How to Find Your Grandfather’s Birth Records Online

Every day we receive questions from our members regarding their family history searches. We are here to help!

Here’s a genealogy question we just received.

GenealogyBank Member Question:

My grandfather Hugh Cornwell was born in Prairie Grove, AR, 4/6/1883. I have been searching for a birth record for the past 20 years with no luck. Any suggestions?

“Ask the Genealogist” Response:

Arkansas vital records do not begin until 1914.

So, while you can possibly obtain a church baptismal certificate, you won’t be able to find a government birth certificate for your grandfather.

I found your grandfather’s California death certificate, which does give his date of birth along with the family surnames of his father and mother. His death certificate is available online on the FamilySearch website at https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VPW3-9Q3.

There is another record for your grandfather in the 1900 census, which also states that he was born in April 1883. His census record is available on FamilySearch.org at https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M9PK-R7K.

Here is a third document with genealogical information about your grandfather: his World War II draft registration card, also showing that he was born on April 6, 1883. You can view your grandfather’s military record at https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/V48Y-54Q.

So, while you cannot get a formal birth certificate—here are three U.S. government documents, created over the past 112 years, that give his date of birth. That should be the evidence you are looking for.

Let’s see how we can help you make progress in your own family history research.

All the best in your genealogy research.

Just Released! 1940 Census Records Are Now Available Online

1940 U.S. Census Newspaper Articles from the Marietta Journal April, 2 1940

1940 U.S. Census Newspaper Article from the Marietta Journal April, 2 1940

The 1940 census began 72 years ago when census enumerators covered the streets of America, documenting every person. This was a very large United States government project; for example, it took 29 census takers just to cover the population of the city of Marietta, Georgia.

Today the 1940 U.S. census was released online completely free to the public. This census release gives genealogists and family historians a fantastic new ancestry research tool. With information on 132 million U.S. citizens, these historical census records are flush with clues we can use to research our genealogy and learn about the lives of our recent American ancestors.

As you dig into the 1940 U.S. census records while doing your own family history research, take some time to read about the great effort it took the U.S. federal government to create this valuable genealogical resource.

The historical newspaper article shown in the graphic above, detailing the work the 29 U.S. census takers did in Marietta, was published by the Marietta Journal (Marietta, Georgia), 2 April 1940, page 1.

Find this old newspaper article and other 1940 census articles in the Marietta Journal, or search our entire historical newspaper archives to discover similar articles about the 1940 census from newspapers all across the United States.

Of course, the 1940 census gives us a snapshot of our ancestors at just one point in time: April 1, 1940. Use GenealogyBank to read about every day of their lives—with newspaper articles from our collection of just under 6,000 newspapers, from all 50 states, going back over 300 years—as well as historical books and government records and documents available at our website.

Tracing Genealogy with Pennsylvania Death Certificates

Every day we get interesting genealogy questions from our members via our Ask the Genealogist service. The following is a good example: a member asked for help finding information about a great-grandfather.

Question:

I am looking for more information on my great-grandfather, Edgar Rhue Harner. He was born in Berks Co., PA, in 1860. He married Naomi Sines and they lived in Delaware Co., PA. No one in the family knows what happened to Edgar. I tracked census info and the last one he appears in with his family is the 1910 census, enumerated in Delaware Co, PA. After much research, I found him in the 1920 census in Norristown, PA, as a patient in the “State Hospital for the Insane.” That hospital, Norristown State Hospital, is still in existence, but I haven’t been able to get any info from them. Everything dead-ends at the 1920 census. I can find NO obituary or death record or any other info at all.

Any suggestions?

Answer from our genealogist:

Since there was no obituary published for him, you want to look for his death certificate. The state of Pennsylvania makes that easy to do. They have put up online indexes for all death certificates from 1906 to 1961 here: http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt?open=514&objID=1085804&mode=2

pennsylvania dept. of health public records death indices

Pennsylvania Dept. of Health Public Records: Death Indices

You need to click on each year and then search the index. This indexing system uses the Soundex system familiar to many genealogists; it assigns codes to sounds to track down surnames and their variants. Harner would code out to H-656.

1922 Pennsylvania death index

1922 Pennsylvania death index

And there he is listed in the deaths for 1922.

