GenealogyBank adds more newspapers – now over 4,000 titles

GenealogyBank adds 25 more newspapers – now has over 4,000 newspapers from 1690 to Today.

GenealogyBank added 35 Million books, documents, genealogical records and articles this month.

Wow what a way to end the year.

Mat-Su Valley Frontiersman (Wasilla, AK). 10/06/2009 – Current

Arizona Range News, The (Wilcox, AZ).
10/02/2009 – Current
Eastern Arizona Courier (Safford, AZ). 10/05/2009 – Current
Green Valley News & Sun (Green Valley, AZ). 10/02/2009 – Current
Nogales International (Nogales, AZ). 10/02/2009 – Current
Sierra Vista Herald (Sierra Vista, AZ). 10/02/2009 – Current
Wickenburg Sun, The (Wickenburg, AZ). 10/05/2009 – Current


Half Moon Bay Review (Half Moon Bay, CA). 10/02/2009 – Current

Sioux City Journal (Sioux City, IA). 10/02/2009 – Current

Greensburg Daily News (Greensburg, IN). 10/02/2009 – Current

El Dorado Times, The (El Dorado, KS). 10/02/2009 – Current
Garden City Telegram, The (Garden City, KS). 10/02/2009 – Current
Leavenworth Times, The (Leavenworth, KS). 10/02/2009 – Current

Floyd County Times, The (Prestonsburg, KY). 10/02/2009 – Current
Sentinel Echo, The (London, KY). 10/02/2009 – Current

Daily Iberian, The (New Iberia, LA). 10/02/2009 – Current
L’Observateur (La Place, LA). 10/03/2009 – Current

Sun-Journal (Lewiston, ME). 10/02/2009 – Current

Free Press, The (Mankato, MN). 10/02/2009 – Current
Jordan Independent (Jordan, MN). 10/02/2009 – Current
Prior Lake American (Prior Lake, MN). 10/02/2009 – Current
Shakopee Valley News (Shakopee, MN). 10/02/2009 – Current

Emery County Progress (Castle Dale, UT). 10/02/2009 – Current
Sun Advocate (Price, UT). 10/02/2009 – Current
Vernal Express, The (Vernal, UT). 10/02/2009 – Current

When I print the article – it is too small. I can’t read it. What do I do now?

A: Great question. GenealogyBank makes it easy to enlarge any page or article.

Newspapers over the past 4 centuries have been printed in all shapes and sizes. That is particularly true of Colonial American newspapers.

GenealogyBank captures each article and page and displays them for you online – making it easy for you to save them as an Adobe PDF document.

When you want print or save an article and you see that it is too small to be easily read – simply enlarge it using Adobe Acrobat.

Step One: Click on the PDF icon to open up the article as a PDF document.

Step Two: Use the zoom button to enlarge the article to the desired size.

Now you can easily read the article, copy, save or print it.

Look closely at this example – an account of the statue of King George III being torn down and made into bullets – Connecticut Journal 17 July 1776 page 1.
On July 9, 1776, after the Declaration of Independence was read to the American army in New York City, the soldiers rushed to the foot of Broadway at the Bowling Green. As depicted in this engraving, they had the assistance of free Blacks or slaves in pulling down the statue of King George III. The lead statue was later brought to Connecticut, where it was made into bullets.”

GenealogyBank brings you:
▬ More Colonial American Newspapers than any other source
▬ Over 3,800 newspapers
▬ 1690 to Today


Join with us – sign up today.

It’s a great day for genealogy.


Happy Independence Day!

Read about it – as it happened in GenealogyBank.
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Church History Library Opens in Salt Lake City – June 12th & 13th

After 15 years of planning, four years of construction and a million artifacts moved, Elder Marlin K. Jensen from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints placed the last historical item on the shelf in the new Church History Library in front of local media.

Jensen, the historian and recorder of the Church, explained that this last item was one of the 100 scrapbooks kept by President David O. McKay. “It is a personal record filled with photos, letters and journal entries that documented his travels as an apostle in 1921 to the far corners of the earth.” Elder McKay’s world tour took him 55,000 miles to such countries as Australia, France, England, Italy, Switzerland, Samoa, Palestine, India and Egypt to survey the Church’s missions. One photograph captured a moment in Egypt with Elder McKay and his traveling companion, Hugh J. Cannon, both sitting on camels in front of the famous Sphinx. Elder Jensen was joined by President McKay’s grandson, Alan Ashton, when the journal was placed in one of the many vaults of the Church History Library.

