Revolutionary War Soldier Andrew Wallace – Dead at 105

In 1772 at the age of 42, Andrew Wallace shipped off for North America from Scotland – and just a few years later he was fighting in the American Revolutionary War for his new country.

obituary for Andrew Wallace, Elyria Republican newspaper article 19 February 1835

Elyria Republican (Elyria, Ohio), 19 February 1835, page 1

According to this old soldier’s obituary, Andrew “was engaged in some of the most memorable battles of the Revolutionary War,” and fought honorably. To the end of his life, he was honored by all for his military service. His most heroic moment on the battlefield came when General Marquis de Lafayette “was wounded at the battle of Brandywine [and] Wallace assisted in rescuing him from his perilous situation, and carried him off the field of battle to a friend’s house nearly two miles distant.” By the war’s close, Wallace was a decorated and honored sergeant.

Painting: “Nation Makers” by Howard Pyle, depicting a scene from the Battle of Brandywine

Painting: “Nation Makers” by Howard Pyle, depicting a scene from the Battle of Brandywine. Source: Brandywine Museum in Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania; Wikimedia.

Wallace lived to be 105. A few weeks before his death, the Peale Museum in Baltimore, Maryland, hosted Andrew as a living exhibit meant to be the “connecting link between the olden and modern age.”

Andrew Wallace, at Peale's Museum, Richmond Whig newspaper article 2 December 1834

Richmond Whig (Richmond, Virginia), 2 December 1834, page 1

Wait – this is interesting.
The article states that Andrew “fought at the battle of Culloden…”
Battle of Culloden? That was in Scotland in 1746 when the British were putting down Bonnie Prince Charlie and the Jacobites.

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Thousands attended Wallace’s funeral at the old St. Patrick’s Cathedral in Manhattan, where he was buried. The Evening Post reported that even though he “lived and died in the Catholic faith…on his death-bed he asked to be buried with the honors of a mason and a soldier.” His request was honored and although “the weather was wet and stormy…there was an exceedingly brilliant display of military, the masonic fraternity, citizens and others.” The Church extended the extraordinary honor of having him buried in the same tomb as the revered Bishop John Connolly (1750-1825), the Second Bishop of New York. Andrew Wallace was beloved by many and had a great love for the country that took him in so many years prior.

Funeral of Andrew Wallace, Evening Post newspaper article 26 January 1835

Evening Post (New York, New York), 26 January 1835, page 2

Our veterans, old and new, have rendered us such great service and should be remembered every day. GenealogyBanks’ archive of over 1.7 billion historical documents holds the untold stories of your veteran ancestors; sign up today and discover them.

Genealogy Tip: Quite often, a person’s death is reported by many different newspapers in multiple states. Be sure to make a wide search for the obituaries of your ancestors. Do not limit your search to just the newspapers published in their home town.

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Wedding Belles! How to Find Your Ancestors’ Marriage Records

Introduction: Mary Harrell-Sesniak is a genealogist, author and editor with a strong technology background. In this blog post, Mary provides search tips for finding your ancestors’ marriage records in old newspapers.

When romance is in the air, newspapers report it in many surprising ways. By searching old newspapers, you’ll find copious details about your ancestors’ engagements, rehearsal dinners and weddings!

photo of a bride in her wedding dress

Photo: bride in wedding dress, 11 September 1929. Credit: Infrogmation; Wikimedia Commons.

Newspapers Provide Shower & Wedding Details

You might even find old newspaper articles on wedding showers, such as this one from 1910, when Grace (Floyd) Kannaman’s friends surprised her with one. Even though the wedding had already occurred, they couldn’t resist more festivities.

They dined on frappes and wafers, while entertaining themselves with the games “Ring on the String,” “Button, Button, Who’s Got the Button,” “Jenkins Up,” and a clothes-pin race. Color-coded gifts were accompanied by poetical dedications, and recipes were pasted in a blue-bound book to become her “infallible household guide!” What a treasure that recipe book must have been to receive – and a great family heirloom to locate if it’s still around!

article about Grace Floyd's bridal shower, Sedan Times-Star newspaper article 1 September 1910

Sedan Times-Star (Sedan, Kansas), 1 September 1910, page 1

Notice how the wedding of Mr. Le Grand C. Cramer and Miss Nellie Almy was described in the following newspaper article as a virtual feast of details. This lengthy historical news article names family members, bridesmaids, groomsmen, the officiant and even the organist – and you get to read about the magnificent pearl and diamond earrings bestowed on Nellie by her groom.

Her bridal costume “consisted of a very rich Velour white-ribbed silk dress with court train, the front breadth elaborately trimmed with flowers and tulle, and the remainder of the dress also elaborately trimmed with waxed orange buds and tulle.” There was a matching veil and extraordinary gifts abounded. An imported camel’s hair shawl was “very cheap at twelve hundred dollars” and of the solid silverware “there seemed to be no end, either in quantity or variety.” The article went on to say that “Those who ought to be good judges say that no bride in this city has ever received such a large quantity of elegant presents as have been bestowed upon Mrs. Cramer.” (I imagine that was an understatement!)

wedding  notice for Le Grand C. Cramer and Nellie Almy, Providence Evening Press newspaper article 17 November 1871

Providence Evening Press (Providence, Rhode Island), 17 November 1871, page 2

The elite are usually proffered prime newspaper coverage for their weddings – but even if your ancestor wasn’t a society belle, you’ll likely uncover intriguing details and descriptions of her wedding.