Here is your great-grandfather’s entry:

H-656:   Edgar Harner, Certificate Number 106302, Norristn (abbreviation for Norristown), died 11/17 (17 November 1922).

Pennsylvania considers death certificates that are over 50 years old public records. So, your next step is to order a copy of his death certificate.

To apply for a non-certified copy of a death certificate from 1906 through 1961: download the death application form here: 

pennsylvania dept. of health death records application

Pennsylvania Department of Health Death Records application

Mail the completed application to:

Division of Vital Records
ATTN:  Public Records
P.O. Box 1528
New Castle, PA  16103

There is a $3 fee for each non-certified copy ordered. Check or money order should be made payable to Vital Records. Mail requests are processed in approximately 4 months.

Genealogist Shares Her Genealogy Research Success Story!

With GenealogyBank adding more records at the rate of 10 documents a second, we hear from genealogists every day sharing their excitement about their family history discoveries.

Here is a genealogy research success story we received today from GenealogyBank member Michele Lewis.

Deaths in Louisiana Article - New Orleans Item Newspaper

New Orleans Item (Louisiana), 4 September 1911, page 2, column 4

Michele wrote us:

Here is a newspaper success story for you.

My great, great Aunt Ida Perry was born in Purvis, MS, in 1884. She and two of her sisters became nurses. All three graduated from the Charity Hospital School of Nursing in Shreveport, LA. Two of the three contracted TB and died and one of those was Ida. The American Journal of Nursing had printed a blurb about Ida in the March 1906 issue: “Miss Ida Perry has resigned her position of the charity Hospital, Shreveport, La., and will engage in private nursing.” On the 1910 census she is living in Eunice, LA, with her sister Mary (who happens to be the other sister that died of TB). She is listed under her maiden name and as single. That is the last official record we had of Ida. Our only other clue was a picture postcard (undated) that Ida had sent to her brother from Denver, CO, that stated:

“Dear Bro, I am feeling fine. Had this made to show you all how fit I’m getting.

With love to all from ‘Jack’” [Jack was her nickname.]

So we knew that Ida had gone to CO for health reasons, which was common with TB patients. On the back of the picture it stated “Ida Perry Faust” so now we knew she had also gotten married.

We had checked EVERYTHING.

Colorado couldn’t find a death certificate or marriage license and neither could Louisiana. I had run her name through GenealogyBank (of course) and got nothing. We couldn’t determine when and where she had died. We couldn’t find her grave. It was very frustrating.

Yesterday I decided to run her name through GenealogyBank again since I know you regularly add papers and I got a hit! Apparently you had added the New Orleans Item since the first time I ran her name through.

New Orleans Item (Louisiana), 4 September 1911, page 2, column 4

Mrs. Ida Perry Faust

EUNICE, La., Sept. 4—A telegram from Denver (Colo.) brings the news of the death of Mrs. Ida Perry Faust, sister of Mrs. J. N. Adams of this city. The remains will be interred at Purvis (Miss.), the girlhood home of the deceased.

So we finally know! She did die in Denver as we suspected but she died earlier than we thought. She got married, moved, and died in the span of one year (she was still in LA and unmarried on the 1910 census) which means her husband knew she had TB and married her anyway. We are still searching for him. We assumed she had died in Denver but were surprised to see that they brought her back to Mississippi! We know which cemetery she would have been buried in (where the rest of the family is) but there is no marker for her. We might have to rectify that.

If I hadn’t run her name through again I wouldn’t have found this. Unfortunately, I can’t find her in any of the Colorado papers you have (including the Denver ones). I am assuming that the death of a TB sanitarium patient from another state didn’t warrant an obituary.

Congratulations to Michele for this family history success story!

Have you had a similar genealogy research discovery you’d like to share?

The Story of Perkins Swain: A Genealogist’s Online Research Discoveries

Online genealogy research is endlessly fascinating—you never know what you will find. I was doing some family history research in GenealogyBank’s newspaper archive when this double obituary caught my eye. Baltimore Patriot (Baltimore, Maryland), 25 July 1834, page 3.

Just a short, simple notice, 4½ lines long—and yet what a sad story it tells.

