She Was the Bringer of Cake – Ways to Involve the Grandkids in Family History

Kids love to eat.
Do you have an old favorite family recipe the kids all love?
Bring the message home to them that they can thank “Cousin Jennie Pearl Ewer” for that cake recipe.

Take a moment to tell them who she was and how her recipe has passed down in the family.

Old Family Recipe Wins Again at Fair, Dallas Morning News newspaper article 12 October 1963

Dallas Morning News (Dallas, Texas), 12 October 1963, section 3, page 2

Document your old family recipes: write them down, take photos, and add them to your family tree.

That’s what I did.

My great-grandmother entered her favorite recipes into a handwritten book she started in 1887. That cookbook has been passed down in the family.

screenshot of a page from FamilySearch website showing Marcia Richmond's cookbook

Source: FamilySearch

For example, here is a recipe she credited to her cousin Jennie Pearl (Drew) Ewer (1873-1933).

Jennie Ewer's chocolate cake recipe

Source: Marcia Amanda (Young) Richmond Cookbook

Take it a step further.
I added that recipe to Jennie (Drew) Ewer’s page in the family tree.

Now when I whip up that cake recipe I can ask the kids if they remember who was responsible for this cake – and if they can find me her recipe attached to her page in the family tree.

They’ll remember her – she was the bringer of cake – and with a click they will pull up her page in the family tree.

And, they’ll want a piece of her chocolate cake!

Jennie Ewer's chocolate cake recipe

Source: FamilySearch

Make family history fun – and let me know how you enjoy this chocolate cake.

Related Recipe Articles:

Tough First Winter for Our Mayflower Ancestors

Our Mayflower ancestors must have been a tough bunch, building the new Plymouth Colony during that first difficult winter of 1620-1621 when so many of them died due to illness and exposure.

Painting: “Pilgrims Going to Church” by George Henry Boughton, 1867

Painting: “Pilgrims Going to Church” by George Henry Boughton, 1867. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

It is recorded that 45 of the 102 original Mayflower passengers died during that first winter. The toll was especially hard on the women: of the 18 adult women who came over on the Mayflower, 13 died during that first winter (and another in May).

Despite the harsh winter conditions, they built seven homes – and four “common houses” – in Plymouth, left the shelter of the Mayflower, and settled into life in their new colony.

The extreme difficulty of that first winter was described in an article columnist John Chamberlain wrote for Thanksgiving in 1966.

article about the first winter the Mayflower Pilgrims spent in Plymouth Colony, Augusta Chronicle newspaper article 24 November 1966

Augusta Chronicle (Augusta, Georgia), 24 November 1966, page 6

It wasn’t easy – but they persevered.

Document your hearty ancestors of all generations by finding their records and stories in GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives.

Related Mayflower Genealogy Articles:

Go West Old Maid! Some of Our Unmarried Ancestors Did

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this blog article, Gena searches old newspapers to learn about a time – in 1898 – when the U.S. government published a report and map to help unmarried women locate bachelors throughout the country.

Having trouble finding a marriage partner? Whom should you turn to for help? A matchmaker? A family member or friend? How about Uncle Sam?

Yes, Uncle Sam. Uncle Sam entered into the matchmaking business with the publishing of a 19th century U.S. Census Bureau report. This work was unique in that it addressed where to find an eligible bachelor based on location. According to the dissertation “Unclaimed Flowers and Blossoms Protected by Thorns: Never-Married Women in the United States, 1880-1930” by Jill Frahm*:

In 1898, the U.S. Census Bureau published what the popular press dubbed an “Old Maids Chart” graphically illustrating at a glance in what localities bachelors [were] the thickest, and in what regions spinsters [were] most dense per square mile.

illustration of a couple at their wedding

Credit: skinbus; openclipart.org

Using the now lost-to-us 1890 census (much of it was destroyed in a 1921 fire), the report documented “the number of single men and women over the age of twenty in each state.”

