Because GenealogyBank Is Growing, Be Sure to Search Again Later

Recently, I checked in GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives for a few of my Sawyer relatives in Grafton County, New Hampshire—and didn’t find them. Bummer.

When I search in GenealogyBank and do not find my target relatives, I make a quick note to try again in a few weeks to see if I can find articles about them later.

Why?

Because GenealogyBank updates its archives and keeps adding millions of articles—in fact we update over 3,000 newspapers every day. What is not there today might be added to GenealogyBank tomorrow.

Case in point: Not finding my Sawyer family, I next decided to recheck GenealogyBank for the Schell family of North Adams, Massachusetts.

I had searched for them in the past, but found nothing.

Bang—this time I found them.

I discovered quite a few articles about H. Horton Schell’s business and fraternal association activities, several obituaries and this wedding announcement.

wedding announcement for Marion Spencer and Harlan Schell, Springfield Republican newspaper article 12 February 1935

Springfield Republican (Springfield, Massachusetts), 12 February 1935, page 7

Great. This article gives me the details of the wedding of my cousin Harlan Horton Schell (1907-2001) along with a photograph of his wife Marion Rudman Spencer (1908-1992).

Enter Last Name










Digging deeper, I found the obituary of her father, Albert Edmund Spencer (1876-1965). Good catch, as this gives me his middle name: “Edmund.” That’s a good clue for further searches.

obituary for Albert Spencer, Boston Herald newspaper article 5 February 1965

Boston Herald (Boston, Massachusetts), 5 February 1965, page 29

Continuing to search, I found this much longer obituary with many more details about his life and family.

obituary for Albert Spencer, Springfield Union newspaper article 5 February 1965

Springfield Union (Springfield, Massachusetts). 5 February 1965, page 7

See: http://bit.ly/1phoLVG

Genealogy Search Tip: If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again. GenealogyBank’s search page includes an “Added Since” feature with a drop-down menu that lets you search on content added in the past one, two or three months.

screenshot of GenealogyBank's search page for its newspaper archives

Good luck with your own genealogy searches!

ad for gift subscriptions to GenealogyBank

The 5 Biggest Mistakes I Made with My Genealogy

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this blog post, Gena talks about the five worst mistakes she made when she first began researching her family tree—and offers advice to help other genealogists avoid those same errors.

How long have you been researching your family history? Do you look back at your genealogy research and wish you had done things differently? We all do. Just like parenting, genealogy research is a “learn as you go” proposition. Even when we receive unsolicited advice from more experienced family historians we may ignore that advice, not understanding the wisdom that comes from having researched over time.

illustration of a light bulb

Mistakes? Yeah, I’ve made a few. Here are five that I’ve made researching my family tree—and how you can avoid them.

1) Sources? What’s a Source?

Most genealogists will name “not citing their sources” as a family history research beginner’s regret. Sure, maybe it doesn’t seem like a big deal now—after all, you aren’t publishing anything right? But a year from now when you want to look at a particular record again and you can’t remember where you saw it, believe me you’re going to wish you wrote down the source of that piece of genealogical information.

So how do you remedy that? Well if you want to do a thorough job, you can refer to the Elizabeth Shown Mills classic Evidence Explained. If you are using a genealogy software program, chances are that program includes citation templates that you can use to fill in the blanks. And for those who prefer to copy and paste, do so with the source citations many genealogy websites provide with each document view. Your end goal should be to have enough information about what the document is, and where to locate it, that you or others can find it when they need to.

2) I Don’t Need to Write That Down (Not Recording What You Find)

Really this genealogy research mistake is connected with the first. I remember when I started working on my personal family history research, most genealogists were buried under paper copies. We have come a long way since the days where you worried about how much room photocopies would take up in your suitcase after a trip to the Family History Library in Salt Lake City. And with the ability to subscribe to websites and print from home, that pile of papers just got bigger and bigger. Yes, it’s fun to find stuff and to have that physically on paper, but it’s equally important to record what you find. Whether you do that in a genealogy software program, spreadsheet or database you create, recording what you find will help you avoid repeating searches that you have already exhausted or, worse yet, “finding” information that you had already discovered six months ago.

Another benefit of recording the information—or even transcribing or abstracting that information—is that you get to know the document better. I find I learn so much more about a resource when I’m actively engaging with it by abstracting the information found in that document.

Sure, print or digitally save that census record, newspaper article, or vital record. But after you do that, then record the information so that you have it and can refer back to it when needed.

Enter Last Name










3) Not Learning How to Search

Sometimes we think that searching our ancestors is easy. Anyone can do it, right? You just enter a name, date, and place and you find what you need. Well yes, almost anyone can do it but crafting a good search and finding those elusive ancestors involves more than filling in the boxes on a search engine.

So how do you conduct a really good ancestry search? For GenealogyBank, which uses OCR (Optical Character Recognition) to search its content, you get better results by using keywords or a keyword phrase. Don’t limit your ancestor searches to just a name.

First, develop lists of keywords to use in your search. One list of keywords should be name variations for your ancestor including nicknames, initials, and misspellings. For example, if my ancestor is John Jacob Smith, I would want to search for him as John Smith, John J. Smith, J.J. Smith, and Mr. Smith.

Because this ancestor search is for a common surname, simply doing a name search is not enough; I would also want to use GenealogyBank’s advanced search engine to add other keywords to narrow my search to my target ancestor. Create a second list of keywords that includes the places your ancestor was from, their occupation, the name of their spouse, and other details like religion or membership organization.

Also, remember this advice: keep searching over time! Conducting a single search on a website that is constantly adding content, like GenealogyBank, isn’t enough. The newspaper article you need may not have been available back when you did your original search months ago, but perhaps it was added yesterday. Make sure you utilize the “Added Since” button found on the Advanced Search engine to search the latest content, especially if you have conducted a search recently.

(We often discuss genealogy search tips here on the GenealogyBank blog; see the end of this article for a list of relevant examples.)

4) Not Evaluating Evidence

There’s a rush of excitement in finding something new about an ancestor—but in that excitement we don’t always take a moment to really analyze the information we found. What’s involved in analyzing the evidence? A good part of the analyzing involves immersing yourself in reading the document and asking yourself what the document tells you, what it doesn’t tell you, and where you should go next. Don’t take the document at face value; take the time to read slowly and deeply to understand everything that is written down in the article, and use that information to ask additional questions to guide your research further.

Enter Last Name










5) Not Having a “Permanent” Email Address

Part of genealogy is networking: reaching out and connecting with other researchers and potential cousins. Making those connections can help you uncover details previously unknown to you. The problem is that in the rush to change an Internet provider we are unhappy with, we often forget all of the clues and questions we’ve left on various message boards and social media websites using that no-longer-current email address as our only contact information. There’s nothing worse than having the answer to someone’s genealogy problem—only to send them an email and having that email bounce because it’s no longer a valid address.

So before you make all those posts and ask all of those questions on genealogy subscription websites, message boards and social media sites, secure a permanent email address through a website like Gmail or Hotmail. This email address won’t change if you switch Internet providers, thus leaving you with a permanent online address for potential cousins to find you today and six years from now.

What genealogy mistakes have you made in your family history research? Fess up in the comments below and help other genealogy researchers not fall into the same traps.

Related Genealogy Search Articles:

ad for gift subscriptions to GenealogyBank

Genealogy: A Brief History of Obituaries & Death Notices

Newspapers have been publishing obituaries for hundreds of years, making it easy for bereaved family and friends to learn the details of the life of the deceased as well as the funeral arrangements.

GenealogyBank has put this information from the past 300 years online, allowing genealogists to find their relatives within a few clicks.

300 years?

That’s a lot of obituaries, resulting in the largest collection online.

Enter Last Name










Have obituaries really changed much over the course of three centuries?

Yes—of course they have, and so have newspapers.

But the basic rule of thumb has always been true: famous people get long obituaries and not-so-famous people get short ones.

Back in the days before the linotype machine (invented in 1886), the type for printing each day’s newspaper was set by hand. That took time and so, realistically, newspapers were generally only four pages long.

Fewer pages meant that there had to be a balance between the length of the news articles and the number and size of the advertisements. That’s why you see old obituaries that are brief—just one line announcing that some individuals had died—with longer, more detailed obituaries about people the editor thought would be of more general interest.

For example, look at the information packed into this brief obituary:

obituary for Ephraim Crofoot, Constitution newspaper article 3 March 1852

Constitution (Middletown, Connecticut), 3 March 1852, page 3

This is a short obituary, but we learn that Ephraim Crofoot died on 24 February 1852 in Middletown, Connecticut. We also learn that he was 51 years old and likely was a lawyer, as indicated by the title “Esq.” [Esquire] following his name.

