Civil War Nurse Mary Maxwell Featured in OGSQ

I received the latest copy of the Ohio Genealogical Society Quarterly (OGSQ) in the mail this week and was interested in the cover story about “Mary Francis (Stokes) Huddleston Maxwell, Civil War Nurse.”

photo of the cover of the Ohio Genealogical Society Quarterly magazine

Source: Ohio Genealogical Society Quarterly

The article was written by Laurel Sheppard, the Assistant Editor of the OGSQ – who was assisted by Barbara Hart, Susan Lee and Daniel Reigel.

OK – I wondered if GenealogyBank had any articles about Mary Francis (Stokes) Maxwell (1835-1924).

I quickly found her obituary in the Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio).
Lots of good data here.

obituary for Mary Maxwell, Plain Dealer newspaper article 13 January 1924

Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 13 January 1924, page 7

Mary’s obituary reports that she died “last night” – on 12 January 1924.
She died at the home of her daughter in Lakewood, Ohio, on Bonnieview Avenue.

A quick search of Google Street View pulls up how that home looks today.

photo of a house in Lakewood, Ohio

Source: Google Street View

Mary’s obituary tells us that she enlisted in the Civil War in 1861 and was stationed at the Civil War-era U.S. Army hospital in Keokuk, Iowa.

Click to Read: Kennedy, Gerald. U.S. Army Hospital: Keokuk, 1862-1865.” Annals of Iowa (Fall 1969), Vol. 40, No. 2, pages 118-136.

Her obituary also reports:

  • She was receiving a pension
  • She lived in Ashland, Ohio
  • She moved from Ashland to Lakewood, Ohio, to live with her daughter in 1910
  • She was buried in Ashland, Ohio, on 14 January 1924

There are hundreds of millions of obituaries in GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives – come find your ancestor’s today!

Note: FamilySearch International ( and GenealogyBank are partnering to make over a billion records from recent and historical obituaries searchable online. The tremendous undertaking will make a billion records from over 100 million U.S. newspaper obituaries readily searchable online. The newspapers are from all 50 states and cover the period 1730 to the present.  Find out more at:

If you are interested in Ohio genealogy research, then a membership in the Ohio Genealogical Society is essential. Do it!

Related Civil War Articles:

How to Research Hispanic Ancestors When You Don’t Speak Spanish

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” Has National Hispanic Heritage Month inspired you to research your Hispanic ancestors – yet you’re not sure how to go about it because you don’t speak Spanish? In this blog article, Gena gives practical tips and describes online resources to help you overcome this family history challenge.

What are your favorite genealogy projects to work on? Mine typically involve English-language records. Let’s face it, when you only speak/read/write English those are the genealogy records that you feel most comfortable using.

So what happens when you have to research outside of your comfort zone – such as researching Hispanic ancestors when you don’t know how to speak or read the Spanish language? Well, for one thing: it’s time to start planning your Hispanic ancestor research.

A basic genealogy tip is to start with yourself and work back through each generation. In this case, after you do that, focus on your immigrant ancestors and exhaust records in the United States, then work on records found in their homeland.

Here are three other tips to keep in mind.

1) Start your timeline. I’ve written about timelines on the GenealogyBank blog before (see: Genealogy Timelines: Helpful Research Tools), and it’s worth taking the time to re-read that article. Organize what you know about your Hispanic ancestors with a timeline, and then study it for gaps in information. Ask yourself what events you should be searching for, such as births, marriages, and deaths. Consider historical events that may have affected your ancestors on a personal level and would have resulted in records. For example: military service during a war. As you study your timeline, what events impacted your family?

You can learn more about historical events in your ancestors’ homeland by consulting online history timelines. And very important: don’t neglect to read online historical newspapers, such as those in GenealogyBank’s Hispanic American Newspapers.

a Spanish-language article about the "Familia Ochoa," Heraldo de Mexico newspaper article 12 September 1928

Heraldo de Mexico (Los Angeles, California), 12 September 1928, page 6

These Spanish-language newspapers were published in the United States, but they also report on events in other countries and can be a valuable resource for better understanding a historical era. These historical Hispanic American newspapers covered events important to the community they served, and provided a perspective not found in the larger city newspapers. GenealogyBank’s Hispanic American Newspapers collection includes newspapers from the early 19th century.

2) Read Spanish-language newspapers. It may seem strange to suggest reading Spanish-language newspapers when you don’t know how to read Spanish. Don’t let Spanish-language newspapers intimidate you. I don’t read Spanish either, but with today’s online tools it’s never been easier to “read” a foreign language.

It’s helpful to become familiar with genealogically-relevant words in the new language you’re trying to understand. What’s genealogically-relevant mean? It depends on what you’re researching, but some words to begin with include those for birth, marriage, baptism, death, and familial relationships. Combining a name and a Spanish-language keyword in the search box will help you narrow down results when researching a common name. Consult the Spanish Genealogical Word List on the FamilySearch Wiki for words to become familiar with. I would also recommend investing in a Spanish-English dictionary for quick lookups. These two tools will assist you as you research Spanish-language documents.

For example, here’s a search for Perez birth records in GenealogyBank.

screenshot of GenealogyBank's search box showing a search for the keywords "Perez" and "nacimiento"

One of my favorite resources for Spanish-to-English language translations is the website Google Translate. While not a perfect language translation tool, it can help you better understand what you are reading. You can use the Google Translate website on your computer or on the go with the Google Translate app. The translation app allows you to speak, scan, type or draw text. The app will even translate text from a photo. Translations can be saved in an online Phrasebook for future reference. Consult the web page for Google Translate Help for information on using these features.

