January Update: GenealogyBank Just Added 27 Million More Records!

Every day, GenealogyBank is working hard to digitize more newspapers and obituaries, expanding our collection to give you the largest newspaper archives for family history research available online. We just completed adding 27 million more U.S. genealogy records, vastly increasing our content coverage from coast to coast!

screenshot of GenealogyBank's home page showing the Monthly Update for January of 27 million new records

Here are some of the details about our most recent U.S. newspaper additions:

  • A total of 13 newspaper titles from 5 U.S. states
  • 9 of these titles are newspapers added to GenealogyBank for the first time
  • We’ve shown the newspaper issue date ranges so that you can determine if the newly added content is relevant to your personal genealogy research

To see our newspaper archives’ complete title lists, click here.

State City Title Coverage Added Collection
California Riverside Riverside Daily Press 01/01/1941 – 01/28/1941 Newspaper Archives
Louisiana New Orleans Louisiana Advertiser 08/18/1826 – 08/18/1826 Newspaper Archives
Louisiana New Orleans Times-Picayune 11/02/1850 – 03/28/1922 Newspaper Archives
Minnesota Faribault Faribault Daily News New! 07/10/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
New York Brooklyn Bay News & Brooklyn Graphic New! 05/02/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
New York Brooklyn Bay Ridge Courier New! 08/11/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
New York Brooklyn Brooklyn Courier New! 05/02/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
New York New York East Villager New! 12/16/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
New York Brooklyn Kings Courier New! 09/30/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
New York Brooklyn Mill-Marine Courier New! 05/02/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Wisconsin Milwaukee Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel 06/09/1964 – 07/15/1964 Newspaper Archives
Wisconsin Minocqua Lakeland Times New! 03/13/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Wisconsin Rhinelander Northwoods River News New! 11/15/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries

Genealogy Tip: One of the ways to take advantage of the fact that Genealogy is constantly adding new content is to use a feature on the newspapers’ search box that lets you search just on the content added since a certain time:

screenshot of GenealogyBank's search box showing ability to search only on newest added content

GenealogyBank adds millions of new records monthly, so keep searching. And good luck with your family history research!

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr: A Brief Genealogy & Family Tree

Introduction: Scott Phillips is a genealogical historian and owner of Onward To Our Past® genealogy services. In this blog post – in honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day – Scott searches old newspapers to find out more about Dr. King’s family history.

The year was 1968. If you lived it, you know it was a year quite like no other in U.S. history. Certain words and images are indelibly seared into our memories from 1968: Vietnam, Tet Offensive, anti-war riots, Robert F. Kennedy, Apollo, Nixon, “Prague Spring,” and Martin Luther King, Jr. to name a few.

It was on 4 April 1968 that our world lost the legendary civil rights activist Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. to an assassin’s bullet, as reported in this 1968 Louisiana newspaper.

article about the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Times-Picayune newspaper article 5 April 1968

Times-Picayune (New Orleans, Louisiana), 5 April 1968, page 1

The world was in shock and sadness over the assassination of MLK, and our entire nation was on edge. As a country, we tried to come to grips with the murder of one of our most stalwart proponents of peaceful humanitarian change.

Since today is the national celebration of Dr. King’s life, as well as the 48th anniversary of his untimely death, I thought I would search GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives to see what I could learn about the genealogy and family history of this truly great American.

Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Father, the Reverend King, Sr.

The first thing we need to recall is that while newspapers often referred to him as Dr. King, his full name was Martin Luther King, Jr. His father was Rev. Martin Luther King, Sr.

Rev. King, Sr. outlived his son, dying in Atlanta of heart disease in 1984, as reported in this Texas newspaper. This obituary gives us more information about the family of Rev. King, Sr., commenting that “his life was stained by repeated tragedy.” He not only lost his son, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in the 1968 assassination, but his only other son, Rev. A. D. King, accidentally drowned in 1969, and his wife, Alberta Williams King, was killed by gunfire while playing the organ during a church service in 1974.

obituary for Rev. Martin Luther King, Sr., Dallas Morning News newspaper article 12 November 1984

Dallas Morning News (Dallas, Texas), 12 November 1984, page 1A

Rev. King, Sr.’s faith and commitment is shown in the last two paragraphs of this obituary:

But in his last years, King refused to speak with bitterness about his family’s losses. Nor did he swerve from his commitment to non-violence and his faith in the ultimate designs of a loving God.

“I do not hate the man who took the life of my dead son,” he said at a bicentennial ceremony in Dallas in 1976. “I am not going to hate the young man who came and killed my wife. I am every man’s brother. I’m going on with my job.”

The murder of Alberta King, wife of Rev. King, Sr. and mother of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was reported in this 1974 Massachusetts newspaper.

article about the murder of Alberta King, wife of Rev. King, Sr. and mother of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Boston Herald newspaper article 1 July 1974

Boston Herald (Boston, Massachusetts), 1 July 1974, page 1

MLK’s Personal “Preacher’s Kid” Story & Family Photo

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was part of a group called “preacher’s kids,” as shown in this 2006 Illinois newspaper article. This old newspaper article not only provides a view of what it is like to grow up as a “PK” or preacher’s kid, but also provides us with a photo of the King family in 1963, as well as a very nice biography of Dr. King which lists his wife, Coretta Scott, and his four children, Yolanda, Martin Luther III, Dexter, and Bernice.

article about the family of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Register Star newspaper article 14 January 2006

Register Star (Rockford, Illinois), 14 January 2006, page 9

Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Daughter, the Reverend Bernice King

I then discovered an intriguing article from a 1991 South Dakota newspaper about Dr. King’s daughter Bernice. She is the only one of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s four children to become a minister. The old newspaper article proclaims: “Bernice King is seeking her own mission and her own identity.” As with so many of our own families, it seems the passion for a profession followed through the branches and roots of the King family with Rev. Bernice King, who is currently the chief executive officer of The King Center.

article about Rev. Bernice King, Aberdeen Daily News newspaper article 20 January 1991

Aberdeen Daily News (Aberdeen, South Dakota), 20 January 1991, page 35

Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Grandfather, the Reverend A. D. Williams

It was also interesting for me to note, when I looked up Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s grave on Findagrave.com, that his maternal grandfather, A. D. Williams, was also a Reverend.

Honoring the Memory of MLK

Dr. King’s legacy was recognized and respected by the signing of the bill establishing a national holiday in his honor by then-President Ronald Reagan, as reported in this 1983 Washington newspaper article.

article about President Reagan signing the bill to create Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Seattle Daily Times newspaper article 2 November 1983

Seattle Daily Times (Seattle, Washington), 2 November 1983, page 1

His legacy was further elevated by the establishment of the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial in Washington, D.C., on 28 August 2011.

Photo: Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial

Photo: Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial. Credit: U.S. National Park Service.