The scrapbook was the last item but certainly not the least of the priceless artifacts and records Elder Jensen and assistant Church historian Richard E. Turley presented to news reporters as part of a media tour on June 11, 2009. Assistant executive director Elder Paul K. Sybrowsky and managing director of the Church History Department, Steve Olsen, were also in attendance and shared their knowledge of Church history with members of the media.

The group was given a first glimpse of what the public can expect to see during the upcoming open house at the Church History Library on June 12 and 13.

In addition to a media presentation and tour of the library, journalists were given a rare look at dozens of one-of-a-kind and intriguing pieces of Church history treasures on display. Perhaps one of the most unique items was an early edition of the Book of Mormon that was printed in French and German — on alternating pages. This early edition, the only one in existence, was translated through the supervision of John Taylor, an apostle and the eventual third president of the Church, while he was serving a mission in Europe in 1852.

In keeping with the Church History Department’s efforts to collect modern and current history, Elder Jensen spoke of the significance of the newly published LDS first edition Spanish language Bible. Another important undertaking on display was the Joseph Smith Papers project; the second volume is due out later this year.

In an extraordinary operation, thousands of similarly valued documents, books, photos, diaries, microfiche and film were

moved from their old home at the Church Office Building across the street to the Church History Library. It took just 19 days to physically accomplish the move, but it took hundreds of volunteers a year and a half to tag and categorize each piece slated for the move. One project leader compared the mammoth undertaking to moving the Library of Congress.

The most priceless and sacred records and documents were the last to make the move, under heightened security measures. They now join more than 600,000 other historic records housed and preserved on nearly 50 miles of shelving in temperature-controlled vaults with fire and seismic protection. Items such as film will even be kept in sub zero chambers. Brent Thompson from the Church History Department says the new temperature-controlled vaults will ensure that “not only will the artifacts be available in 100 years but they will look good 100 years from now.”

The Church History Library not only houses priceless documents and artifacts but also provides the latest methods in

conservation, collection development and research. Conservators repair, restore and stabilize books, documents and photographs with a state-of-the-art Conservation Lab. The lab includes a darkroom, where conservators are able to turn acetate negatives into useable photographs, and a document cleaning room that enables them to wash historical records and apply age-slowing chemical treatments.

That state-of-the-art spirit is also found in the innovation of the Church History Library’s design. Great care was taken to make sure the building not only met, but surpassed building code and energy efficiency standards. That attention to a “green” building design is found in such areas as the filtering system, which eliminates allergens.

The paper, plastic and metal products used in the Church History Library will be recycled, and the heating and cooling systems have the highest efficiency ratings. The landscaping and plumbing will use less water, and the windows, blinds and insulation will preserve temperatures. These careful implementations have put the Church History Library on track for the prestigious Silver Design certificate given through the acclaimed Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system.

But perhaps one of the most notable aspects of the new library is that it is designed for public accessibility. The Church History Department’s previous accommodations were designed to be more of an internal archive, said Steve Olsen, managing director over Church history. “The Church in its foundational documents has a huge commitment to preserving history and to making history useful for members and others interested in learning about its history,” said Olsen. “It is the first time in the Church’s 179-year history that we have had a dedicated public building for this purpose. … It’s really quite significant.”

RFK Dies 41 years ago today

Robert F. Kennedy died 41 years ago today.

With GenealogyBank.com you can read the newspapers just as your ancestors did. It has the stories of your ancestor’s lives – the famous or the obscure – whether it is 40 years ago or over 300 years ago

GenealogyBank has the coverage genealogists rely on to document their family history. Over 3,800 newsapers, all 50 States, over 300 years of coverage. Sign up now.

I had the opportunity to hear RFK speak at Brigham Young University on March 27, 1968. The 1960s were difficult times – in 1968 – the Vietnam War was raging, RFK was challenging a sitting President LBJ for his party’s nomination, demonstrators were in all of the major cities. Less than a week following RFK’s talk Martin Luther King would be shot & killed. Two months after that RFK was shot and killed.