3) Learn more. Perhaps you aren’t just researching your Hispanic ancestors’ vital statistics, but instead verifying a family story. In my family, one story involves being forcibly chased out of Mexico by Pancho Villa. You might have a similar story that you want to verify.

Huerta Plans Ruin of North Mexico as Check to Villa, Fort Worth Star-Telegram newspaper article 21 December 1913

Fort Worth Star-Telegram (Fort Worth, Texas), 21 December 1913, page 1

Good family history research is searching for records, but also learning more about a place in time so that you can find additional documents that you need. Use books and periodicals to learn more about an area and the events your Hispanic ancestors were a part of. Search on the event and read newspapers published throughout the United States archived on GenealogyBank. Join societies like the Genealogical Society of Hispanic America to learn more about research and to benefit from their publications, meetings, and conferences. Genealogy research is so much more than just doing look-ups for dates and places; it takes time to immerse yourself in the material that will help you document your ancestors’ lives.

Researching Hispanic ancestors and you don’t know how to speak or read Spanish? No problem! Take some time to formulate a genealogy research plan and learn more about what you should be researching – and you will be on your way to adding more information to your family tree!

Related Hispanic American Genealogy Articles & Resources:

Court Records in Newspapers: A Gold Mine for Genealogy Research

Introduction: Duncan Kuehn is a professional genealogist with over nine years of client experience. She has worked on several well-known projects, such as “Who Do You Think You Are?” In this blog post, Duncan show how legal articles in old newspapers can tell you about some of the experiences your ancestors went through, and help steer additional research into their court cases and legal issues.

Court records are a gold mine for genealogists. A court record can be anything from a probate record, divorce decree, or guardianship case, to a criminal trial or civil action. Most of our ancestors were involved in the court system in one way or another. But how do you know what court records include your ancestors? Searching through old newspapers, such as those in GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives, is a good way to find clues.

Americans were just as litigious in grandma’s time as they are now. Many people owned land, and that property would have to be distributed upon their death through a will (testate) or letters of administration in the absence of a will (intestate). Our ancestors were also called as witnesses in cases involving their neighbors. And so on.

These court records add a tremendous amount of texture to our understanding of our ancestors’ lives. Knowing more about who our ancestors were and what they were doing can increase our attachment and understanding of them. In addition, court records can also solve brick wall situations. For example, you may find that great-grandpa Connors and his son Jacob were sued for poaching on their neighbor’s property. If you were trying to connect Jacob to his father with documentation, you would have direct evidence of their relationship.

Information Contained in Court Records

Court documents will vary in what information is found within. For example, a probate record might include the names of the decedent’s heirs, what property they owned, clues about their lifestyle, etc. A divorce decree may list the minor children of a couple, the cause of the divorce, etc.

Not all of the records within each type of court document will have the same kind of information. For example, not all wills mention the names of all the heirs. One will I found simply left the decedent’s property “to be divided equally among my children.” However, other wills are highly detailed and informative. Some court document files can be hundreds of pages long!

Court records use legal verbiage, which can be confusing at times. Don’t let this deter you. There are many resources available to work through this challenging legal language. After a while, your comfort level with legal terms will increase and reading the court documents will become easier.

You will also begin to notice that certain phrases are repeated in court records. For example, a will often starts with the phrase, “In the name of God, Amen.” These types of phrases are called boilerplate, and recognizing them can help in reading the court documents. Becoming familiar with these common phrases and how they were used will increase your understanding of what the court document actually says. In the case of the beginning of a will, the phrase “In the name of God, Amen” does not indicate that your ancestor was highly religious; it was just a legal phrase used to begin a will. However, it does mean that your ancestor did not object to such language – which would mean they were not a Quaker or staunch atheist, for example.

Old Newspapers & Court Documents in the News

The main challenge researching your ancestors’ court records is finding them. You may not know a court case existed at all. You may not know in which jurisdiction to begin searching. You may not know what date to search. Unfortunately, most court records are not indexed. You can search through docket books and/or court minute books, but this can be a time consuming venture – especially if you aren’t sure a court case even existed.

Fortunately, there is an effective alternative: searching historical newspaper archives. Old newspapers often listed the cases seen before the court each week or term. Digitized newspapers online are easily searchable, and this often makes finding the court case a breeze!

The legal notices in a newspaper can take several forms. Here is one newspaper that organized the trial list by day:

article about court trials, Washington Reporter newspaper article 27 December 1876

Washington Reporter (Washington, Pennsylvania), 27 December 1876, page 1

This newspaper organized its legal list by type of case, court, and room. It even included the case number (bless them!).

article about court trials, Plain Dealer newspaper article 20 May 1897

Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 20 May 1897, page 8

This newspaper gave a short synopsis of what happened during the hearing:

article about court trials, Cleveland Leader newspaper article 7 June 1897

Cleveland Leader (Cleveland, Ohio), 7 June 1897, page 8

Why were newspapers reporting this information? There are a number of reasons for making court case info public; three come immediately to mind. The first reason being that there was a legal requirement, in many cases, to publish the date of a hearing so that those who were affected could come to the courthouse and participate. Second, it has always been a part of the American justice system to have an open court, except in unusual circumstances. And lastly, before the advent of TV, this was actually a form of entertainment.

How to Find Court Records in GenealogyBank

To find legal information relating to your ancestors in the newspaper, some exceptional search techniques are required. For most genealogy research, you should not narrow a newspaper search down to just one paper. Searching for legal notices in the newspaper is the exception to this general research rule because the cases are often listed just by last name. Entering in “Robertson” without narrowing your search by a newspaper or region would yield far too many results to be practical.