Sally Swain, 27-year-old wife of Perkins Swain, died on 17 June 1834 in Gilmanton, New Hampshire. Her husband, Perkins Swain, age 37, “was in [his] usual health at the funeral of his deceased wife”—but abruptly died seven days later. No doubt, of a broken heart.

Can you imagine the grief of the pallbearers? They were probably family members, or at least friends and neighbors, who sadly carried the body of young Sally Swain to her grave on June 17th while her grieving yet healthy husband, Perkins, stood nearby. And then suddenly, just seven days later, those same pallbearers were carrying the body of her husband to join Sally’s gravesite.

Who were this couple struck down by tragedy? This story of a perfectly-healthy husband dying seven days after his young wife’s funeral made me want to research more about them and learn about their lives.

Digging deeper into my genealogy research online, I found a marriage announcement that Perkins Swain married Sally Weymouth in Gilmanton, New Hampshire, in a November 1823 newspaper. Portsmouth Journal of Literature and Politics (Portsmouth, New Hampshire), 15 November 1823, page 3.

Looking at the free collection of New Hampshire marriage certificates online at FamilySearch, I quickly found their marriage certificate. They were married on 23 October 1823 by the Rev. William Blaisdell. FamilySearch.org is a handy genealogy site. It has put up the entire U.S. Census, as well as birth and marriage certificates from all 50 states and many foreign countries. This free website by the Family History Library is well worth a visit to find great genealogical information that can aid in your research. Checking further in GenealogyBank, I found a newspaper probate article showing that Perkins Swain had known tragedy earlier in his life, when he and his brother Gorham were orphaned at age 5 and 4 respectively. The Sun (Dover Gazette & County Advertiser) (Dover, New Hampshire), 21 December 1805, page 4.
Enlarging the first paragraph, we find some interesting details about Perkins Swain’s life.
In this probate notice, Thomas Balch is acting as guardian for the young orphans. We discover that their father was William Swain, “late of Gilmanton,” a tailor who died without leaving a will. Did he die unexpectedly? And why is there no mention of the mother? These are tantalizing questions that require further family history research.

This probate notice also tells us that the two young boys have inherited an estate of 100 acres in Gilmanton.

Continuing to look further in GenealogyBank’s newspaper archive for details about Perkins Swain, I found this public auction notice that perhaps completes the story of his life.
New Hampshire Patriot (Concord, New Hampshire), 19 October 1835, page 3.

A year after his death, the homestead farm of Perkins Swain is being publicly auctioned on Nov. 2, 1835. This farm is a 100-acre parcel in Gilmanton, New Hampshire—the same piece of land we learned about in the probate notice of 1805.

Isn’t it amazing how many details we’ve found out about Perkins Swain, who died in 1834? We have found his marriage and death notices, his marriage certificate, the probate notice when he was orphaned at age 5, and the public auction notice of his farm after his death. With more online genealogy research, we could no doubt uncover even more details about Perkins Swain and his family.

There are so many digitized newspaper articles, historical documents and government records available online today—terrific research resources for genealogists.

This is a great day for genealogy.

Researching Genealogy with Military Records and Lists in Newspapers

Researching Genealogy with Military Records and Lists in Newspapers
From the Revolutionary War to Pearl Harbor to Iraq, newspapers are a valuable resource for researching your military ancestry and learning about the history of war in the United States. Newspapers have been a dependable source of information that Americans have relied upon throughout this nation’s history.

U.S. War History in Newspapers
This was vividly demonstrated after Dec. 7, 1941, when Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor launched the U.S. into World War II. The next day Congress declared war on Japan—and Americans were riveted by the bold headlines and news stories splashed across the front pages of the nation’s newspapers.

Omaha World Journal (Omaha, Nebraska), 8 December 1941, page 1.
Newspapers tell us what happened every day of our ancestors’ lives.
From the Revolutionary War to the wars in the Middle East, newspapers let us read about our ancestors’ participation in the nation’s conflicts—and what the country as a whole went through. We volunteered, we were enlisted in the U.S. military through the draft—and when we didn’t register for the draft, the government issued “slacker lists” to encourage full participation in the war.