Now look at these obituary examples:

various obituaries, New Hampshire Sentinel newspaper article 28 April 1826

New Hampshire Sentinel (Keene, New Hampshire), 28 April 1826, page 3

The opening paragraph has three brief obituaries:

  • In this town, of consumption, Dr. Joseph Wheeler, aged 46
  • Mrs. Sarah Sturtevant, wife of the late Mr. Cornelius S., aged 88
  • An infant child of Mr. John Phelps

Now contrast that last brief obituary for the infant child of John Phelps with the final obituary in this column—also for an infant who had died:

In Fitzwilliam, an infant daughter of Mr. Geo. Damon. Deacon Oliver Damon and wife have lived in Fitzwilliam 42 years, and this [is] the first instance of mortality that has occurred in his family or among his descendants (25 in all) during that time. Printers in Massachusetts are requested to notice this death.

Both were infants that died. Neither obituary gave the name of the child. One obituary was so brief it only gave the name of the father, even though the child died in Keene, New Hampshire, where the newspaper was published.

The other obituary named the father as well, but also provided more details. This infant’s death was “news”—this was the first death in the family of Deacon Oliver Damon in 42 years. This was big and the editor knew his readers would want to know about it. He even inserted the line “Printers in Massachusetts are requested to notice this death,” indicating to other newspaper editors the importance of this obituary in case they wanted to run it in their own newspapers.

The New Hampshire Sentinel published on 28 April 1826 may have only been four pages long, but the editor used his judgment as to how much copy (how many lines) he would give to each story.

Obituaries can be long or short. The size of the obituary was determined by the importance of the person who had died, the story to be told, and the time the newspaper editor and reporters had to research and write about the deceased. As towns grew into cities it became common for the family itself to write the obituary, so that the newspaper would publish more information about their relatives.

Enter Last Name










Inside the newspaper industry these user-supplied obituaries became known as “Death Notices”—articles written by the family or friends and supplied to newspapers. The articles written by the newspaper staff continued to be called “Obituaries.”

Obituary columns in newspapers have carried all types of headers: Obituaries, Deaths, Died, In Remembrance, Memorials, etc.

For genealogists and the general public, the terms Death Notice and Obituary are synonymous. Most family historians refer to all biographical articles about the recently deceased as obituaries, regardless of who wrote them or how long/short they are.

Over time newspapers came to view these family-supplied articles as paid classified advertisements, and they began charging accordingly. It is customary now for most newspapers to charge by the word count, the inclusion of photographs, and the number of insertions.

Obituaries are critical for genealogists. Long or short, they contain the information and clues we need to document our family tree.

Related Newspaper Obituary Articles:

ad for gift subscriptions to GenealogyBank

New Family Story Find: My 18th Century Uncle Jonathan Dore

Last year I wrote about my relative Elizabeth (Meader) Hanson (1684-1737) who, along with her children, was kidnapped by Abenaki Indians on 7 September 1724 and taken to the Indians’ village along the St. Francis River in Canada. They were held there for over two years. (See: Find & Preserve Your Family’s Stories.)

Powerful. Memorable. That story has been told and retold in our family for the past 290 years. Every night when we were young we asked our grandfather to tell us that story. We loved it. It was real—it was our family story.

Indian Raids Continued

Recently I found this 1749 newspaper article with a report from Timothy Brown about his attempts to learn more about—and to free—captives still held by the Indians.

He was able to get in and around the Abenaki village and learned about multiple captives, including this specific reference:

There is also a Boy who was taken from Rochester in New Hampshire, with the Indians at St. Francois, his Name is Jonathan Dore.

article about Jonathan Dore being taken captive by Abenaki Indians, Boston Post Boy newspaper article 10 July 1749

Boston Post Boy (Boston, Massachusetts), 10 July 1749, page 2

Jonathan Dore?
Rochester, New Hampshire?
St. Francis Indians?

This is sounding just like the story of my relative Elizabeth Hanson, who was also taken prisoner by the Abenaki Indians from St. Francis.

This Jonathan Dore has to be one of my relatives, too—the same Jonathan Dore who was my 5th-great uncle.

Enter Last Name










New England Had Had Enough

The Abenaki and the French were taking American women and children captive so that they could sell them back to their families.

It was time to stop these atrocities—and that was one of the reasons the French & Indian War was launched (1754-1763).

Attack on Fort William Henry

During the war there was an attack on Fort William Henry in August of 1757.

The following account comes from Terror in Rochester by Linda Sargent, 2008:

“The fort was manned by the British, including many New Hampshire men. The siege had ended and the British had surrendered the fort to the French who were being aided by the Indians. There are various accounts of what happened next, but British soldiers were massacred after they had surrendered.

“One man who managed to escape from the fort was from Dover, NH. When he returned to Dover, he told how he had been pursued by Indians. One of them had caught up to him and lifted his tomahawk.

“When their eyes met, under the war paint and Indian dress he recognized the eyes of a young boy he had known well when he worked as a teamster logging on the Salmon Falls River and visiting at the Dore’s home in Rochester. He knew this white Indian was Jonathan Dore. Jonathan recognized him, as well, and dropped his tomahawk to his side and left. No one believed the man’s story when he returned to Dover.”

See: http://bit.ly/Vj2ZVD

Jonathan Dore had been sighted again, 11 years after he was taken by the Abenaki.

New Englanders Settle the Score

The Abenaki had been terrorizing New Englanders for decades. The old scores were settled on 4 October 1759 when Robert Rogers and his Rangers attacked the Indians’ village.

The following account comes from Wikipedia:

“Rogers and about 140 men entered the village, which was reportedly occupied primarily by women, children, and the elderly, early that morning, slaughtered many of the inhabitants where they lay, shot down many who attempted to flee, and then burned the village. Rogers and his men endured significant hardships to reach the village from the British base at Fort Crown Point in present-day New York, and even more hardship afterwards. Chased by the French and vengeful Indians, and short on rations, Rogers and his men returned to Crown Point via the Connecticut River valley.”

Jonathan Dore Witnessed Rogers’ Attack on the Abenaki Village

Digging deeper into GenealogyBank’s archives, I found out more of the story.

Jonathan Dore, Aberdeen Daily News newspaper article 5 January 1905

Aberdeen Daily News (Aberdeen, South Dakota), 5 January 1905, page 2

The above historical newspaper clipping is only part of the long account about Jonathan Dore that appeared in the Aberdeen Daily News. The whole article gives a good overview of what had happened to Jonathan Dore.

Enter Last Name










According to the article, Jonathan Dore (1734-1797)—my 5th-great uncle—was kidnapped on “Salmon Falls Road in Rochester [New Hampshire]” by the Abenaki on 26 June 1746, when he was only 12 years old!

Jonathan Dore married an Abenaki Indian woman and they had two children. When Major Robert Rogers attacked their village in 1759 to avenge the attack on Fort William Henry, Jonathan Dore “witnessed the massacre.”

Everyone in the village was killed and it was set on fire. “Among the ruins he found the bodies of his wife and children. He buried them in one grave and with them his attachment to the Indians.”

In 1760 Jonathan Dore returned home to Rochester, New Hampshire. His family had moved across the Salmon Falls River to Lebanon, Maine, where he also settled.

The newspaper article concluded:

He settled in Lebanon, Me., married again and spent there the remainder of his days, famous for his marksmanship, especially with the bow and arrow, and known to every one as “Indian Dore.”

Wow—we would have loved to have heard that family story as kids!

Our “uncle” was not much older than we were when he was captured by the Indians, and then held captive for over 13 years—what a great story.

Preserve your family’s stories.

Find them in the old newspapers in GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives—preserve those stories and pass them down to the rising generation.

Related Family Story Articles:

ad for gift subscriptions to GenealogyBank

My Favorite Genealogy TV Programs & Family History Videos

There are so many powerful genealogy TV shows and family history videos.

photo of a bucket of popcorn

Source: Phys.org

Here are a few family history—and general history—videos that are of particular interest to me. From time to time I like to re-watch these videos—it’s that time again—so I am watching these in the last weeks of this summer. I thought you’d like to grab the popcorn and watch them too.

Enter Last Name










A Celebration of Family History
http://bit.ly/1r1PKTn

This was the evening keynote session of the 2010 National Genealogical Society annual conference. A powerful, short video about genealogy research—with memorable remarks by David McCullough and Henry B. Eyring. This program sums up what drives us as genealogists to do what we have done for the past 100 years.

The Civil War (series by Ken Burns)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Civil_War_(TV_series)

The Ken Burns series The Civil War first aired September 23 to 27, 1990. Powerful—it is just as riveting now as it was 24 years ago. The impact of David McCullough’s narration and Shelby Foote’s historical insights clearly frame the war, year by year.

John Adams (HBO miniseries)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Adams_(miniseries)

Inspiring miniseries that speaks to the life and hardships of John Adams and America at the time of the American Revolution.

