Trace Your Immigrant Ancestors with Newspaper Passenger Lists

Be sure to check passenger lists that were routinely printed in newspapers—they have critical genealogical information about your immigrant ancestors that you need for your family history research.

Look at this typical example, published in the Irish Nation newspaper in New York City.

This passenger list reports on the Irish passengers who arrived in New York City on board various ships recently arrived from Europe. Look at the entry for Jane Williamson.

passenger list, Irish Nation newspaper article 7 January 1882

Irish Nation (New York City, New York), 7 January 1882, page 8

This passenger list newspaper article tells us that Jane Williamson, from County Antrim, Ireland, arrived on 28 December 1881 on board the steamer England. It also says that her ultimate destination in America was Cincinnati, Ohio.

Enter Last Name










I looked at the original passenger list online, and found that it has no mention of the facts that Jane was from County Antrim or that she was heading to Cincinnati.

  • For the entry “Place of Last Residence” it was blank.
  • For the entry “Province of Last Residence” it read: “Unknown.”
  • For the entry “City or Village of Destination” it read: “United States.”

How did the Irish Nation newspaper get more complete information about Jane Williamson for its newspaper article than was contained in the original passenger list?

Did they pay arriving Irish immigrants for self-reporting this information? Did they devote a lot of reporters’ time to getting all the facts—and do this for the hundreds and hundreds of Irish immigrants that arrived every day?

What a great resource for genealogists who are tracing their ancestral roots overseas!

The federal passenger lists contain part of the story—to get the rest of the story, you need to turn to old newspapers.

It is essential to check the deep newspaper archives on GenealogyBank to get more of the details about your ancestors and their immigration to the United States.

Keep digging and discover the stories of your ancestors’ lives.

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Family Stories Are Important for Children’s Health & Happiness

Everyone loves to hear their old family stories.

We constantly hear from our GenealogyBank members of the powerful family stories that they have found in old newspapers. Stories drive us to keep researching and piece together the fabric that makes our family histories come alive.

the painting “Boyhood of Raleigh,” 1871, by John Everett Millais

Painting: “Boyhood of Raleigh,” 1871, by John Everett Millais (1829-1896). Source: Wikipedia.

It turns out that these family stories are even more important to our children’s health and well-being than we had previously realized. Recently researchers have found that:

The more children knew about their family’s history, the stronger their sense of control over their lives, the higher their self-esteem and the more successfully they believed their families functioned. The “Do You Know?” scale turned out to be the best single predictor of children’s emotional health and happiness.

So—genealogy is not just fun—it is an important predictor of our “children’s emotional health.”

Enter Last Name










I encourage you to read the entire article about the importance of sharing your family’s stories with your children, titled “The Stories That Bind Us” by Bruce Feiler, published in the New York Times (New York, New York), 15 March 2013. See: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/17/fashion/the-family-stories-that-bind-us-this-life.html?pagewanted=all&_r=1&

Also, make sure to follow our “Genealogy for Kids” Pinterest board for more interesting articles like this and to get fun ideas to introduce the youngest leaves on your family tree to their ancestry: http://www.pinterest.com/genealogybank/genealogy-for-kids/

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65 Arizona Newspapers Now Online for Your Genealogy Research

Arizona—the last contiguous state admitted into the Union—became the nation’s 48th state on 14 February 1912. The sixth largest state in the U.S., Arizona features such remarkable natural landmarks as the Grand Canyon, Monument Valley and the Petrified Forest.

photo of Cathedral Rock in Arizona

Photo: Cathedral Rock in Arizona. Credit: Ken Thomas; Wikimedia Commons.

If you are researching your ancestry from Arizona, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online Arizona newspaper archives: 65 titles to help you search your family history in the “Grand Canyon State,” providing coverage from 1866 to Today. There are more than 1.5 million newspaper articles and records in our online archives.

Dig deep into the archives and search for obituaries and other news articles about your ancestors in these recent and historical AZ newspapers online. Our Arizona newspapers are divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries (obituaries only).

Search Arizona Newspaper Archives (1866 – 1977)

Search Arizona Recent Obituaries (1991 – Current)

Here is our complete list of online Arizona newspapers in the archives. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more. The AZ newspaper titles are listed alphabetically by city.