U.S. Military Draft Lists
Military draft lists were published in newspapers, like this one printed in the 26 July 1917 issue of the Perry Republican (Perry, Oklahoma), page 1. It is a census of the men living in Noble County, Oklahoma, in 1917—a valuable genealogical resource to help with your family history research.
Similar lists were the “slacker lists” or “draft dodger lists”: listings of those persons that tried to evade the draft. After World War I the United States War Department issued lists of those men that did not register with the military draft. These lists were widely published in newspapers across the country, like this example from the Trenton Evening Times (Trenton, New Jersey), 25 May 1921, page 1.
From the declaration of war through obituaries published decades after the conflict ended, newspapers have been a dependable source of information about our ancestors and their participation in the United States Armed Forces. Newspapers reported on the battles and covered the stories of the war every step along the way. Family historians can gather facts for their family trees and put them in the context of the war as it happened.
U.S. Military Casualty Lists
Another valuable resource for family historians are the war casualty lists many newspapers published. In this example, published in the Macon Telegraph (Macon, Georgia), 6 August 1918, page 1, the newspaper published the full casualty list and spiked out the Georgia men that died in a prominent boxed note that appeared on page one.
Most U.S. citizens do not remain in the military as a lifelong career. However, their military service was almost always mentioned in their obituary notice—as in this example, published in the Barre Gazette (Barre, Massachusetts), 31 July 1840, page 2, of the late Isaac Van Wart (1751-1840) of Tarrytown (Westchester County) and Pittstown (Rensselaer County), New York. Obituaries, birth announcements and marriage notices are some of the excellent resources newspapers provide family historians. During times of war, draft, slacker, and casualty lists are another helpful genealogical resource. In addition to information about your individual ancestors, newspapers provide the stories about what the entire United States was going through, to help you put your ancestors’ experiences in context and thereby come to understand them a little more. Digital newspaper archives online have become the core tool for modern genealogy, helping genealogists and family history researchers discover more about their family’s military past than ever before possible. Baltimore Sun (Baltimore, Maryland), 7 April 1917, page 1.

A Good Woman Can Be Hard to Find…

When researching your family history, it can be very difficult to find information about women in the early 19th Century—finding genealogical resources that actually give women’s names and family details is challenging. It was common in the 19th Century for newspapers and government records to be brief and give only the basic information about a household in the census, or an entry in a birth register.From 1790 through 1840 the census only named one person from each household. This person was designated as the Head of the household. Most Americans—men and women alike—were simply not named in the early censuses.Birth and church registers often took the same approach as the census and only briefly recorded the facts of a birth.

A typical entry might be:
1812 July 28. A son, to Walter Hickenlooper.


What was the son’s or the mother’s name?
Because of these often-incomplete early records, genealogists have to dig deeper to find sources that give more information in order to fill in the missing details of our family trees. For the pre-1850 period newspapers are an import resource for that information, providing obituaries, birth and marriage notices, news reports, and other articles that provide stories and details about our ancestors’ lives often missing in government and church records.This Brundage obituary notice illustrates the point. It appeared in the
Hudson River Chronicle which was published in Sing Sing, New York, on 8 October 1839. The obituary appeared on page 3.


The 1820 Census records a John Brundage living in Bedford, New York, with his wife (unnamed) and family.

However, in the 1840 census neither husband nor wife were listed. Why? The census provides no answers—but this obituary notice does. It tells us that John has previously died and that his widow (Rachael Brundage) died on 26 September 1839 at age “about 44 years”—well before the 1840 census.

From this short obituary notice we have gained two important clues:

· Clue #1. Name: Rachael Brundage, a widow of John Brundage; her age; her date and place of death
· Clue #2. Name of husband: John Brundage, and the fact that he had predeceased her

In addition to the details about Rachael and John Brundage, the article has two other obituary notices. Look at the facts that we find about these women: Harriet Sutherland and Deborah Cornwell.

Harriet Sutherland
The notice tells us that Harriet Sutherland died on 25 September 1839 at “Middle Patent” (North Castle, New York), the widow of John Sutherland. It gives her age as “aged about 46 years.” Two very helpful clues here:

· Clue #1. Name: Harriet Sutherland, a widow of John Sutherland; her age; her date and place of death
· Clue #2. Name of husband: John Sutherland, and the fact that he had predeceased her
Deborah Cornwell
And in the third obituary notice we learn that “Miss Deborah Cornwell, daughter of the late Jonathan Cornwell” died 6 September 1839 in Henrietta, Monroe County, New York, at the “fiftieth year of her age” and that she was “formerly of New Castle (New York).”