Statistical Chart of Bachelors and Spinsters of the United States

While officially titled the “Statistical Chart of Bachelors and Spinsters of the United States,” an 1898 Colorado newspaper article suggested a more tongue in cheek title:

The National Guide to Bachelors; a complete index for old maids and spinsters to the best places in the Union for getting husbands; with maps, charts, etc.; tells at a glance just where bachelors are most abundant.

article about a government report on bachelors and unmarried women in the United States, Denver Post newspaper article 23 September 1898

Denver Post (Denver, Colorado), 23 September 1898, page 4

Newspapers across the United States reported on the findings of this report. Like any article picked up by the wire services, some reports contained more information than others – and in some cases included the writer’s personal opinion.

How Many Eligible Bachelors Are There?

Did late 19th century spinsters believe that their lack of a marital status was the result of too few good men where they lived? While this was true during certain time periods like immediately after the American Civil War or in Britain after World War I, that doesn’t really seem to be the case in 19th century America, according to this 1898 Kansas newspaper article which stated that there were 2,200,000 more bachelors than old maids in the United States. (It’s important to remember that in reality not all of the men counted as single in the census would have been eligible bachelors. Some may have been institutionalized or incarcerated for example).

The article reports:

There is not a state in the union where there are as many old maids as bachelors. Even Massachusetts, the traditional home of the spinster of the poll-parrot species, has more men than women of marriageable age.

article about a government report on bachelors and unmarried women in the United States, American Citizen newspaper article 14 October 1898

American Citizen (Kansas City, Kansas), 14 October 1898, page 4

The article says “old maids” should have good luck finding bachelors anywhere in the U.S. – but it especially urges spinsters to “Go West”:

But if she wants a territory where negotiations may be completed with even greater ease – where the lottery of marriage must become a dead sure thing – let her hie herself from the crowded cities of the east to the rolling prairies or mountain wilds of the west, where there are ten bachelors to every available maiden. What spinster can resist such an advantage as this, which is offered by the states of Idaho and Wyoming? It would surely be a hopeless case which would not find its cure with the chances ten to one for recovery. Let the old maids try the free, fresh air of these mountain lands for awhile.

Where was the best place for a 19th century “old maid” to find a husband? Probably not too surprisingly, the western states of Idaho and Wyoming. Whether or not it was true, a popular belief was that young men were heading west to seek their riches, thus leaving behind single women in the New England states.

Some editorializing occurred with the publishing of this government report, including the stereotypical views regarding why marriage eluded some women. In this 1898 Massachusetts newspaper article, the rather derogatory point is made that:

With these figures in hand it ought not to be hard for the average lonely spinster to hunt down a husband and corner him, so to speak. She need not be attractive; a woman does not need many charms to secure a mate in a region like Idaho or Wyoming, where there are ten bachelors for every available maiden.

article about a government report on bachelors and unmarried women in the United States, Boston Journal newspaper article28 August 1898

Boston Journal (Boston, Massachusetts), 28 August 1898, page 8

When Are You Getting Married?

So was every New England spinster chomping at the bit to go west to seek her (husband) fortune? Maybe not, according to author Betsy Israel. In her book Bachelor Girl: The Secret History of Single Women in the Twentieth Century she writes:

…very few unwed New England women were inclined to trek after men into the wilderness. The self-educated spinster, in particular, understood just what was in store for her “out there.”

She goes on to point out that a good number of children were needed to help out on farms, and that farm work was hard and giving birth was dangerous, with 1 in 25 pioneer women dying in childbirth.** Other authors have also suggested that professional opportunities for women after the Civil War may have resulted in many women delaying marriage. Economic and educational opportunities may have also influenced where women lived, so they were not necessarily sitting idle in their hometown, left behind by men seeking their fortune.

An online collection of newspapers, such as GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives, is not only a great way to learn about the lives of your ancestors – the old newspaper articles also help you understand American history and the times your ancestors lived in, and the news they talked about and read in their local papers.

Do you have a “spinster” aunt in your family tree? Or do you have a female ancestor that headed west to find a husband? What’s her story? Please share it in the comments below.

————————-

* Franhm, Jill. Unclaimed Flowers and Blossoms Protected by Thorns: Never-Married Women in the United States, 1880-1930. Dissertation. University of Minnesota. p. 142-143. Available at http://conservancy.umn.edu/handle/11299/96235.
** Israel, Betsy. Bachelor Girl: The Secret History of Single Women in the Twentieth Century. New York: William Morrow. p. 22.

Related Marriage Articles:

Genealogy Tip: What’s His Name Again?