City Title Date Range*

Collection

Apache Junction East Mesa Independent 11/13/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Apache Junction Apache Junction-Gold Canyon Independent 11/13/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Apache Junction Chandler Independent 10/20/2010 – 3/30/2011 Recent Obituaries
Apache Junction Queen Creek Independent 1/30/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Arizona City Arizona City Independent 5/31/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Benson San Pedro Valley News-Sun 1/27/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bullhead City Mohave Valley Daily News 10/16/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Casa Grande Tri-Valley Dispatch 11/15/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Casa Grande Casa Grande Dispatch 5/13/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Cave Creek Sonoran News 9/1/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Coolidge Coolidge Examiner 1/9/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Coolidge Florence Reminder and Blade-Tribune 6/14/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Douglas Douglas Dispatch 9/24/1998 – Current Recent Obituaries
Eloy Eloy Enterprise 1/9/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Flagstaff Arizona Daily Sun 5/1/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Gilbert Gilbert Independent 10/20/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Glendale Peoria Times 1/17/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Glendale Glendale Star 12/13/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Green Valley Green Valley News & Sun 5/9/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Green Valley Sahuarita Sun 2/8/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kearny Copper Basin News 9/12/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Maricopa Maricopa Monitor 12/23/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Maricopa Communicator 10/17/2009 – 2/9/2013 Recent Obituaries
Nogales Monitor 9/5/1890 – 9/5/1890 Newspaper Archives
Nogales Nogales International 12/18/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Phoenix Weekly Phoenix Herald 1/2/1896 – 6/22/1899 Newspaper Archives
Phoenix Weekly Republican 6/29/1899 – 3/7/1901 Newspaper Archives
Phoenix North Scottsdale Independent 1/16/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Phoenix Town of Paradise Valley Independent 1/16/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Phoenix Arizona Informant 5/4/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Prescott Prescott Evening Courier 1/5/1891 – 6/30/1908 Newspaper Archives
Prescott Weekly Journal Miner 1/10/1866 – 12/27/1899 Newspaper Archives
Safford Eastern Arizona Courier 2/27/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
San Manuel Pinal Nugget 3/5/2013 – Current Recent Obituaries
San Manuel San Manuel Miner 3/26/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sierra Vista Sierra Vista Herald 4/11/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sonoita Bulletin 1/20/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sun City Sun City-Youngtown Independent 1/2/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sun City Sun City West Independent 1/2/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sun City Peoria Independent 1/16/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sun City Surprise Independent 1/2/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Superior Superior Sun 9/12/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Tombstone Tombstone Prospector 1/1/1889 – 6/30/1899 Newspaper Archives
Tombstone Weekly Tombstone Epitaph 5/1/1880 – 6/25/1899 Newspaper Archives
Tombstone Tombstone Epitaph 7/20/1880 – 11/30/1890 Newspaper Archives
Tombstone Tombstone Epitaph Prospector 7/24/1880 – 8/12/1895 Newspaper Archives
Tombstone Daily Tombstone 3/21/1885 – 12/7/1886 Newspaper Archives
Tombstone Arizona Kicker 12/6/1893 – 2/28/1894 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Tucson Daily Citizen 7/5/1882 – 12/31/1922 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Tucsonense 3/17/1915 – 11/1/1931 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Arizona Weekly Star 5/3/1877 – 10/7/1882 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Arizona Citizen and Weekly Tribune 10/15/1870 – 7/29/1876 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Amigos 5/8/1975 – 12/21/1977 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Fronterizo 1/9/1892 – 12/17/1892 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Dos Republicas 8/23/1879 – 10/18/1879 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Alianza 8/23/1900 – 10/18/1900 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Ferrocarril 5/17/1885 – 5/17/1885 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Iris 6/19/1886 – 6/19/1886 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Arizona Daily Star 1/3/1991 – Current Recent Obituaries
Tucson Explorer 1/16/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Vail Vail Sun 3/24/2007 – 12/2/2008 Recent Obituaries
Wickenburg Wickenburg Sun 11/17/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Willcox Arizona Range News 1/10/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Window Rock Navajo Times 10/16/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Yuma Sun 5/30/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries

You can either print or create a PDF version of this Blog post by simply clicking on the green “Print/PDF” button below. The PDF version makes it easy to save this post onto your desktop or portable device for quick reference—all the AZ newspaper links will be live.

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GenealogyBank Cheat Sheets: Shortcuts to Key Website Resources

Introduction: Mary Harrell-Sesniak is a genealogist, author and editor with a strong technology background. In this guest blog post, Mary provides two handy “cheat sheets” —one for navigating GenealogyBank’s diverse resources, followed by one to help with contact information and membership.

Early in my career as a computer troubleshooter and trainer, I made software cheat sheets. Organized by functionality, rather than titles chosen by software developers, they helped me navigate menus and remember complicated sequences needed to complete tasks.

They became a frequent component of my support work with clients—and not surprisingly, one of my most requested resources.

Everyone loves a shortcut—so in this long-honored tradition from my past, here is a handy GenealogyBank Cheat Sheet for navigating GenealogyBank’s diverse resources, followed by one to help with contact information and membership. You are welcome to share these downloadable cheat sheets with others and store them locally for quick reference.

  • GenealogyBank Categories, Features & Resources cheat sheet, to help navigate the features found on the GenealogyBank website (www.genealogybank.com).
  • GenealogyBank Site & Corporate Links cheat sheet, to assist with contact and membership issues.

GenealogyBank Categories, Features & Resources

Compiled by Guest Blogger
Mary Harrell-Sesniak

(June 2014)

In addition to the following specialty categories,
more results may be found using general searches.

Academic Records (See the Historical Books collection) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/books/
Ads & Classified Advertising www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/newspapers/?type=ads_classifieds
African American Newspapers www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/ethnic/african_american/
Almanacs (See the Historical Books collection) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/books/
American State Papers (See the Historical Documents & Records collection: http://www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/documents/) The collection comprises 28 physical volumes of legislature and executive documents of Congress from 1789-1838. Categories include:

  • I. Foreign Relations
  • II. Indian Affairs
  • III. Finances
  • IV. Commerce and Navigation
  • V. Military Affairs
  • VI. Naval Affairs
  • VII. Post Office Department
  • VIII. Public Lands
  • IX. Claims
  • X. Miscellaneous
Articles (Featured Articles) (See articles on the GenealogyBank Blog as well: http://blog.genealogybank.com) Featured Articles, such as “Honoring Our Military Dead,” are located in the Learning Center.
Articles (Historical Newspapers) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/newspapers/?type=newspaper_articles
Atlases (See the Historical Books collection, which includes Old Maps & Atlases) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/books/
Autobiographies (See the Historical Books collection) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/books/
Biographies (See the Historical Books collection) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/books/
Birth Records www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/newspapers/?type=birth_records
Blog (In addition to this link, you’ll find links to the blog on GenealogyBank’s various social media sites.) http://blog.genealogybank.com 

(You’ll be able to search by any word in a blog post, or by author, and you can browse by date—see links at the bottom of the blog page.)

