List of Recent Newspaper Obituaries Going Online in GenealogyBank

GenealogyBank adds more records online every day to give you the content you need to explore your genealogy. In the next few weeks we will be adding recent obituaries from more than 20 newspapers from 8 states—additional online newspaper obituaries to keep adding resources for your family history research.

Recent obituaries and death notices from newspapers in Florida, Georgia, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Washington are being added to our Recent Obituaries Collection (1977 – Today), adding thousands more obituaries for your genealogy research. Look for these recent obits to go live online soon on the New Content page.

Newspaper Death Notices & Obituaries Collage

Here’s a list of recent obituaries coming to the obituary archives soon:

Plant City Observer (Plant City, Florida)

Obituaries:  07/19/2012 – Current

East Coweta Journal (Senoia, Georgia)

Obituaries:  11/11/2010 – Current

Fayette Chronicle (Fayetteville, Georgia)

Obituaries:  08/25/2011 – Current

Fayette County News (Fayetteville, Georgia)

Obituaries:  12/02/2010 – Current

Today in Peachtree City (Fayetteville, Georgia)

Obituaries:  05/02/2012 – Current

Wicked Local: Avon (Stoughton, Massachusetts)

Obituaries:  06/16/2009 – Current

Death Notices:  12/01/2008 – 04/21/2009

Eden Prairie Sun-Current (Eden Prairie, Minnesota)

Obituaries: added 2/22/2010 – 9/13/2011

Edina Sun – Current (Edina, Minnesota)

Obituaries: added 1/28/2010 – 9/13/2011

Excelsior – Shorewood Sun-Sailor (Excelsior, Minnesota)

Obituaries: added 2/22/2010 – 2/22/2011

Grand Rapids Herald-Review (Grand Rapids, Minnesota)

Obituaries: added 10/12/1997 – 1/10/2011

Winona Post (Winona, Minnesota)

Obituaries:  02/12/2006 – Current: Scattered earlier data available

Commercial Dispatch (Columbus, Mississippi)

Death Notices:  01/30/2009 – Current

Beaufort-Hyde News (Belhaven, North Carolina)

Obituaries:  07/27/2011 – Current

Bertie Ledger-Advance (Windsor, North Carolina)

Obituaries:  07/13/2011 – Current

Duplin Today – Pink Hill Review (Kenansville, North Carolina)

Obituaries:  03/08/2012 – Current

Farmville Enterprise (Farmville, North Carolina)

Obituaries:  07/13/2011 – Current

Perquimans Weekly (Hertford, North Carolina)

Obituaries:  07/13/2011 – Current

Standard Laconic (Snow Hill, North Carolina)

Obituaries: 05/22/2010 – Current

Canton Independent-Sentinel (Canton, Pennsylvania)

Obituaries:  02/05/2008 – Current

Tukwila Reporter (Tukwila, Washington)

Obituaries:  08/18/2012 – Current

Thomas Hill—American Revolutionary War Minuteman Hero Gone

“Hardly a man is now alive

Who remembers that famous day and year.”

—Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

In searching through early 19th Century newspapers, time and again we find historical obituaries about the passing of “Revolutionary Heroes,” as America’s newspapers recorded the honored service of those who fought to secure this country’s freedom from England.

This 1851 American Revolutionary War soldier’s obituary of Thomas Hill is a good example.

Thomas Hill Revolutionary War Hero Obituary - Massachusetts Spy Newspaper 1851

Massachusetts Spy (Worcester, Massachusetts), 15 July 1851, page 3.

This soldier’s obituary says of Thomas Hill: “He was in the battle of Concord, and was on Bunker Hill, but not in the engagement.”

Wait—he was there at the battle but didn’t fight?

Why was he given a pension by the U.S. federal government and called a “Revolutionary Hero” in this historical obituary if he was there at the battle but not engaged in the fighting?

Digging deeper in GenealogyBank I found this old newspaper article profiling Thomas Hill when he was 89, one year before he died. It was published in the New Hampshire Gazette (Portsmouth, New Hampshire), 23 April 1850, page 2, giving more details about his military service.

Thomas Hill New Hampshire Gazette NewspaperSo he was at the Battle of Concord as a 14-year-old boy and also at the Battle of Bunker Hill “with his father and eldest brother Abraham.” They were part of “the volunteer minute men who fought.”

Thomas Hill went on to fight in “two campaigns in the Jerseys and New York.”

Thomas Hill was honored along with “four other survivors, being all that could be found in the country around who were active in the scenes of 1775.”

And honored he was—the historical newspaper article went on to say:

Thomas Hill New Hampshire Gazette Newspaper 1850We can picture the old Revolutionary War veteran being escorted by the grateful citizens of West Cambridge over the same route used by the British when they attacked Lexington and Concord.

It calls to mind the words of the poet Longfellow:

“Listen my children and you shall hear

Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere,

On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-five;

Hardly a man is now alive

Who remembers that famous day and year.”

