A Good Woman Can Be Hard to Find…

When researching your family history, it can be very difficult to find information about women in the early 19th Century—finding genealogical resources that actually give women’s names and family details is challenging. It was common in the 19th Century for newspapers and government records to be brief and give only the basic information about a household in the census, or an entry in a birth register.From 1790 through 1840 the census only named one person from each household. This person was designated as the Head of the household. Most Americans—men and women alike—were simply not named in the early censuses.Birth and church registers often took the same approach as the census and only briefly recorded the facts of a birth.

A typical entry might be:
1812 July 28. A son, to Walter Hickenlooper.


What was the son’s or the mother’s name?
Because of these often-incomplete early records, genealogists have to dig deeper to find sources that give more information in order to fill in the missing details of our family trees. For the pre-1850 period newspapers are an import resource for that information, providing obituaries, birth and marriage notices, news reports, and other articles that provide stories and details about our ancestors’ lives often missing in government and church records.This Brundage obituary notice illustrates the point. It appeared in the
Hudson River Chronicle which was published in Sing Sing, New York, on 8 October 1839. The obituary appeared on page 3.


The 1820 Census records a John Brundage living in Bedford, New York, with his wife (unnamed) and family.

However, in the 1840 census neither husband nor wife were listed. Why? The census provides no answers—but this obituary notice does. It tells us that John has previously died and that his widow (Rachael Brundage) died on 26 September 1839 at age “about 44 years”—well before the 1840 census.

From this short obituary notice we have gained two important clues:

· Clue #1. Name: Rachael Brundage, a widow of John Brundage; her age; her date and place of death
· Clue #2. Name of husband: John Brundage, and the fact that he had predeceased her

In addition to the details about Rachael and John Brundage, the article has two other obituary notices. Look at the facts that we find about these women: Harriet Sutherland and Deborah Cornwell.

Harriet Sutherland
The notice tells us that Harriet Sutherland died on 25 September 1839 at “Middle Patent” (North Castle, New York), the widow of John Sutherland. It gives her age as “aged about 46 years.” Two very helpful clues here:

· Clue #1. Name: Harriet Sutherland, a widow of John Sutherland; her age; her date and place of death
· Clue #2. Name of husband: John Sutherland, and the fact that he had predeceased her
Deborah Cornwell
And in the third obituary notice we learn that “Miss Deborah Cornwell, daughter of the late Jonathan Cornwell” died 6 September 1839 in Henrietta, Monroe County, New York, at the “fiftieth year of her age” and that she was “formerly of New Castle (New York).”

Two valuable clues:

· Clue #1. Name: Deborah Cornwell, a daughter of Jonathan Cornwell; her age; her date and place of death; that she formerly lived in New Castle, New York
· Clue #2. Name of father: Jonathan Cornwell, and the fact that he had predeceased her.
It can be difficult to find a good woman in the early 19th Century—but newspapers are a terrific genealogical resource and GenealogyBank has more online newspapers than you will find anywhere else.

Pittsfield, MA Historical Newspapers 1788-1922; 1998-Today

GenealogyBank has set up a handy site for searching Pittsfield, Massachusetts’ archive of historical newspapers: 1788-1922, 1998-Today.

Pittsfield, Massachusetts Newspapers
Click here to search Pittsfield, MA newspapers 1788-1922
Click here to search Pittsfield, MA obituaries from 1998-Today

Or click on the individual titles below to search a specific Pittsfield, MA newspaper:
Berkshire Chronicle 1788-1790
Berkshire County Eagle 1826-1828
Berkshire County Whig 1841-1849
Berkshire Eagle 1998-Today
Berkshire Gazette 1798-1800
Berkshire Reporter 1807-1815
Pittsfield Sun 1861-1873
Sun 1795-1922

TIP: Other Handy Massachusetts Sites:
Search over 275 Massachusetts newspapers:
Click Here to Search Massachusetts Newspapers 1690-1975
Click Here to Search Massachusetts Obituaries 1985-Today

Massachusetts Death Records
Click Here to Search Massachusetts Deaths 1937-2009 (Free)

National Archives, Library of Congress Documents Go Online

The National Archives and the Library of Congress announced today that they have begun loading digital copies of their materials on a new site called the World Digital Library.

Archivist of the United States Allen Weinstein and Librarian of Congress James H. Billington announced today that the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) has become a founding partner in the World Digital Library (WDL).