Books (Historical). This collection contains a variety of ephemera and specialty items, including:

  • Almanacs
  • Autobiographies & Memoirs
  • Biographies
  • Funeral Sermons, Eulogies & Elegy Poems
  • Genealogies
  • Old Academic Rewards of Merit
  • Old Maps & Atlases
  • Rare Old Books
  • Tax Bills
  • Theater Programs & Playbills
  • Town Meeting Reports
  • Vintage Ads & Prints
  • Vintage Invitations
www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/books/
Charts & Tables www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/newspapers/?type=tables_charts
Commodity & Stock Prices www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/newspapers/?type=commodity_stocks
Congressional Serial Set (See the Historical Documents & Records collection: http://www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/documents/ Contains official reports and documents that the U.S. House and Senate have ordered to be printed since the 15th Congress.
Documents (Historical) See also individual categories. www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/documents/ 

  • American State Papers
  • Historical maps including: burial & cemetery maps, old land & property maps, and military & war battle maps
  • Pension records including: Revolutionary War pension records, Civil War pension records, and World War I & World War II pensions and Widows’ Claims
  • U.S. Congressional Serial Set
  • U.S. government land grants
Downloads (free) Getting Started Climbing
Your Family Tree”
by Thomas Jay Kemphttp://www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/learning-center/how-to-search-genealogybank-ebook/
Elections & Political News www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/newspapers/?type=political_elections
Ethnic Newspapers (See African American, Hispanic American, and Irish American newspaper collections) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/ethnic/african_american/www.genealogybank.com/static/hispaniccontent.html
www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/ethnic/irish_american/
Featured Articles www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/learning-center/
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/ask_the_genealogist/
Funeral Sermons (See the Historical Books collection) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/books/
Genealogies (See the Historical Books collection) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/books/
Google+ (See the Social Media entry below) https://plus.google.com/b/109950473464458943527/+Genealogybank/posts
Hispanic American Newspapers www.genealogybank.com/static/hispaniccontent.html
Historical Books (See the Historical Books collection) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/books/
Historical Documents (See the Documents entry above) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/documents/
Illustrations & Photos www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/newspapers/?type=photos_illustrations
Invitations (See the Historical Books collection) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/books/
Irish American Newspapers www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/ethnic/irish_american/
Learning Center www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/learning-center/
Legal News, Probate & Court Records www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/newspapers/?type=legal_probate_court
Letters Found in Newspapers www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/newspapers/?type=newspaper_letters
List of Newspapers www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/newspapers/sourcelist/
Maps (In addition to searching the newspaper archives, see also the Historical Books and the Historical Documents & Records collections) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/newspapers/?type=historical_mapswww.genealogybank.com/gbnk/books/

www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/documents/

Marriage Records www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/newspapers/?type=marriage_engagement
Memoirs (See the Historical Books collection) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/books/
Military Records (In addition to searching the newspaper archives, see also the Historical Documents & Records collection) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/newspapers/www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/documents/
Newsletter sign-up (free) www.facebook.com/GenealogyBank/app_247174568712874
Newspapers Recently Added: www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/newcontent.html

Source List (all newspapers): www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/newspapers/sourcelist/

Obituaries (Historical: pre-1977) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/newspapers/?type=historical_obituaries
Obituaries (Recent: 1977 to present) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/obituaries/
Passenger Lists www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/newspapers/?type=passenger_lists
Pensions www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/documents/
Photos & Illustrations www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/newspapers/?type=photos_illustrations
Pinterest (See the Social Media entry below) http://www.pinterest.com/search/pins/?q=genealogybank
Playbills (See the Historical Books collection) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/books/
Poems & Songs www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/newspapers/?type=poems_songs
Political News & Election Results www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/newspapers/?type=political_elections
Q&A www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/ask_the_genealogist/
School & Academic Records of Merit (See the Historical Books collection) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/books/
Searching The basic search is at www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/. See the links in this table for specialty searches.
Sermons (See the Historical Books collection) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/books/
Shopping (See the Store entry below) http://store.genealogybank.com/
Social MediaSearch for GenealogyBank on a variety of social media sites. Blog: http://blog.genealogybank.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/GenealogyBank
Google+: https://plus.google.com/s/genealogybank
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/search/pins/?q=genealogybank
Twitter: https://twitter.com / @genealogybank
YouTube: www.youtube.com/user/GenealogyBank
Social Security Death Index (SSDI) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/ssdi/
Songs & Poems www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/newspapers/?type=poems_songs
Stock & Commodity Prices www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/newspapers/?type=commodity_stocks
Store: Shop the GenealogyBank store for a variety of books and special offers. http://store.genealogybank.com/
Tables & Charts www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/newspapers/?type=tables_charts
Tax Bills & Records (See the Historical Books collection) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/books/
Testimonials www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/information/testimonials.html
Theater Programs & Playbills (See the Historical Books collection) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/books/
Tips (See articles on the GenealogyBank Blog as well: http://blog.genealogybank.com) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/learning-center/
Town Meeting Reports (See the Historical Books collection) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/books/
Twitter (See the Social Media entry above) https://twitter.com / @genealogybank
U.S. Congressional Serial Set (See the Historical Documents & Records collection: http://www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/documents/) Contains official reports and documents that the U.S. House and Senate have ordered to be printed since the 15thCongress. 
Videos (See the Learning Center and GenealogyBank’s YouTube channel) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/learning-center/www.youtube.com/user/GenealogyBank
Webinars (free) www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/learning-center/ 

Sampling:

  • How To Search GenealogyBank
  • Newspapers: Critical Resource to Complete Your Family Tree
  • Newspaper for Genealogists
  • Obituaries: Clues to Look For
YouTube Channel (See Social Media entry above) https://www.youtube.com/user/GenealogyBank

GenealogyBank Site & Corporate Links

Compiled by Guest Blogger
Mary Harrell-Sesniak

(June 2014)

About Genealogy Bank: Here you’ll read that GenealogyBank is a leading online genealogical resource from parent company NewsBank, inc. www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/information/about_us/index.html 
Account Information www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/account/
Contacting GenealogyBank: You can do this in a multitude of ways, from calling to e-mailing to networking on social media sites.
Learning Center: Not only is this free, but it includes a wide variety of resources. http://www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/learning-center/
Membership See Account Information for info on your own membership. Special offers are often found in the GenealogyBank store—and don’t forget memberships can be given as gifts.
Parent Company (NewsBank) GenealogyBank is a division of NewsBank, one of the world’s premier information providers. (See www.newsbank.com.)
Privacy Policy www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/information/privacy_policy.html
Sitemap: Use this link to navigate the entire site. www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/information/sitemap.html 
Terms of Use: Use this link to learn how you may use the GenealogyBank website for personal use. www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/information/terms_of_use.html

You can either print or create a PDF version of this Blog post by simply clicking on the green “Print/PDF” button below. The PDF version makes it easy to save this post on your desktop or portable device for quick reference—all the links in the GenealogyBank cheat sheets will be live.