Longfellow’s immortal words were published in January 1861, 11 years after the 1850 tribute to Thomas Hill. Perhaps he was inspired by this celebration honoring Hill and the other four remaining men “who remembered that famous day and year.”

GenealogyBank gives us the key opportunity to dig in and find the details of the thousands who served as soldiers in the American Revolutionary War. Search GenealogyBank’s newspaper archives and document your ancestors—don’t let their stories be lost.

The Lessons of Daniel Boone’s Obituary: Check and Double Check

Introduction: Mary Harrell-Sesniak is a genealogist, author and editor with a strong technology background. In this guest blog post, Mary points out some lessons learned from an early obituary of the American folk-hero Daniel Boone.

Mark Twain (Samuel Langhorne Clemens) once said: “The rumors of my death have been greatly exaggerated.”

Did you know that another great American character, Daniel Boone, could have said something similar? He died at the age of 85 on 26 September 1820—but his death was widely reported in 1818!

Daniel Boone obituary, Providence Gazette newspaper article, 19 September 1818

Providence Gazette (Providence, Rhode Island), 19 September 1818, page 3

The first correct death notice for Daniel Boone that I found in GenealogyBank was published on 30 September 1820, four days after his death. This was a more factual obituary than the one published in 1818, although the legendary image of Boone lying in a blind, with one eye shut and aiming his gun at a deer when death overcame him, still resonates.

Daniel Boone obituary, St. Louis Enquirer newspaper article, 30 September 1820

St. Louis Enquirer (St. Louis, Missouri), 30 September 1820, page 3

The conclusion of this obituary is fairly close to the truth: Boone remained impressively fit and active well into his later years.

conclusion of Daniel Boone's obituary, St. Louis Enquirer newspaper article, 30 September 1820

Conclusion of Daniel Boone’s obituary, St. Louis Enquirer (St. Louis, Missouri), 30 September 1820, page 3

So the lesson from Daniel Boone’s obituary is this: check and double check. Don’t be satisfied with just the first obituary you find. Keep looking for more, since that first obituary may contain exaggerations or inaccuracies—although hopefully, unlike the case of Daniel, the first obituary of your ancestor wasn’t published two years before he or she died!

Interested in finding out more about Daniel Boone, the quintessential American folk-hero, or his family history?

A search of online family trees reveals that Daniel Boone was one of at least 11 children born to Squire and Sarah (Morgan) Boone. Daniel and Rebecca (Bryan) Boone also had a number of progeny, who in turn had many children. With such a large family, you can find numerous Boone relations in your genealogy searches.

A general search of “Daniel Boone” in GenealogyBank will produce over 52,000 hits, so you may wish to limit your results by using keywords or date ranges.

GenealogyBank search box to refine search for Daniel Boone

GenealogyBank search box to refine search for Daniel Boone

Here are a few examples of Boone descendants:

Philadelphia Inquirer of 25 January 1881:

Ex-Mayor Levi D. Boone, of Chicago, died yesterday, aged seventy-three years. He was a descendant of Daniel Boone.

Dallas Morning News of 20 December 1892:

YOAKUM, Tex., Dec. 19.—Died at his residence on East Hill J. B. Boone, aged 58 years, after a lingering illness. Mr. Boone came to this city about two years ago from Hillsboro, Tex. He was buried in the city cemetery at 4 p.m. to-day. Mr. Boone was a descendant of the illustrious Daniel Boone of Kentucky, was born and lived in Louisville, Ky., until sixteen years ago when he moved to Hillsboro.

Kalamazoo Gazette of 27 January 1903:

New Cambria, Mo., Jan. 26.—Fay Boone, an old time Mississippi river captain and a direct descendant of Daniel Boone, is dead, at the age of 89 years.

Idaho Statesman of 22 May 1903:

PIONEER DEAD.

Kansas City, Mo., May 21.—Linville Hayes, a descendant of Daniel Boone and a well known freighter in early days, when he directed the movement of large wagon trains to Salt Lake, New Mexico and Arizona, died today, aged 82 years.

Facts and fiction about Daniel Boone:

  • Daniel Boone was a Revolutionary War patriot.
  • He probably did not wear a coonskin cap; it’s probable he wore black felt and sported a pigtail.

What is your connection to Daniel Boone?

Are you related to Daniel Boone, or did your ancestors explore the frontier with him? We hope you’ll share your ancestral story by tweeting at http://twitter.com/#!/GenealogyBank or posting on our FaceBook page.

Found on FaceBook:

The Boone Society, Inc. at https://www.facebook.com/BooneSociety.

Found on the Web:

Boone Family History and Descendants: The First 5 Generations of the George Boone Family presented by The Boone Society, Inc. and reprinted at http://www.family-genealogy-online.com/little/boone.html, a family history website maintained by Pat and Jim Geary.