It was an article I found in a 1971 Alabama newspaper that really made me nostalgic. This article is all about songwriter Dick Holler and it reports: “Holler considers ‘Abraham, Martin and John’ his best song to date.” It goes on to say: “He said it only took about 10 minutes to write the song and that he had no idea it would be such a tremendous success.”

article about songwriter Dick Holler, Mobile Register newspaper article 30 December 1971

Mobile Register (Mobile, Alabama), 30 December 1971, page 30

While all of the memorials and tributes to Dr. King are wonderful, it is Dick Holler’s that I always carry close in my heart!

Anybody here seen my old friend Martin?
Can you tell me where he’s gone?
He freed a lot of people,
But it seems the good they die young.
I just looked around and he’s gone.
—Dick Holler

Take some time during today’s Martin Luther King Jr. Day commemoration to reflect upon this great civil rights leader and his legacy of faith, love, hope, and non-violence.

Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Family Tree

Here is Martin Luther King, Jr.’s family tree that contains the names, DOB, and DOD (if applicable) of his parents, grandparents and great grandparents.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. family tree

MLK Genealogy Challenge

See if you can find out more about Martin Luther King, Jr.’s ancestry dating back into the 1800s, and fill in some of the unknowns in his family tree. Our African American newspaper archives is a great place to start. Please be sure to share your MLK family history finds with us in the comments!

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Using Newspapers to Expand Your Genealogy Research: A Morgue Example

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this blog article, Gena shows how newspaper articles can fill in the details only hinted at in some records, such as morgue documents.

What records have you used to verify your ancestor’s demise? Normally, death certificates and obituaries are the family historian’s go-to source for researching death, but there are other documents available as well. An example of a unique set of records is the Hamilton County, Ohio, Morgue Records, 1887-1930, available from the University of Cincinnati Libraries Digital Collections. This is but one example of the genealogically significant records available through academic digital collections.

The website explains:

“Bodies were taken to the morgue for various reasons, such as suspicion of murder or suicide, accidental deaths, unidentified or unclaimed bodies, or death under unknown or otherwise suspicious circumstances. Details in the morgue records include the date, time, and location the body was found, personal information on the deceased, probable cause of death, and removal of the body, sometimes effects found on the body. Some entries include letters from the next-of-kin or public officials that offer more information on the deceased.”

Morgue Records Don’t Provide the Full Story

A record set such as this is a rich source of genealogical information. But the information it provides only goes so far – we don’t really learn the full story of how or why the deceased died. To learn that story – or any of the stories about our ancestors’ lives – we need a collection of old newspapers such as GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives.

Filling in the story hinted at by a morgue record is a good example of the importance of enhancing what you find in one set of records with newspaper articles. Newspapers are a perfect companion to most records. Once you find an ancestor in a morgue document, search the newspapers and verify names, dates, places, and additional details to learn the full story.

In this blog article, we’ll look at three examples that show how newspapers enhance the story of an ancestor’s death after first finding them in a morgue record.

Follow the Trail

In the case of deaths that are anything but natural, it’s important to follow the paper trail found in old newspapers. Murders, suicides and accidents can mean numerous newspaper articles on the day of and following the event – and sometimes, preceding the event.

One such example begins with the 1895 Hamilton County morgue record of Louis Stolzenberger. In that record we learn of his death – then, in a series of newspaper articles detailing his crimes and their aftermath, we learn more about the circumstances surrounding Stolzenberger’s death.

Louis, distraught over the death of his child, began his crime spree by physically abusing his wife. After the abuse was reported to the police, Officer Morris went to the Stolzenberger home to serve Louis with a warrant.

Initially, Stolzenberger appeared to cooperate by proclaiming “all right” – but then he took his pistol, placed it at the officer’s chest, and fired. As Stolzenberger fled the scene he saw his sister-in-law, Minnie Cook, and fired two shots at her but missed. Another officer, Fred Shafer, gave chase and, as expected, Stolzenberger then started firing at him.

Officer Shafer returned fire, hitting Louis in the neck. One newspaper article reports that Louis’ “…body was taken to the Morgue.” Stolzenberger is said to have been “… jealous of his wife, and accused her of infidelity.” But this article doesn’t stop there: it goes on to tell the story of Officer Morris’ last moments, including dictating his last will and testament (great news for his descendants).

article about Louis Stolzenberger, Cincinnati Post newspaper article 28 February 1895

Cincinnati Post (Cincinnati, Ohio), 28 February 1895, page 7

This article includes a pencil sketch of the accused, Louis Stolzenberger.

picture of Louis Stolzenberger, Cincinnati Post newspaper article 28 February 1895

Cincinnati Post (Cincinnati, Ohio), 28 February 1895, page 7

After the incident, Officer Shafer demanded that he be arrested for shooting and killing Louis. “I want to be tried on a charge of manslaughter.” But his superior told him: “There’s nothing to try you for…Let me shake hands with you for doing it.”

As this newspaper article reports, a coroner’s inquest ruled that Officer Shafer was acting in self-defense in the death of Stolzenberger.

article about Stolzenberger and Shafer, Cincinnati Post newspaper article 2 March 1895

Cincinnati Post (Cincinnati, Ohio), 2 March 1895, page 3

Genealogy Tip: This event is a good example of why you want to make sure you don’t narrow your geographic search for an ancestor too much. When I searched on “Louis Stolzenberger” in just Ohio newspapers, I came across a few articles. But when I tried the same search and didn’t specify a place, I received hits for articles in newspapers from Indiana, Michigan and Nebraska. It is a safe assumption that an event like this would be picked up by other newspapers. Remember that a newsworthy event may be reported by newspapers across the country.

article about Stolzenberger shooting, Evansville Courier and Press newspaper article 28 February 1895

Evansville Courier and Press (Evansville, Indiana), 28 February 1895, page 1

Further genealogical research into city directories finds Lizzie Stolzenberger, the widow of Louis, living in Cincinnati after his death. If we were to continue our research on the Stolzenberger family it would include tracing their lives in Cincinnati using city directories, the U.S. census, vital records – and, of course, newspaper articles.

Sometimes There’s More to the Story

One of the aspects I love about genealogy is that research is always full of surprises. We want to believe that our ancestors lived predictable, neat lives, but life is messy.

One of the records in the Hamilton County Morgue collection is for George Montgomery. His date of entry is 24 May 1892, but the notes mention that he most likely died the previous month from a suicide. Wanting to know more of the story, I turned to the old newspapers. A newspaper search tells us of the events leading up to the morgue entry. First, a short mention is found in an April newspaper article that reports a man was seen jumping from the Newport Bridge, leaving behind his hat.

article about George Montgomery, Cincinnati Post newspaper article 18 April 1892

Cincinnati Post (Cincinnati, Ohio), 18 April 1892, page 1

A month later we learn that Mr. Montgomery’s body was found. It’s easy to assume he was a local resident, but a follow-up newspaper article informs us that he resided in Kentucky. The article reports:

About the middle of April, George Montgomery, of Butler, Ky., committed suicide by jumping into the Ohio from the new bridge. His name was learned only from a slip of paper found under the lining of his hat, which the suicide threw down on the walk before making the fatal leap.