Here are instructions for narrowing your results to a town or specific newspaper when searching GenealogyBank’s records. From the home page, go ahead and enter the last name only of the ancestor you’re researching.

screenshot of the search box on GenealogyBank's home page

Once the results page appears, select “Newspaper Archive (1690-2010).” Scroll down to the bottom of the page and select the state. Once the new results page has loaded, scroll down to the bottom of the page and select the city. If you still need to narrow it further, scroll down to the bottom of the page and enter the keyword “court,” a date range, or select a single newspaper. (Chose one, not all three.)

Once you find the correct jurisdiction, date, and possibly even case number from various newspaper articles, you can go search through the original case files to find the valuable information you are seeking. Some of these files have been digitized and are available on Others you will need to track down by contacting the court in question and asking where their archives are kept.

Note that GenealogyBank also has a category dedicated to court records, case files and legal news that can help you narrow your search.

I hope you take advantage of court records in your family history research. The information found therein is exceptionally beneficial. Using newspapers to aid your search can make the process much simpler and more likely to yield positive results. Happy searching!

Related Articles:

A Special Family History Gift Fit for a Queen

What gift do you give to a nine-year-old queen? Why, a copy of your just-published book of family history, of course!

Gift to Queen Wilhelmina, New York Tribune newspaper article 23 November 1899

New York Tribune (New York, New York), 23 November 1899, page 5

We remember Queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands (1888-1962) as a kindly, matronly woman – but at age nine she received a special gift.

What young lady wouldn’t be thrilled to receive her own copy of the newly-printed Swartwout Chronicles, 1338-1899? It was presented to her by Major William Merrill Swartwout of Troy, New York.

photo of the Swartwout Chronicles

Source: Library of Congress, American Memory

This handsome family history book was published in a limited edition of 100 copies. According to the New York Tribune article:

The book is 11 inches long, 8 1/2 inches wide and 2 1/4 inches thick. The linen coated paper is of a superior quality that will, it is said, last for centuries…It is bound in full crushed levant, with leather double and fly and richly handtooled in gold. The outer cover, dark brown in color, is embossed in antique, with the Swartwout coat of arms.

This must have been a special day at the Royal Palace in Amsterdam.

According to the article it was “claimed that there is not one typographical error in the volume.”

You can see for yourself and read through this family history online.

All kidding aside – this was a terrific honor.

How many families have the opportunity to present a copy of their family history to the Royal family of their homeland?

Did You Know?

Family history books still make for excellent gifts to give to family and friends. You can have your own family history printed in a hard copy book format by several publishing services nowadays. See Cyndi’s List for a list of family history publishers.

Arizona Archives: 73 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

Arizona became a state on 14 February 1912 – the 48th state to join the Union, and the last of the nation’s contiguous states. AZ is the country’s sixth largest state and the 15th most populous. One of the Four Corners states (it touches Colorado), Arizona has borders with four other states (New Mexico, Utah, Nevada & California) as well as a 389-mile border with Mexico.

Arizona’s ethnic diversity is as varied as its beautiful natural terrain, given its unique history. Our AZ archives are a premier resource to research your Native American, Mormon, and Hispanic ancestry, as well as explore the California Gold Rush, O.K. Corral and other interesting people, places and events of the Old American West.

photo of the North Rim of the Grand Canyon, Arizona

Photo: North Rim of the Grand Canyon, Arizona. Credit: Staplegunther at English Wikipedia; Wikimedia Commons.

If you are researching your ancestry from Arizona, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online AZ newspaper archives: 73 titles to help you search your family history in “The Grand Canyon State,” providing coverage from 1859 to Today. There are more than 1.5 million articles and records in our online Arizona newspaper archives!

Dig deep into our online archives and search for historical and recent obituaries and other news articles about your Arizona ancestors in these AZ newspapers. Our Arizona newspapers are divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries (obituaries only).

Search Arizona Newspaper Archives (1859 – 1977)

Search Arizona Recent Obituaries (1991 – Current)

illustration: state flag of Arizona

Illustration: state flag of Arizona. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Here is a list of online Arizona newspapers in the historical archives. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more. The AZ newspaper titles are listed alphabetically by city.