Handy Quick List: 10 Raleigh, North Carolina Newspapers Now Online

GenealogyBank is growing fast – we now have over 10 Raleigh, North Carolina newspapers online. That’s a lot of local papers to research your ancestry from the state capital of NC!

Trace your genealogy around the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill metro area and beyond. Here is the complete list of Raleigh, NC newspapers currently available in our online archives.

City Title Date Range Collection
Raleigh Dispatch 12/21/1991 – 4/10/1993 Historical Newspapers
Raleigh Gazette 12/16/1893 – 2/19/1898 Historical Newspapers
Raleigh Midtown Raleigh News 1/16/2011 – Current Newspaper Obituaries
Raleigh News & Observer 1/1/1991 – Current Newspaper Obituaries
Raleigh News & Observer 5/6/2004 – Current Newspaper Obituaries
Raleigh North Raleigh News 7/21/2006 – Current Newspaper Obituaries
Raleigh North-Carolina Minerva 11/26/1799 – 5/20/1800 Historical Newspapers
Raleigh Raleigh Extra 6/18/1995 – Current Newspaper Obituaries
Raleigh Semi-Weekly Standard 8/10/1861 – 3/8/1868 Historical Newspapers
Raleigh Star 11/3/1808 – 5/12/1831 Historical Newspapers

Also, bookmark this list of North Carolina newspapers that is frequently updated to stay abreast of newly added titles in and around the city of Raleigh, as well as other popular cities in NC.

The World Was Your Ancestor’s Oyster: Food in Family History

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this guest blog post, Gena explores one of her many interests: the connection of food and cooking to family history, revealing how much oysters were part of our ancestors’ diets.

What did your ancestors eat? Is this something you ever ponder? As family historians, the actual everyday activities of our ancestors can help to bring the dates and places we research to life.

In some cases the food our ancestors ate is quite different from what we are accustomed to today. With the lack of refrigeration and transportation, it’s no surprise that there were regional differences in cuisine. Considering the limited ability to transport and preserve ingredients, the variety of what was available to harvest locally, and the food preferences of local ethnic/immigrant populations, it is not surprising that the food that was served in various areas could be extremely different. A specialty enjoyed by those living in one region of the United States was all but unknown in another. While to some extent this is still true of modern cuisine today, as you can travel to different regions of the United States and taste local favorites not served where you live, these food differences are not as dramatic as they were 100 years ago.

So what were some food commonalities? Well there were many American foods that were feasted upon across the regions. One such food that was enjoyed by almost all Americans in the nineteenth century was oysters. Today oysters, depending on where you live, are usually a delicacy because of the price they command. It would also not be unusual to find people who have never even tried an oyster, raw or cooked.  In the nineteenth century oysters were everyday food items that were inexpensive and plentiful. They were the food of the common person.

Newspaper advertisements hint at the massive amounts of oysters available to our ancestors. Consider this 1874 newspaper advertisement from the Oregonian which lists several places to eat and obtain oysters.

Old Vintage Advertisement for Oysters - Oregonian Newspaper  1874

Oregonian (Portland, Oregon), 16 October 1874, page 5.

Street vendors, oyster houses, saloons, restaurants and home cooks prepared oysters in various, often creative ways. Oysters were served in every way imaginable including ways we are familiar with today like raw and fried. Interesting ways to serve oysters could be found in the era’s cookbooks including pickled oysters, oyster ketchup and one recipe that called for oysters to be served with shortcake.[i]

Consider this newspaper article which provides 11 ways to cook oysters that “if adhered to will bring cheer to the family board.” Note that this article was printed in a Kentucky newspaper—not exactly known today for its seafood. Yet this historical 1913 article tells “how best to serve the succulent bivalve [oysters], perhaps the most universally popular dish of the American table.”

How To Cook Oysters Old Recipe - Lexington Herald Newspaper 1913

Lexington Herald (Lexington, Kentucky), 19 October 1913, section 4, page 3.

There were also “mock oyster” recipes for those who were unable to obtain oysters. These oyster recipes substituted different ingredients for oysters including corn, mashed potatoes, tomatoes, and eggplant. Women could cook dishes such as “Mock Oyster Soup,” “Mock Oyster Sauce,” “Mock Oyster Stew” and just plain “Mock Oysters.” While the appearance of a “mock” recipe in a cookbook might connote that the item was difficult to obtain or expensive, this was not necessarily so in the case of the oyster.

As oyster beds became contaminated and overfished in the early 1900s, oysters began to cease being eaten as an everyday food and became more of a delicacy. No longer was the oyster part of America’s everyday diet.

To learn more about America’s love affair with oysters see the history The Big Oyster. History on the Half Shell by Mark Kurlansky.


[i] Stavely, Keith W. F., and Kathleen‎ Fitzgerald‎. America’s Founding Food. Chapel Hill, North Carolina: University of North Carolina Press, 2004, pg. 108. Viewed on Google Books 1 July 2012.