Kennedy’s remarks on campus were effective. He had done his homework; he had broken the ice and won over the respect of the packed arena. That fairly conservative campus was no longer his adversary but was ready to listen. He spoke briefly and took all questions. Tough questions. He was grilled but he was comfortable explaining his positions on the current state of the war and the country.

I clearly remember his opening remarks – with humor he reached out to his audience and showed respect for their history and beliefs. His actions and remarks echo in today’s headlines.

“Thank you very much. Thank you. I appreciate very much being here at this campus … I understand that this is a campus made up of all political persuasions. I had a very nice conversation with Dr. {Ernest L.} Wilkinson [laughter] … and I promised him that all Democrats would be off campus by sundown [laughter, applause].

But I feel very close to this state. Not only did part of my wife’s family live in the state of Utah for a long period of time, I traveled down your Green River…spent part of the time in the water (laughter) … part of my honeymoon here and I’ve had ten children since – so I have learned something from the Mormons [laughter].

I think that we still have a great deal in common, and in common with the man this university honors. For I too have a large family [laughter], I too have settled in many states [laughter]. And now I too know what it is to take on Johnson’s army. [Standing ovation, laughter and applause].” (Read the complete text at: Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought Vol 3, Number 3, Autumn 1968).

The reference to “Johnson’s Army” was a reference to his taking on President Lyndon B. Johnson in the Democratic Party Primaries as well as to President James Buchanan sending General Albert S. Johnston and his troops to quell the non-existent “Utah Rebellion” in 1857. This otherwise obscure reference was well known to BYU students schooled in Utah history. With this series of well thought out personal & historical references he won over the crowd.

After his remarks students crowded around to shake his hand. I was one of them. I was surprised at how short he was. I had always pictured him as over 6’ tall – but he was only 5’9” … shorter than I was then (but now that I am shrinking, I am catching up to him :)

(Photo courtesy BYU Archives).

I learned that day that it is important to see and hear a person speak for themselves – to take the measure of a man. I concluded that he was an honest man who believed in what he was doing and trying to accomplish. It was an honor to shake his hand that day – 27 March 1968.

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Genealogist, Mary Sue Green Smith (1933-2009)

Prominent Nashville, TN genealogist, Mary Sue Green Smith (1933-2009) has passed away.

She was President of the Middle Tennessee Genealogical Society. She published eight books between 1994 and 2006; mostly reference works to be used in tracing one’s roots in Nashville. She indexed tens of thousands of pre-Civil War civil court records, which added to standard genealogical resources, many families whose names don’t otherwise appear in records.

Tennessean, The (Nashville, TN) – April 25, 2009
SMITH, Mary Sue Green Age 76 of Nashville, TN, died Friday, April 24, 2009. She was a genealogist, whose contributions helped African-American families with Nashville roots to trace their families back before the Civil War.


She was preceded in death by her husband, Burrell G. Smith and one of her sons, Robert Shelton Smith, who died in 1972. She is survived by three sons, John Kennedy Smith and wife Barbie of Indianapolis, Stephen Thomas Smith and wife Barbara Ann Mech of Nashville, and Richard Douglas Smith and wife Julie of Fairbanks, Alaska.

Her surviving grandchildren are John R. Smith of Big Bear, CA, Michael B. Smith, midshipman at the Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD, Thomas Shelton Smith and wife, Anne Kindt Smith of Knoxville, Katherine Holly Smith of Nashville, Andrew Kennedy Smith of Nashville, Jennifer Sue Smith of Fairbanks and Robert Elias Smith of Sault Ste. Marie, MI.

Her surviving sisters are Dorothy Strange of Loudon, TN, Barbara Butler of Nashville and Pam White of Nashville. Mary Sue Smith was a native of Nashville.

She graduated from David Lipscomb High School and attended David Lipscomb College, where she met Burrell G. Smith, who had served in the Army paratroopers in World War II. They were married in April, 1950. Hers was the first wedding in the newly built Otter Creek Church of Christ, at the corner of Otter Creek Road and Granny White Pike. Her father, the late Sam Kennedy Green, was an elder there.