Who Do You Think You Are?
http://www.tlc.com/tv-shows/who-do-you-think-you-are

Watch every episode of this long-running genealogy TV show, which is now in its 5th season here in the United States. Each segment is aimed at demonstrating how easy, fun and compelling family history is. This popular family history show is must-watch TV.

Connections (BBC, PBS)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Connections_(TV_series)

This popular TV series showed how seemingly unrelated events, inventions and discoveries were each essential for progress to be made and new tools to be created. It tied historical events together in a way not demonstrated in any other program.

History Detectives (PBS)
http://video.pbs.org/program/history-detectives/

Each episode focuses on a family heirloom, with the goal of seeing exactly how the heirloom fit into the family’s personal history and the history of the area at large. Family traditions, newspapers and old documents are all researched to determine the true history of each artifact.

What other genealogy and history shows should we be watching this summer? Let us know in the comments and we’ll make sure to add the program to our Genealogy TV Shows board on Pinterest.

Follow Genealogy Bank’s board Genealogy TV Shows on Pinterest.

Related Articles about Genealogy & History Programs:

ad for gift subscriptions to GenealogyBank

How to Research Land Records for Genealogy Clues

Introduction: Duncan Kuehn is a professional genealogist with over eight years of client experience. She has worked on several well-known projects, such as “Who Do You Think You Are?” and researching President Barack Obama’s ancestry. In this blog post, Duncan discusses a genealogy resource that will help family historians trace their family tree: land records.

Prior to the Civil War, more than 85% of American males owned property! This astonishing statistic shows the importance of using and understanding land records when researching our ancestors. Many genealogists are unaware of the value of these historical documents and the family relationship information that can be gathered from them. Some genealogists are intimidated by these old property records. However, it has been said that land records are the bread and butter of American genealogy research, particularly in the Southern states.

During the Civil War, records were destroyed across many areas in the South—some accidentally by fire, others deliberately by Union troops. Southerners had begun classifying slaves as property similar to land. This was a political move to prevent the North from encroaching on their property rights. When Northern troops attacked Southern towns and cities, they often targeted courthouses to destroy documents recording property—and therefore records of slave ownership.

After the war, Southerners were anxious to protect their property rights and quickly re-filed their land claims. Sometimes these reconstructed land deeds list previous owners and their relationships, providing valuable family history information and clues.

Brief History about Deeds

A deed is a document showing the transfer of land from one private entity (person, company, trust, organization, etc.) to another. These documents record the seller, buyer, and property details. They are usually indexed in two ways: under the name of the grantor (seller), and under the name of the grantee (buyer). The index will list the book and page number to search for the actual recording of the deed.

photo of Aroostook County, Maine, deed books 1865-1900

“Maine, Aroostook County Deed Books, 1865-1900,” accessed Aug. 2014, Northern Registry > Deed books, 1868-1879, vol. 7 (p. 1-300) > image 6 of 303; citing Register of Deeds, Houlton. Source: FamilySearch.

See: https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-21740-26870-86?cc=1447693&wc=M6KC-X29:38808601,38833501

This deed is between an engaged couple. It goes on to give conditions and qualifications, including a nullification of the deed in the event that the marriage does not take place. Some of the information that we gather from these two paragraphs:

  • Anna Perkins Pingree of Salem, MA
  • Thomas P. Pingree of Wenham, MA
  • Joseph Peabody of Salem, MA
  • Joseph and Anna plan to marry
  • Anna owns an estate of which Thomas is the trustee
  • She received the estate from her father David Pingree, deceased, of Salem, MA
Enter Last Name










When a married man sold land, his wife was often asked to give a dower release. This meant that after the seller died, his widow could not claim rights to a portion of the land he had previously sold. The dower release will usually list her name.

photo of Cattaraugus County, New York, land records, 1841-1845

“New York, Land Records, 1630-1975,” accessed Aug. 2014, Cattaraugus > Deeds 1841-1845, vol. 13-14 > image 122 of 1144; citing County Clerk. County Courthouse. Source: FamilySearch.

See: https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32808-9067-66?cc=2078654&wc=M7C7-2ZZ:358137101,359440401

In this dower release we learn about the following individuals:

  • Ferdinand Suydam’s wife, who was named Eliza
  • James Boyd Jr’s wife, who was named Maria Ann

Genealogy Clues in Deeds

These land documents can help to distinguish between two individuals with similar names. They can provide the name of the wife. Sometimes they explicitly state other familial relationships such as receiving land from a father, mother, brother, uncle, grandfather, etc. I have even seen deeds which include the last will and testament of an individual. Plotting out the residences of all those with the same last name in an area can help to clarify family groupings. For example if there are two John Smiths in an area, and one owns land near or purchases several plots of land from Robert Smith and the other one is doing the same thing with Simeon Smith, you can build a case for which father belongs to which John Smith.

As you can see, these documents are an important part of a well-researched family history project. Unfortunately, there are some challenges. These documents can be hard to read as the hand writing is not always clear. There is a lot of legal terminology that you will want to become familiar with. Also, not very many of these documents are available online at this point. Fortunately, the sale of land was also recorded in newspapers, which in many cases are available online.

Enter Last Name










Legal notices in newspapers about land transactions began very early. For example, here is one from 1716, 60 years before the USA became a country.

article about an estate sale for Jonathan Springer, Boston News-Letter newspaper article 2 April 1716

Boston News-Letter (Boston, Massachusetts), 2 April 1716, page 2

Genealogy Tip: When reading old newspapers, keep in mind that the letter “s” often appears as an “f.”

This article lists several individuals:

  • Doctor Jackson in Marblehead
  • Jonathan Springer, deceased, of Glocester (sic)
  • John Newman, Esquire, of Glocester (sic)
  • John Maule of Salem

All of this information is helpful for the genealogical researcher.

Some land records will list even more information. Here is an example of an 1857 land sale notice that mentions the grandchildren of an individual.

article about an estate sale for Samuel Randall, Barre Gazette newspaper article 13 February 1857

Barre Gazette (Barre, Massachusetts), 13 February 1857, page 3

This land sale mentions the following individuals:

  • Mary E. Marsh, minor child, daughter of Hiram Marsh, granddaughter of Samuel Randall
  • Ellen Marsh, minor child, daughter of Hiram Marsh, granddaughter of Samuel Randall
  • Hiram Marsh, minor child, son of Hiram Marsh, grandson of Samuel Randall
  • Hiram Marsh, probable son-in-law of Samuel Randall
  • Samuel Randall, original land purchaser
  • Artemas Bryant, guardian of minor children
  • P.W. Barr, owner of auction house in Petersham
  • Deacon Bassett, neighbor of Marsh children

Have you used land records in your family history research? What success have you had tracing your family tree with property records?

Related Articles about Property Records for Genealogy:

ad for gift subscriptions to GenealogyBank

GenealogyBank Just Added 6 Million More Genealogy Records!

Every day, GenealogyBank is working hard to digitize more newspapers and obituaries, rapidly expanding our content to give you the most comprehensive newspaper archives and largest obituary collection for family history research available online. We just completed adding 6 million more U.S. genealogy records, vastly increasing our content coverage from coast to coast!

screenshot of GenealogyBank's homepage announcing the addition of 6 million more genealogy records

Here are some of the details about our most recent U.S. newspaper additions:

  • A total of 42 newspaper titles from 19 U.S. states
  • 21 of these titles are newspapers added to GenealogyBank for the first time
  • Newspaper titles marked with an asterisk (*) are new to our online archives
  • We’ve shown the newspaper issue date ranges so that you can determine if the newly added content is relevant to your personal genealogy research

To see our newspaper archives’ complete title lists, click here.