Two valuable clues:

· Clue #1. Name: Deborah Cornwell, a daughter of Jonathan Cornwell; her age; her date and place of death; that she formerly lived in New Castle, New York
· Clue #2. Name of father: Jonathan Cornwell, and the fact that he had predeceased her.
It can be difficult to find a good woman in the early 19th Century—but newspapers are a terrific genealogical resource and GenealogyBank has more online newspapers than you will find anywhere else.

Breaking News: 200 million census, death records go online

The Family History Library announced today that another 200 million genealogical records have been put online. This pushes their website to over 700 million records online. FamilySearch.org is now the largest international genealogy collection online.

The Family History Library is “focusing on digitizing and publishing online federal and state censuses and state birth, marriage and death records.”

Today’s release included:
TN Death Records 1914-1955
OH Tax Records 1800-1850
IL Death Records 1916-1947
and more collections from around the world.

Click Here to see the complete list of resources

The latest deluge of records includes 53 new or updated collections from the United States and over 100 million new records from Europe, Scandinavia and Mexico. The United States collections include the 1910 U.S. Census and states’ birth, marriage and death records. There are 10 million new records from New Jersey and Michigan, 4 million from Tennessee, an amazing 41 million from Massachusetts, and many more from other states.

TIP: FamilySearch is your best source for free census and vital records. Original digital records – all free.

“Some time ago, FamilySearch committed to creating access to the world’s genealogical records online in a big way. Today’s updates are part of an ongoing effort to make good on those commitments,” said Paul Nauta, FamilySearch public affairs manager. “We have only just begun,” Nauta concluded. In the U.S., FamilySearch is currently focusing on digitizing and publishing online federal and state censuses and state birth, marriage and death records. When complete, the initiative will provide a definitive collection of U.S. genealogical resources for family history researchers.

In addition to the new U.S. collections, over 100 million records were added to FamilySearch’s international collections online — making it most likely the largest international genealogy collection online. The new international databases come from birth, marriage and death records and from municipal records. Go to FamilySearch.org, then click Search Records and then Record Search pilot to see a full list of the free collections. The records will also soon be available at beta.familysearch.org.
.

Newspapers Go Online -

GenealogyBank keeps on growing!

GenealogyBank.com added more newspaper coverage for over 1,600 newspapers – in all 50 States this week.

Here is just a list of some of the new content that has been added.
Search GenealogyBank now!

AK
Juneau
Daily Record-Miner. 1911-01-05 to 1911-05-04

AL
Birmingham
Wide-Awake*. 1900-01-24
AL
Mobile
Mobile Register. 1970-01-04 to 1978-11-30

AR
Garden City
Jonesboro Evening Sun. 1905-12-02 to 1921-08-18
AR
Little Rock
Arkansas Gazette. 1846-11-02 to 1872-05-19

AZ
San Manuel
San Manuel Miner, The. 03/27/2010 to Current
AZ
Tucson
Amigos. 1976-08-03
AZ
Tucson
Tucsonense. 1917-01-03 to 1922-12-23

CA
Benicia
California Gazette. 1851-08-23 to 1852-01-24
CA
Los Angeles
Prensa. 1932-04-03
CA
Los Angeles
Regeneracion. 1913-01-25 to 1914-02-14
CA
Oakland
Oakland Sunshine*. 1915-03-20 to 1922-02-25
CA
Sacramento
Sacramento Weekly Union. 1851-10-31 to 1853-04-15
CA
San Francisco
Grafico Internacional*. 1937-02-01 to 1937-04-01
CA
San Francisco
Hispano America. 1923-08-25 to 1925-10-10
CA
San Francisco
San Francisco Vindicator*. 1887-05-02 to 1889-02-16
CA
San Francisco
Weekly Pacific News. 1849-12-31 to 1851-04-01