His cousin, Dr. I. J. Bonar, identified the remains. The article goes on to report that Montgomery was a single, 40-year-old man with a previous suicide attempt.

article about George Montgomery, Cincinnati Post newspaper article 25 May 1892

Cincinnati Post (Cincinnati, Ohio), 25 May 1892, page 1

Genealogy Tip: It’s important to widen your search to the days, even weeks, prior to a death reported in a morgue record. Earlier newspaper articles may report everything from a sickness to, in this case, the events leading up to finding a body. While narrowing your search is important in cases when you are trying to find someone with a common name, it is imperative to try several different searches and to expect the unexpected.

Work Kills

There’s no doubt that life was dangerous for our ancestors. This can easily be confirmed by reports of occupational-related deaths. In some cases those accidents may affect more than just employees, as in this case of a railroad collision that killed an employee and two “hobos.” The morgue records list the victims of this 23 July 1894 crash as Frank Taylor, Richard Tudor, and Chas Sherman. Newspaper articles provide not only more information about the crash and those killed, but also the names of the injured.

article about a train wreck, Cincinnati Post newspaper article 23 July 1894

Cincinnati Post (Cincinnati, Ohio), 23 July 1894, page 1

This accident involved two trains. Blame is squarely placed on the shoulders of the freight train engineer, who forgot about the express train until it was too late to avoid a collision. Two employees on the express train jumped, along with a small boy who saw them jump, saving their lives. But unfortunately not everyone had time to make that decision.

Ed Bradley, presumably an acquaintance of the two “hobos,” identified the men at the morgue. The newspaper article does not provide much information about one of the men, 20-year-old Richard Tudor, except for his street address and that he lived with his mother, a Mrs. Bailes. Details given about the other man, Charles Sherman, include where he worked, previous occupations, and his fatal return after a visit with a young lady, Maud Carson.

As we would expect when researching a large accident, there are other reports that can help us piece together this story. In this case a short newspaper mention of the coroner’s inquest is found a few months after the train wreck, which proclaims that the accident was “the result of gross carelessness on the part of the engineer, Samuel Hart, in forgetting the schedule time of the train with which he collided.”

article about a train wreck, Cincinnati Post newspaper article 12 September 1894

Cincinnati Post (Cincinnati, Ohio), 12 September 1894, page 1

Accidents can result in numerous newspaper articles that report on the accident for days after including inquiries and of course obituaries. Any time an ancestor is a victim of an accident, occupational or personal, look for newspaper articles and be sure to extend your search to months – even a year – afterward.

What Will You Find?

The limited information I found in the Hamilton County Morgue records was greatly enhanced by additional newspaper research. I was able to learn more about their deaths, the names of family members and acquaintances, as well as details that could lead to other records. Don’t limit your newspaper research to just finding one article about an ancestor. Expand your search by following up on records that mention your ancestor to find additional newspaper articles. Records that document your ancestors’ lives usually lead to other records and newspaper articles.

Are you attending the RootsTech Genealogy Conference?

GenealogyBank is helping to sponsor the upcoming RootsTech conference in Salt Lake City, Utah, 3-6 February, 2016. If you’re attending, come visit us at booth #523 to discuss genealogy in general, or any specific questions you have about your own family history research.

For more information about RootsTech, visit the website at: http://www.rootstech.org/?lang=eng

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Michigan Archives: 159 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

Michigan became the nation’s 26th state when it joined the Union on 26 January 1837. Known as the “Great Lakes State” because of its unique position of being bounded by four of the five Great Lakes, Michigan is the 11th largest state in the country and the 10th most populous.

Photo: Michigan state capitol, Lansing, Michigan

Photo: Michigan state capitol, Lansing, Michigan. Credit: Criticalthinker; Wikimedia Commons.

If you are researching your ancestry from Michigan, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online MI newspaper archives: 159 titles to help you search your family history in the “Wolverine State,” providing coverage from 1817 to Today. There are more than 32 million articles and records in our online Michigan newspaper archives!

Dig deep into our online archives and search for historical and recent obituaries and other news articles about your Michigan ancestors in these MI newspapers. Our Michigan newspapers are divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries (obituaries only).

Search Michigan Newspaper Archives (1817 – 1995)

Search Michigan Recent Obituaries (1995 – Current)

Illustration: Michigan state flag

Illustration: Michigan state flag. Credit: Wikimedia Commons.

Here is a list of online Michigan newspapers in the historical archives. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more. The MI newspaper titles are listed alphabetically by city.

