DNA Testing & Genealogy: Is It Working for You?

Clearly DNA testing is revolutionizing 21st Century family history research.

DNA Testing Helps Orphan Find His Family

There are heartwarming stories about successful DNA tests—like that of 80-year-old Patrick J. Holland, who was raised in an orphanage and through DNA testing finally found his family.

Here is the full report on this touching family story, from CNN:

http://www.cnn.com/video/data/2.0/video/us/2013/10/11/dnt-tx-dna-solves-mystery.wfaa.html

photo of a CNN report of 80-year-old Patrick J. Holland, who was raised in an orphanage and through DNA testing finally found his family

Credit: CNN

DAR Accepts DNA Test Results

Lynn Young, national president of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR), has announced that the DAR is now accepting DNA test results as proof for women wanting to apply for membership.

For more details about the new DAR membership acceptance policy, see: http://youngblog.dar.org/dna-evidence-dar-applications-and-supplementals

photo of Lynn Young, president general of the Daughters of the American Revolution

Credit: DAR

The new acceptance program starts with a DAR member with a proven (well-documented), accepted membership. Next you need to get DNA test results from a male descendant in that line. Then, if someone is applying for DAR membership but cannot produce the paper trail documentation back to the Revolutionary War period, there is now a way for that person to still gain membership—if that person has a DNA match between male relatives in both lines. The DAR says that the DNA evidence from both lines demonstrates that the applicant is related to the already-accepted member, and the applicant can use that DNA evidence of the male relative in support of her application.

DNA Study of Spanish Jews

A new DNA study of the descendants of Spanish (Sephardic) Jews has shown that statistically all Jews alive today have at least one Sephardic Jewish ancestor. Read the new genealogical study on Spanish Jewish ancestry from Cornell University here: http://arxiv.org/abs/1310.1912

map showing migrations and settlements of the Spanish Jews

Credit: Wikipedia

European Jewish DNA Study

Another just-released Jewish DNA study shows that: “…the women who founded the Ashkenazi Jewish community of Europe were not from the Near East, as previously supposed, and reinforces the idea that many Jewish communities outside Israel were founded by single men who married and converted local women.” Read the complete New York Times (New York, New York), 8 October 2013, genealogy report here: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/09/science/ashkenazi-origins-may-be-with-european-women-study-finds.html?_r=0

Genes Suggest European Women at Root of Ashkenazi Family Tree, New York Times newspaper article 8 October 2013

Credit: New York Times

Kemp Genealogy DNA Study

I am participating in a Kemp DNA study and it has changed our conclusions of our ancestral connections. The DNA test we’ve been participating in has shown that our County Cavan, Ireland, Kemp line is completely separate from the County Kent, England, Kemp line—which is the largest recorded Kemp family.

See the current Kemp DNA test results here:
http://www.familytreedna.com/public/Kemp/default.aspx?section=ycolorized

test results from a Kemp DNA study

Credit: FamilyTree DNA

Our Cavan Kemp descendants are all coded to R1a1. The English Kemp lines are all coded to R1b1, which appears similar but—the experts tell me—actually proves that the two Kemp lines are not related at all.

Interestingly, the German Kemp lines are coded to E, and the Scandinavian Kemp lines are coded to I.

The R1a1 marker has remained consistent with the Cavan Kemp descendants in the Canadian line: Australia, New Zealand, Germany, Ireland and here in the United States.

These DNA test findings changed our entire view of how “all” Kemp lines are or are not related.

Is DNA Testing Working for You?

Has a DNA study impacted your family history research? Has it changed your view of your family tree?

What are you finding?

What breakthroughs have you found from DNA testing?

Please share your experiences with DNA testing in the comments section.

Have You Participated in a DNA Study for Ancestry Research?

Have you tried a genetic DNA study as an approach to learning more about your family history?

If so, have you made family connections that you wouldn’t have found otherwise?

It is essential that you participate in a DNA study as soon as possible. Doing so will save time, and give you a clearer picture of your family history that will bridge the gaps where other genealogical records simply have not survived.

In the past, I avoided participating in a genetic DNA study because of the high cost and the sense that it wouldn’t prove anything about my ancestry.

Well, times have changed.

The cost of participating in DNA studies has dropped to very affordable levels and the results are surprising. DNA testing will allow you to clearly see how distinct groups with your surname are or are not related to you.