In 1897, this wedding notice for J. C. Love and Hattie Upchurch reported that the church was “crowded to the doors” and that after the “knot had been tied, to be broken only by death” there was a “swell reception.”

wedding notice for J. C. Love and Hattie Upchurch, Gazette newspaper article 30 October 1897

Gazette (Raleigh, North Carolina), 30 October 1897, page 3

Ancestor Wedding Photographs

Don’t forget to hunt for photographs of marriage engagements and weddings.

Enter Last Name

Historical newspapers have always been prone to printing arrays of pictures. When you find weddings, you get a special treat – not only do you get to see the bride and sometimes the groom, but you also get a fashion show of earlier styles!

Genealogy Tip: As discussed in other articles on this blog, if you’ve got an undated photo, browse early newspapers to see if you can figure out the time period when similar clothing styles were popular. For example, read the article How to Date Family Photos with Vintage Fashion Ads in Newspapers.

Here is a 1913 photograph depicting a society belle with her groom. He was Frances Bowes Sayre (1885-1972), the lucky fellow who married President Woodrow Wilson’s daughter, Jessie (1887-1933). Her gown was magnificent – and if you search GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives for reports about their wedding, you’ll learn about the White House ceremony and their honeymoon in Europe.

wedding photo for Frances Bowes Sayre and Jessie Wilson, Evening Times newspaper article 29 November 1913

Evening Times (Grand Forks, North Dakota), 29 November 1913, page 8

This next photo example, from 1936, is a virtual collage of people – from the wedding party to family members and attendees. What a treasure it would be to include this wedding picture collage in the family scrapbook!

wedding photos, Heraldo de Brownsville newspaper article 9 August 1936

Heraldo de Brownsville (Brownsville, Texas), 9 August 1936, page 8

Search Tips for Ancestor Wedding Information in Old Newspapers

I’d like to leave you with some search tips, and invite you to share your own with us in the comments section.

screenshot of GenealogyBank's newspaper search page

  • After exhausting these two, try other search categories. Occasionally you’ll find a honeymoon mentioned in the Passenger Lists category, or the unfortunate divorce filing in the Legal, Probate & Court category. Any of these can help with finding an elusive date of marriage.
  • Don’t forget to broaden date ranges when you do your newspaper searches. Engagement notices can appear in newspapers many years prior to a wedding. Although local wedding notices are usually printed not long after a wedding, out-of-town papers may report the wedding after a long delay. Even honeymoon stop-overs are reported when the happy couple visits relatives.
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  • Research wedding legal requirements. An often overlooked query are banns, which had to be published prior to a wedding. This was done so that people could report concerns as to why a couple should not be married. The amusing anecdote in the following newspaper article showcases the process. In this instance, the groom had written to the church sexton with a request to publish the banns. Trying to be congenial, he concluded his letter: “So no more from your well wisher and Mary Williams.” This sexton unfortunately interpreted the man’s name as “William Wisher,” which was used in the published banns. Imagine the couple’s disappointment when they learned their wedding had to be postponed until after the corrected banns had been published!
article about wedding banns, Biloxi Herald newspaper article 16 December 1893

Biloxi Herald (Biloxi, Mississippi), 16 December 1893, page 3

  • Many records kept by organizations are only available at the source. Go to your family’s house of worship to see if any canonical records can be searched. One example comes from my own family. I tried to order my parents’ marriage certificate, but it is lost. So Mom and I went to the church where they were married, only to find that the official wedding book had been lost. The church finally located a report in the monthly newspaper which verified the details of their wedding.
  • Learn about religious customs. An example comes from those with ancestors belonging to the Society of Friends (or Quakers). Many of their accounts make for interesting reading. Recently, I spotted reports where members were directed to observe weddings. The intent was to make sure the ceremony was performed in a manner appropriate to the religion. When it wasn’t, there were follow-ups as to how the marriage had occurred out of unity and whether or not a member took appropriate steps to restore the relationship with the church.
  • If you can’t find a family wedding notice in a newspaper, focus on the groom. Enter his full name, and follow up with a search using his given name’s initials. As seen in the Sayre-Wilson wedding photo above, the bride wasn’t even mentioned by name – and the groom only as “F. B.” Sayre
  • A related tip is to search for the bride or groom’s father. It’s all too common to read reports that “a daughter or son of Mr. So & So was married recently.”
  • Many historical newspaper articles will have headlines reporting just the surnames of the wedding couple, so try searching without given names, such as “Smith-Kline marriage.”
  • If your primary objective is to determine a date and you’re striking out as to the exact date of the marriage, look for anniversary notices and obituaries. Many will report that a couple was married on a certain day, or that they were celebrating a special milestone such as a golden wedding anniversary.
article about wedding anniversaries, San Francisco Bulletin newspaper article 26 September 1866

San Francisco Bulletin (San Francisco, California), 26 September 1866, page 3

  • From one’s engagement to the actual wedding, there are more steps associated with marriages than any other type of life event – so consider all of them as potential keywords. Browse the following list to find keywords that can be cross-referenced:
  • bachelor
  • banns
  • best man
  • betrothal or betrothed
  • bride
  • bridal
  • bridal party
  • bridal shower
  • bridegroom
  • bridesmaid
  • ceremony
  • civil ceremony
  • civil union
  • commitment ceremony
  • dowry
  • elope
  • eloped
  • elopement
  • engaged
  • engagement
  • engagement ring
  • fiancé or fiancée
  • flower girl
  • groom
  • groomsmen
  • guests
  • honeymoon
  • intended
  • intentions
  • maid of honor or matron of honor
  • marriage
  • marriage certificate
  • marriage license
  • married
  • marry
  • newlyweds
  • nuptials
  • officiant (minister, priest, rabbi, reverend, etc.)
  • proposal
  • ring
  • shotgun wedding
  • shower
  • spinster
  • trousseau
  • union
  • veil
  • vows
  • wedding
  • wedding party
  • witness and witnesses

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Your Wife – She Just Might Save Your Life

Marriages create life. They connect family trees and create orchards of ancestors.

