Top Genealogy Websites: North Carolina Genealogy Resources for Records

It’s exciting to see the daily growth of North Carolina newspapers and genealogical resources going online.

Here are two key websites you need to be familiar with and rely upon for family history information from the “Tar Heel State”: GenealogyBank and FamilySearch.

a collage of images showing North Carolina genealogy records from GenealogyBank and FamilySearch

Credit: GenealogyBank and FamilySearch

GenealogyBank’s North Carolina Newspapers Collection

GenealogyBank has North Carolina newspapers covered from 1787 to Today.

Our North Carolina newspaper archives contain more than 130 newspapers to cover the history of the Southern state and its people (see the complete list at the end of this article).

Access the North Carolina newspapers with these two links:

Search North Carolina Newspaper Archives (1787 – 1993)

Search North Carolina Recent Obituaries (1988 – Current)

You can also use the nifty map below. Just click on the dots in your NC area of interest to get a popup containing the listing information for that title. Click the hyperlink in the listing to go directly to the newspaper search page. You can also get the full screen version of the map.

Searching through these North Carolina newspapers, you can pull up a news article giving all of the details about special family occasions, such as a wedding. You’ll find information about your family tree that just can’t be found anywhere else.

This 1911 wedding announcement is a good example. It gives a detailed, personal story of the couple’s wedding, as reported that day by the family to the press.

Crutchfield-Stainback wedding announcement, Charlotte Observer newspaper article 4 August 1911

Charlotte Observer (Charlotte, North Carolina), 4 August 1911, page 7

We can learn about their wedding and celebrate it, now that it’s preserved online.

North Carolina Marriage Registers at FamilySearch

FamilySearch is adding to the celebration by putting up the old North Carolina marriage registers from 1762-1979 online. See: https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1726957

photo of North Carolina marriage registers available through FamilySearch

Credit: FamilySearch

According to FamilySearch’s website, this collection contains the “name index and images of marriage records from North Carolina county courthouses. These records include licenses, marriage applications, marriage bonds, marriage certificates, marriage packets and cohabitation registers. Currently, portions of the following counties are represented in this collection: Alamance, Alexander, Anson, Ashe, Beaufort, Bladen, Buncombe, Cabarrus, Caldwell, Camden, Carteret, Caswell, Catawba, Chatham, Cherokee, Chowan, Cleveland, Columbus, Craven, Cumberland, Currituck, Dare, Davidson, Davie, Duplin, Durham, Edgecombe, Forsyth, Franklin, Gaston, Gates, Granville, Halifax, Hanover, Hyde, Johnston, Lincoln, Macon, McDowell, Mecklenburg, Montgomery, Northampton, Pitt, Richmond, Rowan, Surry, Wilkes. This collection is 46% complete. Additional records will be added as they are completed.”

These online NC newspapers and marriage registers are powerful genealogy research tools.

It is a great day for North Carolina genealogy!

Here is the complete list of all 133 North Carolina newspapers in GenealogyBank’s online collection.

Discover a variety of genealogy records and news stories in these 26 North Carolina newspapers:

Search recent obituary records for your relatives in these 107 North Carolina newspapers:

Click on the image below to download a printable list of the North Carolina Newspapers in GenealogyBank for your future reference. You can save to your desktop and click the individual titles to go directly to your newspaper of interest. Simply go to the file tab and click print.

graphic for GenealogyBank's North Carolina newspapers collection

Finding Your “Roots” at Alex Haley Museum Opening

Alex Haley home dedicated as a genealogy library and museum.

When 17-year-old violinist Joseph Matthews performed at the dedication of the Alex Haley Museum and Interpretive Center, he had no idea he would discover his family roots. Joseph, a high school senior from Memphis, Tennessee, was among hundreds who participated in two days of festivities at the Interpretive Center located behind Mr. Haley’s boyhood home in Henning, Tennessee. The center was dedicated on Friday, 13 August, 2010.