City Title Date Range* Collection
Adrian Daily Telegram 01/03/1893 – 12/28/1922 Newspaper Archives
Adrian Daily Telegram 12/09/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Adrian Tri=weekly Telegram 09/25/1900 – 01/01/1903 Newspaper Archives
Ann Arbor Ann Arbor News 04/03/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Ann Arbor Ann Arbor News: Web Edition Articles 07/24/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Ann Arbor Ann Arbor Daily Argus 11/16/1898 – 06/24/1907 Newspaper Archives
Ann Arbor Ann Arbor Daily Times 09/01/1903 – 05/02/1908 Newspaper Archives
Ann Arbor Ann Arbor News 01/02/1909 – 12/30/1922 Newspaper Archives
Ann Arbor Ann Arbor News Argus 06/25/1907 – 05/02/1908 Newspaper Archives
Ann Arbor Michigan Argus 10/17/1879 – 12/27/1907 Newspaper Archives
Ann Arbor True Democrat 12/19/1845 – 03/08/1849 Newspaper Archives
Bad Axe Huron Daily Tribune 12/17/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Baldwin Lake County Star 01/01/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bay City Bay City Times 01/01/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bay City Bay City Times, The: Web Edition Articles 10/22/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bay City Bay City Times 01/02/1889 – 12/30/1922 Newspaper Archives
Big Rapids Pioneer 04/02/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bronson Bronson Journal 03/03/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Caro Tuscola County Advertiser 09/26/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Cassopolis Cassopolis Vigilant 07/23/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Charlevoix Charlevoix Courier 01/02/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Cheboygan Cheboygan Daily Tribune 10/30/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Clare Clare County Review 09/03/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Coldwater Coldwater Daily Reporter 11/09/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Coldwater Coldwater Sentinel 04/16/1841 – 05/26/1854 Newspaper Archives
Coldwater Coldwater Sentinel 04/20/1866 – 11/11/1870 Newspaper Archives
Dearborn Arab American News 10/27/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Detroit Associated Newspapers of Michigan 07/20/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Detroit Detroit Independent 01/13/1923 – 01/13/1923 Newspaper Archives
Detroit Detroit Informer 01/13/1900 – 01/13/1900 Newspaper Archives
Detroit Detroiter Abend-Post 08/18/1929 – 08/18/1929 Newspaper Archives
Detroit Detroit News 01/01/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Detroit Detroit News, The: Web Edition Articles 10/28/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Detroit Herold 01/06/1911 – 12/29/1911 Newspaper Archives
Detroit Plaindealer 09/20/1889 – 05/19/1893 Newspaper Archives
Detroit Metro Times 08/04/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Detroit Michigan Chronicle 08/02/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Detroit Weekly Detroit Free Press 01/02/1886 – 06/04/1887 Newspaper Archives
Detroit South End, The: Wayne State University 05/05/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Detroit Detroit Gazette 07/25/1817 – 04/22/1830 Newspaper Archives
Detroit Michigan Herald 09/13/1826 – 04/30/1829 Newspaper Archives
Dowagiac Dowagiac Daily News 07/23/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Edwardsburg Edwardsburg Argus 07/20/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fenton Tri-County Times 03/23/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Ferndale, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Pleasant Ridge Woodward Talk 05/19/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Flint Burton News 08/14/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Flint Clio Messenger 04/20/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Flint Davison Flagstaff 06/13/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Flint Flint Journal 01/03/1898 – 12/31/1922 Newspaper Archives
Flint Fenton Press 07/24/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Flint Flint Journal 04/03/1995 – Current Recent Obituaries
Flint Flint Journal, The: Web Edition Articles 10/15/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Flint Flint Township News 03/21/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Flint Flushing Observer 10/12/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Flint Grand Blanc News 06/12/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Flint Swartz Creek News 04/20/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Frankfort Benzie County Record Patriot 06/24/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fraser Fraser-Clinton Township Chronicle 02/23/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Gaylord Gaylord Herald Times 01/01/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Gladwin Record & Clarion 10/06/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Grand Haven Grand Haven Tribune 01/02/2014 – Current Recent Obituaries
Grand Rapids Afro-American Gazette 01/01/1991 – 08/07/1995 Newspaper Archives
Grand Rapids Cadence Advance 10/10/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Grand Rapids Grand Rapids Herald 01/01/1898 – 12/31/1900 Newspaper Archives
Grand Rapids Grand Rapids Press 01/11/1893 – 12/30/1922 Newspaper Archives
Grand Rapids Grand Rapids Press 07/25/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Grand Rapids Grand Rapids Press, The: Web Edition Articles 10/18/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Grosse Pointe Grosse Pointe Times 01/30/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hart Oceana’s Herald-Journal 01/14/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hastings Hastings Banner 07/07/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hillsdale Hillsdale Daily News 05/25/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Holland Holland Sentinel 07/25/1997 – Current Recent Obituaries
Holland myZeeland 11/03/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Homer Homer Index 05/02/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hudsonville Grand Valley Advance 11/19/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Ionia Sentinel-Standard 12/17/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Jackson Jackson Citizen 08/15/1849 – 10/16/1903 Newspaper Archives
Jackson Jackson Citizen Patriot 03/27/1865 – 12/31/1922 Newspaper Archives
Jackson Jackson Citizen Patriot 01/01/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Jackson Jackson Citizen Patriot: Web Edition Articles 10/22/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Jenison On-the-Town 12/01/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Jonesville Jonesville Independent 04/08/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kalamazoo Kalamazoo Evening Telegraph 11/02/1900 – 11/02/1900 Newspaper Archives
Kalamazoo Kalamazoo Gazette 03/26/1872 – 12/31/1922 Newspaper Archives
Kalamazoo Kalamazoo Gazette 01/23/1837 – 12/31/1897 Newspaper Archives
Kalamazoo Hometown Gazette 03/26/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kalamazoo Kalamazoo Gazette 01/01/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kalamazoo Kalamazoo Gazette: Web Edition Articles 10/19/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kalamazoo Western Herald 09/14/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kentwood Southeast Advance 09/30/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lake Odessa Lakewood News 07/09/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lansing Lansing City Pulse 03/03/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lansing New Citizens Press 07/09/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lowell Lowell Ledger 07/06/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Ludington Ludington Daily News 02/05/1998 – Current Recent Obituaries
Macomb Macomb Township Chronicle 03/24/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Madison Madison-Park News 03/09/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Manistee Manistee News Advocate 03/01/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Marion Marion Press 03/19/2014 – Current Recent Obituaries
Marlette Marlette Leader 03/02/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Middleville, Caledonia Sun & News 07/16/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Midland Midland Daily News 06/20/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Monroe Monroe News 10/31/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Mount Pleasant Morning Sun 07/01/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Muskegon Muskegon Chronicle 07/03/1879 – 12/30/1922 Newspaper Archives
Muskegon Muskegon Chronicle 01/03/1997 – Current Recent Obituaries
Muskegon Muskegon Chronicle, The: Web Edition Articles 10/17/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Muskegon Muskegon Chronicle 01/30/1869 – 05/04/1905 Newspaper Archives
New Buffalo Harbor Country News 04/08/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Niles Niles Daily Star 07/23/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Ontonagon Lake Superior Miner 10/06/1855 – 09/10/1870 Newspaper Archives
Owosso Argus-Press 02/09/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Petoskey Petoskey News-Review 04/16/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Pontiac Oakland Press 08/08/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Portage Portage Gazette 02/12/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Reed City Herald Review 04/04/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Reed City Pioneer – Osceola Edition 06/06/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Rochester Rochester Post 06/21/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Rockford Northeast Advance 10/15/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Royal Oak Royal Oak Review 10/08/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Saginaw Saginaw News 05/02/1881 – 12/31/1922 Newspaper Archives
Saginaw Saginaw News 11/16/1998 – Current Recent Obituaries
Saginaw Saginaw News: Web Edition Articles 10/22/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sault Ste. Marie Evening News 01/26/1901 – 02/02/1924 Newspaper Archives
Sault Ste. Marie Evening News 10/05/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sault Ste. Marie Lake Superior News and Mining Journal 06/12/1847 – 11/11/1848 Newspaper Archives
Sault Ste. Marie Sault St. Marie News 01/07/1888 – 12/29/1900 Newspaper Archives
Sault Ste. Marie Sault Ste. Marie Democrat 05/12/1887 – 12/29/1887 Newspaper Archives
Shelby, Utica Shelby-Utica News 02/17/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Southfield Detroit Jewish News 02/23/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Southfield Southfield Sun 08/04/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sparta, Kent City Northwest Advance 08/18/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
St. Clair Shores St. Clair Shores Sentinel 01/23/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
St. James Daily Northern Islander 05/01/1856 – 06/20/1856 Newspaper Archives
St. James Northern Islander 12/12/1850 – 06/19/1856 Newspaper Archives
St. Joseph Herald-Palladium 04/01/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
State-Wide County mlive.com: Blogs 08/05/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sterling Heights Sterling Heights Sentry 02/05/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sturgis Sturgis Journal 10/05/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Temperance Bedford Now 08/03/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Traverse City Grand Traverse Herald 02/19/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Traverse City Traverse City Record-Eagle 10/18/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Troy Troy Times 06/04/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Vassar Vassar Pioneer Times 03/09/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Vermontville, Nashville Maple Valley News 07/09/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Vicksburg Commercial-Express 01/22/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Warren Advertiser Times 08/04/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Warren Birmingham-Bloomfield Eagle 02/09/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Warren C&G Newspapers Web Exclusive Articles 01/13/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Warren Farmington Press 06/25/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Warren Mount Clemens-Clinton-Harrison Journal 03/02/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Warren Roseville-Eastpointe Eastsider 09/04/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Warren Warren Weekly 05/15/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Wayland Penasee Globe 12/17/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
West Bloomfield West Bloomfield Beacon 02/22/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Whitehall White Lake Beacon 02/28/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Wyoming Southwest Advance 12/16/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Ypsilanti Eastern Echo: Eastern Michigan University 11/07/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Ypsilanti Ypsilanti Commerical 03/11/1864 – 08/25/1898 Newspaper Archives