And sometimes your wife pulls you out of a snowbank.

Saved by His Wife: Decker Was Caught in the Big Snowstorm, Idaho Daily Statesman newspaper article 18 February 1898

Idaho Daily Statesman (Boise, Idaho), 18 February 1898, page 2

That was the case for Abram Decker, 35, of Sussex County, New Jersey, in 1898.

The Idaho Daily Statesman reports that Decker went to town late one night for groceries in bad weather, and didn’t return. Because they lived far from Newton, what should have been a simple trip for groceries became dangerous due to the distance and the freezing weather.

Patient but worried, his wife waited until early the next morning to go out and search for him; she feared the worst as she fought her way “through snow drifts in some places 15 feet deep.” The Statesman reports that when she found a single foot sticking out of the snow, Abram’s wife identified her frozen husband and saved his life by building a large fire to warm him and bring neighbors to their aid. Decker had collapsed from exhaustion, overtaken by the distance and weather. Thankfully his loving wife saved him from certain doom.

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Genealogy is not just the births, marriages, and deaths; it’s the in-between that truly connects us to our ancestors. Stories like Abram Decker’s brave wife often fail to be passed down in the family – but they really are memorable and should be preserved.

GenealogyBank helps preserve the color and details that fill in our ancestors’ lives. Family stories like this and many others in our archive are waiting to be found. Sign up for GenealogyBank today and add color to your family tree.

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Revolutionary Patriot George Shell Fought Two Wars Simultaneously

When Revolutionary War patriot George Shell died in 1818, newspapers in Maine, Massachusetts, and New York carried the news – but they each gave him a single-line obituary.

obituary for George Shell, Weekly Eastern Argus newspaper article 25 August 1818

Weekly Eastern Argus (Portland, Maine), 25 August 1818, page 3

obituary for George Shell, Salem Gazette newspaper article 18 August 1818

Salem Gazette (Salem, Massachusetts), 18 August 1818, page 3

obituary for George Shell, Columbian newspaper article 15 August 1818

Columbian (New York, New York), 15 August 1818, page 3

However, Revolutionary War veteran George Shell deserved much more; the man fought two wars simultaneously, as detailed in this longer obituary found in another old newspaper.

obituary for George Shell, Albany Gazette newspaper article 15 August 1818

Albany Gazette (Albany, New York), 15 August 1818, page 2

Shell faithfully served in his local Albany, New York, regiment – against the wishes of his father, “who was attached to the royal cause.” So Shell had to fight two wars simultaneously, against the British and his own family. Upon his return to Albany, Shell found himself abandoned and rejected by the family patriarch; George’s father would never forgive him.

However, Shell created a new family for himself in the capital city. He ran a local barber shop and kept the men of Albany looking clean, sharp, and dapper. His funeral drew a significant crowd upon his death, reflecting his service to the town and the esteem his fellow citizens had for him.

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Thanks to GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives, we learn that no one’s life story is truly one line. George Shell was a respected barber who stood up for his beliefs and fought for his country during its war for independence. While many simply fought the British army, George also bore the cross of a family who abandoned him because they supported the crown. Thanks to the preserved records of the Albany Gazette, we know the depth of this veteran’s sacrifice. We feel enriched and motivated to sacrifice for what we know is right.

Sign up to GenealogyBank today and find your ancestors’ stories!

Note: FamilySearch International (FamilySearch.org) and GenealogyBank are partnering to make over a billion records from historical obituaries searchable online. The tremendous undertaking will make a billion records from over 100 million U.S. newspaper obituaries readily searchable online. The newspapers are from all 50 states and cover the period 1730 to the present.  Find out more at: http://www.genealogybank.com/family-search/

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Researching Newspapers to Trace the Life of Moses G. Wilson

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this blog article, Gena searches old newspapers to learn more about a relative on her family tree who – she discovered – was very much involved in the war in Missouri against the Mormons during the 1830s.

Family history can seem deceptively easy when searching for your ancestors in an online newspaper archive. Type a name into a search box and you are rewarded with stories that can help you better understand your family history. Learning about specific individuals is one way to go about newspaper research, but it’s not the only way to research your ancestors.

The Time & the Place

For me, what I love about newspapers is their ability to help me better understand not only my ancestor’s own life – but their time and place. Getting to know what was going on and what they were a part of, often in reports that don’t even mention my ancestor by name, is an essential part of family history research.

a portrait of Lilburn Boggs, governor of Missouri (1836-1840)

Painting: portrait of Lilburn Boggs, governor of Missouri (1836-1840) – he signed the infamous “Extermination Order” against the Mormons, and was an acquaintance of a relative on my family tree: Moses G. Wilson. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Moses G. Wilson & the Mormon War

One of my long-term genealogy research projects involves Moses Greer Wilson (1795-c.1868). I was first introduced to Moses via a research trip I took to Texas 13 years ago. I was researching a branch of my paternal family tree when I “found” Moses, who was the second husband of my 4th great-grandmother, Sophia Bell Lewis Wilson. I’m not descended through that marriage so I didn’t pay too much attention to researching him. After all, the information I really needed involved their son-in-law, my 3rd great-grandfather.

During that Texas trip we found copious amounts of deeds and other materials about Moses Wilson, but due to the high cost of courthouse photocopies (remember this was before smartphones and other mobile devices, back when we thought having a laptop was a big deal) and the fact that he wasn’t our focus, we ended up limiting the info we collected about him.

