Preview to Southern California Genealogical Society Jamboree

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this guest blog post, Gena previews the upcoming Southern California Genealogical Society Jamboree, including the genealogy talks she will be presenting there on behalf of GenealogyBank.

Do you have an event you look forward to every year? There are certain genealogy conferences that family history researchers look forward to year after year, and one of those is the Southern California Genealogical Society Jamboree being held at the Los Angeles Marriott Burbank Airport Hotel June 5th-8th. After all, what’s not to like? Four days of genealogical education in the beautiful Southern California sunshine.

Not familiar with the SCGS Jamboree conference? Each year over 1,000 genealogists from California, other states—and yes, even other countries—converge upon Burbank to take in lectures, historical tours, special events, and displays in an exhibit hall to learn more about genealogy and genealogical services.

photo of a  lecture from last year’s Jamboree genealogy conference

Photo: lecture from last year’s Jamboree. Credit: Used with permission, Southern California Genealogical Society <http://www.scgsgenealogy.com/>.

45th Annual Jamboree

This year will be no exception at “the 45th Annual Southern California Genealogy Jamboree, featuring over 50 speakers, nearly 150 sessions and about 70 exhibitors, software and data providers, and societies.” National speakers at Jamboree this year include: John Philip Colletta, Ph.D.; George G. Morgan; Dick Eastman; Lisa Louise Cooke; Judy G. Russell; and yours truly, just to name a few.

photo of a discussion group from last year’s Jamboree genealogy conference

Photo: discussion group from last year’s Jamboree. Credit: Used with permission, Southern California Genealogical Society <http://www.scgsgenealogy.com/>.

For the second year in a row, a special DNA conference will be held in conjunction with Jamboree on Thursday, June 5th. Family History and DNA: Genetic Genealogy in 2014 brings experts from the field of genetic genealogy, presenting on such topics as autosomal DNA, DNA studies, and DNA testing.

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To learn more about attending the upcoming 2014 Jamboree conference, see the Southern California Genealogical Society Jamboree website. Special events can be added to your registration and offer additional experiences. I’m especially looking forward to the Sunday morning Scholarship Award Breakfast where I will be presenting on Of Elephants, Gold, and Dashed Dreams: Researching the California Gold Rush. Join me as we honor the 2014 winner of the Suzanne Winsor Freeman Memorial Student Genealogy Grant.

GenealogyBank at the Jamboree

Do you love GenealogyBank and want to know how to make the most of your subscription? Come visit us in the exhibit hall where we will be answering your questions and helping researchers search our archival collections. Take advantage of this opportunity to talk to us and learn how to master GenealogyBank and find your ancestors.

photo of blog authhor Gena Philibert-Ortega (left) with Judy G. Russell (The Legal Genealogist), from last year’s Jamboree genealogy conference

Photo: Gena Philibert-Ortega (left) with Judy G. Russell (The Legal Genealogist), from last year’s Jamboree. Credit: from the author’s collection.

To learn even more about GenealogyBank, plan on attending my presentation “Using America’s Ethnic Newspapers to Find and Document Your Family,” Saturday morning at 8:30. On Sunday afternoon at 1:00 I’ll discuss “GenealogyBank—Inside and Out,” where we will discuss how to search on GenealogyBank’s collection of 6,500 newspaper titles and one billion family history records.

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Can’t Make It to California?

Not able to attend Jamboree in person? That’s ok, you can attend virtually! Jamboree will be providing free streaming sessions.

In addition to the streaming sessions, social media provides the opportunity to attend a conference from home. Follow Jamboree on Twitter by monitoring the hashtag #SCGS2014 or the Southern California Genealogical Society account @scgsgenealogy. Don’t forget to also follow the GenealogyBank Twitter account at @GenealogyBank.

Start Thinking about the 2015 Jamboree

If you can’t join us in person at the Jamboree genealogy event this year, start making plans now to attend in 2015. Besides the conference, there’s so much to do for those non-family historians in your family. (Disneyland, anyone?)

For the family historian, plan on spending a few extra days in the area to research at area libraries and archives such as the:

I hope to see you at Jamboree next week!

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The World Was Your Ancestor’s Oyster: Food in Family History

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this guest blog post, Gena explores one of her many interests: the connection of food and cooking to family history, revealing how much oysters were part of our ancestors’ diets.

What did your ancestors eat? Is this something you ever ponder? As family historians, the actual everyday activities of our ancestors can help to bring the dates and places we research to life.

In some cases the food our ancestors ate is quite different from what we are accustomed to today. With the lack of refrigeration and transportation, it’s no surprise that there were regional differences in cuisine. Considering the limited ability to transport and preserve ingredients, the variety of what was available to harvest locally, and the food preferences of local ethnic/immigrant populations, it is not surprising that the food that was served in various areas could be extremely different. A specialty enjoyed by those living in one region of the United States was all but unknown in another. While to some extent this is still true of modern cuisine today, as you can travel to different regions of the United States and taste local favorites not served where you live, these food differences are not as dramatic as they were 100 years ago.

So what were some food commonalities? Well there were many American foods that were feasted upon across the regions. One such food that was enjoyed by almost all Americans in the nineteenth century was oysters. Today oysters, depending on where you live, are usually a delicacy because of the price they command. It would also not be unusual to find people who have never even tried an oyster, raw or cooked.  In the nineteenth century oysters were everyday food items that were inexpensive and plentiful. They were the food of the common person.

Newspaper advertisements hint at the massive amounts of oysters available to our ancestors. Consider this 1874 newspaper advertisement from the Oregonian which lists several places to eat and obtain oysters.

Old Vintage Advertisement for Oysters - Oregonian Newspaper  1874

Oregonian (Portland, Oregon), 16 October 1874, page 5.

Street vendors, oyster houses, saloons, restaurants and home cooks prepared oysters in various, often creative ways. Oysters were served in every way imaginable including ways we are familiar with today like raw and fried. Interesting ways to serve oysters could be found in the era’s cookbooks including pickled oysters, oyster ketchup and one recipe that called for oysters to be served with shortcake.[i]

Consider this newspaper article which provides 11 ways to cook oysters that “if adhered to will bring cheer to the family board.” Note that this article was printed in a Kentucky newspaper—not exactly known today for its seafood. Yet this historical 1913 article tells “how best to serve the succulent bivalve [oysters], perhaps the most universally popular dish of the American table.”

How To Cook Oysters Old Recipe - Lexington Herald Newspaper 1913

Lexington Herald (Lexington, Kentucky), 19 October 1913, section 4, page 3.

There were also “mock oyster” recipes for those who were unable to obtain oysters. These oyster recipes substituted different ingredients for oysters including corn, mashed potatoes, tomatoes, and eggplant. Women could cook dishes such as “Mock Oyster Soup,” “Mock Oyster Sauce,” “Mock Oyster Stew” and just plain “Mock Oysters.” While the appearance of a “mock” recipe in a cookbook might connote that the item was difficult to obtain or expensive, this was not necessarily so in the case of the oyster.

As oyster beds became contaminated and overfished in the early 1900s, oysters began to cease being eaten as an everyday food and became more of a delicacy. No longer was the oyster part of America’s everyday diet.

To learn more about America’s love affair with oysters see the history The Big Oyster. History on the Half Shell by Mark Kurlansky.


[i] Stavely, Keith W. F., and Kathleen‎ Fitzgerald‎. America’s Founding Food. Chapel Hill, North Carolina: University of North Carolina Press, 2004, pg. 108. Viewed on Google Books 1 July 2012.