Plattsburgh, NY newspaper archive (1796-1922) live on GenealogyBank.

Plattsburgh, NY newspaper archive (1796-1922) live on GenealogyBank.

GenealogyBank has added the Northern Herald (1812-1814) to its online collection of Plattsburgh, NY newspapers. These digital facsimile editions include complete copies of each issue and are searchable from a special new link:

Click here to search all of the Plattsburgh, NY newspaper archives.

Click on the individual newspaper titles to search just those titles:
American Monitor 1809-1810
Clinton Advertiser 1810-1811
Northern Herald 1812-1814
Plattsburgh Herald 1815
Political Observatory 1803-1811
Republican 1796-1922

GenealogyBank has over 300 New York (1719-1999) newspapers.

Click here to search all New York newspapers.

Genealogist, Mary Sue Green Smith (1933-2009)

Prominent Nashville, TN genealogist, Mary Sue Green Smith (1933-2009) has passed away.

She was President of the Middle Tennessee Genealogical Society. She published eight books between 1994 and 2006; mostly reference works to be used in tracing one’s roots in Nashville. She indexed tens of thousands of pre-Civil War civil court records, which added to standard genealogical resources, many families whose names don’t otherwise appear in records.

Tennessean, The (Nashville, TN) – April 25, 2009
SMITH, Mary Sue Green Age 76 of Nashville, TN, died Friday, April 24, 2009. She was a genealogist, whose contributions helped African-American families with Nashville roots to trace their families back before the Civil War.


She was preceded in death by her husband, Burrell G. Smith and one of her sons, Robert Shelton Smith, who died in 1972. She is survived by three sons, John Kennedy Smith and wife Barbie of Indianapolis, Stephen Thomas Smith and wife Barbara Ann Mech of Nashville, and Richard Douglas Smith and wife Julie of Fairbanks, Alaska.

Her surviving grandchildren are John R. Smith of Big Bear, CA, Michael B. Smith, midshipman at the Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD, Thomas Shelton Smith and wife, Anne Kindt Smith of Knoxville, Katherine Holly Smith of Nashville, Andrew Kennedy Smith of Nashville, Jennifer Sue Smith of Fairbanks and Robert Elias Smith of Sault Ste. Marie, MI.

Her surviving sisters are Dorothy Strange of Loudon, TN, Barbara Butler of Nashville and Pam White of Nashville. Mary Sue Smith was a native of Nashville.

She graduated from David Lipscomb High School and attended David Lipscomb College, where she met Burrell G. Smith, who had served in the Army paratroopers in World War II. They were married in April, 1950. Hers was the first wedding in the newly built Otter Creek Church of Christ, at the corner of Otter Creek Road and Granny White Pike. Her father, the late Sam Kennedy Green, was an elder there.

The couple raised a family in Bellaire, MI. Burrell was an educator and a social worker. Sue served as clerk of the Antrim County Selective Service Board during the Vietnam War. She served on the mental health board of the county. After Burrell’s death, Sue returned to Nashville in 1986.

Sue was a genealogist and had served as President of the Middle Tennessee Genealogical Society. She published eight books between 1994 and 2006, mostly reference works to be used in tracing one’s roots in Nashville. She indexed tens of thousands of pre-Civil War civil court records, which added to standard genealogical resources, many families whose names don’t otherwise appear in records.

Her work made it possible for many African-American families to trace their parentage back into the years when persons held in slavery were listed, as property, in wills.

Memorial services will be conducted Sunday, April 26, 2009 at 3 p.m., at Woodbine Funeral Home, Hickory Chapel, 5852 Nolensville Road, by Tommy Daniel. Memorial contributions may be made to the charity of your choice. Visitation will be Sunday from 1 – 3 p.m., at WOODBINE FUNERAL HOME, HICKORY CHAPEL Directors, 615-331-1952; Still Family Owned.

Copyright (c) The Tennessean. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Gannett Co., Inc. by NewsBank, inc.

Chicago Marriage certificates 1871-1920 going online

It’s a great day for genealogy. There are only a small handful of Internet sites that are putting up sharp, clear digital images of genealogical records, the kind of resources that genealogists want to use and will rely on for their research.

FamilySearchLabs has been doing just that. They have just added Cook County (IL) Marriage Records from 1900 to 1920 and announced that they will expand these back further to 1871. Cook County – is more than just Chicago – it includes the townships of Barrington, Berwyn, Bloom, Bremen, Calumet, Cicero, Elk Grove, Evanston, Hanover, Lemont, Leyden, Lyons, Maine, New Trier, Niles, Northfield, Norwood Park, Oak Park, Orland, Palatine, Palos, Proviso, Rich, River Forest, Riverside, Schaumburg, Stickney, Thornton, Wheeling, Worth.

Here is a typical example: the marriage certificate of Wyatt Nelson Cronk (1877-1976) to Agnes Brunnell Garcelon (1876-1962). They were married in Oak Park, Cook County, Illinois on 28 March 1908.

Remembering Carole Callard …

I paused this week to remember Carole Callard – she was a terrific genealogist, teacher, librarian and friend.

Carole passed away 3 years ago this week. Her obituary appeared in several newspapers including the Lansing State Journal (MI) – December 12, 2005

Carole Crawford Callard
Lansing, MI
Age 64, died December 10, 2005; born August 8, 1941 in Charleston, WV. Carole was a well-known and respected Librarian and Genealogist for many years, before retiring in June from the Library of Michigan. She is survived by her daughters, Susan (Martin) Philp of Tecumseh and Anne Cottongim of Northville and sister, Rosemary (William) Marquart of Hilton Head, SC. Memorial services will be celebrated Wednesday, December 14, 2005, at 10:00 a.m., at St. Mary’s Cathedral, 219 Seymour, Lansing, with the Rev. George C. Michalek officiating. The family will receive friends one hour prior to the service at the church, as well as on Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at Gorsline-Runciman Funeral Home, 900 E. Michigan Ave, Lansing. Scripture Services will be held Tuesday at 7:00 p.m. Those desiring may make contributions to the Carole Callard Endowment Fund, c/o Library of Michigan Foundation, 717 W. Allegan St., P.O. Box 30159, Lansing, MI 48909, in memory of Carole.
Copyright (c) Lansing State Journal. All rights reserved. Reproduced with the permission of Gannett Co., Inc. by NewsBank, inc., GenealogyBank.com

What the obituary doesn’t say is that Carole was a tireless worker – she lectured all over the country – instantly drawing in her audience, encouraging them and teaching them how to climb their family tree. She wore many hats in her career – she was one of the national GPO Documents Collection Inspectors, worked in Ethiopia to improve library services; Ann Arbor Public Library; University of Michigan Library; Allen County (IN) Library and the Library of Michigan.

There is an old phrase – “to waste and wear out your life” in a good cause. Carole did just that. For years she poured herself into indexing the 1870 census of Michigan – no doubt this contributed to her deteriorating eyesight. Carole didn’t let her limited vision slow her down – she was daily at her post assisting genealogists, attending every conference, giving every lecture – right up to the end.

Carole was honored in 1997 as the first recipient of the Abrams Chair of Genealogy at the Library of Michigan – one of the few endowed positions in librarianship and the only endowed chair in genealogy. She received the Filby Award (2003) and the Distinguished Service Award from the Library and Information Science Program at Wayne State University in June 2005.