Fast forward about 10+ years, when I received an email from another genealogy researcher about Moses. She shared his timeline with me that included the years previous to his marrying my ancestor, his second wife. One of the timeline facts involved his living in Jackson County, Missouri, in the 1830s.

For anyone who is Mormon or familiar with Mormon history, the 1830s in Jackson County, Missouri, were tumultuous years for the Mormon Church and its members. As I started Googling about Moses, I realized that he wasn’t simply present during that time – he was one of the ringleaders in the effort to remove the Mormons from Missouri. A brigadier general in the Missouri Militia who participated in the Mormon War, he was also acquainted with Governor Lilburn Boggs – who ultimately signed the infamous Mormon Extermination Order.* I learned that Moses was even accused of beating a Mormon boy.

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As I started collecting the research and analyzing it, all I could think of was: “this guy was married to my 4th great-grandmother?” She divorced her first husband because of abuse, and somehow this guy didn’t seem much better.

As you can imagine, this long-term project has yielded quite a bit of information due to Moses’ involvement in this historical event involving the Mormons in Missouri. However, it was through newspaper research that I started to gain even more perspective.

The Newspaper Accounts of the Mormon Conflict

One bit of warning here. It’s important to know that, just like today, journalism can be quite tainted. It’s not uncommon for some of these historical newspaper stories to be overdramatized and include falsehoods. However, there’s no denying that what occurred in Missouri during that time was very dramatic, and violent. People died on both sides of the Mormon conflict.

There’s much to tell about this story of the war between the Mormons and the people of Missouri. You can get a sense of the problem from the following two newspaper articles reporting on the tensions between Jackson County Mormons and their neighbors – including Moses G. Wilson.

In June of 1834 this news article was published, describing the fear that those living in Jackson County felt regarding the Mormons. There’s even a mention of a local merchant in Independence who ordered an artillery piece to defend his property. Moses was a merchant in Independence at that time, and it’s possible this could be a reference to him.

article about the conflict with the Mormons in Missouri, Arkansas Weekly Gazette newspaper article 24 June 1834

Arkansas Weekly Gazette (Little Rock, Arkansas), 24 June 1834, page 1

This next newspaper article, published in July of 1834, warns that:

It is a lamentable fact, that this matter is about to involve the whole upper country [of Missouri] in civil war and bloodshed. We cannot (if a compromise is not agreed to before Saturday next) tell how long it will be before we shall have the painful task of recording the awful realities of an exterminating war.

article about the conflict with the Mormons in Missouri, Southern Patriot newspaper article 14 July 1834

Southern Patriot (Charleston, South Carolina), 14 July 1834, page 2

We’re Related to Him?

In conducting historical research we are admonished to not look at the lives of previous generations through our modern-day lens. Quite frankly, in a case like this it’s difficult. But it is important to keep in mind that Moses probably saw these new residents, the Mormons, as a threat. Those early Mormons worried their neighbors by being “peculiar.” They voted in a block and they tended to prefer dealing with their own kind.

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In this September 1838 article, we see that the conflict with the Mormons was continuing.

article about the Mormon War in Missouri, Times-Picayune newspaper article 14 September 1838

Times-Picayune (New Orleans, Louisiana), 14 September 1838, page 2

According to this old news article, a local Missouri sheriff attempted to arrest Lyman Wight, one of the Mormon leaders – but found him protected by a large group of armed Mormon men. Wight is quoted as telling the sheriff:

…that he would not be taken alive – that the law had never protected him, and he owed them no obedience – that the whole State of Missouri could not take him.

The article concludes with the opinion of the editor of the Western Star, a Missouri newspaper:

article about the Mormon War in Missouri, Times-Picayune newspaper article 14 September 1838

Times-Picayune (New Orleans, Louisiana), 14 September 1838, page 2

While I may be less than thrilled about Moses’ role in this bitter history, it’s important for me to learn more about his life and the life of his wife, my ancestress. Newspapers provide me that opportunity, and I look forward to more research on this project!

———————–

* Wilson, Moses Greer. The Joseph Smith Papers. http://josephsmithpapers.org/person/moses-greer-wilson. Accessed 5 October 2014.

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Genealogy Case Study: Researching Isaac Fernald

I recently was researching a man from Oregon named Isaac Fernald (1814-1871), and found information related to him in a variety of places online.

Isaac’s Death Reported in the News

I began my search with GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives, and I found Fernald’s obituary in his home town newspaper: the Portland Daily Press.

obituary for Isaac Fernald, Portland Daily Press newspaper article 1 April 1871

Portland Daily Press (Portland, Maine), 1 April 1871, page 3

I noticed this interesting phrase – “as has been before stated” – in his obituary, which is a good clue to look for earlier newspaper references to his death that were likely printed between the date of death (25 February 1871) and the date of the obituary (1 April 1871).

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Digging deeper in GenealogyBank, I quickly found this reference to his accidental death in Cardenas, Cuba.

obituary for Isaac Fernald, Boston Journal newspaper article 28 February 1871

Boston Journal (Boston, Massachusetts), 28 February 1871, page 2

I also found this report, which adds the detail that Fernald’s fatal accident happened on a “side track of the railroad at Cardenas.”

obituary for Isaac Fernald, Boston Daily Advertiser newspaper article 1 March 1871

Boston Daily Advertiser (Boston, Massachusetts), 1 March 1871, page 2

In addition, I found this report of his funeral services.

article about the funeral services for Isaac Fernald, Portland Daily Press newspaper article 3 April 1871

Portland Daily Press (Portland, Maine), 3 April 1871, page 3

Each newspaper article reports more of the details.

Why was he in Cuba?
It turns out that he had traveled there on business before.