CO
Colorado Springs
Gazette-Telegraph. 1904-09-29 to 1907-08-02

CT
Hartford
Hartford Daily Courant. 1868-04-07 to 1876-12-30
CT
Hartford
Hartford Daily Courant. 1852-02-20 to 1866-05-29
CT
New London
New London Daily Chronicle. 1850-09-03 to 1852-06-23

DC
Washington
Leader*. 1888-12-08 to 1889-12-21
DC
Washington
Washington Bee. 1882-06-10 to 1920-06-26

FL
Jasper
Jasper News, The. 03/27/2010 to Current
FL
Mayo
Mayo Free Press, The. 03/17/2010 to Current
FL
Tampa
Internacional. 1941-02-27
FL
Tampa
Traduccion Prensa. 1946-05-06

GA
Americus
Americus Times-Recorder. 2010-05-06 to Current
GA
Augusta
Augusta Chronicle. 1841-10-19 to 1860-12-30
GA
Augusta
Loyal Georgian*. 1866-01-20 to 1868-02-15
GA
Savannah
Savannah Weekly Echo*. 1883-08-26 to 1884-02-10

HI
Homolulu
Afro-Hawaii News*. 1987-06-01 to 1991-12-31

IA
Des Moines
Iowa State Bystander*. 1896-11-13 to 1900-12-28
IA
Des Moines
Weekly Avalanche*. 1893-01-20
IA
Oskaloosa
Oskaloosa Herald. 2010-03-24 to Current
IA
Ottumwa
Ottumwa Courier, The. 2010-03-05 to Current

IL
Chicago
Latin Times. 1958-10-04 to 1972-05-05
IL
Chicago
Sunday Times. 1874-07-19
IL
Effingham
Effingham Daily News. 2010-01-29 to Current

IN
Indianapolis
Freeman. 1899-08-17 to 1916-11-25
IN
Indianapolis
Recorder*. 1899-01-07 to 1900-12-29
IN
New Albany
Weekly Review*. 1881-04-16

KS
Baxter Springs
Southern Argus*. 1891-06-18 to 1892-02-04
KS
Coffeyville
Afro-American Advocate. 1891-09-02 to 1893-09-01
KS
Coffeyville
American*. 1898-04-23 t0 1899-04-23
KS
Coffeyville
Kansas Blackman*. 1894-04-20 to 1894-06-29
KS
Lawrence
Historic Times*. 1891-07-11 to 1891-11-14
KS
Leavenworth
Leavenworth Advocate. 1888-08-18 to 1891-08-22
KS
Leavenworth
Leavenworth Herald*. 1894-02-07 to 1896-12-26
KS
Nicodemus
Nicodemus Cyclone*. 1887-12-30 to 1888-09-07
KS
Nicodemus
Nicodemus Enterprise*. 1887-08-17 to 1887-12-23
KS
Parsons
Parsons Weekly Blade*. 1892-09-24 to 1900-12-28
KS
Topeka
American Citizen. 1897-01-29 to 1902-05-23
KS
Topeka
American Citizen. 1889-01-11 to 1889-06-21
KS
Topeka
Benevolent Banner*. 1887-05-21 to 1887-10-22
KS
Topeka
Colored Patriot*. 1882-04-20 to 1882-06-22
KS
Topeka
Evening Call*. 1893-06-13 to 1893-07-08
KS
Topeka
Herald of Kansas*. 1880-01-30 to 1880-06-11
KS
Topeka
Plaindealer. 1900-01-26
KS
Wichita
National Baptist World*. 1894-08-31 to 1894-11-23
KS
Wichita
People’s Friend*. 1894-05-24 to 1894-05-24
KS
Wichita
Wichita Times*. 1972-01-11 to 1977-09-22

LA
New Orleans
L’Union*. 1862-09-27 to 1864-07-19
LA
New Orleans
Times-Picayune. 1940-06-22 to 1975-07-28
LA
New Orleans
Times-Picayune. 1866-02-13 to 1879-12-16
LA
New Orleans
Weekly Louisianian. 1882-01-14
LA
New Orleans
Weekly Pelican. 1887-01-29 to 1889-08-31
LA
St. Martinville
Echo*. 1873-03-15