State City Title Date Range Collection
Alabama Birmingham Birmingham Courier* 08/19/1899–09/12/1903 Newspaper Archives
Alabama Cullman Nord Alabama Colonist* 07/01/1881–07/01/1881 Newspaper Archives
Alaska Anchorage Alaska Dispatch News* 07/10/2014–Current Recent Obituaries
Alaska Anchorage Alaska Dispatch* 10/15/2009–Current Recent Obituaries
California Marin Sausalito Marin Scope* 09/16/2009–Current Recent Obituaries
California Novato Novato Advance* 08/26/2009–Current Recent Obituaries
California San Francisco Corriere del Popolo 01/04/1916–07/25/1935 Newspaper Archives
California San Francisco San Francisco Chronicle 12/5/1908–9/1/1927 Newspaper Archives
California San Luis Obispo San Luis Obispo Daily Telegram 4/6/1934–12/31/1937 Newspaper Archives
California San Rafael San Rafael News Pointer* 03/10/2010–Current Recent Obituaries
Connecticut Stamford Stamford Advocate 4/5/1829–12/31/1841 Newspaper Archives
Georgia Macon Macon Telegraph 5/1/1932–5/20/1934 Newspaper Archives
Georgia Marietta Marietta Journal 4/14/1871–11/15/1990 Newspaper Archives
Georgia Toccoa Toccoa Record, The* 06/24/2004–Current Recent Obituaries
Idaho Boise Idaho Statesman 8/16/1931–12/31/1933 Newspaper Archives
Iowa Perry Perry Chief* 06/06/2014–Current Recent Obituaries
Iowa Story City Story City Herald* 06/11/2014–Current Recent Obituaries
Kentucky Lexington Lexington Herald 10/4/1929–12/31/1930 Newspaper Archives
Louisiana New Orleans New Orleans States 6/1/1920–6/1/1920 Newspaper Archives
Mississippi Biloxi Daily Herald 1/21/1937–3/27/1937 Newspaper Archives
New Jersey Egg Harbor City Egg Harbor Pilot 06/22/1872–07/20/1872 Newspaper Archives
New York New York Arbeiter Zeitung* 11/28/1874–05/19/1878 Newspaper Archives
New York New York Cristoforo Colombo 02/04/1892–08/20/1892 Newspaper Archives
New York New York Eco D’Italia* 01/01/1890–12/31/1896 Newspaper Archives
New York New York Fiaccola* 09/05/1912–02/10/1921 Newspaper Archives
New York New York Freiheit* 12/26/1903–12/26/1903 Newspaper Archives
New York New York Fur Worker* 09/01/1917–04/01/1931 Newspaper Archives
New York New York Progresso Italo-Americano 01/09/1886–12/27/1889 Newspaper Archives
New York New York Vorwarts 01/02/1915–10/29/1921 Newspaper Archives
North Carolina Charlotte Charlotte Observer 6/1/1928–5/31/1929 Newspaper Archives
North Carolina Greensboro Greensboro Record 5/6/1908–5/6/1908 Newspaper Archives
Ohio Cleveland Sendbote* 01/05/1927–06/26/1952 Newspaper Archives
Oregon Cannon Beach Cannon Beach Gazette* 05/02/2008–Current Recent Obituaries
Oregon Hermiston Hermiston Herald, The* 02/28/2001–Current Recent Obituaries
Oregon Seaside Seaside Signal* 03/25/2010–Current Recent Obituaries
South Dakota Aberdeen Aberdeen American 11/5/1924–11/21/1924 Newspaper Archives
South Dakota Aberdeen Aberdeen Daily News 6/29/1911–1/23/2000 Newspaper Archives
South Dakota Aberdeen Aberdeen Journal 3/3/1922–3/3/1922 Newspaper Archives
South Dakota Eureka Eureka Post* 06/06/1912–06/06/1912 Newspaper Archives
Vermont St. Albans St. Albans Daily Messenger 3/31/2006–3/31/2006 Newspaper Archives
Washington Bellingham Bellingham Herald 5/2/1935–6/29/1937 Newspaper Archives
Wisconsin Milwaukee Milwaukee Herold und Seebote* 01/01/1901–01/01/1901 Newspaper Archives

ad for gift subscriptions to GenealogyBank

Vintage Ads & Our Ancestors’ Shopping

Introduction: Mary Harrell-Sesniak is a genealogist, author and editor with a strong technology background. In this blog post, Mary finds vintage advertisements and articles in old newspapers and historical books to gain insights into a part of our ancestors’ lives: shopping.

Take a walk down the “past lane” of our ancestors’ shopping lives by delving into historical newspapers.

You’ll find marvelous articles and vintage advertisements to gain insight into purchases that surrounded them in their daily lives.

Vintage Advertisements

Iconic imagery, such as this 1900 advertisement, puts a face to historical eras and displays important visuals of clothing, hairstyles and accessories. They’re marvelous pieces of history—and as such, are highly sought-after collectibles.

Doesn’t this ad inspire you to slurp a Coca-Cola while dolled up in frilly plumes and pearls?

a vintage ad for Coca-Cola

Source: Wikipedia’s article “Advertising” displaying a vintage Coca-Cola advertisement

Advertisements in Historical Books

Advertisements abound across every historical newspaper, and are also located within GenealogyBank’s impressive collection of advertising ephemera. Use the Historical Books search page to search the books collection for vintage advertisements.

search page for GenealogyBank's Historical Books collection

Try entering a business name if you know where your family worked—and if you don’t, query the search engine for a type of trade. You’ll be amused at what you find.

vintage ad for the Excelsior Hat Store

Popular Shopping Items

The popular items of yesterday have certainly changed, so explore newspaper feature pages for intriguing reports. Don’t forget newspaper shipping reports. As so many goods arrived by ships, you’ll soon discover what were the interests of the day.

Enter Last Name










Most people would assume that tea was the popular drink of the 18th Century. It was, but another beverage was highly sought after: cocoa.

Doesn’t this report confirm what chocaholics already suspect—that our forefathers and mothers loved chocolate as much as we do? I imagine the shortage of cocoa might have been alarming news for some.

article about a cocoa shortage, American Weekly Mercury newspaper article 16 March 1727

American Weekly Mercury (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 16 March 1727, page 2

Types of Genealogy Discoveries from Vintage Ads

There is much more to advertisements than you can imagine—they can provide all sorts of family history information and clues.

You might identify information about:

  • where a family worked
  • their coworkers
  • wages
  • working conditions

And who knows, you might even make a startling discovery, such as this one about my Dutch ancestor, Andrew Vos.

His classified advertisement not only confirmed that he was an early and important importer of fine art, but also named the artwork in his inventory. What a thrill to consider that many grandmaster paintings, now only seen in museums, may have passed through his hands.

Original Paintings for Sale, Poulson’s American Daily Advertiser newspaper advertisement 27 April 1805

Poulson’s American Daily Advertiser (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 27 April 1805, page 2

This 1805 newspaper ad also identified his place of business as 107 North Front Street in Philadelphia. Last year my husband and I were able to walk to the location, not far from the Benjamin Franklin Bridge in Philadelphia. What a thrill to walk in the footsteps of an ancestor!

So take a chance. Explore early advertisements and news reports—and don’t forget to be creative when adding keywords. Look for business names, along with specific goods and services. Almost anything that our predecessors owned was advertised for sale—even houses from the Sears Catalog.

photo of twin houses bought from the Sears Catalog

Photo: twin houses bought from the Sears Catalog. Source: Library of Congress.

See: http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2010640757/resource/

Enter Last Name










Keywords to Include

Depending upon the target timeframe, consider using these keywords in your shopping searches:

  • Antiques
  • Bookmobile
  • Bring and Buy Sale
  • Business Names
  • Catalog or Catalogue (such as Sears)
  • Factory
  • Flea Market
  • Food (you could discover the price of milk)
  • Jumble Sale
  • Marché aux Puces
  • Market or Market House
  • Mercantile
  • Provisions
  • Sale
  • Salesmen
  • Sheriff Sales (useful to discover names of neighbors)
  • Trade Days
  • Trading Post
  • Trash and Treasure
  • Trunk Sale
Sheriff's Sales, New Brunswick Fredonian newspaper advertisement 5 February 1824

New Brunswick Fredonian (New Brunswick, New Jersey), 5 February 1824, page 1

We’d love for you to share your GenealogyBank “shopping” discoveries with us in the comment section!

ad for gift subscriptions to GenealogyBank

Texas Archives: 326 Newspapers for Genealogy Research

By any measure, Texas is a large state—the second biggest state in the country in size, and the second most populous. When Texas joined the Union in 1845 as the 28th state, it came with a long, complicated history. The phrase “six flags over Texas” refers to the fact that in its long history, the flags of Spain, France, Mexico, the Republic of Texas, the Confederate States of America, and the United States of America have flown over Texas soil.

photo of the Mission San Antonio, aka the Alamo, Texas

Photo: Mission San Antonio, aka the Alamo, Texas. Credit: Cqui; Wikimedia Commons.

If you are researching your ancestry from Texas, you will want to use GenealogyBank’s online Texas newspaper archives: 326 titles to help you search your family history in “The Lone Star State,” providing coverage from 1813 to Today. There are more than 25 million newspaper articles and records in our online TX archives!

Dig deep into the online archives and search for obituaries and other news articles about your ancestors in these recent and historical TX newspapers online. Our Texas newspapers are divided into two collections: Historical Newspapers (complete paper) and Recent Obituaries (obituaries only).

Search Texas Newspaper Archives (1813 – 1993)

Search Texas Recent Obituaries (1984 – Current)

Here is our complete list of online Texas newspapers in the archives. Each newspaper title in this list is an active link that will take you directly to that paper’s search page, where you can begin searching for your ancestors by surnames, dates, keywords and more. The TX newspaper titles are listed alphabetically by city.