Portuguese American Revolutionary War Hero’s Obituary Discovered

You can learn a lot about the Americans who fought in our country’s wars—from the Colonial Indian Wars down to the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq—from GenealogyBank’s online newspaper archives.

Revolutionary War Hero Lives to Be a Centenarian

This old obituary gives us many details of the life of John Peters, a Portuguese American who fought in the Revolutionary War and lived to be over 100 years old. It was published in the Alexandria Gazette (Alexandria, Virginia), 1 May 1832, page 2.

John Peters Obituary - Alexandria Gazette Newspaper

Peters was there from the beginning of the troubles with Great Britain.

He was at the Boston Tea Party on 16 December 1773. He then joined the army.

John Peters Obituary - Boston Tea Party - Alexandria Gazette Newspaper

During the American Revolutionary War he fought in the Battle of Lexington and the Battle of Bunker Hill.

Although Peters “lost one of his fingers” in that latter battle, he continued to fight for his new country.

John Peters Obituary - Revolution War Battles - Alexandria Gazette

He was “in the battles of Monmouth and Princeton, and assisted in capturing the Hessians at Trenton.”

The historical obituary of this old Revolutionary war soldier goes on to say “He was engaged in the capturing of Burgoyne and also of Cornwallis; he fought under Washington and Lafayette at Valley Forge, where he was again wounded.”

It tells us he was “aged 100 years 5 months and 23 days” when he died on 23 April 1832. That calculates out to give us his birth date:  31 October 1731.

And just where was this centenarian veteran born? The old newspaper obituary tells us that he was born “in Portugal near Lisbon.”

John Peters Obituary - Born in Portugal - Alexandria Gazette Earthquakes That Shook the World in 1755 Remembered

The veteran’s obituary adds the extra detail that he “emigrated [sic] to this country shortly after the earthquake in 1755.”

According to Wikipedia that was the 1755 Lisbon earthquake, “one of the deadliest earthquakes in history” with tens of thousands killed.

There were several powerful earthquakes in 1755. Another one was the Cape Ann earthquake that hit the U.S. 18 days after the Lisbon earthquake, on the northeast coast of Massachusetts.

Young Hannah Clark [Hannah (Clark) Lyman (1743-1842)], then a child of 12, was terrified by the Cape Ann earthquake. Her obituary clearly recorded her terror at living through that earthquake.

Hannah Lyman Obituary - Hampshire Gazette Newspaper

It was published in the Hampshire Gazette (Northampton, Massachusetts), 21 March 1832, page 3.

“She remembered distinctly the great earthquake of Nov. 18, 1755…It was between 4 and 5 in the morning, and the moon shone brightly. She and the rest of the family were suddenly awaked from sleep by a noise like that of the trampling of many horses; the house trembled and the pewter rattled on the shelves. They all sprang out of bed, and the affrighted children clung to their parents. ‘I cannot help you dear children,’ said the good mother [Martha Phelps Clark, 1717-1803], ‘we must look to God for help.’”

According to Wikipedia this was “the largest earthquake in the history of Massachusetts.” Cape Ann and Boston felt the brunt of the earthquake’s aftermath; however hundreds of homes and buildings throughout the state of Massachusetts were also damaged. Northampton, Massachusetts, is 142 miles from Cape Ann, Massachusetts.

These two powerful earthquakes were so memorable that 77 years later they were mentioned in these 1832 obituaries.

Don’t let the stories of your ancestors’ lives be lost. Use GenealogyBank to find them and document their lives.

Old West Stories in Newspapers: Here Comes the Morning Stagecoach!

Maybe it was because of Father’s Day, but there were a lot of old western movies on TV this past weekend. Good ones, too, starring Gregory Peck, John Wayne, and more.

Daily Ohio Statesman -  Stagecoach Story Newspaper Article 1860

Daily Ohio Statesman (Columbus, Ohio), 10 May 1860, page 3

So, it was no surprise when I was combing through GenealogyBank today that I found this great newspaper article about an old western stagecoach, published in the Daily Ohio Statesman (Columbus, Ohio), 10 May 1860, page 3.

It read like the plot of a TV western—only these stories of the old Wild West were real.

This historical newspaper article reports that the Overland Mail Coach arrived with passengers “Lieut. Cogswell, of the USA, Dr. J. P. Breck, and Mr. and Mrs. Arnold.”

They brought news from the Texas frontier and points west. “They report the Indians very troublesome in the vicinity of Mustang Pond [Nevada], and between Mountain Pass Station and Phantom Hill.”

The stagecoach passengers provided details of several attacks:

“A blacksmith in the employ of the Overland Mail Company, and three men living at Mountain Pass, were murdered by the Comanches the day before the stage passed there.

“Fifteen Indians stopped at Mustang Pond and committed sundry depredations upon the whites.