*Date Ranges may have selected coverage unavailable.

You can either print or create a PDF version of this Blog post by simply clicking on the green “Print/PDF” button below. The PDF version makes it easy to save this post onto your desktop or portable device for quick reference – all the Michigan newspaper links will be live.

Related Resource:

If You Don’t Put It Online – Your Descendants Will Not Find It!

With the New Year now started, here’s a genealogy resolution you can keep in 2016: preserve your family history records online so that future generations can find them. Take your records – prepare now to begin scanning them and putting them online.

photo of a letter from Maxine Lacy

Source: Thomas Jay Kemp

Bottom line: “If You Don’t Put It Online – Your Descendants Will Not Find It!”

photo of a letter from Maxine Lacy

Source: Thomas Jay Kemp

It is that simple.

That is the central message of the online lecture that I gave Friday, November 13th.

Click here to listen to my webinar Bringing It All Together and Leaving a Permanent Record.

Whether you’ve been researching your family history for 5 years – 15 years – or perhaps even 50 years – your search skills have improved year after year.

Now is the time to thoroughly review your research conclusions. You want to review and evaluate each person in your family tree. Reconfirm the dates/places of their vital events and upload their photos, stories and documents. Make sure that each person’s record is accurate and that all of your notes are attached.

Put that information online. Now.

Review and rebuild your tree – putting it on multiple websites so that you have double or triple the online backup, widely distributing your information so that your non-genealogist family members can easily find what you spent years discovering.

Put your stories and family photos on multiple websites like:

Facebook

screenshot of a Facebook page showing a recipe for chocolate cake

Source: Facebook

Pinterest

screenshot of a Pinterest board showing a recipe for chocolate cake

Source: Pinterest

FamilySearch

screenshot of a FamilySearch page showing a recipe for chocolate cake

Source: FamilySearch

Listen to the webinar to learn how to review and prepare your data so that you can leave it – permanently – on multiple websites. For the upcoming New Year, resolve to make sure your data is available for your family into the rising generation.

Related Articles:

 

Finding Bion Whitehouse: How Initials Can Help Your Ancestry Search

I have been looking at my Whitehouse cousins of Keene, New Hampshire, this week and was wrapping up the details of Bion Huntley Whitehouse (1858-1929) and his wife Mabel Medora (Wilder) Whitehouse (1871-1938).

In looking at GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives, I searched using his first and last name: Bion Whitehouse. I found a handful of newspaper articles, including this one that stated he was elected secretary of the Masonic lodge: Eureka Lodge No. 9, Order of the Golden Lion in 1891.

article about the Masonic lodge, Eureka Lodge No. 9, Order of the Golden Lion, New Hampshire Sentinel newspaper article 4 February 1891

New Hampshire Sentinel (Keene, New Hampshire), 4 February 1891, page 4

Another article reported that he “is taking a ten days’ trip about Sunapee Lake.”

article about Bion Whitehouse, New Hampshire Sentinel newspaper article 5 August 1891

New Hampshire Sentinel (Keene, New Hampshire), 5 August 1891, page 4

And this one stated that he “has bought the Amos Ross place near Wilson pond, West Keene.”

article about Bion Whitehouse, New Hampshire Sentinel newspaper article 18 December 1889

New Hampshire Sentinel (Keene, New Hampshire), 18 December 1889, page 4

On a hunch, I searched for Bion again in GenealogyBank – but this time I searched using his initials with his last name instead of using his first name.

screenshot of GenealogyBank's search box showing a search for B. H. Whitehouse

Source: GenealogyBank.com

I am glad that I did.

By searching on this variation of his name I found the obituary of his first wife – information that I didn’t have.

obituary for Lena Whitehouse, New Hampshire Sentinel newspaper article 9 April 1890

New Hampshire Sentinel (Keene, New Hampshire), 9 April 1890, page 8

Genealogy Tip: Be sure you discover all of the articles about your relatives. An extra search, such as using only their initials, can sometimes yield critical information for documenting your family tree.

Related Name Search Articles:

Genealogy Tips: Searching for Your Ancestors Using Nicknames

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this blog article, Gena shows how expanding your name searches to include nicknames can discover records about your ancestors you never found before.

Finding your ancestor in old newspapers, such as GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives, isn’t always as easy as it sounds. Sure, you can search by a given name and sometimes find your ancestor right away. Other times you need to try variations and common misspellings of their name before getting good search results. But if even then you come up empty, what do you search on next?

Try Nicknames

Do you have a nickname? Maybe your nickname is based on your actual given name. Perhaps it has to do with a characteristic or physical trait you possess. You may have earned your nickname playing sports or in the workplace. Sometimes a nickname may make absolutely no sense. In my case, my paternal grandfather gave me a nickname shortly after I was born based on his miss-hearing of my actual middle name. That nickname would make no sense to anyone (and no, I won’t tell you what it is) but it was always the name he used to refer to me.

A person can gain a nickname for all kinds of reasons, including: ease of pronunciation; to distinguish between two family members with the same name; and in some cases to call out a negative trait.

The most important thing to remember about nicknames is that they could have also been used in print when a newspaper referred to your ancestor. Have you given some thought to searching for your ancestor using a nickname?