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Our Ancestors’ Stories Live in Old Newspaper Ads Too

I like to look at every mention of each ancestor that I am researching—and that includes newspaper classified ads.

While looking through the Newark Daily Advertiser for 1835 I was surprised to see this unusual paid advertisement.

ad from E. Allen in support of Julia Moore, Newark Daily Advertiser newspaper advertisement 3 July 1835

Newark Daily Advertiser (Newark, New Jersey), 3 July 1835, page 3

What is with this odd newspaper advertisement?

This is to certify, that the bearer, Julia Moore…[is] perfectly honest, never having had the slightest cause for suspicion.

Something must have been wrong if E. Allen felt compelled to take out an ad attesting to Julia Moore’s honesty.

Wait—here’s another one.

ad from M. Seguine in support of Julia Moore, Newark Daily Advertiser newspaper advertisement 3 July 1835

Newark Daily Advertiser (Newark, New Jersey), 3 July 1835, page 3

This old newspaper ad tells us that Julia lived with the Seguine household “for two months during the fall of 1834.” The subscriber went on to state:

I found her perfectly honest, and industrious: she had every opportunity of being dishonest, if she had been so inclined, but I never have had the least cause for suspicion.

OK. There must be more to this story if both subscribers took out ads testifying to the honesty of Julia Moore.

Enter Last Name










Digging deeper into the newspaper archives I found the answer—in the classified ads.

ad about Julia Moore offering reward for stolen cap, Newark Daily Advertiser newspaper advertisement 27 June 1835

Newark Daily Advertiser (Newark, New Jersey), 27 June 1835, page 3

Julia Moore, a young Irish girl of about 13 years old, was accused of stealing an elaborate woman’s hat from her employer when she left for a different job. The former employer bluntly attacks the honesty of the young girl, and also tries to push that suspicion onto her friends that “refuse to tell where she is.”

Now the situation is clearer. Not only was Julia’s reputation insulted in the June 27th ad, but so was the good name of “her friends”—the Allen and Seguine households—causing them both to take out ads six days later attesting to her honesty.

This discord gives us a lot of genealogical information:

  • Her name, Julia Moore
  • She had a sister
  • She was born in Ireland, and in 1835 was about age 13
  • She had lived in Newark at the Seguine home for two months in 1834
  • In 1835 she lived with the Allen household where her sister also lived
  • Her former employer wanted a missing cap back, or information about the cap and about the girl

Life in America was difficult for this young 13-year-old immigrant. There is no mention of her parents, only her sister. This must have been a terrifying time for her in the face of her former employer’s accusations, and hopefully her concerns were tempered by the kindness of these other two families.

Enter Last Name










Was Julia’s story passed down in the family?

Do her descendants understand the hard life their immigrant ancestor lived at age 13?

Imagine her fear, her lost childhood, and the realities of having to deal with an unjust employer. This is a gritty story that a 13-year-old would quickly understand today. I hope that Julia’s story was passed down, and that the family today tells and retells her story, honoring her grit in the face of this painful episode—and that they know about the great kindness shown her in her youth.

Genealogy Tip: Don’t let your family’s stories be lost. Track down every lead in the newspapers, looking through every page right down to the classified ads.

GenealogyBank’s deep newspaper archive is your best source to find and preserve your family’s stories.

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Old-School Social Networking: Social Brief Columns in Newspapers

Newspapers have been the chief “social networking” tool for over 300 years—and that’s a good thing for genealogists.

Newspapers’ social columns reported on the comings and goings of members of the local community, providing personal details that give a glimpse into the daily lives of our ancestors.

For example, here we have word that Dorothy Easton was visiting her sister Mrs. K. Summers in San Francisco.

article about Dorothy Easton, Western Outlook newspaper article 3 July 1915

Western Outlook (Oakland, California), 3 July 1915, page 3

This mention is just a one-liner buried in a social briefs column—just one line—but it is loaded with great genealogical clues:

  • the year is 1915
  • one sister is Dorothy
  • she’s not married
  • her surname is Easton
  • she lives in Los Angeles
  • the other sister is called “K”
  • she’s married
  • her surname is Summers
  • she lives in San Francisco

This social brief notice could be the critical clue to learn the maiden name, hometown and more about the family of K. Summers.

Enter Last Name










Notice that the Western Outlook groups these briefs by town, with headings such as “San Francisco Items” and “Oakland Jottings.” Newspapers were written to sell. Editors made them personal by including these local social briefs to excite the local readers. Picture the impact of seeing your name or your neighbor’s name written up in the paper. That was big news.

You would take the newspaper over to give to them, talk about it with them, and mention it to your wider circle of friends. It is exactly like social media (Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, etc.) today. It holds your attention; you comment on it and share it.

Here is another example of newspaper social networking, from 1879.

article about Carrie Carpenter, Daily Gazette newspaper article 18 November 1879

Daily Gazette (Rockport, Illinois), 18 November 1879, page 4

This notice provides great clues to more family information:

  • the year is 1879
  • Carrie Carpenter is single
  • she opened her own school in Stephenson County
  • her mother is Mrs. Mary L. Carpenter
  • her mother is County Superintendent of Public Schools
  • she has a sister

This article appeared on page 4, under the masthead of the newspaper just like the previous example from the Western Outlook, but in this case the social brief notices are not grouped and labeled by the town the persons mentioned lived in, or by an organization or topic.

Enter Last Name










While the format varies from newspaper to newspaper, it has been very common for the past three centuries to include these local social briefs of such high interest to the public.

Genealogy Tip: Be sure to perform a broad search for your target ancestor, including all of GenealogyBank’s deep newspaper archive. By limiting a search to only the newspapers in your town or state, you might miss key articles (like these social briefs) about your ancestor that appeared in a newspaper from across the country.

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Genealogy Checklist: 13 Types of Records to Include in Your Research

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this guest blog post, Gena provides a handy tool to help with your family history research: a checklist of 13 types of genealogy records that you can use for each ancestor you search for, to make sure your research is thorough.

