. Republica 11/1/1919 to 5/23/1923
TX Houston, TX. Gaceta Mexicana 2/15/1927 to 9/15/1928
TX Kingsville, TX. Eco 4/1/1931 to 12/1/1941
TX Kingsville, TX. Notas de Kingsville 2/26/1953 to 2/12/1959
TX Kingsville, TX. Tex. Mex. Reflector 1/21/1921 to 4/21/1947
TX Laredo, TX. Alfa 1/21/1957 to 5/21/1959
TX Laredo, TX. Correo de Laredo 7/16/1891 to 1/24/1893
TX Laredo, TX. Democrata Fronterizo 12/8/1917 to 6/6/1919
TX Laredo, TX. Evolucion 1/1/1917 to 2/29/1920
TX San Antonio, TX. Heraldo de Mexicano 10/9/1927 to 3/30/1930
TX San Antonio, TX. Imparcial de Texas 12/20/1917 to 3/31/1921
TX San Antonio, TX. Pan American Labor Express 12/4/1918 to 12/4/1918
TX San Antonio, TX. Prensa 3/7/1933 to 7/18/1934
TX San Marcos, TX. San Marcos Daily Record 4/12/2008 to Today
UT Salt Lake City, UT. Salt Lake Telegram 2/3/1902 to 12/31/1922
UT Salt Lake City, UT. Salt Lake Tribune 1/1/1875 to 12/28/1893
VT St. Albans, VT. St. Albans Daily Messenger 5/9/1839 to 12/31/1922
WA Everett, WA. Daily Herald 8/16/2005 to Today

Virginia is 401 years old today!

Happy Birthday to Virginia!
The first colonists arrived in Jamestown, Virginia on May 14, 1607 and with ups and downs the Commonwealth has prospered ever since.

GenealogyBank.com is packed with early Americana – including millions of Virginia items go back to the 1700s.

Newspapers
GenealogyBank has more than 100 Virginia newspapers – containing more than 2.3 Million articles. There are multiple titles going back to the 1700s and early 1800s.
Click here for a complete list

Also – GenealogyBank has more than 4 Million Virginia obituaries and death records in the America’s Obituaries and Social Security Death Index (SSDI) sections.

Other Virginia Resources in GenealogyBank

Search for Virginia documents in:
American State Papers and US Serial Set in the Historical Documents section.
There are thousands of Virginia documents in the Historical Books section that are unique to GenealogyBank.


For example – here is a petition to Congress signed by the local Virginia residents south of the James River that were seeking improved conditions on the Turnpike to Richmond.



Here is an example of an early Virginia funeral sermon – for Mrs. Ann Boyd who died 1819.



Terrific sources.

Beyond GenealogyBank – here are other useful sites for Virginia research
Virginia Census Records
1850, 1880, 1900 – Free Online – FamilySearchLabs


Virginia Digital Books Online
American Memory Project
Documenting the American South

Google Books
Making of America

Library of Virgina – Virginia Land Records

Virginia Genealogical Society
Be sure to see the back issues of their newsletter that you can download and read online

Virginia Historical Society
Current issue of Virginia Magazine of History & Biography
Be sure to see their online research guides

Virginia Vital Records
See the collection at the Library of Virginia
Virginia Department of Vital Records