Genealogists pay careful attention to names, searching diligently to find the complete names of every relative.

But sometimes those names have been changed.

Recently actor David Hasselhoff changed his name to a shortened version: David Hoff.

It might be that one of your ancestors or cousins did the same thing – and it is also likely that changing it took some effort on their part, a process often reported in the local newspaper.

article about name changes, Salem Observer newspaper article 26 April 1828

Salem Observer (Salem, Massachusetts), 26 April 1828, page 1

For example, in 1828 in Massachusetts it took an act of the state Senate and House, passed by both houses and signed into law by the governor, to change your name.

In this article from the Salem Observer we learn that:

  • Joseph Dowding Bass Eaton became Joseph Bass Eaton
  • George Watson Patrick became George Watson
  • Henry Augustus Emery Humphrey (a minor son of George Humphrey) became Henry Smith Humphrey
  • Samuel Smith became Samuel James Hall Smith
  • William C. Johnson became William Johnson Cochrane
  • Nathaniel Russell Sturgis, Jr. became Russell Sturgis
  • Etc.

Men, women and even minor children had their names legally changed.

Genealogy Tip: Individuals wanting to change their names had to take legal action to make it official. The laws varied from state to state and over the centuries – but the legal action of the state legislature or court was routinely published in newspapers across the country.

Search GenealogyBank’s 300+ years of old newspapers in our Historical Newspaper Archives to see if the names of your relatives were ever changed.

Related Name Search Articles:

Start Saving Those Family Photos & Stories – Now – One at a Time!

So, you’ve been researching and documenting your family history for a few years now and have a long list of places to visit and facts to track down.

Where should you start? What are the most important things that you should do first?

For me, the two most urgent items that you should act on – now – are: 1) scanning all of your old family photos; and 2) finding & writing down your family stories.

photo of an old photograph being scanned

Source: FamilySearch.org

Why? Because these are in your control.

Global services like GenealogyBank and FamilySearch are putting millions of original records online. They are there ready for you 24/7 as you have time to do the research.

What is not online – and not preserved – are your old family photos and stories.

Family Photos

Your old family photos are unique to you. You might have the only surviving copy of that photo – and only you can identify the people in the image, provide the context, and tell why they are important to your family’s history.

Genealogy Tip: Organize yourself and decide to scan and upload a few photos every day. Maybe it’s three per day – maybe you can do more. You decide, and go to work.

Family Stories

You know the stories: start now to write them down.

Here’s a tip: pace yourself. Write down one story at a time.

I was talking with my brother over the weekend and he mentioned the time when we were both stationed in the Navy on the USS Albert T. Harris in the 1960s. As we talked the memories came back. After we spoke I took a moment to grab a photo of that ship from Wikipedia and write up a brief story of our memories of that experience while they were fresh in my mind – just a few paragraphs.

photo of the USS Albert T. Harris (DE-447)

Photo: USS Albert T. Harris (DE-447). Source: Wikipedia.

Looking at the old photo of the ship brought back memories of being on board and the experiences we had. I was surprised to learn from Wikipedia that the ship was decommissioned in 1968 and destroyed in 1969.

Now I had one more story written down.

I didn’t try to write the entire story of everyone in the family all at once. But I am finding that by writing one piece of the story at a time, I am painlessly pulling together a more complete family history.

Over months of now and again writing up each story, I am in fact pulling together what will become our family history.

There are family stories that I don’t know – but I am finding those in the old newspapers in GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives.

Time and time again I’ve found a piece here and a piece there to pull together our family history over the past 300 years.

montage of family history records

Source: Thomas Jay Kemp

What details are in the obituaries of my relatives; in their wedding announcements? Newspapers covered every day of their lives: the milestone dates they celebrated and all of the days in between.

I have learned so much about the family – and used each newspaper clipping to generate the “story” that goes with it. Carefully sift through the newspapers and find the articles about your family.

By using the old newspaper articles and old family photos to trigger your memories, you can pace yourself and write up your family’s stories – one episode at a time.

Start now and soon you’ll be surprised at just how complete and interesting your family history is.

Related Articles:

User Success Story: Debby Abad Breaks Through Her Brick Wall!