Genetic DNA Testing for Genealogy Image

Image Credit: Image by jscreationzs at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Imagine being able to sort through records for our family searching not just the surname coupled with a place of birth—but being able to narrow our search to the correct DNA haplogroup, Y-DNA 12 or deeper identifiers so that we can limit our search results to only our relatives.

If you were not sure which Miller, Stark or Sawyer individuals written up in thousands of obituaries were your relatives, knowing which DNA group they fell in would quickly help you to focus on the ones that you are related to.

A few months ago I heard from a researcher in Scotland who was spearheading a study of “Kemp” lines from Ireland, and in particular the Kemp families of County Cavan, Ireland. He wanted to determine if they were all related or if they actually were separate, unrelated families.

A quick search of other DNA projects found a Kemp study already underway, organized by Andrew Kemp in Australia. Efforts were made to find more Kemp men from all parts of the world who would be willing to participate. Seventy-five agreed and the results are still coming in.

I have been researching my Kemp family from County Cavan for the past 50 years. In piecing together the family tree I found that over the past 250 years my family—like so many Irish American families—has been continuously growing and migrating around the world, settling in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Germany and all across the United States.

As I looked at the big picture I could see that there were large concentrations of Kemp families in England, Germany, Sweden and almost everywhere I looked. Were they all related? It is going to take a long time to examine each Kemp household and see how they connect to each other. Since the bulk of the historical family records simply did not survive, there just aren’t records that would prove how these Kemp groups were or were not related—until now.

Unbelievable.

The results of the genetic DNA study were clearly showing which of the Kemp groups are in fact related.

For example: there is the Johann Conrad Kemp group. He was born in Germany in 1685 and settled in Frederick County, Maryland. The DNA study reports that his descendants are in the E1b1b1 haplogroup.

There is a Kemp family group in County Cork, Ireland. A look at the results for all of the descendants participating in this DNA study shows that they are in the R1b1a2 group.

So—the County Cork group and the Germany/Frederick County Kemp groups are not related.

Knowing where not to look for family connections will save genealogists a lot of time.

What about the large Kemp family in England? Over 25 living descendants have participated in this DNA project and all of them are also in the R1b1a2 haplogroup.

So the County Cork, Ireland, Kemp family group clearly should look to England to document their family connections.

There is a Kemp line in the Bahamas. Since that is a part of the British Commonwealth, perhaps they are also descended from a Kemp line in England. But, DNA testing shows that they fall in the I1 haplogroup common to Scandinavia. So, another completely separate Kemp family line.

Where did my Scotch-Irish County Cavan Kemp line fall?

They are all in the R1a1 haplogroup.

So—they are not related to the English, Maryland/German or Bahamian Kemp groups.

But, look at this genetic testing find: they are related to the Kemp family of Wake County, North Carolina.

The Wake County Kemp family descends from Richard Kemp who was born about 1715 in Scotland and settled in Wake County. His descendants have spread across the southern states. They are in the R1a1a haplogroup.

There are no surviving old genealogical records that can help genealogists connect the multiple Kemp lines, but DNA is now clearly showing us which groups are or are not related.

In the decades ahead we will be able to use the basic DNA haplogroups and full DNA sequencing as additional data that we can search on to extend our family trees.

What a great day for genealogy!

What do you have for my town?

Sometimes genealogists look at GenealogyBank‘s 3,700+ newspapers and only focus on newspapers published in their home town.

Beginning researchers often concentrate on their local newspaper or other newspapers published in their state and don’t think they need the rest of the content in GenealogyBank.

When I first began researching 43 years ago – I found an obituary about Edward Kemp (1863-1926) published in the New England Historic Genealogical Society’s Register (NEHGS Memoirs. January 1928. pp. 103-104).

The obituary said that he was born in County Cavan, Ireland. That would have been crucial information for my Kemp research at that time. But the article also said that he was born in New York City so I erroneously concluded this was not my relative. I thought our family was “only” from Stamford, Connecticut.

It would be years later that I would again find Edward’s obituary in the Register. The second time I recognized him immediately as my cousin. By then I knew that the family was from County Cavan – but I stared at that information and wondered – how was it I didn’t find this earlier? And, then I recalled that I had tossed it aside because he was from New York City.

Tip: Families move to other parts of the country. Use GenealogyBank to find your family obituaries; articles, and documents – no matter where in the country these items were published. Don’t assume you only want your hometown newspaper.

Let me give you an example – framed on the basic question researchers often ask – What do you have on Stamford, CT?

The question should be more precise. What do you have on Grace Stewart – who was born and married in Stamford, CT?