The couple raised a family in Bellaire, MI. Burrell was an educator and a social worker. Sue served as clerk of the Antrim County Selective Service Board during the Vietnam War. She served on the mental health board of the county. After Burrell’s death, Sue returned to Nashville in 1986.

Sue was a genealogist and had served as President of the Middle Tennessee Genealogical Society. She published eight books between 1994 and 2006, mostly reference works to be used in tracing one’s roots in Nashville. She indexed tens of thousands of pre-Civil War civil court records, which added to standard genealogical resources, many families whose names don’t otherwise appear in records.

Her work made it possible for many African-American families to trace their parentage back into the years when persons held in slavery were listed, as property, in wills.

Memorial services will be conducted Sunday, April 26, 2009 at 3 p.m., at Woodbine Funeral Home, Hickory Chapel, 5852 Nolensville Road, by Tommy Daniel. Memorial contributions may be made to the charity of your choice. Visitation will be Sunday from 1 – 3 p.m., at WOODBINE FUNERAL HOME, HICKORY CHAPEL Directors, 615-331-1952; Still Family Owned.

Copyright (c) The Tennessean. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Gannett Co., Inc. by NewsBank, inc.

Linda Fay Kaufman, genealogist, 1940-2009

Remembering one of our own: Linda Fay Kaufman, genealogist, 1940-2009

Enthusiastic genealogist Linda Fay Kaufman (1940-2009) has passed away.
She put her family history research online and actively corresponded with genealogists across the country. A search of the genealogy lists shows her posts as recently as the last few months.

Star Tribune: Newspaper of the Twin Cities (Minneapolis, MN) – April 12, 2009
Kaufman, Linda Fay Born in Hanover, NH on July 15, 1940, died peacefully on March 30, 2009 surrounded by family at North Memorial Hospital.


She is survived by husband Stan, daughters Eleanor Kaufman (Chicago, IL) and Elizabeth Shiroma (St. Paul, MN), son-in law Ian Shiroma, grandson Ryan Shiroma, sisters Marcia Fay (Bethlehem, PA) and Norma Bigos (Baltimore, MD), nephew Jon Bigos (Baltimore, MD), and extended family across the U.S.

A graduate of Newton High School and Wellesley College in Massachusetts, Linda studied classical languages and literature in graduate school at Yale University. During this time, she met Stan, and they married in 1964.

Linda taught at Vassar College and at the Thomas School for Girls. In 1969, she embarked with Stan for universities in Germany, first in Heidelberg and then in Mainz. In Heidelberg, she taught English to German-speaking adults.

Later, she worked in the University’s Library of Southeast Asian studies, organizing and cataloging documents in the many languages of that region. At the University in Mainz, she assisted in the Comparative Literature Department.

In 1976, Linda and Stan moved to Minnesota, and adopted their first daughter Elizabeth the next year; their second daughter Eleanor was born in 1979. When the children were in school, Linda held several accounting positions. She then became a Certified Professional Accountant and developed a small practice of her own, specializing in tax returns with international involvement. She especially enjoyed her work assisting recent immigrants in the Somali community.

During the past decade, Linda conducted extensive genealogy research on her New England family roots. She developed comprehensive family websites, collaborated with many others, and responded to world-wide inquiries from fellow genealogists and distant relatives.

Linda will be remembered lovingly by her family and the many people whose lives she touched. A gathering in her honor will be held later in the spring. In lieu of flowers, the family prefers donations to Green Belt Movement (http://greenbeltmovement.org) or Books for Africa (http://www.booksforafrica.org/)

Edition: METRO
Page: 5B
Copyright (c) 2009 Star Tribune: Newspaper of the Twin Cities

Did you know GenealogyBank has more than 130 million obituaries and death records – from Newspapers 1690 to Today; Government Reports like the US Army Register and hundreds of other sources?

Click Here and Start Searching Now

Need help writing an obituary?

You can find all types of helpful advice in newspapers.
This humorous advice on writing an obituary is from today’s New London (CT) Day (3 April 2009). It wasn’t written on April Fool’s Day – but it sure could have been.

This video clip is by Day reporter Rick Koster.
You can view the video clip of his column here.