Every genealogist has experienced it: hitting the dreaded “brick wall” – when you reach a dead end in your family history research, unable to find any more records to fill in the missing names, dates or places of your ancestor’s story.

On the other hand, few genealogy stories are more encouraging than hearing of someone smashing through their brick wall, finally getting the answers they spent years searching for with equal measures of determination and frustration.

photo of a brick wall

Photo: brick wall. Credit: Pawel Wozniak; Wikimedia Commons.

It took Debby Abad 15 years, but she finally broke through her own brick wall. Here’s how she did it.

As Debby explains:

I have been searching for information on my great grandmother Nannie Willis, and my great uncle Cary Sprouse, for the last 15 years. Without a date, I could not apply for a death record.

Debby had been a member of GenealogyBank and found information about other members of her family, but after thoroughly searching its Historical Newspaper Archives could not find any articles about Nannie or Cary’s deaths – so she didn’t renew her membership.

Two years later, Debby learned that GenealogyBank is constantly adding new content every single day, adding millions more genealogy records and newspaper articles every month. Having been frustrated everywhere else she had looked, Debby decided to come back and give GenealogyBank one more try – and was glad she did!

As Debby wrote to us:

You can imagine my surprise when these articles popped up! I now had dates and could locate death records for my uncle and grandmother!!

Imagine her delight when she did a new search on her great grandmother Nannie Willis – and up popped the elusive record she had spent years looking for: her great grandmother’s obituary.

obituary for Nannie Willis, Richmond Times Dispatch newspaper article 9 February 1951

Richmond Times Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia), 9 February 1951, page 34

Finally she knew the date of Nannie’s death: 7 February 1951. Not only did this obituary give her this important information, it was filled – as obituaries often are – with many more family history clues: the names of Nannie’s three surviving sons and the married names of her two surviving daughters, plus the fact that Nannie had 24 grandchildren, 34 great-grandchildren and 2 great-great-grandchildren. Armed with this information, Debby now had many more directions in which to pursue her family history research.

Perhaps even more dramatic was what happened when Debby searched for her great uncle Cary Sprouse, trying once again to find out when – and how – he died. When this article popped up, Debby at long last had her answers.

obituary for Cary Sprouse, Richmond Times Dispatch newspaper article 13 August 1917

Richmond Times Dispatch (Richmond, Virginia), 13 August 1917, page 7

There it was, the long-sought date of Cary’s death: 11 August 1917. And, like Nannie’s obituary, this article gives other family history clues: Cary was survived by his wife and three children, and his surviving brother and two sisters are named along with the cities where they lived. Now Debby had even more directions to pursue her family history research.

This article about her great uncle’s death makes an important point about using old newspapers for family history research: government records can give names and dates, but to learn something about our ancestors as people, and the individual lives they lived, we need their stories – and these stories are found in old newspapers.

Sometimes the stories we learn about our ancestors are not pretty, but they are real – and they’re our ancestors’ stories. In this case, Cary died a gruesome death by electrocution while trying to locate and fix a live wire that had fallen to the ground. The article gives some grisly details of Cary’s death, including the poignant detail of his having been found “lying prone upon his face with fingers on both hands dug into the ground” due to the agony of the electricity burning through his right foot and leg.

Not a comforting picture. But now, as Debby looks at Cary’s name and dates on her family tree, she at least knows the story of his death and can take comfort in the fact that he died doing his job, trying to restore power to his community.

Our congratulations to Debby for breaking through her genealogy brick wall, and our thanks for sharing her story with us and giving us permission to tell that story to our readers.

As we often remind readers here in the GenealogyBank Blog, it pays to redo your searches periodically in GenealogyBank. Just because you didn’t find something a week, month, or several months ago, doesn’t mean we don’t have something on your ancestors now. There is a feature on the newspapers’ search box that lets you search just on the content added since a certain time:

screenshot of GenealogyBank's newspaper search box showing the "added since" feature

GenealogyBank adds millions of new records monthly, so keep searching. And good luck!

Have you had success breaking through a genealogy brick wall in your family history research? If so, please tell us about it in the comments section.