What was known?
Her name: Grace Toms
Approximate year/place of birth: born about 1896 in Stamford, CT
Spouse: She married “Charles Stewart”
Other: The rest of the “Toms” family lived/died in the Stamford area.

Problem:
Initial searches found nothing on them.
Charles Stewart and Grace Stewart are common names.

A search of GenealogyBank for Grace Stewart yielded 1,238 results – that is just too many to sort through to find her.

I narrowed the search to just the more recent America’s Obituaries section to see if I could locate her obituary notice.


That resulted in 143 hits – I could sift through those – but I first limited the search again by state – for just obituaries published in Connecticut newspapers. This time I got zero hits.

So I turned to search for her husband: Charles Stewart.

A search for him in the America’s Obituaries section for all newspapers produced 632 hits. When I limited the search to just CT newspapers I found one hit, but it was not him

I then repeated the America’s Obituaries section search for Grace Stewart but this time I added her middle name “Toms” to the extra search terms in “Include keywords” box.

Nothing.

One more try. I repeated the America’s Obituaries section search for Grace Stewart but this time I added “Stamford” to the extra search terms “Include keywords” box.

Success!

Grace Stewart
Washington Post, The (DC) – February 4, 1992
GRACE STEWART, LAWYER, ASSOCIATE JUDGE, DIES
Grace M. Stewart, 93, an associate judge of the Municipal Court in Washington in 1952 and 1953, died of pneumonia Feb. 1 at the Collingswood Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Rockville, where she was a patient for five years. She was a Washington resident off and on for 74 years.


Mrs. Stewart was appointed to the court after serving as executive assistant in the attorney general’s office. She worked for the Justice Department for 24 years.
After she left Municipal Court, she was on the staff of the Senate District Committee and later became administrative director of the Washington office of Executive Manpower Corp, a recruitment firm. She retired in 1973.


A native of Stamford, Conn., Mrs. Stewart attended American University and its law school. She was a typist with the Veterans Administration before she became a lawyer at Justice.

She belonged to the Federal and Women’s Bar associations and Phi Delta Delta legal fraternity.

Her husband, Charles Stewart, died in 1920. Survivors include two daughters, Barbara S. Eskey of Rockville and Patricia S. de Hoffman of La Jolla, Calif.; four grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren.
Copyright (c) 1992 The Washington Post

Tip: Don’t only concentrate on your home town newspaper. You can find articles about your family published in out of state newspapers – in this case the Washington Post.

Tip: Be sure to be creative in adding/removing search terms to fine tune your search.
Tip: Search GenealogyBank now.
What will you find?

So, what do you have on Long Island?

A friend of mine asked – “What do you have on Long Island?”

We started looking in GenealogyBank to see what we had – turns out we have quite a bit.

We found millions of articles, obituaries and records from the 1700s to today. There are over 330 New York newspapers in GenealogyBank – we spotted this early obituary of Mary Youngs (ca. 1784-1810) printed in the Long Island (NY) Star (22 Feb 1810).
I didn’t know that Long Island had it’s own newspaper that early in the century. GenealogyBank also includes the obituaries from Newsday right up to today’s paper.

We also found this sermon – that was preached in Hempstead, Long Island in 1813. It certainly gives the tenor of the sermons from 200 years ago.

We found many articles about the Blizzard of 1898 – including this one about Abram Decker who was saved from freezing to death in the snowstorm by the persistence of his “devoted wife”. This story was picked up and printed by the Idaho Daily Statesman, 18 Aug 1898.

Wow, what a story. His wife searching for him through 15′ snow drifts – finally spotting his foot above the snow and her efforts to rescue him by taking the railings from a fence to build a bonfire – lit by the flame in her lantern, to keep him warm. The fire got the attention of two farmers who came to their rescue. Now that’s an incredible family story.

Tip: Don’t limit your search to just one state – Remember that the articles you’re looking for may have appeared in a newspaper in another state – in this example the story was picked up and printed in a paper clear across the country in Idaho.

We found millions of articles about Long Islanders from the 18th Century to today.

What will you find in GenealogyBank?

To celebrate GenealogyBank’s success over the past two years, GenealogyBank is now offering a 30-day trial for only $9.95. Give it a try right now.

Woman struck blind on seeing her son …

Obituaries can give us the details of our ancestor’s lives that we just don’t find anywhere else.

Today I found this obituary in GenealogyBank for Judith Tormey (1800-1898) who died in Newark, NJ.