City Title Date Range* Collection
Apache Junction East Mesa Independent 11/13/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Apache Junction Chandler Independent 10/20/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Apache Junction Apache Junction-Gold Canyon Independent 11/13/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Apache Junction Queen Creek Independent 01/30/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Arizona City Arizona City Independent 05/31/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Benson San Pedro Valley News-Sun 01/27/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bullhead City Mohave Valley Daily News 10/16/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Casa Grande Tri-Valley Dispatch 11/15/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Casa Grande Casa Grande Dispatch 05/13/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Cave Creek Sonoran News 09/01/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Coolidge Coolidge Examiner 01/09/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Coolidge Florence Reminder and Blade-Tribune 06/14/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Douglas Douglas Dispatch 09/24/1998 – Current Recent Obituaries
Eloy Eloy Enterprise 01/09/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Flagstaff Arizona Daily Sun 05/01/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Gilbert Gilbert Independent 10/20/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Glendale Peoria Times 01/17/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Glendale Glendale Star 12/13/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Green Valley Sahuarita Sun 02/08/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Green Valley Green Valley News & Sun 05/09/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kearny Copper Basin News 09/12/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kingman Mohave County Miner 10/30/1897 – 10/30/1897 Newspaper Archives
Maricopa Maricopa Monitor 12/23/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Maricopa Communicator 10/17/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Nogales Monitor 09/05/1890 – 09/05/1890 Newspaper Archives
Nogales Nogales International 12/18/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Phoenix Arizona Informant 05/04/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Phoenix Town of Paradise Valley Independent 01/16/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Phoenix North Scottsdale Independent 01/16/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Phoenix Weekly Republican 06/29/1899 – 03/07/1901 Newspaper Archives
Phoenix Weekly Phoenix Herald 01/02/1896 – 06/22/1899 Newspaper Archives
Phoenix Phoenix New Times 01/29/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Poston Poston Chronicle 12/22/1942 – 10/23/1945 Newspaper Archives
Prescott Arizona Weekly Journal-Miner 01/10/1866 – 12/26/1900 Newspaper Archives
Prescott Prescott Morning Courier 01/05/1891 – 06/30/1908 Newspaper Archives
Queen Creek Southeast Valley Ledger 01/29/2013 – Current Recent Obituaries
Rivers Gila News Courier 09/12/1942 – 09/05/1945 Newspaper Archives
Safford Eastern Arizona Courier 02/27/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
San Manuel Pinal Nugget 03/05/2013 – Current Recent Obituaries
San Manuel San Manuel Miner 03/26/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sierra Vista Sierra Vista Herald 04/11/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sonoita Bulletin 01/20/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sun City Sun City West Independent 01/02/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sun City Peoria Independent 01/16/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sun City Surprise Independent 01/02/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sun City Sun City-Youngtown Independent 01/02/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Superior Superior Sun 09/12/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Tombstone Tombstone Daily Epitaph 07/20/1880 – 11/30/1890 Newspaper Archives
Tombstone Arizona Kicker 12/06/1893 – 02/28/1894 Newspaper Archives
Tombstone Weekly Tombstone Epitaph 05/01/1880 – 06/25/1899 Newspaper Archives
Tombstone Tombstone Epitaph Prospector 07/24/1880 – 08/12/1895 Newspaper Archives
Tombstone Tombstone Daily Prospector 01/01/1889 – 06/30/1899 Newspaper Archives
Tombstone Daily Tombstone 03/21/1885 – 12/07/1886 Newspaper Archives
Tubac Weekly Arizonian 05/26/1859 – 04/12/1860 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Fronterizo 01/09/1892 – 12/17/1892 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Arizona Weekly Star 05/03/1877 – 10/07/1882 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Iris 06/19/1886 – 06/19/1886 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Arizona Daily Star 01/03/1991 – Current Recent Obituaries
Tucson Tucsonense 03/17/1915 – 11/01/1931 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Arizona Citizen 10/15/1870 – 07/29/1876 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Explorer 01/16/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Tucson Tucson Citizen 07/05/1882 – 12/31/1922 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Ferrocarril 05/17/1885 – 05/17/1885 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Amigos 05/08/1975 – 12/21/1977 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Dos Republicas 08/23/1879 – 10/18/1879 Newspaper Archives
Tucson Alianza 08/23/1900 – 10/18/1900 Newspaper Archives
Tucson 01/28/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Vail Vail Sun 03/24/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Wickenburg Wickenburg Sun 11/17/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Willcox Arizona Range News 01/10/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Window Rock Navajo Times 04/01/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Yuma Sun 05/30/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Yuma Arizona Sentinel 09/27/1873 – 07/15/1876 Newspaper Archives

*Date Ranges may have selected coverage unavailable.

You can either print or create a PDF version of this Blog post by simply clicking on the green “Print/PDF” button below. The PDF version makes it easy to save this post onto your desktop or portable device for quick reference – all the Arizona newspaper links will be live.

Related Arizona Articles & Resources:

A Guide to Using Social Media for Genealogy

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this blog article, Gena examines the various social media channels that exist for genealogy and shows how they can help your family history research.

I remember the more recent “good old days” of genealogy. In those days, connecting with other researchers meant reading Everton’s Genealogical Helper magazine, where pages of researchers’ messages resided. I eagerly read those blurbs looking for my surnames, hoping to connect with a yet-unknown cousin who was trying to track down the same information I was.

I miss that magazine but I’m grateful to live in a time where making genealogical connections is considerably easier, thanks to the rise of the Information Age. With online message boards and numerous social media channels, I’m able to make connections in ways that my family historian grandmother could only imagine.

Are you using social media for your own genealogy? I realize it’s not everyone’s cup of tea, but seriously consider trying at least one social media network (Twitter, Facebook, GenealogyWise, Google+, YouTube are examples), or create a family history blog so that you can take advantage of all that modern-day genealogy offers.

graphic to illustrate an article on using social media for genealogy

Whether you are just dipping your toes in the ocean of social media or a seasoned user, consider these ways that social networking can benefit and enhance your genealogy research.

Seeking Family History Information

Genealogy research often raises more questions than answers, so I’m glad that I’m able to go online and seek guidance from libraries, archives and other family history researchers when I need to ask a question or talk through a tough research problem.


There are various ways that I do this, but one method is crowd-sourcing questions using a social media website like Twitter. I add relevant hashtags to my post that expand the reach of my question beyond just the people that follow me (some examples include #genealogy or #familyhistory). For questions I want to direct specifically to one person or institution, I use the direct message feature so that we can have a longer, private conversation. Note that Twitter apps such as Tweetdeck can help you track your responses more easily.