“The scout for this stage saw some bands of Indians at the latter place, looking with eager eyes towards the coach, and the passengers prepared themselves for a fight, but the red skins were too wary, and it did not become necessary to fire upon them.

“Col. Fountleroy had started on a tour to select a site for Fort Butler.

“Maj. Ruff had been ordered with five companies of rifles to take the field immediately against the Kiowa and Comanches. His depot was at Fort Butler.

“Several ranging companies were out in the vicinity of Jackborough.”

Clearly, riding a stagecoach in the Wild West was just as dangerous as western movies later portrayed it!

Every stop was an adventure. This old Pony Express Route, April 3, 1860 – October 24, 1861 map (courtesy, Library of Congress) shows the overland route many travelers took from Missouri to California.

Historical Map of Pony Express Route that Stagecoaches Followed - 1860-1861

Pony Express Route, April 3, 1860 – October 24, 1861

The strength of historical newspapers is that they provide a daily record of the past.

GenealogyBank has the largest online newspaper archive, full of details about our American heritage. You can find stagecoach passenger lists, information about the early American pioneers and Native Americans and so much more in GenealogyBank. Carefully review GenealogyBank’s 1.2 billion records for the details of your family’s history.

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Search More than 45 Alabama Newspapers Online in Our Archive

GenealogyBank adds new content to its U.S. newspaper archives on a daily basis—a collection of newspapers from all 50 states, currently numbering more than 5,850 titles.

Included in this online newspaper collection are more than 45 old and recent newspaper titles from Alabama, from cities and towns ranging from Albertville, AL, to Tuscumbia, AL.

These Alabama newspaper archives cover the length and breadth of AL, providing an excellent genealogy resource for this state in the heart of the South whose nicknames are “Heart of Dixie” and the “Cotton State.”

GenealogyBank has Alabama newspaper content covered from 1816 to today. We’ve got the online genealogy resources you need to document your Alabama family history.

Alabama Newspaper Archives Articles Collage

Alabama Newspaper Articles

Alabama Newspaper Titles In GenealogyBank

State Town Newspaper Coverage Notes
Alabama Albertville Sand Mountain Reporter 3/22/2001 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Anniston Anniston Star 10/1/1998 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Anniston Jacksonville News 8/27/1998 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Athens News-Courier 2/1/2006 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Birmingham Age-Herald 7/1/1894 – 3/31/1901
Alabama Birmingham Birmingham News 4/27/1993 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Birmingham Birmingham Times 4/1/2010 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Birmingham Labor Advocate 6/29/1895 – 12/20/1902
Alabama Birmingham Wide-Awake 1/24/1900 – 1/24/1900
Alabama Blakeley Blakeley Sun 12/12/1818 – 6/2/1819
Alabama Cahawba Alabama Watchman 8/8/1820 – 12/15/1820
Alabama Cahawba Cahawba Press and Alabama Intelligencer 7/10/1819 – 12/30/1820
Alabama Claiborne Alabama Courier 3/19/1819 – 10/15/1819
Alabama Cullman Cullman Times 12/27/2007 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Decatur Decatur Daily 8/1/2006 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Dothan Dothan Eagle 8/16/2005 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Enterprise Enterprise Ledger 3/26/2008 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Eufaula Eufaula Tribune 2/8/2011 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Fort Payne Times-Journal 9/13/2003 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Gardendale North Jefferson News 6/27/2007 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Grove Hill Grove Hill Herald 3/6/1850 – 12/6/1854
Alabama Grove Hill Southern Recorder 2/24/1847 – 11/7/1849
Alabama Heflin Cleburne News 2/14/1999 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Huntsville Huntsville Gazette 12/21/1816 – 12/29/1894
Alabama Huntsville Huntsville Star 1/26/1900 – 1/26/1900
Alabama Huntsville Huntsville Times 1/2/1992 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Jasper Daily Mountain Eagle 1/22/1998 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Lanett Valley Times-News 3/18/1999 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Leeds Leeds News 2/4/2009 – 8/25/2011 Obituaries Only
Alabama Mobile Mobile Evening Telegraph 11/3/1864 – 11/3/1864
Alabama Mobile Mobile Register 9/9/1858 – 12/31/1992
Alabama Mobile Press-Register 11/1/1992 – Current (10/2001-1/10/2003 unavailable) Obituaries Only
Alabama Montgomery Daily Alabama Journal 4/14/1849 – 12/31/1853
Alabama Montgomery Daily Confederation 5/1/1858 – 7/17/1860
Alabama Montgomery Montgomery Advertiser 5/11/1901 – 12/31/1922
Alabama Montgomery Montgomery Enterprise 1/26/1900 – 1/26/1900
Alabama Opelika Opelika-Auburn News 1/30/2008 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Pell City St. Clair News Aegis 7/9/2008 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Pell City St. Clair Times 7/26/2001 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Piedmont Piedmont Journal 10/2/2009 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Rainsville Weekly Post 3/15/2001 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Scottsboro Daily Sentinel 9/28/2004 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama St. Stephens Halcyon 6/2/1818 – 11/27/1820
Alabama Talladega Daily Home 1/20/1999 – Current Obituaries Only
Alabama Tuscaloosa Alabama Intelligencer and State Rights Expositor 3/2/1833 – 12/5/1835
Alabama Tuscumbia North Alabamian 11/17/1865 – 12/7/1866