Note: FamilySearch International (FamilySearch.org) and GenealogyBank are partnering to make over a billion records from recent and historical obituaries searchable online. The tremendous undertaking will make a billion records from over 100 million U.S. newspaper obituaries readily searchable online. The newspapers are from all 50 states and cover the period 1730 to the present.  Find out more at: http://www.genealogybank.com/family-search/

Related Brick Wall Articles:

Family Holiday Traditions

Many of us have holiday traditions that have persisted for years – and have even been passed down through the generations.

Dr. Charles Crouch and his family of Petersburg, Virginia, had a long-running family tradition: they sent the Abner T. Holt family of Macon, Georgia, a fruit cake every Christmas – for 57 years!

article about a fruitcake tradition between the Crouch and Holt families, Macon Telegraph newspaper article 21 December 1919

Macon Telegraph (Macon, Georgia), 21 December 1919, page 12

It was a tradition that began during the Civil War when Abner T. Holt fought at the Battle of Gettysburg while serving in Company C of the 2nd Battalion of the Georgia Infantry.

According to the National Park Service Soldiers & Sailors Database:

“2nd Independent Infantry Battalion was assembled at Norfolk, Virginia, in April, 1861. The unit contained four companies; two from Macon, one from Columbus, and one from Griffin. It served in North Carolina, then returned to Virginia during the Seven Days’ Battles and fought at Malvern Cliff under General J.G. Walker. Transferred to A.R. Wright’s Brigade, the battalion was active in the campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia from Fredericksburg to Appomattox. It reported 2 killed and 26 wounded at Chancellorsville and lost more than forty-five percent of the 173 engaged at Gettysburg. The unit surrendered 8 officers and 74 men in April, 1865. Its commanders were Majors Thomas Hardeman, Jr., C.J. Moffett, and George W. Ross.”

This holiday tradition between the Crouch and Holt families captured the public imagination. One year when the fruit cake went missing it was a breaking story in the local newspaper.

article about a fruitcake tradition between the Crouch and Holt families, Macon Telegraph newspaper article 5 January 1908

Macon Telegraph (Macon, Georgia), 5 January 1908, page 8

We use GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives to find our ancestor’s obituaries, birth notices and wedding announcements. We can also use it to find their traditions and stories too!

Related Holiday Articles:

Kentucky Archives: 102 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

Kentucky became the young nation’s 15th state when it joined the Union on 1 June 1792. Famous for its horse farms, horse racing, and bourbon distilleries, Kentucky is the 37th largest state in the country and the 26th most populous.

photo of a horse farm in bluegrass country, south of Paris, Kentucky

Photo: horse farm in bluegrass country, south of Paris, Kentucky. Credit: Peter Fitzgerald; Wikimedia Commons.

If you are researching your ancestry from Kentucky, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online KY newspaper archives: 102 titles to help you search your family history in the “Bluegrass State,” providing coverage from 1794 to Today. There are more than 43.5 million articles and records in our online Kentucky newspaper archives!

Dig deep into our online archives and search for historical and recent obituaries and other news articles about your Kentucky ancestors in these KY newspapers. Our Kentucky newspapers are divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries (obituaries only).

Search Kentucky Newspaper Archives (1794 – 1984)

Search Kentucky Recent Obituaries (1984 – Current)

photo of the Kentucky State Capitol Building, Frankfort, KY

Photo: Kentucky State Capitol Building, Frankfort, KY. Credit: RXUYDC; Wikimedia Commons.

Here is a list of online Kentucky newspapers in the historical archives. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more. The KY newspaper titles are listed alphabetically by city.