NARA will contribute digital versions of important documents from its collections to the WDL, which will be launched for the international public in early 2009.

These documents include Civil War photographs, naturalization and immigration records of famous Americans, the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution of the United States, the Bill of Rights, the Emancipation Proclamation, and photographs by Ansel Adams, Dorothea Lange and Lewis Hine. Examples of the images that NARA is contributing to the World Digital Library are now available online.

Example of a naturalization document – Declaration of Intent of Maria von Trapp, 01/21/1944 – that was put online by NARA. NARA ARC Identifier 596198.

The WDL will include representative examples from these document categories – not the complete backfiles of these documents.

The complete run of the American State Papers is already available on GenealogyBank. See GenealogyBank’s Historical Documents collection where you will find military records, casualty lists, Revolutionary and Civil War pension requests, widow’s claims, orphan petitions, land grants and much more including the complete American State Papers (1789-1838) and all genealogical content carefully selected from the U.S. Serial Set (1817-1980). More than 146,000 reports, lists and documents. GenealogyBank has the most comprehensive collection of these US Government reports and documents available to genealogists online. GenealogyBank is adding more documents to this collection every month.

Proposed in 2005 by the Library of Congress in cooperation with UNESCO, the WDL will make available on the Internet significant primary materials from countries and cultures around the world. The project’s goal is to promote international understanding and to provide a resource for use by students, teachers, and general audiences.

“We are pleased that our fellow Federal cultural institution, the National Archives, is joining the Library of Congress in the early stages of this project,” said Billington.

“NARA’s participation not only will ensure that the World Digital Library contains a full record of the American experience, but it also will encourage archives around the world to join with their counterparts from the library world in this important initiative.”

“The mission of the National Archives is to make U.S. Government records widely accessible,” said Weinstein. “The World Digital Library will be a valuable conduit for us to share some of our nation’s treasures with others around the world. We look forward to working with the Library of Congress on this important project.”

In addition to NARA and the Library of Congress, the WDL project partners include cultural institutions from Brazil, China, Egypt, Israel, Russia, Saudi Arabia and many other countries. Click here for more Information about the WDL.

The Library of Congress, the nation’s oldest Federal cultural institution, is the world’s preeminent reservoir of knowledge, providing unparalleled integrated resources to Congress and the American people. Founded in 1800, the Library seeks to further human understanding and wisdom by providing access to knowledge through its magnificent collections. The Library seeks to spark the public’s imagination and celebrate human achievement through its programs and exhibits. In doing so, the institution helps foster the informed and involved citizenry upon which American democracy depends. The Library serves the public, scholars, members of Congress and their staffs through its 22 reading rooms on Capitol Hill. Many of the rich resources and treasures of the Library may also be accessed through its
award-winning web site and via interactive exhibitions on a new, personalized web site.
.

Peruvian Vital Records 1874-1930; Spanish Parish Registers go online

FamilySearchLabs.org has put the birth, marriage and death records of Lima, Peru for 1874-1930; and the Ciudad Rodrigo (Spain) Parish registers for 1550-1930 online.

This has been my third blog posting today about new Hispanic family history records.

Earlier I wrote about the more than 230 Spanish language newspapers – 1808-1977 going live on GenealogyBank and that FamilySearch Indexing now has a Spanish language website.

GenealogyBank is the best and largest source for online Hispanic newspapers.

It’s a great day for Hispanic genealogy!

Peruvian Vital Records – 1874-1930
The civil registration records: births, marriages and deaths from the Registro Civil de Lima, Peru are now searchable on FamilySearchLabs. These records were digitized and indexed from 227 (35mm) microfilm in the vaults of the Family History Library in Salt Lake City. For more information on Lima’s vital records see: Officina Registral Lima

Ciudad Rodrigo (Spain) Parish registers for 1550-1930
Roman Catholic parish registers from the Ciudad Rodrigo Diocese in Spain from 1550-1930 are now searchable at FamilySearchLabs. These records include baptisms, marriages, burials and other church records.

It’s Wild Bill Hickok’s Day ….

Wild Bill Hickok – James Butler Hickok – was born on May 27, 1837 in Troy Grove, Illinois.

Famous in movies, films and hundreds of newspaper articles – he is central to the legends of the Old West.

Newspapers serialized his story and pictured him fighting bears, outlaws and Confederate agents. Images by Van Ben.