Baltimore Sun 4 July 1898


This obituary article gives us lots of details and clues to fill in the family tree.

1. Mrs. Judith Tormey – her name and tells us that she was married
2. Died on Friday night at her home and then gives the exact street address
3. She has “lived in Newark since 1847″
4. “She was born in County Cavan, Ireland, in 1800″
5. “Her father (not named) was 101 years old when he died and her mother was ninety-nine”
6. “A grandmother died at the age of ninety-nine”
7. “She was the mother of five children”
8. “She lost her sight in 1894″
9. “In that year her son Edward died”
10. She was blind from the final moment “she was taking a farewell look at his face in the coffin”

Incredible – we learn not only about four generations of the family – but also the dramatic story of how she became blind in the last years of her life.

GenealogyBank has millions of obituaries from over 3,700 newspapers.
We add even more every day.
Click here and search GenealogyBank right now.

What will you find?

More Newspapers Added to GenealogyBank – covering 1775-2008

GenealogyBank today added 115 newspapers from 29 States – with coverage from 1775 to today.

Wow – GenealogyBank is growing at a rapid pace. That’s over 2 million more records and documents for genealogists. What a great day for genealogists.
Here’s a great obituary I found for Mrs. Catherine Reilly (1770-1874) – it has plenty of the genealogical facts we’re looking for.

It gives her date and place of birth: 4 May 1770 – in Cootehill, County Cavan, Ireland …. and the date and place of her death: 3 Oct 1874 in Media, PA.
States that she came to America in 1840 – through the Port of Philadelphia – where she lived “for many years”.
It tells us that she had “seven children and twenty-four grandchildren” and that her aunt “recently died in Ireland at the age of one hundred and eight”.
That’s terrific - but look closer. This obituary was first published in the Philadelphia Public Ledger and was reprinted in the San Francisco Evening Bulletin (23 Oct 1874). You might just find that the obituary you are looking for also appeared in a newspaper clear across the country.

TIP: Narrowing your search to the town where your ancestor lived – could cause you to miss the articles you need. Be flexible and search all of GenealogyBank for your ancestor AND also narrow your search to the specific city or state where they lived.
GenealogyBank has more than 3,700 newspapers – click here and search it now – see what you’ll find!

Here is a list of the content just added to GenealogyBank.