MA
Amherst
Amherst Bulletin. 2009-10-02 to Current
MA
Boston
Boston Daily Advertiser. 1874-01-01 to 1874-04-30
MA
Lawrence
Eagle-Tribune, The. 2010-05-12 to Current
MA
Provincetown
Provincetown Banner. 2009-10-02 to Current
MA
Springfield
Springfield Republican. 1925-02-01 to 1946-09-26
MA
Springfield
Springfield Republican. 1886-12-02
MA
Springfield
Springfield Union. 1947-04-01 to 1963-02-15
MA
Worcester
National Aegis. 1825-01-12 to 1827-12-12

MD
Baltimore
Afro-American*. 1893-04-29 to 1898-03-26
MD
Baltimore
Baltimore American. 1905-06-18 to 1910-04-24
MD
Baltimore
Race Standard*. 1897-01-02 to 1897-01-16

MI
Detroit
Plaindealer. 1889-09-27 to 1892-11-18
MI
Grand Rapids
Grand Rapids Press, The. 2010-05-12 to Current
MI
Holland
Holland Sentinel, The. 2009-10-02 to Current

MN
Minneapolis
Afro-American Advance*. 1899-05-27 to 1900-11-17
MN
Sleepy Eye
Sleepy Eye Herald Dispatch. 2009-10-02 to Current
MN
St. Paul
Broad Axe. 1894-02-01 to 1902-06-12
MN
St. Paul
Negro World*. 1900-03-10 to 1900-06-09
MN
St. Paul
St. Paul Daily Pioneer. 1855-11-01 to 1855-12-22
MN
St. Paul
Western Appeal*. 1885-06-13 to 1888-12-29

MO
Kansas City
Cosmopolita. 1917-12-08 to 1919-11-15
MO
Kansas City
Kansas City Times. 1891-12-23 to 1895-10-16
MO
Kansas City
Rising Son*. 1903-01-16 to 1907-12-28
MO
Sedalia
Sedalia Times*. 1901-08-31 to 1903-12-19
MO
St. James
St. James Leader Journal. 2009-10-02 to Current
MO
St. Louis
St. Louis Palladium*. 1903-01-10 to 1907-10-05

NC
Asheboro
Courier-Tribune, The. 2010-04-06 to Current
NC
Boone
Watauga Democrat, The. 2009-10-02 to Current
NC
Littleton
True Reformer*. 1900-07-25
NC
Nashville
Nashville Graphic, The. 2010-01-28 to Current
NC
Raleigh
Gazette*. 1893-12-16 to 1898-02-19

NE
Omaha
Afro-American Sentinel. 1896-04-25 to 1899-03-25
NE
Omaha
Enterprise*. 1895-08-10 to 1897-07-03
NE
Omaha
Progress*. 1890-03-22 to 1891-03-07

NH
Concord
New Hampshire Patriot. 1879-06-26 to 1881-02-17
NH
Exeter
Freeman’s Oracle. 1786-07-01 to 1789-07-28

NJ
Flemington
Hunterdon County Democrat. 2009-10-02 to Current
NJ
Wayne
Wayne Today. 2009-10-14 to Current

NM
Albuquerque
Bandera Americana. 1903-10-01 to 1903-11-06
NM
Albuquerque
Daily Citizen. 1887-03-16 to 1892-12-31
NM
Albuquerque
Daily Times*. 1893-06-14
NM
Albuquerque
Evening Citizen. 1893-06-29 to 1893-06-29
NM
Las Cruces
Labrador. 1904-12-30
NM
Las Cruces
Tiempo. 1885-04-30 to 1902-04-02
NM
Las Vegas
Misionero Bautista: Organo Oficial de la Convencion Bautista Hispano-Americana de Nuevo Mexico. 1943-12-21 to 1951-08-21
NM
Mesilla
Mesilla News. 1879-04-19 to 1884-02-09
NM
Mountainair
Independent. 1918-02-02 to 1920-09-25
NM
Santa Fe
Daily New Mexican. 1871-04-15 to 1875-06-30
NM
Santa Fe
Santa Fe Weekly New Mexican and Livestock Journal. 1888-05-31 to 1895-09-26
NM
Socorro
Defensor del Pueblo. 1924-12-19 to 1938-02-11
NM
Springer
Colfax County Stockman. 1910-07-23 to 1911-06-10

