65 Arizona Newspapers Now Online for Your Genealogy Research

Arizona—the last contiguous state admitted into the Union—became the nation’s 48th state on 14 February 1912. The sixth largest state in the U.S., Arizona features such remarkable natural landmarks as the Grand Canyon, Monument Valley and the Petrified Forest.

photo of Cathedral Rock in Arizona

Photo: Cathedral Rock in Arizona. Credit: Ken Thomas; Wikimedia Commons.

If you are researching your ancestry from Arizona, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online Arizona newspaper archives: 65 titles to help you search your family history in the “Grand Canyon State,” providing coverage from 1866 to Today. There are more than 1.5 million newspaper articles and records in our online archives.

Dig deep into the archives and search for obituaries and other news articles about your ancestors in these recent and historical AZ newspapers online. Our Arizona newspapers are divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries (obituaries only).

Search Arizona Newspaper Archives (1866 – 1977)

Search Arizona Recent Obituaries (1991 – Current)

Here is our complete list of online Arizona newspapers in the archives. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more. The AZ newspaper titles are listed alphabetically by city.

City Title Date Range*

Collection

Apache Junction East Mesa Independent 11/13/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Apache Junction Apache Junction-Gold Canyon Independent 11/13/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Apache Junction Chandler Independent 10/20/2010 – 3/30/2011 Recent Obituaries
Apache Junction Queen Creek Independent 1/30/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Arizona City Arizona City Independent 5/31/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Benson San Pedro Valley News-Sun 1/27/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bullhead City Mohave Valley Daily News 10/16/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Casa Grande Tri-Valley Dispatch 11/15/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Casa Grande Casa Grande Dispatch 5/13/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Cave Creek Sonoran News 9/1/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Coolidge Coolidge Examiner 1/9/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Coolidge Florence Reminder and Blade-Tribune 6/14/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Douglas Douglas Dispatch 9/24/1998 – Current Recent Obituaries
Eloy Eloy Enterprise 1/9/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Flagstaff Arizona Daily Sun 5/1/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Gilbert Gilbert Independent 10/20/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Glendale Peoria Times 1/17/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Glendale Glendale Star 12/13/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Green Valley Green Valley News & Sun 5/9/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Green Valley Sahuarita Sun 2/8/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kearny Copper Basin News 9/12/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Maricopa Maricopa Monitor 12/23/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Maricopa Communicator 10/17/2009 – 2/9/2013 Recent Obituaries
Nogales Monitor 9/5/1890 – 9/5/1890 Newspaper Archives
Nogales Nogales International 12/18/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Phoenix Weekly Phoenix Herald 1/2/1896 – 6/22/1899 Newspaper Archives
Phoenix Weekly Republican 6/29/1899 – 3/7/1901 Newspaper Archives
Phoenix North Scottsdale Independent 1/16/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Phoenix Town of Paradise Valley Independent 1/16/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Phoenix Arizona Informant 5/4/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Prescott Prescott Evening Courier 1/5/1891 – 6/30/1908 Newspaper Archives
Prescott Weekly Journal Miner 1/10/1866 – 12/27/1899 Newspaper Archives
Safford Eastern Arizona Courier 2/27/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
San Manuel Pinal Nugget 3/5/2013 – Current Recent Obituaries
San Manuel San Manuel Miner 3/26/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sierra Vista Sierra Vista Herald 4/11/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sonoita Bulletin 1/20/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sun City Sun City-Youngtown Independent 1/2/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sun City Sun City West Independent 1/2/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sun City Peoria Independent 1/16/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sun City Surprise Independent 1/2/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Superior Superior Sun 9/12/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Tombstone Tombstone Prospector 1/1/1889 – 6/30/1899 Newspaper Archives
Tombstone Weekly Tombstone Epitaph 5/1/1880 – 6/25/1899 Newspaper Archives
Tombstone Tombstone Epitaph 7/20/1880 – 11/30/1890 Newspaper Archives
Tombstone Tombstone Epitaph Prospector 7/24/1880 – 8/12/1895 Newspaper Archives
Tombstone Daily Tombstone 3/21/1885 – 12/7/1886 Newspaper Archives
Tombstone Arizona Kicker 12/6/1893 – 2/28/1894 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Tucson Daily Citizen 7/5/1882 – 12/31/1922 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Tucsonense 3/17/1915 – 11/1/1931 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Arizona Weekly Star 5/3/1877 – 10/7/1882 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Arizona Citizen and Weekly Tribune 10/15/1870 – 7/29/1876 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Amigos 5/8/1975 – 12/21/1977 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Fronterizo 1/9/1892 – 12/17/1892 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Dos Republicas 8/23/1879 – 10/18/1879 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Alianza 8/23/1900 – 10/18/1900 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Ferrocarril 5/17/1885 – 5/17/1885 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Iris 6/19/1886 – 6/19/1886 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Arizona Daily Star 1/3/1991 – Current Recent Obituaries
Tucson Explorer 1/16/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Vail Vail Sun 3/24/2007 – 12/2/2008 Recent Obituaries
Wickenburg Wickenburg Sun 11/17/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Willcox Arizona Range News 1/10/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Window Rock Navajo Times 10/16/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Yuma Sun 5/30/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries

You can either print or create a PDF version of this Blog post by simply clicking on the green “Print/PDF” button below. The PDF version makes it easy to save this post onto your desktop or portable device for quick reference—all the AZ newspaper links will be live.