AK. Juneau. Daily Record-Miner. 875 issues. 1903-03-12 to 1911-05-06
AR. Helena. Western Clarion* 17 issues. 1865-04-01 to 1865-12-16
AR. Jonesboro. Jonesboro Evening Sun. 1554 issues. 1904-09-03 to 1921-09-29
AR. Little Rock. Arkansas Gazette. 135 issues. 1820-01-08 to 1889-03-22
CA. Colton. Chicano. 8 issues. 1968-04-21 to 1977-06-30
CA. Los Angeles. Eco de Mexico. 1 issue. 1924-10-29
CA. Los Angeles. Heraldo de Mexico. 44 issues. 1917-12-9 to 1928-12-28
CA. Los Angeles. Prensa. 143 issues. 1917-12-08 to 1937-01-01
CA. Los Angeles. Union. 6 issues. 1898-02-26 to 1898-09-10
CA. San Francisco. Voz del Nuevo Mundo* 1 issue. 1869-03-09
CO. Colorado Springs. Gazette-Telegraph. 4,051 issues. 1873-01-04 to 1922-12-31
CO. Cortez. Cortez Journal* 2008-01-05 to Current
CO. Trinidad. Anunciador. 8 issues. 1918-04-06 to 1922-11-18
CT. Danielsonville. Windham County Transcript. 3 issues. 1863-07-02 to 1890-02-12
CT. New London. New London Daily Chronicle. 166 issues. 1860-07-03 to 1864-12-31
CT. New London. New London Democrat. 107 issues. 1845-03-21 to 1852-12-25
CT. Norwich. Norwich Morning Bulletin. 7 issues. 1863-04-06 to1882-04-01
DC. Washington. Spirit of ‘Seventy-Six* 11 issues. 1808-09-20 to 1809-07-11
FL. Tampa. Internacional* 1 issue 1939-10-04
ID. Idaho City. Idaho Falls Times. 11 issues. 1891-11-26 to 1895-11-07
ID. Idaho City. Idaho Register. 281 issues. 1887-06-25 to 1916-04-18
ID. Twin Falls. Twin Falls News. 182 issues. 1918-04-22 to 1922-05-10
IL. Centralia. Centralia Sentinel. 114 issues. 1864-01-05 to 1876-03-02
IL. Chicago. Latin Times. 12 issues. 1958-02-01 to 1975-05-02
IL. Chicago. Vida Latina. 56 issues. 1952-02-21 to 1963-07-21
IL. Chicago. Vorbote* 1 issue. 1875-03-20
KY. Richmond. Richmond Register* 2008-07-15 to Current
LA. News Orleans. Times Picayune* 989 issues. 1837-01-25 to 1865-09-22
MA. Boston. Boston Courier* 198 issues. 1805-06-13 to 1809-05-04
MA. Dedham. Norfolk Democrat. 7 issues. 1839-02-09 to 1854-09-15
MA. New Bedford. New-Bedford Mercury. 2 issues. 1863-10-23 to 1877-03-16
MA. Springfield. Massachusetts Gazette* 95 issues. 1782-05-14 to 1784-07-20
MA. Springfield. Springfield Republican. 49 issues. 1877-01-01 to 1910-12-31
MA. Stoughton. Stoughton Sentinel. 222 issues. 1863-12-05 to 1876-12-23
MD. Baltimore. Baltimore American. 1826 issues. 1903-03-01 to 1922-12-31
MD. Baltimore. Dunlap’s Maryland Gazette* 84 issues. 1775-05-02 to 1779-01-05
MD. Bel-Air. National American* 4 issues. 1861-06-21 to 1865-09-29
MD. Fredericktown. Rights of Man* 14 issues. 1794-02-05 to 1800-11-05
ME. Augusta. Herald of Liberty* 85 issues. 1810-02-13 to 1815-09-02
MN. International Falls. Daily Journal* 2000-10-31 to Current
MO. Kansas City. Kansas City Times. 1392 issues. 1884-05-14 to 1896-01-31
MO. Lebanon. Lebanon Daily Record*. 2007-02-07 to Current
MS. Vicksburg. Daily Commercial. 272 issues. 1882-01-02 to 1882-12-23
NC. Raleigh. Semi-Weekly Standard. 15 issues. 1861-08-10 to 1868-03-08
NE. Nebraska City. Daily Nebraska Press. 1127 issues. 1868-09-22 to 1876-12-28
NH. Concord. Republican Gazette* 85 issues. 1801-02-05 to 1803-04-28
NH. Derry. Derry News* 2008-01-08 to Current
NH. Dover. Phoenix* 49 issues. 1792-02-08 to 1795-08-22
NM. Albuquerque. Evening Citizen. 1 issue. 1894-08-06
NM. Las Cruces. Dona Ana County Republican. 1 issue. 1902-02-15
NM. Las Cruces. Estrella. 1 issue. 1935-05-18
NM. Las Cruces. Las Cruces Democrat. 1 issue. 1899-11-29
NM. Las Vegas. Las Vegas Daily Gazette. 1 issue. 1886-01-31
NM. Mesilla. Mesilla News. 3 issues. 1879-02-08 to 1883-11-24
NM. Santa Fe. Daily New Mexican. 756 issues. 1872-04-02 to 1875-06-28
NM. Santa Fe. Gato. 3 issues. 1894-05-23 to 1894-08-24
NM. Santa Fe. New Mexican Review. 2 issues. 1885-03-30 to 1906-08-30