After conducting online searches through your favorite genealogy websites, you may feel like you’ve hit a brick wall. This is understandable—it’s easy to become overwhelmed with multiple databases and lose sight of what sources might help you answer your research question.

Before you decide you’re facing that brick wall, consult this checklist of frequently-used family history sources. A checklist of sources can help you plan out your research and keep track of where you have searched. Print this out for each individual you search for, and refer to it as you research your family history.

illustration of a magnifying glass

Illustration: magnifying glass. Credit: Wikimedia Commons.

1) Census Records

One of the first places we often look for our family is in the U.S. Federal Census. The census should be your go-to source for trying to place your ancestor in time. The census was taken every 10 years starting in 1790. (However, the 1890 census was largely destroyed.) Because of privacy concerns, the latest census you can access is 1940.

As you think about your ancestor in the census, don’t forget that other census schedules exist aside from the familiar population schedules. Depending on the year, you may also want to consult the Mortality, Agriculture, Slave, Veterans and Defective, Dependent and Delinquent schedules.

Also take a note if the state your ancestor lived in conducted a state or territorial census. Not every state participated in such a census and in some cases a state may have only conducted one when it was still a territory, but a state census can often yield additional information not compiled in the federal census.

2) Church or Synagogue Records

What religion was your ancestor? This is important, especially considering that in some cases a religious record might take the place of a civil registration. What records should you look for? The answer is: it depends. It depends on where your ancestor lived, what religion they practiced, and what still exists.

Records that might exist include those that document baptisms, christenings, marriages, and deaths. Other religious records include: cemetery records, school records, censuses, meeting notes, membership lists, pew deeds, adoption records, excommunications, church periodical articles, directories, and church auxiliary records. Exhaust religious databases found online like the selection found at JewishGen. To find church records, consult the individual meeting house and then archives associated with that religious community, including academic institutions and seminaries. Also, consider conducting a place search in the Family History Library Catalog.

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3) Court Records

Even if you think your ancestor would have no interaction with the local court, don’t overlook searching at least the civil case index for their name. Our ancestors were involved in all sorts of legal matters, and it’s a myth to believe that only our modern society is “sue happy.” Some items to look for include minutes, orders/decrees, judgments, case files, indexes, criminal proceedings, naturalizations, and divorce petitions. Learn more about what court records exist by reading the book The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy by Val D. Greenwood. Note that you can also find court case files and courtroom transcripts in GenealogyBank’s newspaper archives.

4) Death Records

Death results in a lot of paperwork. Sure, there’s the death certificate—but that’s just the beginning. There can be paperwork from the hospital, funeral home and cemetery. What other paperwork can be found? Death certificates, newspapers (including articles, legal notices, funeral notices, death notices and obituaries), funeral home records, pension records, church records, cemetery records, court records (to include a will or probate or in the case of an accident there might be a lawsuit), Coroner’s Inquest, city directories, and the Social Security Death Index. Notices from membership directories and publications may also offer clues.

5) Home Sources

Every genealogy project should begin with home sources. These are the heirlooms and “stuff” inherited and passed down through the generations. Sometimes just talking about your interest in genealogy will alert family members that you would be a grateful recipient of items that they have inherited. What are some possible home sources? Correspondence, newspaper clippings, photos, scrapbooks, diaries and journals, family Bibles, naturalization paperwork, funeral home cards, and work- and school-related papers. As you try to find home sources, don’t forget to use social media to connect with long-lost cousins who have also inherited heirlooms.

6) Land Records

Did your ancestor own land or a home? You’ll want to search for a grantee/grantor index, deeds, mortgages, patents and grants. These records can be found anywhere from the Family History Library, a local courthouse or a county recorder’s office, to the National Archives. Make sure to plan out what you are looking for and search online for what entity has that record.

7) Major Life Events

Let’s face it, a birth or marriage can result in all kinds of documentation. Everything from home sources (think baby books and photo albums filled with greeting cards and descriptions of the big day), to official government records (vital record certificates) and church records. Don’t forget newspaper articles about the actual event (birth or marriage) as well as articles about the engagement, elopement or milestone anniversaries. Marriage records that could exist include: banns, bonds, licenses/applications, and certificates.

8) Military Service Records

Did your ancestor serve in the military? If they were a soldier at any point, think about searching for military service records, pensions, bounty land grants, awards, draft registrations, unit histories, battle histories and maps. Been told that all of your ancestor’s military records burned? Make sure to check for a Final Pay Voucher and ask your recent vets about the DD214 which lists information about their service including awards earned.

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9) Historical Newspapers

Many of the life events we have mentioned were reported in newspaper articles. But don’t forget that your ancestor could be mentioned in all parts of the newspaper, including legal notices, advertisements, society pages, crime reports, and other general articles. Not sure what types of articles exist? On the GenealogyBank Blog we focus on a variety of newspaper articles and how they can assist your genealogical research.

10) Occupational Records

Even if your ancestor was “just a farmer,” an occupation can leave behind a paper trail. Consider items like paycheck stubs, occupational periodicals, union records, membership cards and records to professional groups. Mentions of occupations can also be found in the city directory.

11) Published Sources

There are many different types of published sources that can assist you throughout your family history research. In some cases, like that of unsourced family history books, they may be just a place to gather initial clues. In other cases, however, they can provide you with definitive information to confirm your ancestor’s place in time, such as city directories.

Make sure to consult biographical works on your ancestor or their associates, county and local histories, and periodical indexes like PERSI, Google Scholar and JSTOR.

12) School Days

What schools did your ancestor attend? Even if they only attended for a few years, records may be available. Consider what may be available from attending an Elementary, Secondary, High, or Vocational/Trade school, as well as a College or University. Papers may in some cases be found in the home, but also could be found in an archive or the Family History Library. Look for yearbooks and alumni directories, school newspapers, articles about school awards and events in local newspapers, award certificates, report cards, and school census records.

13) Tax Records

We all know the saying “nothing is certain but death and taxes,” and that is as true for us now as it was for our ancestors. Why search tax records? They can not only establish a place in time for your ancestors, but they help you better understand their lives.