Ship Passenger Lists

I know that FamilySearch has put the passenger lists for U.S. ports online, so I looked there for reference to Fernald’s travels to Cuba. I found him listed several times. For example, here he is reported returning to the U.S. onboard the steamship Cahawba, returning on 1 April 1860. His occupation is listed as “merchant.”

New York Passenger Lists 1820-1891, showing entry for Isaac Fernald

Source: FamilySearch, New York Passenger Lists 1820-1891

I also know that the Prints & Graphics Division of the Library of Congress has put their massive collection of ship photographs and images online. Checking there, I was able to find this sketch of the Cahawba that was drawn at about the same time that Isaac Fernald had traveled to Cuba.

drawing of the  U.S. steamship "Cahawba"

Illustration: U.S. transport Cahawba. Source: Library of Congress.

Genealogy Tip: After you find your ancestor’s obituary, be sure to keep on digging. There are several types of historical records easily accessible online that contain relevant information about our ancestors. By making the extra research effort you will find additional details of the story of your ancestor’s life.

Note: FamilySearch International (FamilySearch.org) and GenealogyBank are partnering to make over a billion records from historical obituaries searchable online. The tremendous undertaking will make a billion records from over 100 million U.S. newspaper obituaries readily searchable online. The newspapers are from all 50 states and cover the period 1730 to the present.  Find out more at: http://www.genealogybank.com/family-search/

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John M’Donogh – Loyal American Patriot ’till Death

Deemed an upstanding citizen by the Salem Gazette, two-time American war veteran John M’Donogh passed away, losing a long fight with disease on 19 March 1809.

M’Donogh is noted for serving directly under a young General George Washington during the French & Indian War. M’Donogh fought during British General Braddock’s failed expedition in 1755 against the French, in which a 23-year-old Washington led troops, including M’Donogh, into battle on the Monongahela River.

obituary for John McDonogh, American and Commercial Daily Advertiser newspaper article 22 March 1809

American and Commercial Daily Advertiser (Baltimore, Maryland), 22 March 1809, page 2

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M’Donogh also served for the Maryland 3rd Regiment during the Revolutionary War, under Captain Cox. “One of the patriotic band of Baltimore,” Captain Cox led M’Donogh and other troops into battle at Germantown and Brandywine. M’Donogh survived, and went on to lead an exceptional life in Baltimore.

obituary for John McDonogh, Providence Gazette newspaper article 8 April 1809

Providence Gazette (Providence, Rhode Island), 8 April 1809, page 3

GenealogyBank makes it easy for me to learn about John M’Donogh and other Revolutionary War heroes; see what’s inside the archives on your ancestor’s story. Start your 30-day trial now!

Note: FamilySearch International (FamilySearch.org) and GenealogyBank are partnering to make over a billion records from historical obituaries searchable online. The tremendous undertaking will make a billion records from over 100 million U.S. newspaper obituaries readily searchable online. The newspapers are from all 50 states and cover the period 1730 to the present.  Find out more at: http://www.genealogybank.com/family-search/

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Gershom Beach Dead at 77 – the Forgotten Paul Revere

Gershom Beach, a blacksmith in Rutland, Vermont, was 77 when he passed away on 2 September 1805, according to his obituary.

obituary for Gershom Beach, Middlebury Mercury newspaper article 5 February 1806

Middlebury Mercury (Middlebury, Vermont), 5 February 1806, page 3

Born 24 September 1728 in Cheshire, Connecticut, Gershom Beach was credited as being one of the original settlers of Rutland, Vermont.

Beach is most noted for his Paul Revere-style message delivery for Colonel Ethan Allen at the battle for Fort Ticonderoga during the Revolutionary War, described in an article published by the Rockford Republic (Rockford, Illinois), 14 March 1930, page 6.

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Beach rallied the famous Green Mountain Boys by covering 60 miles of country in one day, carrying Colonel Ethan Allen’s message. According to the article: “He walked and ran 60 miles in 24 hours.” He went from town to town calling on the men in each town to join Col. Allen to take Fort Ticonderoga: “Even when he reached Hands Point, the rendezvous, ahead of the men he had summoned, he slept only a few hours.”

His life proved one man can make a difference. Beach’s heroic ride was detailed in a 1939 poem “Vermont’s Paul Revere” that describes this major turning point in the Revolutionary War.

The poem begins this way:

poem about Gershom Beach, Boston Herald newspaper article 29 June 1939

Boston Herald (Boston, Massachusetts), 29 June 1939, page 14

And ends like this:

poem for Gershom Beach, Boston Herald newspaper article 29 June 1939

Boston Herald (Boston, Massachusetts), 29 June 1939, page 14

Genealogy Tip: Gershom Beach’s brief obituary is just a few lines long, but with a small amount of digging in GenealogyBank you can find the rest of Beach’s interesting life story.

GenealogyBank has over 1.7 billion records and adds more newspaper archives daily. Interested in learning more about what GenealogyBank knows about your ancestors? Sign up today at GenealogyBank.com

Note: FamilySearch International (FamilySearch.org) and GenealogyBank are partnering to make over a billion records from historical obituaries searchable online. The tremendous undertaking will make a billion records from over 100 million U.S. newspaper obituaries readily searchable online. The newspapers are from all 50 states and cover the period 1730 to the present.  Find out more at: http://www.genealogybank.com/family-search/

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New Mexico Archives: 161 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

New Mexico, which became American territory in 1848 at the close of the Mexican-American War, waited 64 years before finally being admitted as the 47th state of the Union on 6 January 1912. One of the western Mountain States in the U.S., New Mexico is the 5th largest state in the country—yet only the 36th most populous.

photo of the Wheeler Peak mountain group, New Mexico

Photo: Wheeler Peak mountain group, New Mexico. Credit: David Herrera; Wikimedia Commons.