Newspapers reported the high moments and the low ones – like the time he mistakenly killed a friend – Special Deputy Marshall Mike Williams.
(Aberdeen (SD) American – 10 Jan 1908).


They called him a hero and a coward (Columbus Daily Enquirer – 11 May 1899).


But the real coward was his killer Jack McCall who shot him – in the back – in 1876.

He was shot in the back and killed by Jack McCall in 1876 in Deadwood, SD.

GenealogyBank has over 3,400 newspapers packed with historical articles about the Old West right up to today. Give it a try right now.

On the Road Again – Delaware Genealogical Society

I am on the road again.

Last night I had the opportunity to speak to the Delaware Genealogical Society about GenealogyBank.

Hat’s off to the Society and particularly to DGS President Phoebe Doherty, her husband Tom and to the incoming DGS President Fran Allmond and her husband Charles for their invitation and hospitality. The Union City Grille was a great place to eat.
What a terrific group. The hall was packed and they asked lot’s of questions ranging from the coverage of Delaware newspapers in GenealogyBank and a non-stop presentation of the variety of examples found in historical newspapers.

Newspapers are a terrific resource. They give us these details and more.

GenealogyBank has more than 1 billion names – and we’re adding more than 4 million articles every month.

Give it a try right now – only $9.95.

Jacquelyn Ladd Ricker – 1935-2008

Long time office manager of the Connecticut Society of Genealogists has passed away.
A prolific genealogist and writer – she was a long time presence in Connecticut genealogical circles. She is best known for her republication of the Barbour Index to Connecticut Vital Records which was issued as a CD-ROM under the title: The Ricker Compilation of Vital Records of Early Connecticut Based on the Barbour Collection of Connecticut Town Vital Records and Other Statistical Sources.

Our condolences to the family.

Here is her obituary – posted by permission of GenealogyBank.com

Star-Gazette (Elmira, NY) – April 4, 2008
RICKER, Jacquelyn Ladd 1935-2008
Was born September 25th, 1935 in Elmira, NY, and passed away March 30th, 2008 in Payson, AZ. Mrs. Ricker graduated from Southside High School in Elmira, NY, and then attended Upsala College in East Orange, NJ. Mrs. Ricker returned to her native Elmira, and worked at the American Bridge Division of the U.S. Steel Corp in Elmira, where she met her husband.


After moving to Glastonbury, CT, she volunteered in several civic organizations while rearing their two sons. Then Mrs. Ricker began a career in genealogy and worked her way up to be Office Manager of the Connecticut Society of Genealogists. During this time, she became an active member in several genealogy organizations. She also became a prolific researcher of genealogy archives and was a noted author and editor of several genealogy publications. After retiring from The Connecticut Society of Genealogists, Mrs. Ricker moved to Payson, AZ with her husband and continued her extensive Genealogy research and publishing.

She also has been active with the Library Friends of the Payson Public Library, The Gila County Historical Society and The Zane Grey Cabin Foundation. Mrs. Ricker was predeceased earlier this year by her husband of nearly 50 years, David T. Ricker. Mrs. Ricker is survived by her sons, David W. Ricker of Dallas, TX, and Dr. Jonathan E. Ricker (Nancy) of Danville, KY. She is also survived by her mother, Arthea Johnson of Prescott, AZ; two brothers, William E. Ladd (Mary) of Scottsdale, AZ and Gary A. Ladd (Vivian); two grandchildren, Jeffrey L Ricker and Rachel E. Ricker, both of Danville, KY; four nephews and one niece.

A celebration of life will be held from 11:00 a.m. to noon Wednesday, April 2nd, 2008, at Messinger Payson Funeral Home, 302 W. Aero Dr., Payson, AZ. Memorial gifts may be sent in Mrs. Ricker’s honor to the Library of Friends, Payson Public Library, 328 N. McLane Rd., Payson, AZ 85541; Payson Humane Society, 812 S. McLane Rd, Payson, AZ 85541; RTA Hospice, 511 S. Mud Springs Rd., Payson, AZ 85541; and the Zane Grey Cabin Foundation, 201 N. McLane Rd., Payson, AZ 85541.

¡Hola! – Hispanic Newspapers added to GenealogyBank

GenealogyBank has launched the Next Big Thing in genealogy – online resources:
Hispanic Newspapers.

This is the single largest compilation of Hispanic newspapers in the country.