 

GenealogyBank Has More than 100 North Carolina Newspapers

GenealogyBank Has More than 100 North Carolina Newspapers

GenealogyBank has a strong and growing archive of newspapers from all 50 U.S. states. Our historical newspaper archives contain more than 100 old and recent newspaper titles from North Carolina: from Charlotte to New Bern to Chapel Hill to Raleigh to Danbury.

We’ve got the online genealogy resources you need to document your N.C. family history.

State City Title Dates
NC Albemarle Stanly News and Press 1/2/2007 – Current
NC Apex Apex Herald 10/2/2009 – Current
NC Asheboro Courier-Tribune 4/6/2010 – Current
NC Asheboro Randolph Guide 4/6/2008 – Current
NC Blowing Rock Blowing Rocket 10/2/2009 – Current
NC Boone Mountain Times 2/4/2011 – Current
NC Burgaw Pender Chronicle 10/28/2009 – Current
NC Burgaw Pender Post 10/8/2009 – Current
NC Cary Cary News 2/13/2011 – Current
NC Chapel Hill Chapel Hill Herald 1/1/2002 – Current
NC Chapel Hill Chapel Hill News 5/3/2000 – Current
NC Charlotte Africo-American Presbyterian 12/21/1899 – 12/21/1899
NC Charlotte Carolina Israelite 2/1/1944 – 12/1/1958
NC Charlotte Charlotte News 12/11/1888 – 9/29/1922
NC Charlotte Charlotte Observer 3/13/1892 – 12/31/1922
NC Charlotte Charlotte Observer 1/1/1992 – Current
NC Charlotte Charlotte Post 2/3/2011 – Current
NC Clinton Sampson Independent 4/18/2010 – Current
NC Danbury Stokes News 12/20/2007 – Current
NC Durham Herald-Sun 1/1/2002 – Current
NC Elizabeth City Daily Advance 11/9/2004 – Current
NC Elizabethtown Bladen Journal 2/23/2007 – Current
NC Elkin Tribune 9/19/2007 – Current
NC Fayetteville American 4/26/1816 – 4/11/1827
NC Fayetteville Fayetteville Observer 1/18/1988 – Current
NC Forest City Daily Courier 1/1/2005 – Current
NC Fuquay-Varina Cleveland Post 1/18/2007 – Current
NC Fuquay-Varina Fuquay-Varina Independent 10/2/2009 – Current
NC Garner Garner News 10/2/2009 – Current
NC Greensboro Daily Record 3/17/1906 – 11/30/1929
NC Greensboro Greensboro Daily News 7/20/1909 – 11/30/1980
NC Greensboro Greensboro News and Record 4/11/1985 – 4/20/1985
NC Greensboro Greensboro Record 9/5/1927 – 2/28/1983
NC Greensboro News & Record 1/1/1990 – Current
NC Greenville Daily Reflector 8/30/2004 – Current
NC Halifax North-Carolina Journal 8/1/1792 – 9/11/1797
NC Hampstead Topsail Voice 9/10/2008 – Current
NC Henderson Daily Dispatch 4/10/2002 – Current
NC Hickory Hickory Daily Record 2/10/2011 – Current
NC High Point High Point Enterprise 4/14/2007 – Current
NC Holly Springs Holly Springs Sun 7/10/2008 – Current
NC Kannapolis Independent Tribune 2/20/2010 – Current
NC Kannapolis Kannapolis Citizen 4/1/2008 – 5/12/2009
NC Laurinburg Laurinburg Exchange 1/2/2006 – Current
NC Lenoir News-Topic 11/12/2008 – Current
NC Littleton True Reformer 7/25/1900 – 7/25/1900