If you are researching your family roots in New Mexico, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online New Mexico newspaper archives: 161 titles to help you search your family history in the “Land of Enchantment,” providing coverage from 1844 to Today. There are currently more than two million newspaper articles and records in our online NM archives!

Dig deep into our archives and search for obituaries and other news articles about your New Mexico ancestors in these recent and historical NM newspapers online. Our New Mexico newspapers are divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries (obituaries only).

Search New Mexico Newspaper Archives (1844 – 1973)

Search New Mexico Recent Obituaries (1994 – Current)

Here is our complete list of online New Mexico newspapers in the archives. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more. The NM newspaper titles are listed alphabetically by city.

City Title Date Range* Collection
Alamogordo Alamogordo Daily News 9/10/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Albuquerque Albuquerque Journal 1/2/1906 – 12/31/1922 Newspaper Archives
Albuquerque Albuquerque Morning Democrat 1/1/1886 – 12/31/1898 Newspaper Archives
Albuquerque Albuquerque Citizen 2/10/1887 – 12/31/1900 Newspaper Archives
Albuquerque Bandera Americana 8/10/1901 – 5/13/1909 Newspaper Archives
Albuquerque Albuquerque Weekly Press 1/20/1863 – 7/12/1864 Newspaper Archives
Albuquerque Nuevo Mundo 5/1/1897 – 9/20/1900 Newspaper Archives
Albuquerque Opinion Publica 7/2/1892 – 3/2/1907 Newspaper Archives
Albuquerque Defensor del Pueblo 6/27/1891 – 5/28/1892 Newspaper Archives
Albuquerque Indito 11/24/1900 – 4/4/1901 Newspaper Archives
Albuquerque News 1/23/1886 – 12/6/1886 Newspaper Archives
Albuquerque Morning Journal 11/9/1884 – 12/3/1886 Newspaper Archives
Albuquerque Daily Times 6/14/1893 – 6/14/1893 Newspaper Archives
Albuquerque Industrial Advertiser 12/23/1899 – 12/23/1899 Newspaper Archives
Albuquerque Hormiga de Oro 11/7/1903 – 11/7/1903 Newspaper Archives
Albuquerque Revista 12/5/1881 – 12/5/1881 Newspaper Archives
Albuquerque Union de Albuquerque 1/20/1893 – 1/20/1893 Newspaper Archives
Albuquerque Combate 7/7/1892 – 7/7/1892 Newspaper Archives
Albuquerque Voz de Nuevo Mexico 9/1/1894 – 9/1/1894 Newspaper Archives
Albuquerque Estrella Mejicana 10/11/1890 – 10/11/1890 Newspaper Archives
Albuquerque Estrella Mexicana 10/4/1890 – 10/4/1890 Newspaper Archives
Albuquerque Albuquerque Journal 1/6/1995 – Current Recent Obituaries
Albuquerque Albuquerque Tribune 1/1/1997 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bernalillo Agricultor Moderno 3/23/1916 – 3/23/1916 Newspaper Archives
Bernalillo Espejo 3/8/1879 – 3/8/1879 Newspaper Archives
Bland Bland Herald 12/30/1898 – 6/6/1902 Newspaper Archives
Carlsbad Carlsbad Current-Argus 1/28/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Chama Northwestern New Mexican 6/10/1893 – 6/17/1893 Newspaper Archives
Chloride Black Range 12/29/1882 – 8/6/1897 Newspaper Archives
Columbus Columbus News 7/9/1909 – 5/26/1911 Newspaper Archives
Deming Deming Herald 4/2/1901 – 3/10/1903 Newspaper Archives
Deming Deming Headlight 1/24/1891 – 2/18/1899 Newspaper Archives
Deming Deming Tribune 12/25/1884 – 12/25/1884 Newspaper Archives
Deming Deming Headlight 6/3/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Eddy Eddy Argus 6/30/1893 – 6/30/1893 Newspaper Archives
Eddy Eddy County Citizen 6/13/1893 – 6/27/1893 Newspaper Archives
Elizabethtown Mining Bulletin 1/4/1900 – 8/11/1900 Newspaper Archives
Estancia Estancia News 9/1/1905 – 7/5/1907 Newspaper Archives
Farmington Daily Times 2/16/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Gallup Gallup Independent 10/11/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Grants Cibola County Beacon 6/20/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hillsboro Sierra County Advocate 9/25/1886 – 11/26/1897 Newspaper Archives
Kingston Kingston Weekly Shaft 4/16/1887 – 7/15/1893 Newspaper Archives
Kingston Kingston Clipper 3/8/1884 – 3/8/1884 Newspaper Archives
La Mesilla Defensor del Pueblo 3/7/1891 – 3/28/1891 Newspaper Archives
Las Cruces Estrella 2/1/1911 – 5/18/1935 Newspaper Archives
Las Cruces Labrador 9/8/1896 – 6/14/1912 Newspaper Archives
Las Cruces Tiempo 11/9/1882 – 7/8/1911 Newspaper Archives
Las Cruces Dona Ana County Republican 3/11/1897 – 2/15/1902 Newspaper Archives
Las Cruces Mesilla Valley Democrat 9/2/1886 – 12/2/1890 Newspaper Archives
Las Cruces Eco del Valle 11/18/1905 – 5/6/1916 Newspaper Archives
Las Cruces Las Cruces Progress 2/22/1902 – 1/1/1904 Newspaper Archives
Las Cruces Las Cruces Democrat 2/3/1892 – 11/29/1899 Newspaper Archives
Las Cruces Las Cruces Daily News 3/5/1889 – 11/23/1889 Newspaper Archives
Las Cruces Borderer 7/24/1872 – 1/10/1874 Newspaper Archives
Las Cruces Mesilla Valley Bulletin 2/2/1934 – 10/21/1938 Newspaper Archives
Las Cruces Flor del Valle 2/3/1894 – 10/11/1894 Newspaper Archives
Las Cruces Thirty-Four 4/16/1879 – 11/3/1880 Newspaper Archives
Las Cruces Democrata 6/2/1894 – 11/24/1894 Newspaper Archives
Las Cruces Empresa 9/26/1896 – 6/12/1897 Newspaper Archives
Las Cruces Eco del Rio Grande 2/12/1876 – 3/2/1882 Newspaper Archives
Las Cruces Verdad 9/16/1890 – 4/9/1898 Newspaper Archives
Las Cruces Promotor Escolar 9/12/1891 – 2/16/1892 Newspaper Archives
Las Cruces Observador Fronterizo 9/11/1888 – 10/30/1888 Newspaper Archives
Las Cruces Las Cruces Daily Times 5/8/1889 – 5/10/1889 Newspaper Archives
Las Cruces Newmans Semi-Weekly 4/2/1881 – 4/20/1881 Newspaper Archives
Las Cruces Gaceta Popular 10/24/1919 – 12/1/1919 Newspaper Archives
Las Cruces Fronterizo 4/29/1875 – 4/29/1875 Newspaper Archives
Las Cruces Las Cruces Sun-News 2/15/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Las Vegas Las Vegas Daily Gazette 7/27/1880 – 1/31/1886 Newspaper Archives
Las Vegas Revista Catolica 1/8/1888 – 2/10/1895 Newspaper Archives
Las Vegas Grito del Norte 8/24/1968 – 7/1/1973 Newspaper Archives
Las Vegas Las Vegas Daily Optic 3/8/1884 – 10/31/1900 Newspaper Archives