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Top Genealogy Websites: Alabama Genealogy Resources

If you’re researching your family roots in Alabama, I suggest you rely on two online sources—GenealogyBank and FamilySearch—to find digitized newspapers and genealogy records from the “Heart of Dixie.”

Concentrating your Alabama genealogy research on these two websites will give you the documentation you need to learn about your family’s stories—and the specifics of their birth, marriage and death dates.

collage of Alabama genealogy records and newspapers from FamilySearch and GenealogyBank

Credit: FamilySearch and GenealogyBank

You want to focus on the best genealogy websites—the ones that have the information you need to trace your ancestry from Alabama.

GenealogyBank has the most extensive newspaper archive of Alabama newspapers online.

Search Alabama Newspaper Archives (1816 – 1992)

Search Alabama Recent Obituaries (1992 – Current)

FamilySearch has 14 collections of early Alabama records free online.

Search Alabama Census, Probate & Vital Records

Let’s look at the marriage of Joseph A. Gilbert and Margianna Whiddon on 4 August 1859 in Mobile, Alabama.

collage of records about the 1859 wedding of Joseph A. Gilbert and Margianna Whiddon, from FamilySearch and GenealogyBank

Credit: FamilySearch and GenealogyBank

Looking in GenealogyBank’s historical Alabama newspaper archive we find their marriage announced in the Mobile Register (Mobile, Alabama), 11 August 1859, page 2.

The newspaper article tells us:

  • The date of the marriage: 4 August 1859 at 8 p.m.
  • The exact place of the marriage: “the residence of Levi H. Norton”
  • Groom: Joseph A. Gilbert, formerly of Greenville, Butler County, Alabama
  • Bride: Margianna Whiddon, “adopted daughter of the officiating gentleman”

Great genealogical information—we have the who, what, when and where.

Let’s dig deeper and find out exactly who the “officiating gentleman” at the wedding was.

Looking at the Alabama marriage certificates online records on FamilySearch we can easily find the marriage certificate for Joseph Gilbert and Margianna Whiddon.

photo of the 1859 Alabama marriage certificate for Joseph Gilbert and Margianna Whiddon

Credit: FamilySearch

Who performed the wedding?

Looking at the signature of the Justice of the Peace, it appears to be L.H. Hardin or L.H. Nordin.

“L.H. Nordin” —that looks a lot like the Levi H. Norton named in the marriage announcement published in the Mobile Register. Their wedding was performed at his home.

So—we have the “officiating gentleman’s” name from the old newspaper and, although very difficult to read, confirmed again in the signature on the marriage certificate.

The marriage certificate gives us the basic facts given in the newspaper marriage announcement: their names and the date and place of the wedding, plus it tells us who performed the wedding.

The old newspaper announcement adds the important details that the officiator was her adopted father and that Joseph Gilbert was from Greenville, Butler County, Alabama.

By using only the best genealogy resources online we can find the facts we need to document our family and, importantly, the crucial details that fill in the stories of their lives…while focusing our ancestry research and saving time.

Note that this article is part of our ongoing series covering the top genealogy websites. To read the previous articles in this series visit the links below:

Top Genealogy Websites Pt. 1: Google

Top Genealogy Websites Pt. 2: Google Books & Internet Archive

Top Genealogy Websites Pt. 3: Burial & Cemetery Records

Which of Your Ancestors Would You Invite to Your Family Reunion?

Introduction: Mary Harrell-Sesniak is a genealogist, author and editor with a strong technology background. In this guest blog post, Mary fantasizes about being able to invite some of her famous ancestors—including flight pioneers the Wright brothers—to a family reunion.

I’ve got a number of friends who get excited about fantasy football.

Whereas this is quite a snoozer for me, I see their point. They love to discuss and theorize about favorite football players—which is not unlike family historians when they get together, who assert their knowledge about favorite genealogical finds. And genealogists love to discuss their favorite ancestors!

Nobody can really speak for their ancestors, of course, but you can—in a round-about way—introduce them at your next family reunion. Someone could present a written report on their favorite ancestor, or the more theatrical members at your reunion could re-enact times and events surrounding your more noteworthy (or notorious) ancestors.