Some ideas about tax records that could exist are: poll, personal property, real estate, income, federal, inheritance, and school taxes. Don’t forget that the newspaper also printed lists of those who were negligent in paying their taxes.

Is the above list of 13 genealogical sources totally comprehensive? No, of course not, but it provides a handy reference for your family history research. As you plan your genealogy searches, also consider what libraries, archives, and museums exist where your ancestor lived. They may have catalogs that will provide you with additional sources that you may not have known existed.

You can either print or create a PDF version of this Blog post by simply clicking on the green “Print/PDF” button below. The PDF version makes it easy to save this post on your desktop or portable device for quick reference—all the links will be live.

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Old Newspaper Ads, Your Immigrant Ancestors & U.S. Migrations

Introduction: Scott Phillips is a genealogical historian and owner of Onward To Our Past® genealogy services. In this guest blog post, Scott searches old newspapers to find advertisements that encouraged families to move to other parts of the U.S. for a better life—and shows how these ads can help you better understand the lives your ancestors lived and the decisions they made.

As genealogy and family history fans, we all know the concept of “chain migration,” which is loosely defined as the process of immigrants moving from their homeland to new lands and communities, building upon familiar and familial social relationships from the Old Country. This certainly was true in the case of many of my immigrant ancestors.

But what happened once those immigrants got to their destination in the United States? While some put down lifelong roots in the community they first arrived in, many moved on to other destinations in America. What were some of the influences on these migratory movements within the U.S.?

Newspaper Advertisements Influenced Migrations

Some of the answers can be found in simple newspaper advertisements. Just as letters home might have influenced some people to come to the States, once here they were subjected to the constant allure of a better life in other parts of the country.

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Here are some examples of historical newspaper advertisements that influenced our immigrant ancestors’ migrations to other parts of America.

Arkansans Urged to Migrate West

With the bold headline “Westward, Ho!” this 1845 advertisement tells of a meeting to be held in Napoleon, Arkansas, “to organize a company of emigrants, to remove to California.”

ad urging westward migration, Arkansas Weekly Gazette newspaper article 29 September 1845

Arkansas Weekly Gazette (Little Rock, Arkansas), 29 September 1845, page 3

Montana Riches: Land of Opportunity for Millions!

Some of the people and organizations looking to entice emigrants to move used a method that had worked in the Old Country: they wrote letters to the editor, which in many cases sure resembled an advertisement to me.

For example, take a look at this 1882 letter to the editor headlined “ROOM FOR MILLIONS.” The author of this “letter,” one James S. Brisbin writing from Keogh, Montana, covers a range of items in this letter/advertisement, including the weather, parks, the wealth of the mines in the area, and more. He states:

But not only are stock raisers, farmers and miners needed in the West, but artisans and skilled labor of all kinds. Towns are everywhere springing up, and the services of workmen of every grade are in great demand.

And just for good measure he closes his letter by reminding readers that Montana is only a four-day train ride from the East Coast, and ends with this statement: “Only four days from want and misery to wealth and joy.” Well, how could you not move there?

article urging migration to Montana, New York Herald newspaper advertisement 10 February 1882

New York Herald (New York, New York), 10 February 1882, page 9

Telegraphers Needed

This 1905 advertisement for The Morse School of Telegraphy promises immediate employment upon graduation and a salary of $40-$60 a month “east of the Rockies” and $75-$100 a month “west of the Rockies.” For that big of a difference in salary, I’d say there was probably a waiting line for telegraphers heading out West!

ad offering employment to telegraphers, Morning Olympian newspaper advertisement 2 August 1905

Morning Olympian (Olympia, Washington), 2 August 1905, page 3

The Allure of Arizona Gold

The following 1907 newspaper article reads like an ad. While not an actual advertisement, it surely advertises what opportunities might await folks interested in moving to Kofa, Arizona. Kofa, which is an acronym for “King of Arizona,” held the richest gold mine in the history of the Southwestern United States.

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It may have been an article just like this that enticed one of my own immigrant ancestors, Elijah Poad, to seek his fortune in Kofa. As a Cornish miner, he would have been well suited to the work. However, the one note this article leaves out is the fact that there was no water in Kofa, so they had to bring it in by mule teams. While Elijah did live in Kofa for a few years, he then followed many of his fellow Cornish miners and became a Yupper in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan mining copper, then on to Linden, Wisconsin, to mine lead, and finally to Anaconda, Montana, to mine for silver and other minerals.

article urging migration to Arizona for the Kofa gold rush, Tucson Daily Citizen newspaper article 12 December 1907

Tucson Daily Citizen (Tucson, Arizona), 12 December 1907, page 7

Workers Wanted All across America

This 1922 newspaper article tells readers that there are workers needed across the U.S., and reports what jobs are available where. Almost every category of employment seems to be mentioned in this article.

Jobs Now Plentiful in U.S., Saginaw News newspaper article 15 December 1922

Saginaw News (Saginaw, Michigan), 15 December 1922, page 28

Eastward Migration, Also

Not all the U.S. migration advertisements urged westward expansion, however—some encouraged migrants to head east. For example, this 1920 ad in a Colorado newspaper encourages land-seekers to head east to Michigan. It starts out with the statement “Big opportunity in Michigan.” The old advertisement continues and promises “Big money in grains, stock, poultry, or fruit.”

ad urging migration to Michigan, Denver Post newspaper advertisement 18 August 1920

Denver Post (Denver, Colorado), 18 August 1920, page 21

Many of the ancestors in my family tree moved around the United States, especially in pursuit of better economic opportunities. Did your ancestors move around the country—and if so, do you think they might have been influenced by old newspaper advertisements like these? Leave me a comment, as I’d enjoy knowing your thoughts and experiences.

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Preview to Southern California Genealogical Society Jamboree

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this guest blog post, Gena previews the upcoming Southern California Genealogical Society Jamboree, including the genealogy talks she will be presenting there on behalf of GenealogyBank.