Las Vegas Misionero Bautista: Organo Oficial de la Convencion Bautista Hispano-Americana de Nuevo Mexico 12/21/1943 – 8/21/1951 Newspaper Archives
Las Vegas Las Vegas Weekly Optic 10/23/1880 – 10/30/1880 Newspaper Archives
Las Vegas Voz del Pueblo 6/4/1892 – 12/13/1904 Newspaper Archives
Las Vegas Sol de Mayo 5/1/1891 – 7/24/1891 Newspaper Archives
Las Vegas Hispano Americano 4/21/1892 – 10/15/1892 Newspaper Archives
Las Vegas New Mexico Herald 6/25/1879 – 7/30/1879 Newspaper Archives
Las Vegas Las Vegas Record 1/29/1901 – 4/12/1902 Newspaper Archives
Las Vegas Campaign Bulletin 8/25/1880 – 8/27/1880 Newspaper Archives
Las Vegas Daily Examiner 8/30/1895 – 8/30/1895 Newspaper Archives
Las Vegas Chronicle 10/19/1886 – 10/19/1886 Newspaper Archives
Las Vegas Clarin Mexicano 10/30/1890 – 10/30/1890 Newspaper Archives
Las Vegas Political Comet 11/4/1882 – 11/4/1882 Newspaper Archives
Las Vegas Cachiporra 10/19/1888 – 10/19/1888 Newspaper Archives
Las Vegas Boletin de Anuncios 1/19/1878 – 1/19/1878 Newspaper Archives
Las Vegas Las Vegas Optic 11/7/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lordsburg Western Liberal 6/23/1893 – 4/12/1901 Newspaper Archives
Los Alamos Los Alamos Monitor 9/27/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Magdalena Magdalena News 2/28/1918 – 3/10/1918 Newspaper Archives
Magdalena Magdalena Mountain Mail 4/5/1888 – 4/5/1888 Newspaper Archives
Maldonado Estrella 1/30/1897 – 1/30/1897 Newspaper Archives
Maxwell Maxwell Mail 1/7/1915 – 12/30/1915 Newspaper Archives
Mesilla Mesilla News 2/1/1879 – 2/9/1884 Newspaper Archives
Mora Mosquito 12/3/1891 – 6/30/1892 Newspaper Archives
Mora Cronica de Mora 6/13/1889 – 11/2/1889 Newspaper Archives
Mora Gaceta de Mora 8/28/1890 – 8/28/1890 Newspaper Archives
Mora Mora Echo 9/16/1890 – 9/16/1890 Newspaper Archives
Mountainair Independiente 1/26/1918 – 12/25/1920 Newspaper Archives
Raton Relampago 5/21/1904 – 8/6/1904 Newspaper Archives
Raton Weekly News 5/6/1904 – 6/24/1904 Newspaper Archives
Raton Union 2/26/1898 – 9/10/1898 Newspaper Archives
Raton Raton Range 6/22/1893 – 8/29/1895 Newspaper Archives
Raton Raton Reporter 7/12/1893 – 7/12/1893 Newspaper Archives
Raton Amigo del Pueblo 1/8/1896 – 1/8/1896 Newspaper Archives
Rincon Rincon Weekly 8/29/1895 – 5/11/1897 Newspaper Archives
Roswell Roswell Record 7/14/1893 – 7/14/1893 Newspaper Archives
Roswell Roswell Daily Record 1/3/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Ruidoso Ruidoso News 12/1/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
San Acacio Comercio 7/11/1907 – 7/11/1907 Newspaper Archives
San Marcial San Marcial Bee 4/29/1893 – 3/29/1902 Newspaper Archives
San Marcial San Marcial Reporter 4/14/1888 – 3/8/1890 Newspaper Archives
San Marcial Libertad 4/15/1896 – 4/15/1896 Newspaper Archives
Santa Fe Santa Fe Daily New Mexican 4/15/1871 – 6/27/1905 Newspaper Archives
Santa Fe Santa Fe Weekly New Mexican and Livestock Journal 4/25/1863 – 8/30/1906 Newspaper Archives
Santa Fe Nuevo Mexicano 8/16/1890 – 5/9/1908 Newspaper Archives
Santa Fe Boletin Popular 4/1/1886 – 5/30/1895 Newspaper Archives
Santa Fe Voz del Pueblo 4/27/1889 – 6/15/1889 Newspaper Archives
Santa Fe Guia de Santa Fe 10/2/1886 – 10/16/1886 Newspaper Archives
Santa Fe Cachiporrota 10/8/1890 – 10/28/1890 Newspaper Archives
Santa Fe Gato 5/23/1894 – 8/24/1894 Newspaper Archives
Santa Fe Registro de Nuevo Mexico 5/2/1916 – 5/2/1916 Newspaper Archives
Santa Fe New Mexican Mining News 12/21/1881 – 12/21/1881 Newspaper Archives
Santa Fe Santa Fe Weekly Express 7/2/1887 – 7/2/1887 Newspaper Archives
Santa Fe Gauntlet 6/25/1894 – 6/25/1894 Newspaper Archives
Santa Fe Santa Fe Weekly Sun 6/17/1893 – 6/17/1893 Newspaper Archives
Santa Fe Capitol 9/14/1901 – 9/14/1901 Newspaper Archives
Santa Fe Clarin Mejicano 8/10/1873 – 8/10/1873 Newspaper Archives
Santa Fe Verdad 9/12/1844 – 9/12/1844 Newspaper Archives
Santa Fe Santa Fe New Mexican 9/12/1994 – Current Recent Obituaries
Santa Rosa Santa Rosa Sun 10/31/1919 – 5/28/1920 Newspaper Archives
Silver City Southwest Sentinel 10/19/1886 – 12/27/1887 Newspaper Archives
Silver City Silver City Enterprise 9/17/1886 – 8/23/1895 Newspaper Archives
Silver City Silver City Independent 8/3/1897 – 11/5/1901 Newspaper Archives
Silver City Eagle 8/28/1895 – 8/28/1895 Newspaper Archives
Silver City Mining Chronicle 3/3/1881 – 3/3/1881 Newspaper Archives
Silver City Herald 4/1/1876 – 4/1/1876 Newspaper Archives
Silver City New Southwest 1/7/1882 – 1/7/1882 Newspaper Archives
Silver City Grant County Herald 6/15/1878 – 6/15/1878 Newspaper Archives
Silver City Silver City Daily Press & Independent 4/19/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Silver City Silver City Sun-News 3/2/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Socorro Defensor del Pueblo 3/30/1906 – 4/9/1943 Newspaper Archives
Socorro Progreso 5/17/1887 – 8/9/1887 Newspaper Archives
Socorro Industrial Advertiser 6/10/1893 – 8/24/1895 Newspaper Archives
Socorro Hispano Americano 11/17/1891 – 1/9/1892 Newspaper Archives
Socorro Socorro Bullion 4/24/1886 – 9/11/1886 Newspaper Archives
Socorro Estrella de Nuevo Mexico 8/7/1896 – 3/26/1897 Newspaper Archives
Socorro Combate 1/3/1898 – 1/15/1898 Newspaper Archives
Socorro Bullion 3/1/1884 – 3/1/1884 Newspaper Archives
Socorro Republicano 3/16/1901 – 3/16/1901 Newspaper Archives
Socorro Golondrina 2/12/1898 – 2/12/1898 Newspaper Archives
Springer Colfax County Stockman 7/8/1893 – 12/27/1913 Newspaper Archives
Springer Estandarte de Springer 6/27/1889 – 6/15/1893 Newspaper Archives
Springer Sentinel 2/8/1901 – 12/27/1901 Newspaper Archives
Taos Revista de Taos 2/20/1904 – 2/20/1904 Newspaper Archives
Taos Taos News 2/15/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Wagon Mound Combate 12/6/1902 – 11/2/1918 Newspaper Archives
White Oaks White Oaks Eagle 8/22/1895 – 8/22/1895 Newspaper Archives
White Oaks Lincoln County Leader 6/24/1893 – 6/24/1893 Newspaper Archives
White Oaks New Mexico Interpreter 11/15/1889 – 11/15/1889 Newspaper Archives