NY
Albany
Albany Evening Journal. 1857-07-23 to 1876-12-13
NY
Brooklyn
Colonia Latina*. 1938-01-08
NY
Garden City
Eco. 1930-11-15
NY
New York
Morning Telegraph. 1877-12-09
NY
New York
New York Herald-Tribune. 1874-11-02 to 1888-11-02
NY
New York
Cosas*. 1931-12-03
NY
New York
Doctrina de Marti. 1897-04-30 to 1897-08-31
NY
New York
Ecos de Nueva York. 1954-10-10
NY
New York
New York Age*. 1889-11-02 to 1892-11-19
NY
New York
New York Freeman*. 1886-01-02 to 1887-10-08
NY
New York
Western Star*. 1900-01-27

OH
Cincinnati
Cincinnati Daily Gazette. 1867-04-13 to 1881-02-03
OH
Cleveland
Cleveland Gazette*. 1883-12-01 to 1941-08-09
OH
Cleveland
Plain Dealer. 1947-11-23 to 1975-12-10
OH
Cleveland
Plain Dealer. 1846-02-27 to 1858-10-30

OR
Portand
Oregonian. 1917-07-03 to 1918-08-12
OR
Portland
New Age*. 1900-01-27 to 1902-09-20
OR
Portland
Oregonian. 1925-08-22 to 1971-11-20
OR
Portland
Portland New Age*. 1905-12-23 to 1907-03-30

PA
Harrisburg
State Journal*. 1883-12-13 to 1885-01-24
PA
Philadelphia
Aurora General Advertiser. 1796-03-24
PA
Philadelphia
Philadelphia Inquirer. 1830-01-08 to 1831-12-28

SC
Charleston
South Carolina Leader*. 1865-10-07 to 1866-05-12
SC
Columbia
Southern Indicator*. 1921-02-21 to 1923-02-03

TN
Knoxville
Negro World*. 1887-10-15 to 1887-11-26

TX
Beaumont
Beaumont Enterprise and Journal. 1906-04-11 to 1911-09-23
TX
Brownsville
Cronista del Valle. 1925-01-23 to 1929-09-06
TX
Brownsville
Daily Cosmopolitan. 1884-09-10 to 1885-07-11
TX
Brownsville
Heraldo de Brownsville. 1937-12-30 to 1940-02-28
TX
Brownsville
Puerto. 1959-03-21
TX
Dallas
Dallas Morning News. 1979-11-11 to 1980-07-20
TX
Edinburg
Defensor. 1931-07-10
TX
El Paso
Clarin del Norte. 1906-08-11 to 1906-10-06
TX
El Paso
Continental. 1935-12-31 to 1960-03-08
TX
El Paso
Defensor*. 1894-09-24 to 1895-03-03
TX
El Paso
Sunday Herald. 1888-10-28 to 1889-05-18
TX
Fort Worth
Torchlight Appeal*. 1890-01-17 to 1890-02-22
TX
Houston
Gaceta Mexicana. 1928-05-15
TX
Kingsville
Notas de Kingsville*. 1957-05-16 to 1960-08-18
TX
Kingsville
Tex. Mex. Reflector. 1922-04-21 to 1939-01-21
TX
Laredo
Evolucion. 1917-06-30 to 1918-08-11
TX
San Antonio
Epoca. 1919-03-23 to 1927-05-08
TX
San Antonio
Pan American Labor Express. 1918-08-28 to 1918-11-13
TX
San Antonio
Regidor. 1913-08-14 to 1915-06-30

UT
Salt Lake City
Broad Ax. 1897-02-06 to 1899-12-23
UT
Salt Lake City
Salt Lake Telegram. 1907-10-04 to 1922-11-12

VA
Richmond
Reformer*. 1900-01-27
VA
Richmond
Richmond Planet*. 1895-03-02 to 1900-01-13

WA
Seattle
Seattle Daily Times. 1936-10-20 to 1984-12-31
WA
Seattle
Seattle Republican*. 1900-01-19
WA
Seattle
World*. 1899-01-04

WI
Milwaukee
Guardia. 1969-10-21 to 1975-08-01
WI
Milwaukee
Wisconsin Afro-American*. 1892-08-13 to 1892-11-19