Cronista del Valle. Brownsville, TX – 20 April 1925

GenealogyBank has added the first 20 titles from 4 States – (IN, MO, NM, TX) -1855 to 1956.
The entire collection of Hispanic newspapers will span 1808-1980.
This is unique data not available online anywhere else.
Search on every word – find birth, marriage and obituary announcements – historical events even the advertisements.
Bejareno. San Antonio, TX 17 May 1856

More content will be added monthly.

Try it right now for 30 days for $9.95 Click
Amigo del Hogar. Indiana Harbour, IN 23 June 1929
…………………

This week we added:
Indiana.
Amigo del Hogar. Indiana Harbour, IN. 11/22/1925 to 4/13/1930
Missouri
Cosmopolita. Kansas City, MO. 8/22/1914 to 11/8/1919
New Mexico
Democrata. Las Cruces, NM. 6/14/1894 to 11/24/1894
Eco del Rio Grande. Las Cruces, NM. 2/12/1876 to 3/2/1882
Eco del Valle. Las Cruces, NM. 11/18/1905 to 5/6/1916
Empresa. Las Cruces, NM. 9/26/1896 to 6/12/1897
Estrella. Las Cruces, NM. 2/1/1911 to 5/18/1935
Fronterizo. Las Cruces, NM. 4/29/1875 to 4/29/1875
Gaceta Popular. Las Cruces, NM. 10/24/1919 to 10/24/1919
Labrador. Las Cruces, NM. 9/8/1896 to 6/14/1912
Las Cruces Democrat. Las Cruces, NM. 6/21/1899 to 10/11/1899
Observador Fronterizo. Las Cruces, NM. 9/11/1888 to 10/30/1888
Promotor Escolar. Las Cruces, NM. 9/12/1891 to 2/16/1892
Defensor del Pueblo. Socorro, NM. 12/26/1913 to 4/9/1943
Texas
Cronista del Valle. Brownsville, TX. 10/8/1924 to 2/28/1930
Defensor. Edinburg, TX. 2/7/1930 to 12/25/1931
Azote. El Paso, TX. 9/17/1922 to 4/15/1923
Ciudanano. El Paso, TX. 3/12/1892 to 4/23/1892
Continental. El Paso, TX. 9/20/1936 to 8/28/1938
Bejareno. San Antonio, TX. 2/7/1855 to 7/28/1956

GenealogyBank – Added Over 42.5 Million Records Last Year!

GenealogyBank reported explosive growth in 2007 increasing its digital archive with over 40 million historical newspaper articles and modern obituaries.

GenealogyBank is quickly becoming the fastest growing newspaper archive for family history research with over 3,300 U.S. newspapers in all 50 states. The exclusive collection features newspapers from the 1600’s to the present day with over 106 million historical newspaper articles and more than 26 million obituaries now available for family history research. Each article is a single digital image that can be printed and preserved for family scrapbooks.

To celebrate, GenealogyBank is currently offering a 30-Day trial for only $9.95.

“We are excited about the rapid growth of our newspaper collection and the vast breadth of family history information we now have available” says Genealogy Director for NewsBank, inc., Tom Kemp. “GenealogyBank provides exclusive access to more than four centuries of important genealogical information such as obituaries, marriage and birth announcements as well as interesting and often surprising facts about our ancestors.”

Latest additions to the GenealogyBank historical newspaper collection features big city dailies and regional weeklies including: San Jose (CA) Mercury 1886-1922, Baltimore (MD) Sun – 1837-1901, Kansas City Star (MO) 1815-1922, NY Herald 1844-1863, Philadelphia Evening Post – 1804-1912, Philadelphia Inquirer 1860-1922 And many more. View entire list.

Kemp added, “Toward our stated goal of creating the single most comprehensive resource of newspapers for family history research, GenealogyBank will continue to digitize millions of family history records in the upcoming months that will greatly expand and increase the depth of our collections. We will begin releasing Hispanic American Newspapers, 1808-1980 in February along with hundreds of additional historical newspaper titles.”

About GenealogyBank: GenealogyBank, a division of NewsBank, inc., supplies individuals interested in family history research with over 300 years of U.S. newspapers, government documents and other historical records in all 50 states. GenealogyBank contains over 214 million family history records including obituaries, birth, marriage, death notices and much more.

Wow, at this great price – give it a try right now. I have been finding hundreds of articles, articles with critical new information about my family – write me and tell me what you find.

Try it right now – click: GenealogyBank