Also, try searching the names and hashtags of genealogical societies, companies, magazines, conferences and more, to find accounts to follow and stay on top of what is going on in the community, as shown below.

screenshot of GenealogyBank on Twitter

See: #genealogybank Twitter search


Obviously there are other ways to ask questions and seek information. Facebook’s specific subject groups are a great place to direct questions to those who have an interest in a certain type of research (like newspapers for example) or who use a website or software product. To find relevant groups, use the search engine located at the top of Facebook and enter keywords like “genealogy” or your favorite website or software program. Note that you must be logged into Facebook to search.

screenshot of GenealogyBank on Facebook

Follow Genealogical Societies, Organizations & Companies

Don’t forget to follow your favorite libraries, historical archives and genealogy companies on social media. They often post great resources to try, as well as information about emergency closings. Their social media channels are a great way to stay informed. For example, to find genealogy groups on Facebook, type “genealogy” into the search box and then select the “Pages” tab to get a listing of related pages to follow. Note that you must be logged into Facebook to search as shown below.

screenshot of genealogy pages on Facebook

Genealogy pages on Facebook

Attract Cousins

How do distant relations know of your research unless you have information about yourself out “there”? Leaving a virtual trail is one way people can find and connect with you to share information as well as answer questions. In my research, it’s through looking at online family trees, message boards and social media websites that I find modern-day descendants to share information, ask questions, and on occasion, reunite a family heirloom that I have found in an antique store.

I know it’s your genealogy research and I understand how protective you are of the work you’ve invested in it. But make it easier for others to find you. While some communications could be frustrating, others might result in wonderful things like a lost heirloom making its way back to your family. Get out there in the virtual world by using a genealogy blog or website to post information about your family history research. Then add a family tree or family images to share.

As one example, I put together a blog about an early 20th century couple I am researching. An antique dealer Googled the name she found on a painting (the wife was a painter), found my blog and then contacted me with information. Researching family history is not just about searching websites – it’s also about making connections with people who share your passion.

Learn More from GenealogyBank

We all could use a little help now and then. That’s why I always appreciate genealogy website social media tools. GenealogyBank has numerous tools online to help you learn more about genealogy research, as well as using the website to find your ancestors.

What tools are available? For one, take a look at GenealogyBank’s YouTube channel. Here you can find tutorials helping you do everything from finding family stories to using the GenealogyBank website itself. Sign into Google with your Google Account or your Gmail credentials and you can add your favorite genealogy tutorial videos to your YouTube playlist.

screenshot of GenealogyBank tutorial videos available on YouTube

See: GenealogyBank tutorial videos on Youtube

GenealogyBank also has a Google+ account with links to a variety of family history blog posts.

screenshot of GenealogyBank on Google+

See: GenealogyBank on Google Plus

Whom to Follow on Twitter for Genealogy

Those who know me know that I love Twitter. It’s a great place to follow other researchers, libraries, archives, and your favorite genealogy websites. GenealogyBank can be found at @genealogybank. Don’t forget to follow the GenealogyBank writers at their accounts: Gena Philibert-Ortega, @genaortega; Mary Harrell-Sesniak, @compmary; Duncan Kuehn, @FamBriarPatch; and Tom Kemp, @TomKemp.

GenealogyBank can also be found on Facebook and Pinterest.

I saved the best for last: the GenealogyBank blog. Frequent articles on the blog include nods to history, methodology, and ideas for your family history research. Don’t forget that we also post the latest newspaper additions to GenealogyBank, so the blog is a great place to learn about what’s new on the website.

I would recommend you add the GenealogyBank blog to your favorite blog reader by subscribing via the RSS feed. The RSS orange subscribe button can be found at the top right of the blog page.

screenshot of the GenealogyBank Blog RSS subscribe button

GenealogyBank Blog RSS Subscribe

You can search blog postings by the date, name of the author (to find all my blog posts search on my name: Gena Philibert-Ortega), and even by tags. You can find tagged subjects for each article at the bottom of the post. These tags index the article by subjects, and those subjects might be shared by other posts. You can find social media share buttons (as well as the option to print your favorite posts) at the bottom of each blog article.

Why Use Social Media for Genealogy?

Social media is an important tool in family history research. It provides us opportunities to network, share, and find information. Even if you are overwhelmed by social media, give one of the above tips a try. You just might find that these online genealogy tools can help you find a new cousin or unravel that family history mystery you’ve been working on for a while. I’d love to hear your experiences finding family or answers via social media networking. Please use the comment section below to share your social media genealogy tips.

Related Articles:

What’s a Third Cousin Anyway? Genealogy Tutorial Video

The Anaconda Standard reported this interesting case in 1901 of one of George Washington’s “third cousins” who had fallen on hard times.

article about Agnes Washington Fairchild, Anaconda Standard newspaper article 24 November 1901

Anaconda Standard (Anaconda, Montana), 24 November 1901, page 14

Per the news report, Miss Agnes Washington Fairchild, who was born in Fairfax, Virginia, had no means of support and had called on the “Supervisor of the Outdoor Poor” (now, that’s a descriptive title) and the local New York City chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution for help.

Wait – “third cousin”?
What exactly is that?

How can you easily see how cousin relationships are structured and named?

Here are two handy genealogy tutorial videos from YouTube that will help you do just that.

Watch “What’s a Second Cousin Once Removed?”

Now that you have the basics of tracing your cousins, you’re ready to tackle a more advanced family tree.

Watch “The Complicated Chinese Family Tree – Cantonese Version”

Did you know? has a Learning Center and Youtube channel where you can watch expert-led genealogy tutorial videos to learn how to use historical newspapers and obituaries to find your family stories and trace your family tree.

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Genealogy Humor: 7 Funny and Odd Inheritances & Bequests

Introduction: Mary Harrell-Sesniak is a genealogist, author and editor with a strong technology background. In this blog article, Mary reminds us that humor can be a fun part of family history research by sharing seven strange bequests she ran across in old newspapers.

They say that in order to be remembered long after you’re gone, make an unusual bequest in your will.

Writers and editors love to feature oddities, and genealogists love to read them – so go ahead and enjoy these odd and unusual inheritances and bequests. Search GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives to find boatloads of these news stories to tickle your funny bone. You’ll be sure to have a good laugh.