You Say Mary, I Say Polly

Probably the most familiar use of a nickname is one that simply substitutes one name for a person’s given name. Throughout history, there have been some standard names substituted for “proper” given names. Case in point: Mary. Mary could be May, Mimi, Molly or Polly. And of course she could have been just Mary, Mary Ann or Mary Jane.

While these nicknames may have seemed childish to some – and they certainly were to the writer of this 1875 newspaper article – in reality it’s possible the nickname was used all of the person’s life. This writer seems annoyed at the use of such familiar names as “Bettie,” commenting:

While this vulgar and silly practice of calling ladies by their nicknames is in vogue among the ignorant and the shoddy class in all parts of the country…

article about nicknames, Cincinnati Daily Enquirer newspaper article 5 March 1875

Cincinnati Daily Enquirer (Cincinnati, Ohio), 5 March 1875, page 2

Are you searching on all variations of your ancestor’s written name, including nicknames? Their name may have been abbreviated to a form considered archaic to our modern written language, such as “Jno” for John, “Wm” for William or “Geo.” for George. Previous generations’ nicknames may make little sense to us today. Sarah being referred to as Sally is one such example. Many modern people are confused about why Dick is a nickname for Richard, but according to an online article by David K. Israel, 12th and 13th century nicknames for Richard included Rich and Rick as well as rhyming versions of those names – including Dick.*

In order to improve your chances of finding your ancestor in the newspaper (and other records), it’s important to become familiar with nicknames for a given name. One way to do this is to consult a resource list on nicknames like the FamilySearch Wiki page, “Traditional Nicknames in Old Documents – A Wiki List,” or “A Listing of Some Nicknames Used in the 18th & 19th Centuries” from the Connecticut State Library. You can also read more about nicknames in Christine Rose’s book, Nicknames: Past and Present.

Boy, They Weren’t Very Original!

Do you ever get tired of ancestors who seem to use the same few given names generation after generation? Recycling the names William and John, or Elizabeth and Mary, makes it very difficult to trace a family tree. In some cases re-using a name or favoring certain names might be due to a tradition like naming a child after a saint. You may stumble upon a whole family that has used one singular given name, as in the case of one branch of my family where all the daughters share the name Maria but used their middle names in day-to-day life. This is another example of why searching newspapers for variations of your ancestor’s name, such as middle names or nicknames, is so important. Don’t forget to look for home sources or conduct family interviews to uncover a person’s possible nicknames.

Nicknames can be an important distinguisher for those who are given the same name as a parent, grandparent or older relative. A newspaper article may refer to someone as “Junior” or “Senior.” While referring to someone as Junior or the Second (II) may seem straightforward, a more uncommon nickname could be utilized to refer to someone named after a previous generation or who carries the same name held by successive generations. For example, Skip may be the nickname of someone named after their grandfather but not their father.

“Billy the Kid” & “Gorgeous” George

We are all familiar with nicknames that are substitutes for both a given name and surname. A good example is Billy the Kid. Looking for articles using his given name, Henry McCarty, or his alias, William H. Bonney, might not yield as many returns as searching for his moniker, Billy the Kid.

obituary for Billy the Kid, Kalamazoo Gazette newspaper article 22 July 1881

Kalamazoo Gazette (Kalamazoo, Michigan), 22 July 1881, page 1

Billy the Kid wasn’t the only desperado who ditched his given name. Nicknames were seemingly so popular among those committing crimes that the U.S. District Clerk’s Office kept track of defendant’s actual names and nicknames. Researching a black sheep ancestor? Make sure to use both his or her “real” name and their nickname to find relevant articles.

article about criminals' nicknames, Dallas Morning News newspaper article 23 December 1938

Dallas Morning News (Dallas, Texas), 23 December 1938, page 5

One way to incorporate nicknames in your search is to consider your ancestor’s descriptive nickname substituting for a first or middle name, offset with quotes, as is often done for people like athletes or criminals.

This 1962 sports example of a wrestler named George “Gorgeous” Grant shows the difficulty that can arise when searching on a name. I’ve also seen a nickname listed with parenthesis in the middle like George (Gorgeous) Grant in genealogically-rich articles like obituaries. So make sure that you search on multiple versions of a name including just the nickname and the surname. And while exact phrase searches are important, incorporate other searches as well.

article about professional wrestlers, Times-Picayune newspaper article 14 February 1962

Times-Picayune (New Orleans, Louisiana), 14 February 1962, page 37

When you aren’t sure of a family member’s nickname, it can be beneficial to try a surname search and include other keywords that can assist you in discovering that nickname. Remember that on GenealogyBank, in addition to keywords, you can narrow your search by place, date, newspaper title and even type of article.

article about professional baseball players, Trenton Evening Times newspaper article 26 August 1911

Trenton Evening Times (Trenton, New Jersey), 26 August 1911, page 13

Before you start your next family history research project, keep in mind the importance of having a list of name variations that includes all the various nicknames and versions of your ancestor’s name, as well as possible misspellings.

————————

* “The Origins of 10 Nicknames,” by David K. Israel. Mental Floss: http://mentalfloss.com/article/24761/origins-10-nicknames

Related Name Search Articles:

Typical Genealogy Research Problem: Here’s What You Want to Do

Here is my task: find documentation for the marriage of Benjamin Walter Tribble and Lilian Blanche Mathias, who were married on 30 December 1906 in Irmo, South Carolina.

OK. That should be easy.

Step One

I’ll go to FamilySearch.org and look for their marriage certificate.
With billions of records online, this should be quick.

FamilySearch has an online database: South Carolina Marriages 1709-1913.
See: https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1675541

A close look at this collection shows that so far it has only 4,154 South Carolina marriage records online. Clearly this is a work in process – there must have been hundreds of thousands if not more than a million marriages in South Carolina during those 200+ years.

Let’s search this database and see if their marriage certificate is online.
No. Not there.
I can keep checking back and see when it is uploaded to their site.

Step Two

Digging deeper into FamilySearch’s certificates, I next looked to see if they had records for Irmo, South Carolina.

Irmo is located in both Lexington and Richland Counties in South Carolina.

Let’s look in the FamilySearch online catalog and see if they have microfilm or published marriage records for these counties.

Search the FamilySearch Catalog here: https://familysearch.org/catalog/search

Looking at the records for Lexington County – great – they have marriage licenses and indexes for that county – but only for 1911-1950 and 1911-1958 respectively.

Benjamin and Lilian’s marriage was in 1906 – so I won’t find it there.

Turning to Richland County, South Carolina, I find that FamilySearch has their marriage licenses from 1911-1922 online – but again, no coverage for 1906.

Step Three

Let’s see if there is a record of their marriage in GenealogyBank.com, searching through the South Carolina Newspaper Archives.

screenshot of GenealogyBank showing the South Carolina Newspaper Archives search page

Source: GenealogyBank.com

OK good.
GenealogyBank has newspaper coverage for South Carolina from 1735 to 1996.