So if you could invite any relation (direct or otherwise) to your next family reunion, who would it be?

The Wright Brothers

One of my choices would be my latest cousin discovery: aviation pioneers Wilbur and Orville Wright, who share Edmund Freeman (1737-1813) and Martha Otis (1737-1790) as mutual ancestors.

I’d love to ask the Wright brothers if they were apprehensive about their flying machine when it first took flight. I’ve read the patents and various reports about their incredible aviation invention, but it would be wonderful to get their first-hand accounts.

Patent No. 821, 393 of 2 May 1906 (available for viewing at Google Patents):

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that we, ORVILLE WRIGHT and WILBUR WRIGHT, citizens of the United States, residing in the city of Dayton, county of Montgomery, and State of Ohio, have invented certain new and useful Improvements, in Flying-Machines, of which the following is a specification.

Our invention relates to that class of flying-machines in which the weight is sustained by the reactions resulting when one or more aeroplanes are moved through the air edgewise at a small angle of incidence, either by the application of mechanical power or by the utilization of the force of gravity.

This old newspaper article from 1903 reports that the Wright brothers’ flying machine flew three miles against the wind.

A Flying Machine Goes Three Miles against the Wind, Fort Worth Star-Telegram newspaper article, 18 December 1903

Fort Worth Star-Telegram (Fort Worth, Texas), 18 December 1903, page 1

If Orville Wright were alive, I’d love to see him fly his hydro-aero-boat invention. This 1913 newspaper article describes him, not as an aviator, but as a “noted birdman,” and reports that Wilbur Wright had been stricken with scarlet fever. What fun that Orville’s flying boat was tested on “Mad River”!

Orville Wright Perfects New Flying Boat, Evening Times newspaper article 5 December 1913

Evening Times (Grand Forks, North Dakota), 5 December 1913, page 10

Accused Witch Lydia Gilbert

Another on my list of ancestors I’d invite to my family reunion would be accused witch Lydia, wife of Thomas Gilbert. This travesty occurred in October of 1651, reportedly in Hartford, Connecticut (not Salem, Massachusetts). At the time, Lydia and her husband were living in the household of Henry Stiles. A neighbor, Thomas Allyn, was present when a gun discharged, slaying Stiles. Allyn was found guilty of “homicide by misadventure” but three years later, Lydia and others were accused at a Court of Oyer and Terminer of having caused the deed by witchcraft.

Poor Lydia. Wouldn’t you love to hear from her and to reassure her that witchcraft trials were finally put to rest when Governor Phils dissolved this particular Court on 29 October 1692. (Note: that didn’t put an end to all Courts of Oyer and Terminer, a term easily searchable in GenealogyBank. Such courts were authorized to oversee certain criminal cases.)

GenealogyBank’s newspaper archives don’t date to 1651 (although they do contain the first newspaper published in America, Publick Occurrences, in 1690), but there are various references to witch trials contained in the old newspapers, including this photo of the Old Witch House taken in 1914.

Oldest Building in Salem, Mass., Anaconda Standard newspaper article 26 June 1914

Anaconda Standard (Anaconda, Montana), 26 June 1914, page 1

Oyster Cracker Inventor Adam Exton and Wife Elizabeth Aspden

Although not household names today, British immigrants Adam Exton (1823-1887) and wife Elizabeth Aspden (1821-1894) were well known in Trenton, New Jersey, during their lifetime. Adam Exton was the inventor of the oyster cracker, a recipe which became immensely popular. I’d love to invite both of them to my family reunion as well.

I’d like to inquire why Adam Exton didn’t patent this particular invention, as it was soon stolen—and to this day some still disclaim him as the inventor of the delicious invention. However, this piece of family provenance is substantiated in a 1917 newspaper article written by his nephew, also named Adam Exton, who worked in the cracker factory and knew his uncle personally.

Life History of Oyster Crackers, Trenton Evening Times newspaper article 31 May 1917

Trenton Evening Times (Trenton, New Jersey), 31 May 1917, page 4

If you’d like to know more about this topic, search the Web for “Adam Exton’s cracker factory.” The factory still exists and has been renovated into condominiums, known as the Trenton Lofts.

So as family reunion season approaches, consider inviting a few “virtual” ancestors to the party, and don’t forget to search GenealogyBank’s historical archives for the family trivia. You might even uncover a news report of a previous family reunion. When I input “family reunion” into GenealogyBank’s search box, almost 100,000 matches return! Many of these old news articles include old family reunion photos that show the whole family the way they were in the past. What great find to share with the rising generation at your next family get-together so that the young ones can see their ancestors’ faces.

GenealogyBank search box for "family reunion"

GenealogyBank search box for “family reunion”

So which ancestors would you place on your “fantasy ancestral team”? Please share your more extraordinary ancestral finds with us!