NC Lousiburg Franklin Times 10/3/2009 – Current
NC Lumberton Robesonian 1/1/2004 – Current
NC Marion McDowell News 2/12/2011 – Current
NC Monroe Enquirer-Journal 10/1/2009 – Current
NC Mooresville Mooresville Tribune 2/16/2011 – Current
NC Morehead City Carteret County News-Times 4/16/2008 – Current
NC Morganton News Herald 1/12/2008 – Current
NC Mt. Airy Mt. Airy News 10/2/2009 – Current
NC Nashville Nashville Graphic 1/28/2010 – Current
NC New Bern Carolina Federal Republican 1/12/1809 – 4/25/1818
NC New Bern Morning Herald 9/17/1807 – 12/30/1808
NC New Bern Newbern Herald 1/20/1809 – 2/26/1810
NC New Bern Newbern Sentinel 3/21/1818 – 6/12/1828
NC New Bern North Carolina Sentinel 1/13/1827 – 12/21/1836
NC New Bern State Gazette of North Carolina 8/9/1787 – 2/20/1799
NC New Bern True Republican 4/2/1810 – 8/7/1811
NC Newton Observer News Enterprise 9/6/2008 – Current
NC Pilot Mountain Pilot 2/20/2008 – Current
NC Princeton Princeton News-Leader 5/30/2007 – Current
NC Raleigh Dispatch 12/21/1991 – 4/10/1993
NC Raleigh Gazette 12/16/1893 – 2/19/1898
NC Raleigh News & Observer 1/1/1991 – Current
NC Raleigh News & Observer, The: Web Edition Articles 5/6/2004 – Current
NC Raleigh North-Carolina Minerva 11/26/1799 – 5/20/1800
NC Raleigh Raleigh Extra 6/18/1995 – Current
NC Raleigh Semi-Weekly Standard 8/10/1861 – 3/8/1868
NC Raleigh Star 11/3/1808 – 5/12/1831
NC Red Springs Red Springs Citizen 7/10/2008 – Current
NC Reidsville Reidsville Review 3/25/2008 – Current
NC Richlands Richlands-Beulaville Advertiser News 10/28/2009 – Current
NC Roanoke Rapids Daily Herald 9/2/2003 – Current
NC Rockingham Richmond County Daily Journal 5/5/2003 – Current
NC Rocky Mount Rocky Mount Telegram 9/3/2002 – Current
NC Roxboro Courier-Times 11/22/2006 – Current
NC Saint Pauls St. Pauls Review 9/4/2008 – Current
NC Salisbury Salisbury Post 12/1/1998 – Current
NC Sanford Sanford Herald 2/17/2007 – Current
NC Shallotte Brunswick Beacon 4/21/2010 – Current
NC Smithfield Smithfield Herald 1/19/2011 – Current
NC Southern Pines Pilot 10/8/2009 – Current
NC Spring Hope Spring Hope Enterprise & The Bailey News 8/3/2006 – Current
NC Statesville Statesville Record & Landmark 2/6/2011 – Current
NC Swansboro Tideland News 9/3/2008 – Current
NC Sylva Sylva Herald & Ruralite 10/2/2009 – Current
NC Tabor City Tabor-Loris Tribune 3/14/2007 – Current
NC Tarboro Daily Southerner 1/23/2007 – Current
NC Thomasville Thomasville Times 1/1/2011 – Current
NC Tryon Tryon Daily Bulletin 5/14/2007 – Current
NC Wadesboro Anson Record 6/19/2003 – Current
NC Wallace Wallace Enterprise 1/6/2010 – Current
NC West Jefferson Jefferson Post 9/25/2007 – Current
NC Whiteville News Reporter 4/22/2004 – Current
NC Wilmington StarNews 1/31/2002 – Current
NC Zebulon Eastern Wake News 1/19/2011 – Current