Do you have an event you look forward to every year? There are certain genealogy conferences that family history researchers look forward to year after year, and one of those is the Southern California Genealogical Society Jamboree being held at the Los Angeles Marriott Burbank Airport Hotel June 5th-8th. After all, what’s not to like? Four days of genealogical education in the beautiful Southern California sunshine.

Not familiar with the SCGS Jamboree conference? Each year over 1,000 genealogists from California, other states—and yes, even other countries—converge upon Burbank to take in lectures, historical tours, special events, and displays in an exhibit hall to learn more about genealogy and genealogical services.

photo of a  lecture from last year’s Jamboree genealogy conference

Photo: lecture from last year’s Jamboree. Credit: Used with permission, Southern California Genealogical Society <http://www.scgsgenealogy.com/>.

45th Annual Jamboree

This year will be no exception at “the 45th Annual Southern California Genealogy Jamboree, featuring over 50 speakers, nearly 150 sessions and about 70 exhibitors, software and data providers, and societies.” National speakers at Jamboree this year include: John Philip Colletta, Ph.D.; George G. Morgan; Dick Eastman; Lisa Louise Cooke; Judy G. Russell; and yours truly, just to name a few.

photo of a discussion group from last year’s Jamboree genealogy conference

Photo: discussion group from last year’s Jamboree. Credit: Used with permission, Southern California Genealogical Society <http://www.scgsgenealogy.com/>.

For the second year in a row, a special DNA conference will be held in conjunction with Jamboree on Thursday, June 5th. Family History and DNA: Genetic Genealogy in 2014 brings experts from the field of genetic genealogy, presenting on such topics as autosomal DNA, DNA studies, and DNA testing.

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To learn more about attending the upcoming 2014 Jamboree conference, see the Southern California Genealogical Society Jamboree website. Special events can be added to your registration and offer additional experiences. I’m especially looking forward to the Sunday morning Scholarship Award Breakfast where I will be presenting on Of Elephants, Gold, and Dashed Dreams: Researching the California Gold Rush. Join me as we honor the 2014 winner of the Suzanne Winsor Freeman Memorial Student Genealogy Grant.

GenealogyBank at the Jamboree

Do you love GenealogyBank and want to know how to make the most of your subscription? Come visit us in the exhibit hall where we will be answering your questions and helping researchers search our archival collections. Take advantage of this opportunity to talk to us and learn how to master GenealogyBank and find your ancestors.

photo of blog authhor Gena Philibert-Ortega (left) with Judy G. Russell (The Legal Genealogist), from last year’s Jamboree genealogy conference

Photo: Gena Philibert-Ortega (left) with Judy G. Russell (The Legal Genealogist), from last year’s Jamboree. Credit: from the author’s collection.

To learn even more about GenealogyBank, plan on attending my presentation “Using America’s Ethnic Newspapers to Find and Document Your Family,” Saturday morning at 8:30. On Sunday afternoon at 1:00 I’ll discuss “GenealogyBank—Inside and Out,” where we will discuss how to search on GenealogyBank’s collection of 6,500 newspaper titles and one billion family history records.

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Can’t Make It to California?

Not able to attend Jamboree in person? That’s ok, you can attend virtually! Jamboree will be providing free streaming sessions.

In addition to the streaming sessions, social media provides the opportunity to attend a conference from home. Follow Jamboree on Twitter by monitoring the hashtag #SCGS2014 or the Southern California Genealogical Society account @scgsgenealogy. Don’t forget to also follow the GenealogyBank Twitter account at @GenealogyBank.

Start Thinking about the 2015 Jamboree

If you can’t join us in person at the Jamboree genealogy event this year, start making plans now to attend in 2015. Besides the conference, there’s so much to do for those non-family historians in your family. (Disneyland, anyone?)

For the family historian, plan on spending a few extra days in the area to research at area libraries and archives such as the:

I hope to see you at Jamboree next week!

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Funeral Sermons: How to Research Funeral Records for Genealogy

Introduction: Mary Harrell-Sesniak is a genealogist, author and editor with a strong technology background. In this guest blog post, Mary explains that in earlier times funeral sermons were published and sold—and these documents often provide a wealth of family history information.

You’re probably wondering what’s so exciting about funeral sermons, a rather sobering subject. Until recently I agreed, but then I did some genealogy research using funeral sermons and discovered that there are exciting ancestral details to be culled from them.

In fact, I urge all family historians to find and examine funeral sermons about their ancestors whenever they can.

Funeral Sermons: a Long and Honored Tradition

In earlier days, funeral sermons were often published. Authors (especially ministers) delivered inspirational and memorable sermons, often including personal family details about the deceased. Afterward, friends and bereaved family members requested copies for keepsakes; the funeral sermons were printed and sold to them.

Although published sermons are rare nowadays, the practice is a long and honored tradition.

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Newspaper Advertisements for Funeral Sermons

Early newspapers ran ads announcing the availability of funereal sermons for purchase. In order to entice sales, most of these ads include pertinent genealogical details that we as genealogists can use as proof documents for lineage society applications.

This newspaper advertisement for Hezekiah Huntington’s funeral sermon is typical. Notice that it includes his date of death, where he died, the burial date and the minister’s name.

ad for the sale of the funeral sermon for Hezekiah Huntington, Connecticut Gazette newspaper advertisement 14 May 1773

Connecticut Gazette (New London, Connecticut), 14 May 1773, page 2

By comparison, this obituary for Hezekiah Huntington is a disappointment with its dearth of details—the entire obituary is one simple line:

At New-London, the hon. Hezekiah Huntington, Esq; of Norwich.

obituary for Hezekiah Huntington, Massachusetts Spy newspaper article 25 February 1773

Massachusetts Spy (Boston, Massachusetts), 25 February 1773, page 217

Just think: the old newspaper ad for the funeral sermon—let alone the actual funeral sermon itself—provides more details than the obituary!