Mr. Haley, who passed away in 1992, received a Pulitzer Prize for his 1976 novel Roots: The Saga of an American Family. The book tells of his ancestors being sold into slavery in West Africa and their migration from North Carolina to Tennessee. The following year a TV series of Roots, described as “eight straight days of the Super Bowl,” aired and remains the highest rated TV miniseries in television history. Among the significant impact of Roots was a surge in interest throughout the world in family history research.

TIP: Search the Largest Collection of African American newspapers is in GenealogyBank.

Inside the museum Joseph and his family visited a FamilySearch center sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Through the free online program FamilySearch.org, Joseph explored his ancestral lines. “Basically we were able to type in my grandmother’s mother’s and father’s name, and from there we searched their records and we were able to find information about their parents as well as their siblings, birthdates, wedding dates, things of that nature,” said Matthews. “We made a couple of steps to where we can make some pretty good discoveries in the future as to our family lineage. We’re going to find out a lot more about our family and where we came from.”

According to Art Johnson, FamilySearch area manager, the placement of the FamilySearch center within the Alex Haley Museum is a perfect fit, “I think it’s a great opportunity to simply share the message of family history and genealogy to individuals that come in and commemorate the accomplishments and successes of Mr. Haley’s life. It’s an opportunity to simply bring people in and help them understand their heritage the way that Mr. Haley did.”
William Haley, Alex’s son, said that resources available through
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints are very valuable in searching African-American ancestry. “I always send them to the LDS Church. I say, ‘Well find an LDS Church with a history portion and go in there and they will help you find out who you are and it doesn’t matter what country or anything, they will help you.’ Folks are very surprised at that, but it’s true.”

This is one of several related projects supported by the Church. In 2001, FamilySearch released the Freedman’s Bank records on CD, a unique searchable database documenting several generations of African-Americans immediately following the Civil War. In 2006, FamilySearch participated in the
Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society’s (AAHGS) national conference in Salt Lake City. An African-American family history conference is held in Salt Lake City each year.

The Alex Haley Museum and Interpretive Center and FamilySearch center are located in Henning, Tennessee, about 45 miles northeast of Memphis.

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‘Great American Success Story’ – William & James Ledford

We receive “fan mail” every day – this letter was so good I wanted to share it.
_____________________________________________
Tom,
I’ve been working, several months, on an ‘Great American Success Story’. William L. Ledford and his brother James E. Ledford were born in the mid 1840′s in Cherokee County, NC. by the time they were 6 & 7 years their father had died and they were working in the newly discovered and opened copper mines in eastern Polk Co., TN.

They both married in 1866 and both had children. By 1878 they, with others emigrated to Leadville, Colorado to get into the same industry there but with little success. By the 1890′s they had gone to Butte, Montana. Both their wives had died…both had re-married.

In Butte James ran a saloon selling “Overland Rye Whiskey”. William (WL) had obtained a lease on the land surrounding the streams running from two of the area mines. He knew of a precipitation method he’d learned in Polk’s mines that folks there obviously didn’t know. Newspaper accounts give WL and Jim credit for ‘inventing’ the method on several occasions. In three years WL had accumulated over 100,000.00. A fair sum in 1895. He returned to Tennessee with his new wife and only a few of his children.

We were just about to initiate a search for son Thomas when I subbed to GenealogyBank. Thanks to a fantastic find with your service I located several different articles concerning W.L. and Jim Ledford but one was simply outstanding. It seems that Thomas had died sometime between mid 1898 and July 1899.

WL had told brother Jim to make arrangements for the burial. The person who’d actually done the burial was, apparently, trying to gouge WL so the issue went into the courts.

Thus an article giving very detailed accounts of Jim, WL, one of the missing daughters AND Thomas. WOW

Thanks Tom….

Joyce Gaston Reece, Secretary
Friends of the Archives Historical & Preservation Society
Monroe County, TN
www.rootsweb.com/~tnfahps