Monthly Update: GenealogyBank Adds 16 Million Records in January!

Every day, GenealogyBank is working hard to digitize more newspapers and obituaries, expanding our online collection to give you the largest newspaper archives for family history research available anywhere.

Here are some details about our most recent additions to our website (we actually added new content to thousands of newspaper titles, but the following is a representative sample):
A total of 103 newspaper titles from 26 states plus the District of Columbia

Titles marked with an asterisk * are newspapers new to our archive
We’ve shown the archive date ranges so that you can determine if the new content is relevant to your personal research

If a recent addition to our online archive interests you, simply click on that newspaper’s title: it is an active link leading to that paper’s search form.

There is also an option available on the historical newspapers’ search form that gives you the ability to search only the new newspaper content added in the past month, two months, or three months.

Alabama. Grove Hill. Grove Hill Herald*. 03/06/1850–12/06/1854
Arkansas. Little Rock. Arkansas Democrat-Gazette: Web Edition Articles*. 03/30/2007–Current
Arkansas. Little Rock. ARPreps*. 05/28/2011–Current
Arkansas. Fayetteville. Whole Hog Sports*. 04/14/2007–Current
Arkansas. Camden. Camden News*. 12/02/2011–Current
Arkansas. Fort Chaffee. Helping Hand *. 05/02/1975–12/19/1975
Arkansas. Bella Vista. Weekly Vista, The*. 11/30/2011–Current
Arkansas. Little Rock. Arkansas State Press. 08/23/1957–08/23/1957
Arkansas. Fayetteville. NW Arkansas Times*. 11/14/2011–Current
Arkansas. Fayetteville. NWAOnline: Web Edition Articles*. 07/28/2009–Current
Arkansas. El Dorado. El Dorado News-Times*. 12/01/2011–Current
Arkansas. Magnolia. Banner-News*. 11/19/2011–Current
Arkansas. Springdale. Springdale Morning News*. 11/18/2011–Current
Arkansas. Rogers. Rogers Morning News*. 11/14/2011–Current
Arkansas. Searcy. Daily Citizen, The*. 08/26/2003–Current
California. San Francisco. Alaska Appeal *. 03/06/1879–04/15/1880
California. Santa Anita. Santa Anita Pacemaker *. 04/24/1942–07/29/1942
California. Tanforan. Tanforan Totalizer *. 05/15/1942–09/12/1942
California. San Diego. Evening Tribune. 7/1/1925–1/25/1935
California. Riverside. Riverside Daily Press. 5/20/1938–10/1/1942
California. San Diego. San Diego Union. 3/1/1908–7/8/1934
Colorado. Denver. Denver Rocky Mountain News. 12/3/1880–1/5/1881
Connecticut. New Haven. Columbian Register. 1/1/1831–5/27/1876
Florida. Tampa. Tampa Tribune. 10/31/1928–9/22/1932
Florida. Jacksonville. Florida Times-Union, The: Web Edition Articles*. 11/28/2011–Current
Georgia. Savannah. Closeup*. 11/11/1999–Current
Georgia. Marietta. Marietta Journal. 7/22/1966–6/30/1989
Illinois. Rockford. Register Star. 8/31/2006–4/20/2007
Louisiana. New Orleans. Times-Picayune. 3/30/1841–2/28/1915
Louisiana. Baton Rouge. Daily State. 1/14/1907–1/1/1910
Louisiana. Baton Rouge. State Times Advocate. 3/24/1911–12/30/1922
Louisiana. Baton Rouge. Daily Advocate. 9/17/1855–1/4/1889
Louisiana. Baton Rouge. Weekly Advocate. 6/28/1855–6/28/1902
Louisiana. Baton Rouge. Advocate. 10/23/1925–5/31/1985
Louisiana. New Orleans. Courrier de la Louisiane. 10/01/1821–10/01/1821
Massachusetts. Boston. Boston Herald. 10/11/1893–8/31/1907
Massachusetts. Springfield. Springfield Daily News. 11/16/1916–11/16/1916
Massachusetts. Springfield. Springfield Union. 09/10/1963–12/26/1986
Michigan. Gaylord. Gaylord Herald Times*. 01/01/2001–Current
Michigan. Jackson. Jackson Citizen Patriot. 06/15/1875–12/07/1921
Missouri. Lake Ozark. Lake Today, The*. 05/06/2009–Current
North Carolina. Charlotte. Carolina Israelite*. 02/01/1944–12/01/1958
North Carolina. Winston-Salem. Winston-Salem Journal. 1/5/1917–7/31/1920
Nebraska. Omaha. Omaha World Herald. 8/1/1945–12/4/1983
New Jersey. New Brunswick. Jewish Journal. 06/14/1963–04/28/1967
New York. Westbury. Westbury Times, The*. 12/04/1997–Current
New York. New York. Irish American Weekly. 02/08/1873–07/04/1914
New York. New York. Truth *. 07/06/1880–01/06/1884
New York. New York. Irish Nation *. 11/26/1881–10/06/1883
New York. New York. Socialist Call. 06/09/1944–08/13/1948
New York. New York. Daily People. Current–Current
New York. New York. Worker. 05/04/1903–02/23/1907
New York. New York. People. 05/03/1891–03/22/1896
Oregon. Portland. Oregonian. 04/08/1917–04/08/1917
Pennsylvania. Pittsburgh. National Labor Tribune. 03/19/1903–07/01/1958
Pennsylvania. Erie. Erie Labor Press *. 06/18/1921–12/31/1921
Pennsylvania. Pittsburgh. Welsh-American *. 01/08/1914–12/15/1918
Pennsylvania. Erie. Truth *. 10/25/1913–06/11/1921
Rhode Island. Providence. Providence Evening Press*. 03/14/1859–12/29/1869
South Carolina. Charleston. Charleston Mercury. 7/2/1860–12/31/1866
South Carolina. Clemson. Tiger, The*. 04/14/2002–Current.
South Carolina. Charleston. Charleston Courier. 7/14/1859–3/19/1866
Texas. Dallas. Dallas Morning News. 4/4/1983–1/29/1984
Utah. Salt Lake City. Intermountain Catholic*. 10/05/2007–Current
Virginia. Richmond. Richmond Times Dispatch. 7/1/1929–3/14/1930
Wisconsin. Fond du Lac. Fond du Lac Trade Extension*. 02/13/1918–02/13/1918
Wisconsin. Gratiot. Gratiot Reporter *. 06/13/1912–10/09/1913
Wisconsin. Grafton. Grafton Enterprise *. 07/27/1927–08/03/1927
Wisconsin. Fox Lake. Fox Lake Representative*. 12/15/1911–12/20/1917