NM. Santa Fe. Santa Fe Weekly New Mexican & Livestock Journal. 11 issues. 1885-10-08 to 1895-12-26
NM. Springer. Estandarte de Springer. 190 issues. 1889-06-27 to 1893-06-15
NM. Springer. Sentinel. 1 issue. 1901-12-27
NY. Albany. Albany Evening Journal. 4813 issues. 1834-06-12 to 1873-07-23
NY. Auburn. Cayuga Tocsin. 1812-03-12 to 1814-06-08
NY. Ballston Spa. Saratoga Advertiser* 103 issues. 1804-11-12 to 1812-03-10
NY. Balston Spa. Saratoga Journal. 3 issues. 1814-02-01 to 1817-06-11
NY. Brooklyn. Espana Libre. 9 issues. 1939-11-03 to 1942-12-25
NY. Canandaiqua. Western Repository* 13 issues. 1804-01-24 to 1807-12-08
NY. Herkimer. Farmer’s Monitor* 37 issues. 1805-01-29 to 1807-05-19
NY. Lansingburgh. American Spy* 62 issues. 1791-06-17 to 1798-02-27
NY. New York. Ebenezer* 2 issues. 1945-03-01 to 1945-0601
NY. New York. Eco de Cuba. 2 issues. 1855-06-22 to 1856-02-01
NY. New York. Ecos de Nueva York* 8 issues. 1952-03-30 to 1954-09-26
NY. New York. Exito* 1 issue. 1954-01-21
NY. New York. Grafico. 55 issues. 1915-10-21 to 1917-08-21; 1928-11-11 to 1931-01-03
NY. New York. Mundo Latino* 1 issue. 1948-05-15
NY. New York. Nosotros* 1 issue. 1953-11-21
NY. New York. Papagayo. 2 issues. 1855-02-15 to 1855-04-16
NY. New York. Pasatiempo* 3 issues. 1951-03-21 to 1951-05-21
NY. New York. Patria* 1 issue. 1895-06-25
NY. New York. Pueblos Hispanos. 3 issues. 1944-03-26 to 1944-07-29
NY. New York. Puerto Rico y Nueva York* 1 issue. 1954-11-21
NY. New York. Republican Watch-Tower* 363 issues. 1800-03-19 to 1810-11-16
NY. New York. Royal American Gazette* 112 issues. 1777-04-10 to 1783-08-07
NY. Troy. Troy Gazette* 67 issues. 1802-09-15 to 1808-03-29
NY. Troy. Troy Post* 10 issues. 1812-09-29 to 1823-03-18
NY. Whitestown. Western Centinel* 57 issues. 1794-03-26 to 1797-04-19
NY. Whitestown. Whitestown Gazette* 20 issues. 1796-07-05 to 1803-02-21
OH. Steubenville. Western Herald* 11 issues. 1812-11-05 to 1822-05-11
OH. Wooster. Wooster Republican* 166 issues. 1862-05-29 to 1872-12-26
OR. Eugene. Oregon State Journal. 185 issues. 1868-01-04 to 1879-02-22
PA. Philadelphia. National Gazette* 139 issues. 1820-04-05 to 1841-04-08
RI. Pawtucket. Pawtucket Times. 16 issues. 1898-01-01 to 1921-02-23
TX. Beaumont. Beaumont Enterprise & Journal. 350 issues. 1906-03-28 to 1911-09-18
TX. Brazoria. Texas Republican. 1 issue. 1835-10-17
TX. Brownsville. Cronista del Valle. 1 issue. 1930-02-28
TX. Brownsville. Daily Metropolitan* 4 issues. 1893-10-23 to 1893-11-20
TX. Brownsville. Puerto. 1 issue. 1961-12-30
TX. Brownsville. Republican* 89 issues. 1862-09-25 to 1868-07-30
TX. Cleburne. Cleburne Morning Review. 37 issues. 1911-07-02 to 1916-05-31
TX. Corpus Christi. Verdad. 2 issues. 1950-05-02 to 1959-12-13
TX. Edinburg. Defensor. 1 issue. 1931-12-25
TX. El Paso. Atalaya Bautista: Semanario Evangelico Bautista. 7 issues. 1908-01-02 to 1930-12-21
TX. El Paso. Continental. 57 issues. 1934-12-12 to 1960-03-11
TX. Galveston. Galveston News. 246 issues. 1877-01-01 to 1883-12-27
TX. San Antonio. Epoca. 7 issues. 1918-03-03 to 1927-12-25
TX. San Antonio. Prensa. 2,560 issues. 1918-10-11 to 1999-12-15
UT. Salt Lake City. Salt Lake Telegram. 15 issues. 1902-02-22 to 1922-12-31
VA. Lexington. Rockbridge Repository* 9 issues. 1801-08-21 to 1805-08-06
VA. Lynchburg. Lynchburg Press* 23 issues. 1809-05-13 to 1818-04-24
VA. Petersburg. Petersburg Intelligencer* 158 issues. 1798-05-29 to 3/29/1914
VA. Richmond. Richmond Commercial Compiler* 302 issues. 1816-12-18 to 1820-04-20
VA. Richmond. Virginia Argus* 445 issues. 1799-07-23 to 1814-07-25
VA. Winchester. Winchester Gazette* 14 issues. 1798-06-27 to 1820-01-15
VT. Putney. Argus* 42 issues. 1797-03-16 to 1799-02-12
VT. St. Albans. St. Albans Daily Messenger. 1,548 issues. 1843-12-06 to 1922-01-31

Titles with the asterisk * are new on GenealogyBank