Where to Find Funeral Sermons

GenealogyBank’s newspaper archives are a good place to find old ads for funeral sermons. Also, the site’s Historical Books collection contains digitized funeral sermons and eulogies.

a screenshot of the search page for GenealogyBank’s Historical Books collection

Screenshot: search page for GenealogyBank’s Historical Books collection

To find genealogical information in early funeral sermons, try searching both the newspaper archives for historical advertisements about the funeral, as well as the Historical Books collection.

My Own Family History Discovery in a Funeral Sermon

When I decided to look at the funeral sermons in GenealogyBank’s Historical Books collection, I really wasn’t expecting to find anything about my own family. How wrong I was! While browsing the titles on the search results page, one heading jumped out at me: it named my 6th great grandfather, Joseph Starr, husband of Mary Benedict.

screenshot of GenealogyBank's search results page for funeral sermons

In all my years of genealogy research, I’ve never been able to find an obituary for Joseph Starr—so this 23-page funeral sermon was an exciting find. I already knew several things about my ancestor’s life, such as his occupation as a shoemaker, tanner and farmer, and military service with the 20th Regiment of Cap. Nehemiah Waterman’s Company during the American Revolutionary War.

New Details about My Ancestor Joseph Starr

photo of the cover of the funeral sermon for Captain Joseph Starr, 1802

Photo: cover of the funeral sermon for Captain Joseph Starr, 1802. Credit: GenealogyBank’s Historical Books.

This old funeral sermon confirmed some facts I already knew, but also added new details about Joseph Starr’s life. Some of these new research findings include:

  • Various vital record dates, including the year of his birth in 1726, his marriage in 1745, and his death on 3 April 1802.
  • Family details (11 children, 39 grandchildren and 24 great grandchildren—74 in all, 66 of whom were alive at the time of his death).
  • The name of the minister, as well as his church (Rev. John Ely, pastor of the 2nd Church of Danbury).
  • Joseph Starr was healthy and attended church. (“As he enjoyed a good state of health he was seldom absent from public worship.”)
  • I also learned about his personality. (“He was affable, benevolent and hospitable; being a man of but few words he was not disposed to meddle with other men’s matters, and consequently he had perhaps as many friends, and as few enemies as most men; He lived beloved, and died greatly lamented.”)
  • The publication had been requested by surviving friends.
  • There were also kind words directed to the widow, her family and attending friends.
photo of part of the funeral sermon for Captain Joseph Starr, 1802

Photo: part of the funeral sermon for Captain Joseph Starr, 1802. Credit: GenealogyBank’s Historical Books.

All in all, it was an exciting genealogy research find—and for me, a funeral sermon with so many personal life details trumps an obituary any day.

(For more information about Joseph Starr, see: the History of Danbury; a lengthy genealogy book on the Starr family; and Find A Grave memorials 21148746 and 21148747.)

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Genealogy Tips for Researching Published Sermons

  • The date associated with the sermon will be the publication date, not the date of death.
  • The sermon publication day and month may not be exact, but the year is correct. Many funeral sermons are recorded in the database as January 1, because the exact date of publication is not known. (For example, Joseph Starr died on 3 April 1802, yet his funeral sermon is indexed in the database as 1 January 1802 because the indexers had no way of knowing the actual date of publication.)
  • Look for other items in the publication. In the funeral sermon examples below, a copy of a will, letters, and a transcription of a tombstone were found.
  • Don’t forget to search for the newspaper advertisements that accompanied the sermons.
  • Prominent ancestors are more likely to have had published sermons than lesser known persons.
  • Others who died around the same time may be named in the body of the document, even if not included in the title. (In one of the examples below, Capt. Whittlesey passed away as the result of a hurricane, and the crew members of his ship were also named. In other instances, people who died the same week or month were also mentioned in passing.)

Funeral Sermon Examples

The following examples demonstrate the variety of genealogical and personal family information that can be found when researching published funeral sermons.

  • John Cushing: This 15-page sermon includes information about the widow and orphaned children.
photo of the funeral sermon for John Cushing, 1806

“A sermon, delivered at Ashburnham, May 22, 1806, at the interment of Mr. John Cushing, Jun. who expired at the house of his father. By Seth Payson, A.M. pastor of the church in Rindge. Published by request.”

  • Lydia Fisk: The title reveals that Mrs. Lydia Fisk was the consort of the Rev. Elisha Fisk and shows the Bible passages cited.
photo of the funeral sermon for Lydia Fisk, 1805

“A sermon, preached July 13, 1805. At the funeral of Mrs. Lydia Fisk, late consort of the Rev. Elisha Fisk, Pastor of the First Church in Wrentham. By Nathanial [i.e., Nathanael] Emmons, D.D. pastor of the church in Franklin.”

  • Alexander Hamilton: This funeral discourse includes a copy of his will, one of his papers and several letters.
photo of the funeral sermon for Alexander Hamilton, 1804

“A discourse, delivered in the city of Albany, occasioned by the ever to be lamented death of Gen. Alexander Hamilton, July 29, 1804. By Eliphalet Nott, A.M. pastor of the Presbyterian Church in said city. To which is added, a paper, written by Gen. Hamilton: containing, his motives and reflections on the causes that led to this fatal catastrophe. Also—his will, Bishop Moore’s letter—and a letter by the Rev. Mr. Mason.”

  • Mrs. Harris: On page 20, this document includes information about a family member’s gravestone.
photo of the funeral sermon for Mrs. William Harris, 1801

“A tribute of filial respect, to the memory of his mother, in a discourse, delivered at Dorchester, Feb. 8, 1801, the Lord’s day after her decease: by Thaddeus Mason Harris.”

  • Capt. William Whittlesey: The appendix mentions the tragic details of his death, along with the crew members who accompanied him.

photo of the funeral sermon for William Whittlesey, 1807

“The providence of God universal; a sermon, delivered at East Guilford, Feb. 1807. Occasioned by the death of Capt. William Whittlesey and others. By John Elliott, A.M. pastor of a church in Guilford. Published at the request of the mourners. [Two lines from Isaiah]”

Funeral sermons are an often-overlooked genealogical treasure, providing details about our ancestors’ lives perhaps not found anywhere else. Be sure to include them in your family history searches to discover more about the stories of your ancestors’ lives.

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