Here are seven of my favorite funny “final requests.”

1) A Dollar in Four Monthly Payments

In 1908, the appropriately-named Catherine E. Heckler of Portland, Oregon, left her husband a dollar payable in four monthly installments of 25 cents. She didn’t call him her husband, but rather “the individual who married me in 1905 in San Diego, Cal., and who got from me thousands of dollars and when he could get no more deserted me.”

article about Catherine E. Heckler's bequest, Aberdeen Daily News newspaper article 2 November 1908

Aberdeen Daily News (Aberdeen, South Dakota), 2 November 1908, page 7

Hope Mr. Heckler didn’t spend his inheritance all in one place!

2) Home for Non-Smoking Clergymen

Philanthropist Ann Jane Mercer, who died in 1886, left her residence to establish a home for Presbyterian clergymen who were “decayed by age, or disabled by infirmity and who do not use tobacco in any form or shape.”

article about Ann Jane Mercer's bequest, Plain Dealer newspaper article 14 April 1886

Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 14 April 1886, page 1

This wonderful cause doesn’t sound that odd, but as this 1909 newspaper article reports, there were some strange aspects to the bequest. For one, it says of Ann Mercer’s insistence that the home only be used by clergymen who were nonsmokers:

This provision was the more singular because the bulk of the Mercer fortune was made on raising tobacco.

Another thing: it turned out that nonsmoking clergymen were scarce.

In the twenty-one years since the institution’s foundation four clergymen have entered its portals.

By 1909 only one clergyman was using the home, and the board of managers decided to put him up in a hotel at their expense.

Finally Rev. Mr. Jones was left alone, so he was sent to the hotel, where thoughtless young men, summer visitors, have been blowing cigaret smoke around his aged head.

article about Ann Jane Mercer's bequest, Plain Dealer newspaper article 3 September 1909

Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), 3 September 1909, page 5

3) An Astronomical Challenge

Mrs. Gruzman was interested in the planets. Her big idea was to bequeath a prize of 100,000 francs to the Institute of France (science section) for the person who could discover interplanetary or astral communications.

article about Mrs. Gruzman's bequest, Macon Telegraph newspaper article 24 January 1892

Macon Telegraph (Macon, Georgia), 24 January 1892, page 2

A ten-year limit was set to collect the prize, with the other stipulation that a reply from outer space was necessary. If the Institute of France did not accept the legacy, the price would divert to the Institute of Milan or the Institute of New York.

What do you suppose happened to the money when nobody collected?

4) She Left Her Body to Favorite Nephew

One has to wonder what Charles Brower of Downingtown thought of his aunt’s will.

He was literally to inherit her body. By reading this newspaper article you’ll get her intent, but the wording was strange. Her will instructed the nephew to bring a double team of horses to Pottstown to fetch her. Apparently she didn’t want her estranged husband to bury her, so her nephew returned her body to Downingtown as requested.

Enter Last Name

Let’s hope she left some money for his corpse-carrying troubles.

article about Mrs. Steele's bequest, Philadelphia Inquirer newspaper article 1 June 1896

Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 1 June 1896, page 4

5) Don’t Miss the Banquet

If your ancestors were heirs of Albert Karutz, let’s hope they attended his funeral when he passed in 1909. As an inducement, he offered in his will a $500 funeral banquet with “liquid refreshments” – but heirs who failed to show up were to be disinherited!

article about Albert Karutz's funeral banquet, Times-Picayune newspaper article 26 August 1909

Times-Picayune (New Orleans, Louisiana), 26 August 1909, page 3

6) Dinner on the House

One has to wonder if Karutz’s 1909 bequest inspired Ratke Siedenburg in 1910. He set aside $500 for friends to dine together within three months after his death. The executor was to choose the location as well as the lucky dozen diners.

article about Ratke Siedenburg's funeral banquet, Oregonian newspaper article 8 November 1910

Oregonian (Portland, Oregon), 8 November 1910, page 1

7) Delayed Support for Kitties & Puppies

This next bequest left $1,100 to found a homeless shelter for cats and dogs, but the money wasn’t to be touched until the year 2163. Wonder how much the trust is worth today, if it even still exists?

article about a bequest to establish a cat and dog shelter, St. Albans Daily Messenger newspaper article 18 July 1918

St. Albans Daily Messenger (St. Albans, Vermont), 18 July 1918, page 3

So there you have it. Strange and odd bequests are not that unusual. Have any of you encountered any funny or odd bequests in your ancestry research? If so, we’d love to hear about it; tell us in the comments section.

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RootsTech 2016 Registration Is Now Open!

Early bird registration is now open for RootsTech 2016 – the largest genealogy conference in North America. This year’s RootsTech conference is expected to draw well over 23,000 attendees to Salt Lake City, Utah.

photo of the audience at the RootsTech genealogy conference


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More than 200 live genealogy sessions will start on Wednesday, February 3rd, and continue through Saturday, February 6th.

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North Carolina Archives: 169 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

One of America’s original 13 states, North Carolina’s state flag has two dates that commemorate NC’s drive for independence from Britain. On 20 May 1775 citizens of Mecklenburg County, NC, approved the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence – supposedly the first declaration of independence made in the Thirteen Colonies. Then on 12 April 1776, North Carolina instructed its delegates to the Continental Congress to vote for independence from Britain – the first former colony to do so.

photo of the Blue Ridge Mountains, North Carolina

Photo: Blue Ridge Mountains, North Carolina. Credit: Ken Thomas; Wikimedia Commons.

If you are researching your ancestry from North Carolina, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online NC newspaper archives: 169 titles to help you search your family history in “The Tar Heel State,” providing coverage from 1775 to Today. There are more than 78 million articles and records in our online North Carolina newspaper archives!

Dig deep into our online archives and search for historical and recent obituaries and other news articles about your North Carolina ancestors in these NC newspapers. Our North Carolina newspapers are divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries (obituaries only).

Search North Carolina Newspaper Archives (1775 – 1993)

Search North Carolina Recent Obituaries (1988 – Current)

illustration of the state flag of North Carolina

Illustration: state flag of North Carolina. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Here is a list of online North Carolina newspapers in the historical archives. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more. The NC newspaper titles are listed alphabetically by city.

City Title Date Range* Collection
Ahoskie Roanoke-Chowan News Herald 07/10/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Albemarle Stanly News and Press 01/02/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Andrews Andrews Journal 12/04/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Apex Apex Herald 01/04/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Apex, Holly Springs Southwest Wake News 06/01/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Asheboro Randolph Guide 04/06/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Asheboro Courier-Tribune 04/06/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Belhaven Beaufort-Hyde News 07/27/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Blowing Rock Blowing Rocket 05/06/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Boone Mountain Times 02/04/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Boone Watauga Democrat 01/14/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bryson City Smoky Mountain Times 02/06/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Burgaw Pender Chronicle 10/28/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Burgaw Pender-Topsail Post & Voice 11/10/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Cary Cary News 02/13/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Cashiers Crossroads Chronicle 03/18/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Chapel Hill Chapel Hill News 05/03/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Chapel Hill Chapel Hill Herald 01/27/1995 – Current Recent Obituaries
Charlotte Charlotte Semi-Weekly Observer 12/15/1916 – 12/15/1916 Newspaper Archives
Charlotte Africo-American Presbyterian 12/21/1899 – 12/21/1899 Newspaper Archives
Charlotte Charlotte Observer 01/01/1992 – Current Recent Obituaries
Charlotte Charlotte Observer 03/13/1892 – 12/31/1935 Newspaper Archives
Charlotte Charlotte News 12/11/1888 – 09/29/1922 Newspaper Archives
Charlotte Carolina Israelite 02/01/1944 – 12/01/1958 Newspaper Archives
Charlotte Charlotte Post 02/03/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Charlotte Charlotte Observer, The: Blogs 11/09/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Clayton Clayton News-Star 08/10/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Clemmons Clemmons Courier 01/06/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Cleveland Cleveland Post 01/18/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Clinton Sampson Independent 07/07/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Davidson 01/01/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Durham Herald-Sun 01/01/1995 – Current Recent Obituaries
Durham Chronicle, The: Duke University 01/25/1994 – Current Recent Obituaries
Durham Durham News 09/03/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Edenton Chowan Herald 07/12/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Edenton Edenton Gazette 02/26/1806 – 02/26/1821 Newspaper Archives
Edenton State Gazette of North Carolina 05/11/1793 – 02/20/1799 Newspaper Archives
Elizabeth City Daily Advance 11/09/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Elizabethtown Bladen Journal 03/05/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Elkin Tribune 09/19/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Farmville Farmville Enterprise 07/13/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fayetteville Fayetteville Observer 01/18/1988 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fayetteville Carolina Observer 12/09/1824 – 02/23/1863 Newspaper Archives
Fayetteville North Carolina Chronicle or Fayetteville Gazette 02/01/1790 – 07/19/1790 Newspaper Archives
Fayetteville American 04/26/1816 – 04/26/1816 Newspaper Archives
Forest City Daily Courier 01/01/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Franklin Franklin Press 02/19/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fremont Wayne-Wilson News Leader 07/06/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fuquay-Varina Fuquay-Varina Independent 10/14/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Garner Garner News 10/21/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Garner, Cleveland Garner-Cleveland Record 01/05/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Greensboro News & Record: Blogs 01/24/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Greensboro News & Record 01/01/1990 – Current Recent Obituaries
Greensboro Greensboro Record 03/17/1906 – 03/16/1984 Newspaper Archives
Greensboro Greensboro News and Record 03/19/1984 – 11/10/1989 Newspaper Archives
Greensboro Greensboro Daily News 01/03/1906 – 12/31/1982 Newspaper Archives
Greensboro Yes! Weekly 03/16/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Greenville Daily Reflector 08/30/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Grifton Times-Leader 07/20/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Halifax North-Carolina Journal 08/01/1792 – 09/11/1797 Newspaper Archives
Hampstead Topsail Voice 09/10/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hayesville Clay County Progress 09/19/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Henderson Daily Dispatch 04/10/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hertford Perquimans Weekly 07/13/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hickory Hickory Daily Record 02/10/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
High Point High Point Enterprise 04/14/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Highlands Highlander 02/28/2013 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hillsborough Hillsborough Recorder 03/10/1824 – 05/10/1865 Newspaper Archives
Hillsborough News of Orange County 08/27/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Holly Springs Holly Springs Sun 07/10/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Jamestown Jamestown News 01/12/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kannapolis Independent Tribune 05/27/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kannapolis Kannapolis Citizen 04/01/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kenansville Duplin Times 09/29/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kenansville Duplin Today – Pink Hill Review 03/08/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Laurinburg Laurinburg Exchange 01/02/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lenoir News-Topic 11/12/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lincolnton Lincoln Republican 01/23/1840 – 05/25/1842 Newspaper Archives
Lincolnton Lincoln Courier 05/02/1846 – 02/15/1851 Newspaper Archives
Littleton Lake Gaston Gazette-Observer 07/08/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Littleton True Reformer 07/25/1900 – 07/25/1900 Newspaper Archives
Louisburg Franklin Times 12/19/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lumberton Robesonian 01/01/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Marion McDowell News 02/12/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Mebane Mebane Enterprise 09/17/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Milton Milton Gazette and Roanoke Advertiser 05/03/1822 – 04/21/1825 Newspaper Archives
Monroe Enquirer-Journal 10/01/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Mooresville Mooresville Tribune 02/16/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Morehead City Carteret County News-Times 04/16/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Morganton News Herald 01/12/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Mount Olive Mount Olive Tribune 10/06/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Mt. Airy Mt. Airy News 11/02/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Murfreesboro Hornets’ Nest 10/01/1812 – 07/22/1813 Newspaper Archives
Murphy Cherokee Scout 04/20/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Nashville Nashville Graphic 01/06/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
New Bern True Republican, and Newbern Weekly Advertiser 04/02/1810 – 08/07/1811 Newspaper Archives
New Bern Newbern Sentinel 03/21/1818 – 12/21/1836 Newspaper Archives
New Bern North-Carolina Gazette 03/24/1775 – 07/14/1775 Newspaper Archives
New Bern Newbern Herald 01/20/1809 – 02/26/1810 Newspaper Archives
New Bern Morning Herald 09/17/1807 – 12/30/1808 Newspaper Archives
New Bern Carolina Federal Republican 01/12/1809 – 04/25/1818 Newspaper Archives
New Bern State Gazette of North Carolina 08/09/1787 – 02/07/1788 Newspaper Archives
Newton Observer News Enterprise 09/06/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Pilot Mountain Pilot 02/20/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Princeton Princeton News-Leader 05/30/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Raleigh Star 11/03/1808 – 09/29/1852 Newspaper Archives
Raleigh Midtown Raleigh News 01/16/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Raleigh Raleigh Register 06/04/1819 – 12/28/1821 Newspaper Archives
Raleigh Raleigh Extra 06/18/1995 – Current Recent Obituaries
Raleigh North Raleigh News 07/21/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Raleigh Gazette 12/16/1893 – 02/19/1898 Newspaper Archives
Raleigh Observer 02/24/1877 – 09/11/1880 Newspaper Archives
Raleigh Semi-Weekly Standard 01/14/1852 – 03/08/1868 Newspaper Archives
Raleigh Dispatch 12/21/1991 – 04/10/1993 Newspaper Archives
Raleigh News & Observer, The: Web Edition Articles 05/06/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Raleigh News & Observer, The: Blogs 12/07/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Raleigh North-Carolina Minerva 11/26/1799 – 12/31/1804 Newspaper Archives
Raleigh News & Observer 01/01/1991 – Current Recent Obituaries
Red Springs Red Springs Citizen 09/10/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Reidsville Eden Daily News 02/13/2013 – Current Recent Obituaries
Reidsville Reidsville Review 03/25/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Richlands Richlands-Beulaville Advertiser News 10/28/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Roanoke Rapids Daily Herald 08/15/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Robbinsville Graham Star 01/28/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Rockingham Richmond County Daily Journal 05/05/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Rocky Mount Rocky Mount Telegram 09/03/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Roxboro Courier-Times 11/22/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Salisbury Salisbury Post 12/01/1998 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sanford Sanford Herald 02/17/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Shallotte Brunswick Beacon 05/18/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Smithfield Smithfield Herald 01/19/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Snow Hill Standard Laconic 07/13/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Southern Pines Pilot 10/08/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Spring Hope Spring Hope Enterprise & The Bailey News 08/03/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Spruce Pine Mitchell News-Journal 06/12/2013 – Current Recent Obituaries
St. Pauls St. Pauls Review 09/04/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Statesville Statesville Record & Landmark 02/06/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Swansboro Tideland News 09/03/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sylva Sylva Herald & Ruralite 10/21/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Tabor City Tabor-Loris Tribune 03/14/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Tarboro Daily Southerner 01/23/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Tarboro Tarboro Press 01/04/1840 – 03/02/1844 Newspaper Archives
Thomasville Thomasville Times 01/01/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Troy Montgomery Herald 06/20/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Tryon Tryon Daily Bulletin 05/14/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Wadesboro Anson Record 06/19/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Wallace Wallace Enterprise 01/06/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Walnut Cove Stokes News 12/20/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Warrenton Warren Record 07/08/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Warsaw Warsaw-Faison News 01/06/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Washington Washington Daily News 10/02/2014 – Current Recent Obituaries
Washington American Recorder 04/28/1815 – 05/27/1825 Newspaper Archives
Weaverville Weaverville Tribune 04/30/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
West Jefferson Jefferson Post 09/25/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Whiteville News Reporter 04/22/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Williamston Martin County Enterprise and Weekly Herald 07/14/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Wilmington StarNews 01/31/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Wilmington Wilmington Gazette 01/01/1801 – 01/13/1816 Newspaper Archives
Wilmington Wilmington Centinel and General Advertiser 06/18/1788 – 06/18/1788 Newspaper Archives
Wilmington True Republican or American Whig 01/03/1809 – 11/07/1809 Newspaper Archives
Wilmington Cape-Fear Recorder 11/28/1818 – 04/11/1827 Newspaper Archives
Wilson Wilson Daily Times 10/10/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Windsor Bertie Ledger-Advance 07/13/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Winston-Salem Winston-Salem Journal 11/14/1997 – Current Recent Obituaries
Winston-Salem Twin City Sentinel 12/27/1906 – 12/27/1906 Newspaper Archives
Winston-Salem Winston-Salem Journal 08/30/1898 – 12/31/1929 Newspaper Archives
Yadkinville Yadkin Ripple 09/19/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Yanceyville Caswell Messenger 08/27/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Zebulon Eastern Wake News 11/12/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries

*Date Ranges may have selected coverage unavailable.

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