City Title Date Range* Collection
Abilene Abilene Reporter-News 5/21/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Alice Alice Echo-News Journal 5/27/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Allen Allen American 3/29/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Alvarado Alvarado Post 1/5/2005 – 11/10/2010 Recent Obituaries
Amarillo Amarillo Globe-News 6/20/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Angleton Angleton Times 7/31/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Arlington Arlington Morning News 4/3/1996 – 12/31/1999 Recent Obituaries
Athens Athens Daily Review 1/26/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Atlanta Atlanta Citizens Journal 4/17/2011 – 12/7/2012 Recent Obituaries
Austin Texas State Gazette 8/6/1853 – 12/29/1860 Newspaper Archives
Austin Texas Siftings 11/4/1882 – 5/1/1886 Newspaper Archives
Austin Southern Intelligencer 8/27/1856 – 4/4/1860 Newspaper Archives
Austin Austin Republican 2/6/1868 – 12/31/1868 Newspaper Archives
Austin Austin City Gazette 10/30/1839 – 8/17/1842 Newspaper Archives
Austin Daily Texan, The: University of Texas at Austin 4/20/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Austin Austin Villager 2/18/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Austin Austin American-Statesman 1/1/1989 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bay City Bay City Tribune 11/7/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Baytown Baytown Sun 4/2/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Beaumont Beaumont Enterprise 4/1/1906 – 9/30/1911 Newspaper Archives
Beaumont Beaumont Journal 3/28/1906 – 9/27/1911 Newspaper Archives
Beaumont Beaumont Enterprise 11/27/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Beeville Beeville Bee 6/12/1896 – 5/25/1900 Newspaper Archives
Bellaire Bellaire – River Oaks – West University Examiner 6/21/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bellaire Bellaire Examiner 10/31/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Big Sandy Big Sandy & Hawkins Journal 1/19/2011 – 11/19/2012 Recent Obituaries
Big Spring Big Spring Herald 7/30/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Blanco Blanco County News 9/26/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bonham Bonham Journal 9/12/2006 – 4/1/2011 Recent Obituaries
Borger Borger News-Herald 6/11/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Brazoria Texas Republican 7/5/1834 – 10/17/1835 Newspaper Archives
Brazoria Constitutional Advocate and Texas Public Advertiser 9/5/1832 – 6/15/1833 Newspaper Archives
Brazoria Advocate of the People’s Rights 2/22/1834 – 3/27/1834 Newspaper Archives
Breckenridge Breckenridge American 11/5/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Brownsville Heraldo de Brownsville 12/2/1935 – 2/29/1940 Newspaper Archives
Brownsville Cronista del Valle 10/8/1924 – 2/28/1930 Newspaper Archives
Brownsville Daily Cosmopolitan 8/19/1881 – 8/18/1885 Newspaper Archives
Brownsville Puerto 1/6/1954 – 12/30/1961 Newspaper Archives
Brownsville Progreso 1/4/1876 – 12/31/1876 Newspaper Archives
Brownsville Daily Metropolitan 9/8/1893 – 11/30/1893 Newspaper Archives
Brownsville Daily Republican 9/20/1884 – 9/26/1884 Newspaper Archives
Brownsville Republican 7/5/1865 – 7/5/1866 Newspaper Archives
Brownsville Mundo 3/7/1886 – 3/7/1886 Newspaper Archives
Brownsville Zaragoza 12/20/1865 – 12/27/1865 Newspaper Archives
Brownsville Courier de Rio Grande 11/8/1866 – 11/8/1866 Newspaper Archives
Brownsville Boletin Estraordinario 12/7/1865 – 12/12/1865 Newspaper Archives
Brownsville Brownsville Herald 2/4/1993 – Current Recent Obituaries
Brownwood Brownwood Bulletin 1/1/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bryan-College Station Eagle 1/16/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bryan-College Station Aggie Sports 8/24/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Bryan-College Station Brazos Sports 3/24/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Burnet Burnet Bulletin 9/10/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Carrollton Carrollton Leader 3/29/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Carthage Panola Watchman 2/2/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Celina Celina Record 3/29/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Clarksville Standard 9/3/1842 – 12/29/1882 Newspaper Archives
Cleburne Cleburne Morning Review 1/1/1911 – 5/31/1916 Newspaper Archives
Cleburne Cleburne Times-Review 12/7/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Cleveland Cleveland Advocate 10/17/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Cleveland Eastex Advocate 4/23/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Clifton Clifton Record 9/12/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Clute Brazosport Facts 8/29/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Commerce Commerce Journal 2/8/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Conroe Courier 2/23/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Coppell Coppell Gazette 3/29/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Corpus Christi Verdad 6/2/1950 – 12/13/1959 Newspaper Archives
Corpus Christi Nueces County News 5/12/1938 – 6/29/1939 Newspaper Archives
Corpus Christi Progreso 6/16/1939 – 5/1/1940 Newspaper Archives
Corpus Christi Weekly Labor Herald 11/21/1941 – 9/4/1942 Newspaper Archives
Corpus Christi Horizonte 11/5/1879 – 11/13/1880 Newspaper Archives
Corpus Christi Corpus Christi Caller-Times 1/4/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Corsicana Oil City Afro-American 1/27/1900 – 1/27/1900 Newspaper Archives
Corsicana Corsicana Daily Sun 2/14/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Cuero Cuero Record 10/10/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Cypress Cypress Creek Mirror: Cy-Fair Edition 10/6/2011 – 6/14/2012 Recent Obituaries
Cypress Cypress Sun 12/12/2007 – 8/30/2011 Recent Obituaries
Cypress Cypress Creek Mirror: Cypress – Cy-Fair Edition 6/14/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Cypress Cy-Fair Sun 3/19/2008 – 3/24/2011 Recent Obituaries
Cypress Cypress Creek Mirror: Cypress Edition 9/7/2011 – 5/31/2012 Recent Obituaries
Daingerfield Bee 3/23/2011 – 11/27/2012 Recent Obituaries
Dallas Dallas Morning News 10/1/1885 – 12/31/1984 Newspaper Archives
Dallas Dallas Weekly Herald 12/8/1855 – 12/31/1887 Newspaper Archives
Dallas Weekly Times-Herald 2/1/1890 – 11/29/1890 Newspaper Archives
Dallas Dallas Express 1/13/1900 – 1/13/1900 Newspaper Archives
Dallas Brotherhood Eyes 10/31/1936 – 10/31/1936 Newspaper Archives
Dallas Advocate: Lake Highlands Edition 3/1/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Dallas Quick 11/12/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Dallas Dallas Morning News, The: Blogs 5/18/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Dallas Dallas Morning News 8/12/1984 – Current Recent Obituaries
Dayton Dayton News 10/17/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Deer Park Deer Park Broadcaster 11/8/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Del Rio Del Rio News-Herald 9/2/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Denison Denison Daily News 1/29/1874 – 6/28/1878 Newspaper Archives
Denton Denton Record-Chronicle 7/30/2004 – 5/12/2014 Recent Obituaries
Edinburg Defensor 2/7/1930 – 12/25/1931 Newspaper Archives
Edinburg Edinburg Review 2/3/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Edna Jackson County Herald-Tribune 9/12/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
El Paso Continental 12/12/1934 – 3/11/1960 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Atalaya Bautista: Semanario Evangelico Bautista 1/2/1908 – 12/21/1930 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Patria 6/18/1919 – 8/12/1923 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Republica 11/1/1919 – 5/23/1923 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Clarin del Norte 10/8/1905 – 2/9/1907 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Sunday Herald 10/28/1888 – 5/18/1889 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Evening Telegram 3/16/1896 – 4/6/1896 Newspaper Archives
El Paso El Paso Daily News 2/11/1901 – 7/3/1902 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Evening Tribune 4/3/1889 – 5/19/1896 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Monitor 1/30/1897 – 1/26/1900 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Latino Americano 1/14/1891 – 3/28/1891 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Defensor 9/24/1894 – 3/3/1895 Newspaper Archives
El Paso El Paso Evening Tribune 6/15/1893 – 6/23/1893 Newspaper Archives
El Paso El Paso del Norte 3/12/1904 – 11/18/1904 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Noticias 10/14/1899 – 1/20/1900 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Ciudanano 3/12/1892 – 5/14/1892 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Lone Star 12/24/1881 – 2/3/1883 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Los Dos Americas 3/7/1888 – 7/25/1898 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Observador Fronterizo 4/4/1886 – 10/24/1886 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Independiente 5/6/1896 – 8/7/1896 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Correo del Bravo 3/13/1913 – 5/19/1913 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Monday Morning Mercury 6/12/1893 – 7/17/1893 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Dia 2/18/1919 – 2/23/1919 Newspaper Archives
El Paso El Paso Weekly Tribune 4/22/1886 – 4/22/1886 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Echo Fronterizo 10/3/1896 – 11/14/1896 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Justica 9/5/1893 – 11/4/1893 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Renacimiento 5/28/1923 – 6/14/1923 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Azote 9/17/1922 – 4/15/1923 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Homer Union News 10/1/1919 – 10/1/1919 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Hispano Americano 8/7/1893 – 8/7/1893 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Commercial Review 4/1/1891 – 4/1/1891 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Buena Prensa : Organo del Comite de la Asociacion del Mismo Nombre 9/15/1923 – 9/15/1923 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Democracia 1/14/1906 – 1/14/1906 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Opinion Publica 5/11/1895 – 5/11/1895 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Sancho Panza 11/8/1891 – 11/28/1891 Newspaper Archives
El Paso Progresista 6/17/1901 – 6/17/1901 Newspaper Archives
El Paso El Paso Times 4/15/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Ennis Ennis Journal 11/9/2004 – 11/26/2010 Recent Obituaries
Fairfield Fairfield Recorder 11/6/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Flower Mound Flower Mound Leader 1/14/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Flower Mound Messenger 8/25/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fort Worth Fort Worth Star-Telegram 7/2/1902 – 12/31/1922 Newspaper Archives
Fort Worth Fort Worth Morning Register 1/1/1897 – 6/30/1902 Newspaper Archives
Fort Worth Fort Worth Gazette 3/31/1891 – 6/30/1891 Newspaper Archives
Fort Worth USA Monitor 8/1/1992 – 3/1/1993 Newspaper Archives
Fort Worth Bronze Texan News 5/2/1969 – 10/16/1969 Newspaper Archives
Fort Worth Fort Worth Mind 11/13/1943 – 9/13/1947 Newspaper Archives
Fort Worth Torchlight Appeal 1/17/1890 – 2/22/1890 Newspaper Archives
Fort Worth Dallas District Crusader 12/22/1944 – 12/22/1944 Newspaper Archives
Fort Worth Fort Worth Star-Telegram 1/1/1991 – Current Recent Obituaries
Fredericksburg Fredericksburg Standard-Radio Post 8/7/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Freer Duval County Press 1/11/2011 – 4/15/2011 Recent Obituaries
Friendswood Friendswood Journal 10/18/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Frisco Frisco Enterprise 1/14/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Gainesville Gainesville Daily Register 8/31/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Galveston Flake’s Bulletin 12/27/1865 – 3/13/1872 Newspaper Archives
Galveston Galveston Tri-Weekly News 5/31/1869 – 12/31/1873 Newspaper Archives
Galveston Galveston Weekly News 3/18/1851 – 12/27/1883 Newspaper Archives
Galveston Civilian 10/19/1838 – 12/6/1845 Newspaper Archives
Galveston Galveston Daily News 4/19/1842 – 12/27/1873 Newspaper Archives
Galveston Weekly Journal 3/19/1852 – 11/5/1852 Newspaper Archives
Galveston Galvestonian 4/3/1840 – 4/4/1840 Newspaper Archives
Galveston Free Man’s Press 10/24/1868 – 10/24/1868 Newspaper Archives
Galveston Galveston County Daily News 1/1/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Gladewater Gladewater Mirror 2/16/2011 – 10/29/2012 Recent Obituaries