*Date Ranges may have selected coverage unavailable.

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Historical Italian American Newspapers Online

Per favore, provalo!

photo of street vendors in Manhattan’s Little Italy

Photo: street vendors in Manhattan’s Little Italy. Source: Wikipedia.

See: Street vendors at the Feast of San Gennaro in Manhattan’s Little Italy.

GenealogyBank is pleased to announce that these historical Italian American newspapers are available in our online archives.

State City Newspaper Start End
CA San Francisco Corriere del Popolo 1916 1962
NY New York Cristoforo Colombo 1892 1893
NY New York Eco d’Italia 1890 1896
NY New York Fiaccola Weekly 1912 1921
NY New York Progresso Italo-Americano 1884 1889
PA Philadelphia Momento 1917 1919

This collection of online newspapers is a terrific resource for Italian American genealogists.

Whether you’re looking for an old Italian marriage announcement or an obituary, GenealogyBank’s deep historical newspaper archives are your source.

collage of articles from Italian American newspapers

Two examples from GenealogyBank: a marriage notice from
Progresso Italo-Americano (New York City, New York), 2 August 1889, page 1 and an obituary from Corriere del Popolo (San Francisco, California), 25 December 1947 page 8

Please – give it a try!

Per favore, provalo!

Related Italian American Genealogy Articles:

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