Have you noticed that more and more newspapers are adding video clips of their columnists and in depth expanded coverage of local news stories?
These “news clips” are a terrific 21st century bonus in today’s newspapers.

One of my favorite newspaper video clip stories is the New York Time’s report on Green Wood Cemetery’s (NYC) Civil War Graves Project. See it here. McDonald, Brett & Donald Glenn Collins. Green-Wood Remembers the Civil War Dead. (NY Times, 28 May 2007).

Both of these newspaper video clips are must viewing by genealogists.

Green-Wood Cemetery – Brooklyn, NY – Honors Civil War Vets

Newspapers are producing more than newsprint – they are adding video news clips.
Here is an example from the New York Times – “Green-Wood Remembers Civil War Dead”

Click here and watch in depth report about Green-Wood Cemetery’s effort to document the graves of Civil War veterans.

It’s must viewing!

Kentucky Newspapers online

List of Kentucky newspapers that are scheduled to go online on GenealogyBank in the months ahead.

Quickly find obituaries; birth, engagement & wedding announcements; and so much more.

(Stephen Foster’s My Old Kentucky Home …. courtesy of Library of Congress, Music for the Nation)

List of upcoming Kentucky Newspapers that will be added to GenealogyBank

Bardstown, KY. Western American 1803 to 1804
Frankfort, KY. Argus of Western America. 1816 to 1834 Frankfort, KY. Guardian of Freedom. 1798 to 1804
Paris, KY. Western Citizen. 1804 to 1816
Russellville, KY. Mirror. 1806 to 1807

and here’s the list of Kentucky newspapers that GenealogyBank already has online:

Bowling Green, KY. Daily News. 7/2/1999 to Today
Covington, KY. Kentucky Post. 4/2/1990 to 12/31/2007
Danville, KY. Mirror. 9/3/1804 to 12/1/1807
Danville, KY. People’s Friend. 1/30/1819 to 1/30/1819
Frankfort, KY. Frankfort Argus – variant title: Argus; Argus of Western America
2/3/1808 to 6/28/1821
Frankfort, KY. Kentucky Journal. 12/5/1795 to 12/5/1795
Frankfort, KY. Western World. 7/7/1806 to 6/8/1810
Ft Mitchell, KY. Kentucky Enquirer. 1/1/1999 to Today
Georgetown, KY. Telegraph. 9/25/1811 to 12/22/1813
Harlan, KY. Harlan Daily Enterprise. 11/17/2005 to Today
Harrodsburg, KY. Kentucky People. 3/18/1870 to 8/25/1871
Henderson, KY. Gleaner. 4/14/2006 to Today
Lancaster, KY. Political Theatre. 11/18/1808 to 7/26/1809
Lexington, KY. Kentucky Gazette. 3/15/1794 to 12/28/1837
Lexington, KY. Lexington Herald – variant titles: Lexington Daily Press; Lexington Daily Press-Transcript. 1/1/1907 to 12/31/1922
Lexington, KY. Lexington Herald-Leader. 5/1/1906 to 12/31/1907

Lexington, KY. Lexington Herald-Leader. 1/25/1984 to Today
Lexington, KY. Morning Herald. 1/1/1896 to 4/30/1906
Lexington, KY. Reporter – variant title: Kentucky Reporter. 3/12/1808 to 12/25/1820
Lexington, KY. Stewart Kentucky Herald. 7/14/1795 to 9/15/1801
Lexington, KY. Western Monitor. 8/3/1814 to 12/20/1817
Louisville, KY. Courier-Journal. 1/13/1999 to Today
Louisville, KY. Weekly Courier-Journal. 5/19/1879 to 7/29/1889
Maysville, KY. Eagle. 1/19/1815 to 3/27/1818
Middlesboro, KY. Daily News. 2/1/2007 to Today
Owensboro, KY. Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer. 9/1/1988 to Today
Richmond, KY. Globe. 1/24/1810 to 0/17/1810
Russellville, KY. News-Democrat & Leader. 12/13/2005 to Today
Washington, KY. Republican Auxiliary. 8/15/1807 to 8/15/1807
Washington, KY. Union. 3/8/1814 to 5/19/1817