Glen Rose Glen Rose Reporter 1/12/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Graham Graham Leader 11/29/2002 – 7/22/2005 Recent Obituaries
Grand Saline Grand Saline Sun 6/16/2011 – 11/29/2012 Recent Obituaries
Greenville Greenville Herald-Banner 11/16/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Greenville Rockwall County Herald Banner 3/27/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Gun Barrel City Cedar Creek Pilot 2/24/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hallsville Hallsville Herald 1/18/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Harlingen Valley Morning Star 2/8/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hearne Hearne Democrat 10/31/2008 – 8/25/2010 Recent Obituaries
Hearne Franklin Advocate 10/31/2008 – 8/25/2010 Recent Obituaries
Hearne Robertson County News 9/12/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Hearne Calvert Tribune 11/5/2008 – 8/25/2010 Recent Obituaries
Hempstead Waller County News Citizen 1/29/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Henderson Southern Beacon 1/15/1859 – 7/2/1859 Newspaper Archives
Highland Park, University Park Park Cities People 8/4/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Houston Houston Chronicle 1/1/1917 – 12/31/1963 Newspaper Archives
Houston Houston Post 5/15/1888 – 10/29/1926 Newspaper Archives
Houston Houston Daily Union 1/6/1869 – 12/31/1871 Newspaper Archives
Houston Weekly Houston Telegraph 5/2/1837 – 8/21/1860 Newspaper Archives
Houston Houston Tri-Weekly Telegraph 8/28/1860 – 12/1/1865 Newspaper Archives
Houston Houston Telegraph 2/8/1864 – 10/31/1864 Newspaper Archives
Houston Gaceta Mexicana 2/15/1927 – 9/15/1928 Newspaper Archives
Houston Western Star 1/27/1900 – 1/27/1900 Newspaper Archives
Houston Independent 1/27/1900 – 1/27/1900 Newspaper Archives
Houston Klein Sun 3/19/2008 – 7/18/2011 Recent Obituaries
Houston Memorial Examiner 10/18/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Houston Champions Sun 3/26/2008 – 7/18/2011 Recent Obituaries
Houston Kingwood Observer 10/17/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Houston Houston Chronicle 10/30/1985 – Current Recent Obituaries
Houston Cypress Creek Mirror: Klein Edition 3/15/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Houston Cypress Creek Mirror: Champions Edition 9/15/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Houston Lake Conroe Plus 3/13/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Houston River Oaks Examiner 11/1/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Humble Humble Observer 10/31/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Humble Spring Observer 11/1/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Humble Atascocita Observer 10/17/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Humble East Montgomery County Observer 11/7/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Huntsville Huntsville Item 1/5/1856 – 3/16/1860 Newspaper Archives
Huntsville Huntsville Item 7/1/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Irving Irving Rambler 7/2/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Jacksonville Jacksonville Daily Progress 1/5/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Jasper Jasper Newsboy 12/28/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Katy Katy Sun 11/14/2008 – 2/17/2011 Recent Obituaries
Keller Keller Citizen 11/30/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kerrville Kerrville Daily Times 2/7/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kingsville Notas de Kingsville 4/2/1944 – 8/24/1961 Newspaper Archives
Kingsville Tex. Mex. Reflector 1/21/1921 – 4/21/1947 Newspaper Archives
Kingsville Eco 4/1/1931 – 12/1/1941 Newspaper Archives
Kingsville Accion 9/26/1931 – 11/1/1932 Newspaper Archives
Laredo Evolucion 1/1/1917 – 2/29/1920 Newspaper Archives
Laredo Laredo Times 1/2/1929 – 6/30/1929 Newspaper Archives
Laredo Cronica 1/1/1910 – 4/18/1914 Newspaper Archives
Laredo Democrata Fronterizo 12/8/1917 – 6/6/1919 Newspaper Archives
Laredo Correo de Laredo 7/16/1891 – 1/24/1893 Newspaper Archives
Laredo Alfa 10/21/1956 – 5/21/1959 Newspaper Archives
Laredo Laredo Morning Times 12/15/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lewisville Colony Courier-Leader 3/26/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lewisville Lewisville Leader 1/14/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lexington Lexington Leader 4/9/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lindale Lindale News & Times 4/28/2011 – 11/12/2012 Recent Obituaries
Linden Cass County Sun 6/15/2011 – 12/4/2012 Recent Obituaries
Little Elm Little Elm Journal 1/14/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Llano Llano County Journal 9/10/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Longview Longview News-Journal 4/6/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lubbock Lubbock Avalanche-Journal 6/6/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lufkin Lufkin Daily News 10/14/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Lumberton Hardin County News 4/19/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Magnolia Magnolia Potpourri 11/28/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Mansfield Mansfield News-Mirror 10/2/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Marble Falls Highlander 9/19/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Marble Falls River Cities Daily Tribune 2/25/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Marshall Star State Patriot 3/20/1852 – 10/23/1852 Newspaper Archives
Marshall Marshall News Messenger 8/30/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
McAllen Monitor 2/17/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
McAllen Valley Town Crier 2/23/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
McKinney McKinney Courier-Gazette 1/4/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Meridian Meridian Tribune 9/12/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Mesquite Mesquite News 1/14/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Mexia Mexia News 9/13/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Midland Midland Reporter-Telegram 3/10/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Midlothian Midlothian Mirror 11/9/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Mineola Mineola Monitor 4/27/2011 – 11/29/2012 Recent Obituaries
Mineral Wells Mineral Wells Index 10/31/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Mount Pleasant Mount Pleasant Daily Tribune 1/2/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Nacogdoches Nacogdoches Chronicle 8/7/1852 – 10/17/1854 Newspaper Archives
Nacogdoches Gaceta de Texas 5/25/1813 – 5/25/1813 Newspaper Archives
Nacogdoches Daily Sentinel 8/31/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
New Boston Bowie County Citizens Tribune, The & DeKalb News 4/17/2011 – 11/13/2012 Recent Obituaries
New Braunfels New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung 10/2/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Odessa Odessa American 8/16/1995 – Current Recent Obituaries
Olney Olney Enterprise 11/3/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Orange Orange Leader 10/20/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Overton Overton Press 2/24/2011 – 5/26/2011 Recent Obituaries
Palestine Trinity Advocate 4/22/1857 – 12/12/1860 Newspaper Archives
Palestine Palestine Herald-Press 5/15/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Paris Paris News 12/3/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Pasadena Pasadena Citizen 10/26/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Pasadena Lake Houston Sentinel 12/27/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Pasadena North Channel Sentinel 11/8/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Pearland Pearland Journal 10/18/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Pittsburg Pittsburg Gazette 3/24/2011 – 11/20/2012 Recent Obituaries
Plainview Plainview Daily Herald 2/6/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Plano Plano Star Courier 1/14/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Port Arthur Port Arthur News 4/30/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Quitman Wood County Democrat 6/15/2011 – 11/19/2012 Recent Obituaries
Red Oak Ellis County Chronicle 11/9/2004 – 11/16/2010 Recent Obituaries
Richardson Richardson Echo 1/10/1920 – 12/28/1966 Newspaper Archives
Richardson Richardson Digest 1/6/1965 – 12/29/1965 Newspaper Archives
Robstown Nueces County Record Star 1/12/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Rowlett Rowlett Lakeshore Times 1/14/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Royse City Royse City Herald Banner 1/5/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Rusk Cherokee Sentinel 5/17/1856 – 3/28/1857 Newspaper Archives
Rusk Rusk Pioneer 4/4/1849 – 11/7/1849 Newspaper Archives
San Angelo San Angelo Standard-Times 12/7/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
San Antonio Prensa 2/13/1913 – 5/28/1959 Newspaper Archives
San Antonio San Antonio Express 1/3/1867 – 5/14/1913 Newspaper Archives
San Antonio Epoca 3/3/1918 – 12/25/1927 Newspaper Archives
San Antonio Regidor 6/23/1910 – 12/29/1915 Newspaper Archives
San Antonio Imparcial de Texas 12/20/1917 – 3/31/1921 Newspaper Archives
San Antonio Ledger and Texan 6/1/1854 – 12/31/1859 Newspaper Archives
San Antonio Revista Mexicana 5/28/1916 – 1/25/1920 Newspaper Archives
San Antonio Heraldo de Mexicano 10/9/1927 – 3/30/1930 Newspaper Archives
San Antonio Bejareno 2/7/1855 – 7/28/1856 Newspaper Archives
San Antonio Pan American Labor Express 8/28/1918 – 12/4/1918 Newspaper Archives
San Antonio Freie Presse fur Texas 5/12/1915 – 5/12/1915 Newspaper Archives
San Antonio Chiltipiquin 7/13/1919 – 7/13/1919 Newspaper Archives
San Antonio Northeast Herald 3/25/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
San Antonio Conexión 5/5/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
San Antonio San Antonio Express-News 9/27/1990 – Current Recent Obituaries
San Augustine Texas Union 10/16/1847 – 4/1/1848 Newspaper Archives
San Augustine Red-Lander 10/7/1843 – 8/7/1847 Newspaper Archives
San Felipe Texas Gazette 9/25/1829 – 2/18/1832 Newspaper Archives
San Felipe Telegraph and Texas Register 10/10/1835 – 3/12/1836 Newspaper Archives
San Marcos San Marcos Daily Record 6/19/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Seguin Seguin Gazette-Enterprise 2/1/2005 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sherman Herald Democrat 12/1/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Southlake Grapevine Courier 1/20/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Southlake Colleyville Courier 2/21/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Southlake Southlake Times 1/14/2011 – 10/18/2013 Recent Obituaries
Southlake Southlake Journal 1/18/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Stephenville Stephenville Empire-Tribune 6/8/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sugar Land Rancher 12/22/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sugar Land Sugar Land Sun 1/9/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sugar Land Fort Bend Sun 1/9/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Sweetwater Sweetwater Reporter 9/17/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Taft Panamericana News 9/21/1942 – 6/21/1956 Newspaper Archives
Texarkana Texarkana Gazette 1/7/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
Texas City Texas City Sun 6/15/2002 – 11/6/2004 Recent Obituaries
The Woodlands Villager 10/18/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Tomball Tomball Potpourri 11/28/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
Van Alstyne Van Alstyne Leader 12/11/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Victoria Victoria Advocate 1/20/1848 – 11/8/1851 Newspaper Archives
Victoria Victoria Advocate 1/1/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Waco Paul Quinn Weekly 1/27/1900 – 1/27/1900 Newspaper Archives
Waco Waco Tribune-Herald: Blogs 9/5/2006 – Current Recent Obituaries
Waco Waco Tribune-Herald 12/15/1999 – Current Recent Obituaries
Waxahachie Waxahachie Daily Light 11/9/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Weatherford Weatherford Telegram 1/7/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
Weatherford Weatherford Democrat 9/10/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Webster Bay Area Citizen 10/25/2007 – Current Recent Obituaries
West Columbia Telegraph and Texas Register 9/13/1836 – 4/11/1837 Newspaper Archives
West University Place West University Examiner 10/31/2007 – 6/21/2012 Recent Obituaries
Wichita Falls Wichita Falls Times Record News 3/24/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Yorktown Yorktown News-View 10/10/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries

You can either print or create a PDF version of this Blog post by simply clicking on the green “Print/PDF” button below. The PDF version makes it easy to save this post onto your desktop or portable device for quick reference—all the Texas newspaper links will be live.

ad for gift subscriptions to GenealogyBank

Why Do You Love Genealogy?

Introduction: Mary Harrell-Sesniak is a genealogist, author and editor with a strong technology background. In this blog post, Mary shares comments that she and her fellow family historians have exchanged on social media about why they love genealogy.

I was browsing social media pages recently and saw that my friends were commenting about why they love genealogy. Everyone’s reasons for loving family history research varied, but the depth of the intrinsic rewards we feel was shared by all.

Here is my reason for loving genealogy research:

  • I’m following in the footsteps of my mother, great grandmother and great grandfather, who researched with a passion and left the family with a legacy of several family history books.

What a family treasure that anyone could only hope to equal, which explains my favorite saying: “Genealogy isn’t just a pastime; it’s a passion!”

genealogy saying: "I love genealogy!"

Below you’ll find excerpts of the quotes (with minor corrections). The initials indicate my social media friends. Hope you enjoy them as much as I have.

  • “One time I helped a police investigator find the family of a man who had died, who left very little information. He [the policeman] said the family was very grateful. That was rewarding.” —A.C.
  • “As my friend Christie says, ‘It’s a labor of love.’” —A.J.
  • “My grandmother died last year and I was really lucky that she’d humor me with questions. I’d bring DD coffee every Sunday and we’d chat—all her peers had gone—and sometimes we’d talk genealogy, but because I knew so much, I think she almost felt like she had somebody who knew the stuff she did and she could talk about events and people who mattered to her, without prompting, and be understood. That’s what validates what I do.” —A.M.
  • “At least we can all say ‘We know where we came from’ [because] we did the research…” —C.D.
  • “I do it because I want to put stories to names. I wanted to know who I am. And now when I try and not do it, I swear that I hear [my name] in my sleep: ‘Find me.’ You are never lost as long as one person remembers your name…” —C.F.
  • “My family and friends are genuinely appreciative of my genealogy research. I’ve never heard any criticism. I’ve reunited lost family members and distant cousins.” —C.H.
  • “It is for people who love history and want to know exactly where they came from. It is comforting.” —C.K.

genealogy saying: "Looking for dead people makes me happy!"

  • “After 25+ years…I just smile and say…looking for dead people makes me happy!” —C.L.J.Y.
  • “It’s very satisfying when you find lost cousins or other information. I just found a cousin here on one of the groups yesterday; her grandfather is the brother of my grandfather…So cool when this happens.” —C.M.S.C.
  • “[I love genealogy] because dead people are much more interesting than the live people that are around me.” —D.E.L.
  • “My Mom has been the ultimate source in my and my sister’s research. She remembers everything, has written things down, and saved pictures from my dad’s side of the family. She is so supportive to us and helps out so much. I wish everyone had someone as supportive as her. Thanks Mom!” —D.R.
  • “Genealogy is a favorite pastime, I love knowing our ancestors’ names, families, their work, etc. I have been working on my family and my husband’s. It is very rewarding.” —D.Y.
  • “I’ve found close cousins I had never known…I have laughed so much with them over the years! We met on the Internet searching for the same Great Grandparents! We didn’t know each other, but it’s like having a cool sister to laugh with on things we have in common! I can’t believe how similar we think about things!!! Genetics!” —E.R.
  • “When I was about 14 it was the Bicentennial year. My great Aunt showed me the grave of an ancestor who was from Lexington during the Revolution. That was what started the genealogy bug for me! I took a college class that year in genealogy, and started to ride my bike to local archives to research how I was related to that soldier, and the rest of my family tree. His name was Andrew Munroe, and his uncles were killed in the Lexington Battle, and Andrew was a Major by the end of the war.” —H.W.
  • “I think of this as more of an avocation than a hobby and if I don’t do it, who will?” —J.B.
  • “I am chuckling about all the comments about helping kids in school with their family history projects. My genealogy path started when a college class I was taking asked for such a project. Two years later, my son had the same project in fourth grade. Seven years later I am still working on it…” —J.C.M.

genealogy saying: "I research my ancestors so I'll know who to blame!"