But – I see only seven South Carolina cities are listed and Irmois not one of them.

So – is my search over?
No – wait – there’s more.

Important Genealogy Tip: Marriages, obituaries, etc., were routinely reported by newspapers from around the state. You want to search all the newspapers in your target state and not limit your search to only your ancestors’ local newspapers.

A quick search across all South Carolina newspapers for their wedding announcement quickly pulls up a record about them.

screenshot of GenealogyBank showing a search for the Tribble family

Source: GenealogyBank.com

I found their marriage notice.

marriage announcement for Benjamin Walter Tribble and Lilian Blanche Mathias, State newspaper article 31 December 1906

State (Columbia, South Carolina), 31 December 1906, page 2

This newspaper article from a Columbia, South Carolina, newspaper provides a long description of their wedding.

Where else would we learn details such as this:

The church was darkened and decorated in white and green. Just in front of the pulpit a double arch of evergreens had been erected and from the intersection hung a large white wedding bell. The arch was studded with lighted tapers.

Wow – a candlelight wedding. That is an image I won’t soon forget.

Bottom Line: Take a balanced approach in your family history research. In searching for marriage records I always look in FamilySearch and GenealogyBank. I want a copy of the original marriage certificate that FamilySearch provides – AND – a firsthand account of the wedding itself that can only be found in GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives.

Find and document your family history – gathering the old marriage certificates and also the newspaper articles about their candlelight weddings beneath a canopy of evergreens.

Related Marriage Record Articles:

Arkansas Archives: 86 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

Arkansas became the nation’s 25th state when it joined the Union on 15 June 1836. Arkansas (whose pronunciation with the final “s” being silent was made official by the state legislature in 1881) is the 29th largest state in the country and the 33rd most populous.

Photo: Cedar Falls at the end of the Cedar Falls Trail, located in Petit Jean State Park near Morrilton, Arkansas

Photo: Cedar Falls at the end of the Cedar Falls Trail, located in Petit Jean State Park near Morrilton, Arkansas. Credit: Brandonrush; Wikimedia Commons.

If you are researching your ancestry from Arkansas, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online AR newspaper archives: 86 titles to help you search your family history in the “Natural State,” providing coverage from 1819 to Today. There are more than 3.7 million articles and records in our online Arkansas newspaper archives!

Dig deep into our online archives and search for historical and recent obituaries and other news articles about your Arkansas ancestors in these AR newspapers. Our Arkansas newspapers are divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries (obituaries only).

Search Arkansas Newspaper Archives (1819 – 1999)

Search Arkansas Recent Obituaries (1999 – Current)

Illustration: Arkansas state flag

Illustration: Arkansas state flag. Credit: Wikimedia Commons.

Here is a list of online Arkansas newspapers in the historical archives. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more. The AR newspaper titles are listed alphabetically by city.

City Title Date Range * Collection
Arkadelphia Daily Siftings Herald 03/15/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bella Vista Weekly Vista 11/23/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Benton Saline Courier 05/08/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bentonville Benton County Daily Record 01/01/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Booneville Booneville Democrat 10/23/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Cabot Cabot Star-Herald 08/22/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Camden Camden News 12/02/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Camden Ouachita Herald 05/22/1856 – 03/30/1861 Newspaper Archives
Carlisle Carlisle Independent 06/06/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Charleston Charleston Express 06/03/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Clinton Van Buren County Democrat 01/26/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Denson Denson Tribune 03/02/1943 – 06/06/1944 Newspaper Archives
El Dorado El Dorado News-Times 01/04/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Farmington Washington County Enterprise-Leader 11/04/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fayetteville Northwest Arkansas Democrat-Gazette 01/01/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fayetteville Northwest Arkansas Times 01/02/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fayetteville NWAOnline: Web Edition Articles 07/28/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fayetteville Whole Hog Sports 04/14/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Forrest City Homeland 10/01/1991 – 07/01/1999 Newspaper Archives
Fort Chaffee Helping Hand 05/02/1975 – 12/19/1975 Newspaper Archives
Fort Smith Times Record 10/13/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fort Smith Fort Smith New Era 01/20/1869 – 05/12/1880 Newspaper Archives
Gravette Westside Eagle Observer 08/04/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Greenwood Greenwood Democrat 06/03/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Heber Springs Jacksonian 11/27/1890 – 05/31/1894 Newspaper Archives
Heber Springs Sun Times 11/13/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Helena Western Clarion 04/01/1865 – 12/16/1865 Newspaper Archives
Helena, West Helena Daily World 02/09/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hope Hope Star 10/20/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hot Springs Hot Springs Village Voice 09/03/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hot Springs Sentinel-Record 03/01/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hot Springs Sentinel=Record 01/01/1962 – 12/31/1964 Newspaper Archives
Jacksonville Jacksonville Patriot 04/18/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Jonesboro Jonesboro Daily News 10/19/1908 – 05/31/1910 Newspaper Archives
Jonesboro Jonesboro Daily Times-Enterprise 09/03/1904 – 10/16/1908 Newspaper Archives
Jonesboro Jonesboro Daily Tribune 01/01/1910 – 12/30/1922 Newspaper Archives
Jonesboro Jonesboro Evening Sun 12/08/1904 – 12/27/1922 Newspaper Archives
Jonesboro Jonesboro Weekly Sun 03/03/1904 – 02/21/1923 Newspaper Archives
Jonesboro Jonesboro Weekly Times-Enterprise 05/18/1905 – 01/16/1908 Newspaper Archives
Jonesboro Jonesboro Weekly Tribune 06/01/1905 – 02/17/1921 Newspaper Archives
Jonesboro Jonesboro Sun 08/25/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Little Rock Arkansas Democrat-Gazette 10/30/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Little Rock Arkansas Democrat-Gazette: Web Edition Articles 03/30/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Little Rock Arkansas Times 07/07/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Little Rock Arkansas Times: Blogs 04/12/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Little Rock ARPreps 05/28/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Little Rock American Guide 01/27/1900 – 01/27/1900 Newspaper Archives
Little Rock Arkansas Freeman 10/05/1869 – 10/05/1869 Newspaper Archives
Little Rock Arkansas Gazette 12/23/1820 – 11/01/1908 Newspaper Archives
Little Rock Arkansas Weekly Mansion 06/23/1883 – 04/19/1884 Newspaper Archives
Little Rock Arkansas Star 09/07/1839 – 02/01/1841 Newspaper Archives
Little Rock Arkansas State Press 05/09/1941 – 10/30/1959 Newspaper Archives
Little Rock Weekly Arkansas Gazette 11/20/1819 – 05/25/1876 Newspaper Archives
Little Rock Arkansas Whig 05/22/1851 – 05/24/1855 Newspaper Archives
Little Rock Morning Republican 11/25/1867 – 06/03/1874 Newspaper Archives
Little Rock Southern Mediator Journal 06/22/1962 – 02/25/1966 Newspaper Archives
Little Rock Arkansas Advocate 07/28/1830 – 03/27/1833 Newspaper Archives
Little Rock Arkansas Times and Advocate 05/01/1837 – 03/11/1844 Newspaper Archives
Lonoke Lonoke Democrat 03/21/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Magnolia Banner-News 11/19/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Malvern Malvern Daily Record 08/01/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Maumelle Maumelle Monitor 10/17/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
McGehee Rohwer Outpost 10/24/1942 – 07/21/1945 Newspaper Archives
McGehee Rohwer Relocator 08/01/1945 – 11/09/1945 Newspaper Archives
Newport Newport Independent 01/25/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
North Little Rock Times 10/12/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Paragould Paragould Daily Press 07/11/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Paris Paris Express 06/03/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Pea Ridge Times of Northeast Benton County 10/05/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Pine Bluff Pine Bluff Weekly Herald 01/27/1900 – 01/27/1900 Newspaper Archives
Pine Bluff Pine Bluff Commercial 10/11/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Prescott Gurdon Times 12/17/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Prescott Nevada County Picayune 10/05/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Rogers Rogers Morning News 10/26/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Russellville Courier 08/20/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Searcy Daily Citizen 08/26/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sherwood Sherwood Voice 06/05/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Siloam Springs Siloam Springs Herald-Leader 12/28/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Springdale Springdale Morning News 10/26/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Springdale, Rogers Morning News of Northwest Arkansas 10/23/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Stuttgart Stuttgart Daily Leader 03/15/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Van Buren Alma Journal 06/25/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Van Buren Arkansas Intelligencer 02/15/1845 – 10/01/1858 Newspaper Archives
Van Buren Press Argus Courier 10/22/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
White Hall White Hall Journal 09/30/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
White Hall White Hall Progress 11/08/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries

*Date Ranges may have selected coverage unavailable.

You can either print or create a PDF version of this Blog post by simply clicking on the green “Print/PDF” button below. The PDF version makes it easy to save this post onto your desktop or portable device for quick reference – all the Arkansas newspaper links will be live.

Related Resource:

Genealogy Resolution for the New Year: Make a ‘To-Do’ List

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this blog article, Gena settles on one New Year’s genealogy resolution for 2016 that she’s determined to follow.

Yikes! Where did 2015 go? I feel like another year has flown by and I’m still not where I want to be with the genealogy goals I wrote down in December 2014. I don’t know about you but I’m just not a New Year’s resolution person. Sure, I have great intentions. I feel motivated on January 1st and still fairly committed by the end of the month. But then February comes and goes and then March and I start justifying my continuing procrastination with promises that “I’ll accomplish that stuff during the summer when it’s not as busy.” Oh, sure I will. Life gets busy, stuff happens, and then pretty soon it’s December 31st again.

So if you’re like me, try sticking to just one New Year’s genealogy resolution: make a to-do list for those moments when you can say “I have an hour to work on my genealogy.” By creating a family history research to-do list you can refer back to it when you’re ready, and not feel the pressure and disappointment that will inevitably come on December 31st when you realize you never tackled a long list of New Year’s genealogy resolutions.

Photo: New Year’s resolutions postcards from the early 20th century

Photo: New Year’s resolutions postcards from the early 20th century. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

As I spent some time looking over my genealogy database recently I realized I could do a better job adding information from newspapers, such as those in GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives. The following ideas from my 2016 genealogy to-do list might be some you could incorporate into your own.

Go Back and Utilize Name Variations

I’ve talked about it before and believe me, I have been guilty of not heeding my own advice. I’ve noticed that when I’ve missed newspaper articles about the person I was researching it’s often because I didn’t take into consideration name variations, misspellings, and use of initials. For example, one of the women I am researching was married twice, went by a name other than her given first name, used her first husband’s surname even when married to her second husband because that was her “professional” name, and used her initials instead of her first name! Because of all this, here are some of the name variations I have to take into consideration when searching for Eleanore G. Burdick Stetson Dederick:

  • G. Stetson
  • E. G. Stetson
  • Louis Dederick
  • Eleanore Dederick
  • Ella Burdick
  • Eleanore Stetson
article about registered hotel guests, Daily Inter Ocean newspaper article 6 August 1895

Daily Inter Ocean (Chicago, Illinois), 6 August 1895, page 2

One of the first things I do when researching an individual is create a list of name variations, including initials substituting for first and middle name, and all the possible alternative spellings of their name. I add to this list as I come across other misspellings or variations. Each time I research I use this list to guide my search. By being flexible about how you search for a person, you are more likely to find them.

Fill in Your 20th Century Blanks

It’s easy to get side tracked when looking at newspapers – let’s face it, there are some great articles that can be found about our ancestors’ lives from very long ago. But I know I need to go back and concentrate on finding some of the basics for my more recent generations. Sometimes in our quest to trace our family back as far as we can, we fail to gather information on those family members that may have lived in the 20th century. My plan is to gather those newspaper articles to fill in the timelines for my great-great-grandparents and successive generations.

For example, this 1954 obituary for Betty Chatham filled in some gaps in my family tree and gave me several clues for further family history research.

obituary for Betty Chatham, Sacramento Bee newspaper article 24 December 1954

Sacramento Bee (Sacramento, California), 24 December 1954, page 21

While it’s tempting to skip multiple generations in our quest to trace our family lines farther back, don’t do it. Take some time today to document your more recent family. Their stories and lives deserve to be preserved for the future.

Try Something New

Whether it’s correct or not, we often hear statistics about how we only use a small percentage of our brains – but the same could be said for many of the tools we use. We become familiar with a few features of a software program or a website and we don’t venture beyond those features or databases.

I must admit that I am guilty of this. I get so caught up in finding historical newspaper articles in GenealogyBank that I forget to check out some of the other databases GenealogyBank has to offer, such as Historical Documents and Historical Books.

One of their databases that is a real gem is the Recent Newspaper Obituaries collection. At first glance you may assume you wouldn’t need obituaries from the late 1970s to today – but that would be a mistake. While the majority of our work as genealogists concentrates on those who lived generations before us, we also need to track those who died more recently, and their immediate families. That’s how we make connections with cousins and ultimately uncover new information. As I explored this collection of more recent obituaries, I came across the obituary of a cousin that listed his children. These were family members that we had lost contact with decades ago and now, because of that one obituary, I have names and residences that I can use to contact them.

Take some time today to brainstorm your 2016 genealogy to-do list. What would you like to know more about your family before 31 December 2016 rolls around?

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