City Title Date Range * Collection
Ashland Daily Independent 05/12/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Barbourville Mountain Advocate 09/13/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bardstown Kentucky Standard 09/29/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bardstown Western American 09/06/1803 – 12/21/1804 Newspaper Archives
Bardstown Bardstown Repository 06/29/1814 – 10/30/1816 Newspaper Archives
Bardstown Candid Review 07/14/1807 – 08/27/1810 Newspaper Archives
Bedford Trimble Banner 09/29/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bowling Green Daily News 07/02/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Campbellsville Central Kentucky News-Journal 10/03/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Carrollton Carrollton News-Democrat 07/14/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Columbia Adair Progress 04/27/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Corbin News Journal 01/04/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Corbin Times-Tribune 05/15/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Covington Kentucky Post 04/02/1990 – Current Recent Obituaries
Covington Kentucky Post 07/01/1895 – 04/17/1920 Newspaper Archives
Cynthiana Cynthiana Democrat 10/08/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Danville Advocate-Messenger 08/01/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Danville Mirror 09/03/1804 – 10/24/1804 Newspaper Archives
Danville People’s Friend 01/30/1819 – 01/30/1819 Newspaper Archives
Elizabethtown News-Enterprise 04/30/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Frankfort Frankfort Argus 02/03/1808 – 11/12/1834 Newspaper Archives
Frankfort Guardian of Freedom 06/19/1798 – 05/26/1804 Newspaper Archives
Frankfort Kentucky Journal 12/05/1795 – 12/05/1795 Newspaper Archives
Frankfort Palladium 12/25/1798 – 09/06/1816 Newspaper Archives
Frankfort Western World 07/07/1806 – 06/08/1810 Newspaper Archives
Frankfort Commentator 07/10/1818 – 02/15/1831 Newspaper Archives
Franklin Franklin Favorite 02/23/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Georgetown Georgetown News-Graphic 09/08/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Georgetown Telegraph 09/25/1811 – 12/22/1813 Newspaper Archives
Glasgow Glasgow Daily Times 02/09/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Grayson, Olive Hill Journal-Times 07/05/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Harlan Harlan Daily Enterprise 11/17/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Harrodsburg Kentucky People 03/18/1870 – 08/25/1871 Newspaper Archives
Hazard Hazard Herald 06/28/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Henderson Gleaner 04/14/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hodgenville Larue County Herald News 11/26/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
LaGrange Oldham Era 10/17/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lancaster Political Theatre 11/18/1808 – 07/26/1809 Newspaper Archives
Lawrenceburg Anderson News 01/02/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lebanon Lebanon Enterprise 11/20/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Leitchfield Grayson County News Gazette 10/17/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Leitchfield Record 08/20/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lexington Kentucky Gazette 03/15/1794 – 12/28/1837 Newspaper Archives
Lexington Lexington Herald 03/20/1904 – 12/31/1982 Newspaper Archives
Lexington Lexington Standard 01/27/1900 – 01/27/1900 Newspaper Archives
Lexington Morning Herald 01/01/1896 – 03/19/1904 Newspaper Archives
Lexington Lexington Herald-Leader 01/25/1984 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lexington Lexington Herald-Leader: Blogs 05/08/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lexington Reporter 03/12/1808 – 06/15/1831 Newspaper Archives
Lexington Stewart Kentucky Herald 07/14/1795 – 09/15/1801 Newspaper Archives
Lexington True American 06/03/1845 – 10/21/1846 Newspaper Archives
Lexington Western Monitor 08/03/1814 – 12/20/1817 Newspaper Archives
Lexington American Statesman 07/20/1811 – 08/14/1813 Newspaper Archives
Lexington Independent Gazetteer 04/19/1803 – 11/16/1805 Newspaper Archives
Lexington Lexington Leader 06/16/1901 – 09/15/1981 Newspaper Archives
Lexington Lexington Public Advertiser 03/13/1822 – 10/09/1824 Newspaper Archives
Lexington Lexington Herald-Leader 03/01/1951 – 01/15/1984 Newspaper Archives
Liberty Casey County News 08/27/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
London Sentinel Echo 09/18/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Louisville Bulletin 09/24/1881 – 09/24/1881 Newspaper Archives
Louisville Louisville Anzeiger 03/28/1923 – 05/31/1928 Newspaper Archives
Louisville Louisville Times 09/01/1913 – 09/04/1913 Newspaper Archives
Louisville Ohio Falls Express 07/11/1891 – 07/11/1891 Newspaper Archives
Louisville Louisville Eccentric Observer 04/21/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Louisville Weekly Courier-Journal 05/19/1879 – 07/29/1889 Newspaper Archives
Louisville Western Courier 11/16/1813 – 09/26/1816 Newspaper Archives
Louisville Daily Louisville Public Advertiser 01/22/1830 – 12/28/1830 Newspaper Archives
Louisville Louisville Correspondent 05/11/1814 – 06/28/1817 Newspaper Archives
Louisville Louisville Daily Courier 01/19/1853 – 10/26/1868 Newspaper Archives
Madisonville Messenger 05/14/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Maysville Eagle 01/19/1815 – 01/14/1846 Newspaper Archives
Maysville Ledger Independent 07/11/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Maysville Tri-weekly Maysville Eagle 03/12/1845 – 12/15/1846 Newspaper Archives
Middlesboro Middlesboro Daily News 06/01/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Monticello Wayne County Outlook 07/03/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Morehead Morehead News 08/31/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
New Castle Henry County Local 10/09/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Nicholasville Jessamine Journal 10/08/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Owensboro Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer 09/01/1988 – Current Recent Obituaries
Owenton Owenton News-Herald 01/12/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Paris Western Citizen 12/24/1808 – 12/27/1815 Newspaper Archives
Paris Rights of Man 08/30/1797 – 01/10/1798 Newspaper Archives
Prestonsburg Floyd County Times 07/21/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Richmond Globe 01/24/1810 – 10/17/1810 Newspaper Archives
Richmond Richmond Register 07/15/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Richmond Luminary 01/18/1812 – 03/08/1816 Newspaper Archives
Russellville Mirror 11/01/1806 – 01/05/1809 Newspaper Archives
Russellville News-Democrat & Leader 12/13/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Russellville Weekly Messenger 01/26/1819 – 12/29/1827 Newspaper Archives
Shelbyville Sentinel-News 10/10/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Shepherdsville Pioneer News 10/08/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Somerset Commonwealth-Journal 08/05/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Springfield Springfield Sun 07/08/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Stanford Interior Journal 08/31/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Taylorsville Spencer Magnet 07/18/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Washington Republican Auxiliary 08/15/1807 – 08/15/1807 Newspaper Archives
Washington Union 03/08/1814 – 05/09/1817 Newspaper Archives
Washington Weekly Messenger 06/23/1803 – 10/06/1803 Newspaper Archives
Whitley City McCreary County Record 06/07/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Williamstown Grant County News and Express 04/15/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Winchester Winchester Sun 08/25/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Winchester Winchester Advertiser 08/05/1814 – 06/28/1817 Newspaper Archives