  • “I research my ancestors so I’ll know who to blame!” —J.H.
  • “I do it for my children and their children and like-minded relatives with whom I share the stories. To know our ancestors’ strengths and talents is to know where ours come from and is inspiring to me.” —J.R.
  • “I started really getting into it after I met my husband. His family has been in this one county of Virginia since they came over on a boat. Lol. So jealous—I literally just have to go to the county library, ask about his family, and poof! the library has it all. Lol. Everyone wants to reap my rewards also. But I have the time and I love it, so I keep on. Lol!” —J.R.
  • “My dad asked me years ago to research his family. He remembered the stories he was told and shared many of them. May he rest in peace because he has since passed, but once I started the journey there was no turning back. Every new name holds promise of a new story. The one thing I didn’t comprehend when I started was that the research would open many history books to help me better understand how people lived in their respective eras. I feel like it is an exciting adventure with many mysteries.” —J.S.B.

genealogy saying: "Ancestors don't give me grief and they don't come with drama!"

  • “I was told by a sibling that I like my dead ancestors more than my living relatives. Of course I do!! They don’t give me grief and don’t come with drama!” —K.P.

genealogy saying: "Genealogy is like being a detective!"

  • “I’ve always been interested too, even as a teenager. It made U.S. History come alive in school! My mom and dad used to do genealogy together. They went to libraries and cemeteries every weekend. They were both very involved which is how I got interested at the age of 16. It is like being a detective, isn’t it?” —K.V.E.A.
  • “I love all these comments! I don’t have any profound reasons why I love researching, I just do! I didn’t care for history or genealogy when I was younger. Then my mother passed away eleven years ago. In cleaning out the attic in my childhood home, one of the first things I found was a statement of service in the Civil War. I was stunned and got the bug at that moment! I also found some tintypes and lots of old photos, unidentified and undated of course…So fascinating. Unfortunately, I got the bug after my parents passed away. How I wish I got it when they were alive especially since I had an older father who was born in 1902.” —L.H.

genealogy saying: "Genealogy is not a hobby, it's a calling!"

  • “I’ve also been doing this for over 40 years, started when I was 9. Anyone that knows me, knows right away that I am a Genealogist. It’s not a hobby, it’s a calling. I don’t discuss it unless someone asks or it’s pertinent to the conversation. But overall, I’ve found that MOST people find what we do fascinating…Sometimes, this passion of mine affects someone’s life tremendously. I had one family of my grandmother’s first cousin contact me after putting something out…She said, ‘this is my father-in-law’s family. He’s in his late 80s and I never knew ANYTHING about them. His father died when he was 2, his mother remarried, and they never saw his father’s family again. He always felt that he was the reason for that and carried the guilt around all his life.’ I contacted her back, shared with her that at the time of his father’s birth his grandparents were both dead, and his father’s siblings lived too far away for interaction to be feasible. The daughter-in-law was able to go back and tell him the story of the family and she said it was like a weight lifted off his shoulders, his whole personality changed and he was a happier man…he died 6 months later, but at peace! So when anyone has anything negative to say, which is rare, I hold that story close and smile.” —L.L.B.J.

genealogy saying: "I don't understand people who don't like genealogy. It's so satisfying to find a fact about someone in all the world papers!"

  • “I have found numerous lost cousins and a diamond ring that was passed down to one of my new cousins that belonged to my great gma. It’s so cool to look at it and know she had it on her finger. My quest continues to find a pic of her. I love [genealogy]. I don’t understand people who don’t like it. It’s so satisfying to find a fact about someone in all the world papers.” —L.O.R.
  • “I’m lucky to have a ton of support around me. Even my husband is actively helping me with my family research. I have yet to meet one person in my family that isn’t fascinated by the research.” —L.S.
  • “I studied history in college. Genealogy is a continuation of my love of studying the past…and it’s personal. Something I can pass on to my children and now my granddaughter.” —L.S.A.
  • “I have some good stories [from cousins] that I’ve met…that I didn’t know I had…Besides, I love skeletons. They make the world go round.” —M.F.C.
  • “I follow my family histories because I WANT to; like people who sit/partake in sports, fish, or knit/sew, it’s MY hobby. There are people who are history buffs, and those who are sports nuts and some who are GEN NUTS (which I’m one).” —M.J.W.M.

genealogy saying: "Genealogy is like playing detective!"

  • “It’s like playing detective. It’s fun learning the stories about our ancestors.” —N.H.S.
  • “Working on my family tree is comforting. I feel close to my mom and dad, who have been gone for a very long time.” —P.M.H.
  • “It’s not about the doubters—it’s about two other things. First, to ensure [we remember] those who would otherwise be forgotten in less than 100 years, and two, for those yet to come to know and understand their roots. And then they can decide for themselves if they care or not. So don’t ever let anyone tell you that you’re wasting your time following after dead people. If they are family then you will have to include them too. Although they may wish to be forgotten in a generation or two, ask them about it!” —R.B.
  • “Always was fascinated with the past; [I] wanted to be an archeologist when I grew up but my teachers were not too happy with that aspiration! I love to do genealogy for several reasons. First, when I do research on my ancestors, I feel like I am bringing my family together again in the past and, since I freely share my discoveries with relatives, I feel it brings us together in the present. I also love it because it makes me feel part of a whole, a link in the chain that would not have a future without myself and my children. I love it because it makes me feel more connected to my country when so many of my ancestors were pioneers and founders of early settlements and churches and helped to build this country by participating in government positions and fighting in various wars for our freedom & protection. And most of all, I love it for the connection I feel with certain ancestors when I can be successful enough in my research to learn some of the personal aspects of their lives. I believe in some way they are always with us, living on in our cells, our blood & our genes.” —R.B.K.

genealogy saying: "Genealogy is more fun than most sports!"

  • “It’s more fun than most sports. I like to find new info.” —S.C
  • “[I] love [genealogy] and find it fascinating.” —S.H.
  • “Well, the journey into our past has been interesting, and I am blessed to share it with my cousin.” —S.H.E.
  • “I can’t speak for anyone but myself, but I know that I have always been fascinated with my family history. I remember being a young teen and pondering my family origins. I asked a few questions of my grandmothers, but not nearly enough before they either passed or lost the ability to communicate. In reading her saved letters, I know that one of my grandmothers was the same way and her father before her. In letters written between them long before my birth, they discuss the family Bible and family records. He gave her a copy, which I never found. He also left the family Bible to one of his other children, which I’ve also failed to locate. Other than one of my grandmother’s half-sisters, no one else in the family seems to have any interest in it, including the family who now has (hopefully) or had (crossing fingers) the family Bible. Did some of you come to this later in life and develop an interest long after your childhood, or did you always wonder? I’ve often pondered whether those who don’t care just never had it in them in the first place, kind of like how people are born with the ability to either love cilantro or think it tastes like soap and therefore will never like it, no matter what.” —S.W.H.

genealogy saying: "Why do I love genealogy? I credit my old style Polish grandmother for my desire to know my family history!"

  • “I credit my old style Polish grandmother for my desire to know my family history. She and her mom “were” those black sheep, moved away, changed their names, pretended they were French rather than Kashubian/Polish…Oh, I had visions of her coming from a family of horse thieves or gypsies or some such thing. When I finally found the truth and reunited with her family, wouldn’t you know that the first thing I heard was, ‘Oh! We’ve been looking for you for a hundred years!’ I’m glad they didn’t give up looking, and perhaps it’s the Polish in me that doesn’t give up either.” —S.W.H.

genealogy saying: "If you don't know someone among your ancestors, they're not real!"

  • “An in-law, a wonderful and generous lady, told me that if I didn’t know someone among my ancestors, they were not real. My sister tells me she only wants to know about the dead relatives I discover if she was mentioned in the will, and [she and] I have fun kidding each other about this…” —T.K.
  • “It’s very nice to make older people especially happy.” —T.P.

genealogy saying: "Family history is simply the best!"

  • “Family history is simply the best!” —V.W.

Please tell us your delightful reasons why you love genealogy!

ad for gift subscriptions to GenealogyBank