*Date Ranges may have selected coverage unavailable.

You can either print or create a PDF version of this Blog post by simply clicking on the green “Print/PDF” button below. The PDF version makes it easy to save this post onto your desktop or portable device for quick reference – all the Kentucky newspaper links will be live.

Related Resource:

Mayflower Hat Maker: Degory Priest

Are you a descendant of Mayflower passenger Degory Priest?
If you are, then please tell us your line.

Painting: “The Mayflower Compact, 1620,” by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris

Painting: “The Mayflower Compact, 1620,” by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris, 1899. Source: Library of Congress.

According to Wikipedia, Degory Priest:

was a hat maker from London who married Sarah, sister of Pilgrim Isaac Allerton in Leiden. He was a signatory to the Mayflower Compact in November 1620 and died less than two months later.

Searching in GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives, I can easily find hundreds of articles about descendants of other Mayflower Pilgrims such as Thomas Rogers, Stephen Hopkins or Dr. Samuel Fuller – but, articles about Degory Priest descendants – not so much.

I only found six persons who mentioned their descent from him in their obituaries, such as this one for Patricia Sayward.

obituary for Patricia Sayward, Amesbury News newspaper article 17 March 2009

Amesbury News (Amesbury, Massachusetts), 17 March 2009

Patricia A. (Woodward) Sayward’s (1929-2009) obituary tells us that “she was a descendant of Degory Priest” and that she had two ancestors who fought at the Battles of Lexington and Concord. She was active in both the Mayflower Society and the Daughters of the American Revolution.

Here are the other five individuals I found whose obituaries mentioned that they were descendants of Degory Priest:

If you are a descendant of Degory Priest – or any other Mayflower passenger – please tell us about it in the comments section.

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GenealogyBank is an outstanding source for documenting your Mayflower family lines.

Painting: “Mayflower in Plymouth Harbor” by William Formby Halsall, 1882

Painting: “Mayflower in Plymouth Harbor” by William Formby Halsall, 1882. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

We have posted a number of blog articles about tracing your family history back to the Mayflower and its passengers. Take a moment and read these key articles for tips on researching your family history.

Mayflower Articles: