January Update: GenealogyBank Just Added 27 Million More Records!

Every day, GenealogyBank is working hard to digitize more newspapers and obituaries, expanding our collection to give you the largest newspaper archives for family history research available online. We just completed adding 27 million more U.S. genealogy records, vastly increasing our content coverage from coast to coast!

screenshot of GenealogyBank's home page showing the Monthly Update for January of 27 million new records

Here are some of the details about our most recent U.S. newspaper additions:

  • A total of 13 newspaper titles from 5 U.S. states
  • 9 of these titles are newspapers added to GenealogyBank for the first time
  • We’ve shown the newspaper issue date ranges so that you can determine if the newly added content is relevant to your personal genealogy research

To see our newspaper archives’ complete title lists, click here.

State City Title Coverage Added Collection
California Riverside Riverside Daily Press 01/01/1941 – 01/28/1941 Newspaper Archives
Louisiana New Orleans Louisiana Advertiser 08/18/1826 – 08/18/1826 Newspaper Archives
Louisiana New Orleans Times-Picayune 11/02/1850 – 03/28/1922 Newspaper Archives
Minnesota Faribault Faribault Daily News New! 07/10/2002 – Current Recent Obituaries
New York Brooklyn Bay News & Brooklyn Graphic New! 05/02/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
New York Brooklyn Bay Ridge Courier New! 08/11/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
New York Brooklyn Brooklyn Courier New! 05/02/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
New York New York East Villager New! 12/16/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
New York Brooklyn Kings Courier New! 09/30/2011 – Current Recent Obituaries
New York Brooklyn Mill-Marine Courier New! 05/02/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
Wisconsin Milwaukee Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel 06/09/1964 – 07/15/1964 Newspaper Archives
Wisconsin Minocqua Lakeland Times New! 03/13/2003 – Current Recent Obituaries
Wisconsin Rhinelander Northwoods River News New! 11/15/2000 – Current Recent Obituaries

Genealogy Tip: One of the ways to take advantage of the fact that Genealogy is constantly adding new content is to use a feature on the newspapers’ search box that lets you search just on the content added since a certain time:

screenshot of GenealogyBank's search box showing ability to search only on newest added content

GenealogyBank adds millions of new records monthly, so keep searching. And good luck with your family history research!

Amelia Earhart: First Solo Flight from Hawaii to California

Amelia Earhart electrified the world during the 1920s and ’30s with her daring feats of flying and the many aviation records she set. In 1932 she became the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic – for this 15-hour feat of endurance and pluck she became the first woman to receive the Distinguished Flying Cross. That same year, she became the first woman to fly nonstop across the U.S.

Photo: Amelia Earhart, c. 1928

Photo: Amelia Earhart, c. 1928. Source: U.S. Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Then, on this day in 1935, Earhart took off from Hawaii and became the first pilot, male or female, to fly solo from Hawaii to California, accomplishing this unprecedented feat in a grueling 18 hours.

Earhart was an established celebrity by the time of her 1935 Hawaii-California flight, with huge crowds greeting her public appearances and record-setting flights. During the last three hours of her Hawaii-California flight there had been no radio contact with her, yet when she landed in Oakland, California, on January 12 a rapturous crowd of 5,000 people awaited her, showering her and her plane with flowers and eagerly reaching to shake her hand.

Earhart’s record-setting flight was big news at the time, and was featured prominently on the front pages of the nation’s newspapers – such as this one from South Dakota.

article about Amelia Earhart’s solo flight from Hawaii to California in 1935, Aberdeen Daily News newspaper article 13 January 1935

Aberdeen Daily News (Aberdeen, South Dakota), 13 January 1935, page 1

This article gave details of her challenging flight, and the wild, cheering reception she received when she finally landed.

article about Amelia Earhart’s solo flight from Hawaii to California in 1935, Aberdeen Daily News newspaper article 13 January 1935

Aberdeen Daily News (Aberdeen, South Dakota), 13 January 1935, page 1

Here is a transcription of this newspaper article:

Amelia Earhart Completes Flight to U.S.

Finishes First Solo Flight in 18 Hours Time

‘Lady Lindy’ Expresses Weariness as Wheels Touch Earth of Airport
Had No Major Trouble
Declares Pacific Crossing Worst than Atlantic; Prophesies Airways

By Louis Ashlock
(Copyright, 1935, by the AP)

Oakland, Calif., Jan. 12—(AP)—Amelia Earhart Putnam, ocean-conquering aviatrix, flashed into Oakland today to complete the first solo flight ever made between Hawaii and California—and hastily combed her tousled blonde hair before turning to face a madly cheering, milling crowd.

“I’m tired,” said the famous holder of many aviation records as she popped her head out of the cockpit, saw the crowd and reached for her comb.

The wheels of her swift red monoplane touched dry land at 1:31 p.m. PST (3:31 p.m. CST), just 18 hours and 16 minutes after her exciting takeoff from Wheeler Field, 25 miles out of Honolulu and 2,408 miles from Oakland. Two hours after landing she went to bed without benefit of negligee, in an Oakland hotel.

Host of Honors

Not satisfied with two aerial trips across the Atlantic and a host of other aviation honors, the 36-year-old aviatrix challenged the Pacific as has no other man or woman. She came through neatly but only after fighting a variety of weather and giving California watchers an uneasy three hours during which her position was not known.

“It was worse than the Atlantic flight,” she said. “There was no purpose or reason for it.”

Asked about reports that she was considering continuing on to Chicago or Washington immediately, she smiled mysteriously and said: “Well, I’ll have to check the weather before hopping, but I won’t be going for three or four hours.”

But Miss Earhart appeared pretty tired and the circumstances discounted the idea. Airport attendants said she had left instructions not to refuel her plane. Weather conditions to the east were reported unfavorable.

For three hours California coastal cities had been awaiting her, and when she swooped down on the airport she took the crowd by surprise.

Greeted by Crowd

A mighty cheer arose from the 5,000 persons assembled at the field. The crowd surged toward the plane and stopped little short of its whirring propeller blades.

It was at that point feminine instinct got the better of the globetrotting flier and she reached for the comb.

They pushed her plane into a hangar and closed the doors against the admiring crowd but only after many had succeeded in grasping her hand and shouting words of praise at her.

“I don’t want to sit down,” she said firmly when an attendant saw her fatigue and offered her a chair. “I’ve been sitting down a long time.”

Someone mentioned that she had not been heard from for a considerable time before landing; that there were reports she was battling fog; had strayed from her course; that her gasoline was running low before she reached the coast. They asked if she had been worried.

“Worried?” she echoed. “Oh, I thought I would like to have the sight of land a couple of times.”

First Saw Land

Miss Earhart asserted she never was lost but said she veered south of her course and first sighted land about 60 miles south of San Francisco.

“I wasn’t sure that it was land I sighted,” she said. “I throttled back my motor purposely to save fuel and I don’t understand why anyone should have been worried about me. The reason I didn’t give my position was because I didn’t “shoot” the stars (with a sextant) and therefore couldn’t give it.”

An interviewer mentioned seeing a rainbow over the Golden Gate as Miss Earhart was nearing the coast.

“Oh, rainbows!” she exclaimed. “I flew through many of them.

“I wasted a lot of time because some of the equipment was new, and a new type of compass threw me off. The ventilators blew off and this bothered me considerably also.”

Motor Never Faltered

“But the motor functioned perfectly and it was only little things, like the ventilator, that bothered me.

“I had a lot of sandwiches with me but I didn’t eat any of them. I did eat a hard-boiled egg, which was quite a luxury, and drank some tomato juice. I feel just filthy and I want a bath.”

Miss Earhart said commercial flights between the islands and California were “entirely feasible.”

“They are inevitable,” she said, “and we’ll be flying everywhere in a short time.”

Asked about the three hours during which the outside world heard little or nothing from her plane she said: “I listened to a message broadcast from my husband (George Palmer Putnam, New York publisher) and was greatly cheered by his voice. I also listened to musical programs broadcast throughout the night.”

Miss Earhart said she believed the use of two-way voice radio communication was advisable for planes making distance flights. This type of radio was a portion of her elaborate equipment.

As she snuggled down into a soft bed in her hotel room she sighed and said:

Needs Sleep

“I want sleep more than anything else.”

In a moment she was sleeping deeply and hotel attaches said she planned to slumber two to six hours—“or maybe more.”

The finale of the epochal flight was short as it was swift. On reaching the coast she made a bee-line northward for the airport.

She didn’t waste a foot of distance or a second of time. She did not circle the field as a gesture of delight over her extraordinary and exciting feat. She slid straight down to the runway and drove the plane to the doors of a hangar.

For a moment it looked like the crowd might jam madly into the propeller but it stopped just short of the danger line.

The field was a bedlam of noise, cheers and action, colored with uncounted bouquets of American beauty roses and other flowers for the woman who became “one up” on the male flying fraternity.

Related Article:

November Update: GenealogyBank Just Added 5 Million More Records!

Every day, GenealogyBank is working hard to digitize more newspapers and obituaries, expanding our collection to give you the largest newspaper archives for family history research available online. We just completed adding 5 million more U.S. genealogy records, vastly increasing our content coverage from coast to coast!

screenshot of GenealogyBank's home page showing the announcement that 5 million more records were added in November

Here are some of the details about our most recent U.S. newspaper additions:

  • A total of 27 newspaper titles from 16 U.S. states
  • 12 of these titles are newspapers added to GenealogyBank for the first time
  • We’ve shown the newspaper issue date ranges so that you can determine if the newly added content is relevant to your personal genealogy research

To see our newspaper archives’ complete title lists, click here.

State City Title Coverage Added Collection
Arizona Tombstone Daily Tombstone 06/03/1886 – 06/09/1886 Newspaper Archives
Arizona Tombstone Tombstone Daily Epitaph 06/02/1886 – 12/07/1889 Newspaper Archives
Arizona Tombstone Tombstone Daily Prospector 04/12/1889 – 11/22/1889 Newspaper Archives
Arizona Tombstone Tombstone Epitaph Prospector 04/25/1889 – 04/25/1889 Newspaper Archives
California Chowchilla Chowchilla NewsNew! 05/17/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Connecticut Ansonia, Derby, Seymour Valley Gazette, The: Web Edition Articles New! 11/05/2012 – Current Recent Obituaries
Idaho Lewiston Lewiston Tribune 11/28/1971 – 12/31/1973 Newspaper Archives
Indiana Crown Point Crown Point StarNew! 02/05/2015 – Current Recent Obituaries
Kansas Prairie Village Prairie Village PostNew! 10/13/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Louisiana New Orleans New Orleans Item 08/28/1911 – 08/18/1915 Newspaper Archives
Louisiana New Orleans New Orleans States 09/25/1922 – 09/25/1922 Newspaper Archives
Louisiana New Orleans Times-Picayune 04/07/1858 – 06/14/1976 Newspaper Archives
Maryland Baltimore Sun 07/20/1914 – 09/05/1914 Newspaper Archives
Massachusetts Fairhaven AdvocateNew! 02/26/2015 – Current Recent Obituaries
Mississippi Biloxi Daily Herald 10/01/1954 – 10/30/1954 Newspaper Archives
New Jersey Bergen County Cliffview PilotNew! 06/28/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
New Jersey Jersey City Jersey Journal 01/17/1966 – 12/31/1969 Newspaper Archives
North Carolina Winston-Salem Winston-Salem Journal 06/23/1915 – 06/23/1915 Newspaper Archives
Pennsylvania Philadelphia Philly WeeklyNew! 12/05/2001 – Current Recent Obituaries
Pennsylvania Sanatoga Sanatoga PostNew! 11/13/2008 – Current Recent Obituaries
South Carolina Charleston Charleston News and Courier 12/14/1924 – 02/28/1946 Newspaper Archives
South Carolina Charleston Evening Post 02/02/1976 – 02/28/1977 Newspaper Archives
Texas Houston Houston Chronicle 10/15/1901 – 12/31/1904 Newspaper Archives
Wisconsin Bay View South Shore NOWNew! 01/21/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries
Wisconsin Greenfield Greenfield-West Allis NOWNew! 08/20/2009 – Current Recent Obituaries
Wisconsin Milwaukee Packer PlusNew! 05/06/2004 – Current Recent Obituaries
Wisconsin Muskego, New Berlin Muskego-New Berlin NOWNew! 02/04/2010 – Current Recent Obituaries

True Ghost Stories from America’s Most Haunted Old Cemeteries?

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this blog article – just in time for Halloween – Gena searches old newspapers to uncover eerie stories of ghostly sightings and hauntings at some of America’s oldest cemeteries.

In my work as a genealogist, I’ve been to cemeteries all over America. I’ve even written a book (Cemeteries of the Eastern Sierra) about cemeteries in the Eastern Sierra mountain range of California. And because I’ve been to so many cemeteries I’ve also had diverse experiences on these visits – from a tender scene of a deer family grazing on the morning grass, to an opened grave and its skeleton inhabitant. But I have, luckily, never seen a ghost during my various cemetery trips.

illustration of a ghost in a cemetery

Source: Ghost Horror Collections

However, there have been plenty of ghost sightings by others who visit America’s cemeteries, and some of these cemeteries are rather notorious for their paranormal activity. Have you had a supernatural experience of your own at any of these famous haunted cemeteries?

New Orleans Voodoo Queen Marie Laveau

One of the more infamous New Orleans citizens was Marie Laveau. While today her name is synonymous with voodoo, it’s obvious from her obituary that she was a well-regarded citizen of her community – although there were those at the time who feared her strange priestess powers.

Her obituary reports:

On Wednesday the invalid sank into the sleep which knows no waking. Those whom she had befriended crowded into the little room where she was exposed, in order to obtain a last look at the features, smiling even in death, of her who had been so kind to them.

Known as the “Voodoo Queen of New Orleans,” Laveau willingly administered to the sick.

According to her obituary:

Besides being very beautiful Marie was also very wise. She was skillful in the practice of medicine and was acquainted with the valuable healing qualities of indigenous herbs. She was very successful as a nurse, wonderful stories being told of her exploits at the sick bed. In yellow fever and cholera epidemics she was always called upon to nurse the sick, and always responded promptly.

obituary for Marie Laveau, Times-Picayune newspaper article 17 June 1881

Times-Picayune (New Orleans, Louisiana), 17 June 1881, page 8

Marie’s obituary concludes:

All in all Marie Laveau was a most wonderful woman. Doing good for the sake of doing good alone, she obtained no reward, oft times meeting with prejudice and loathing, she was nevertheless contented and did not flag in her work…Marie Laveau’s name will not be forgotten in New Orleans.

Not only has her name not been forgotten, some people insist her healing powers remain active. Generations of visitors to her tomb in Saint Louis Cemetery have marked an “X” on its walls and made a wish for her to grant, returning with an offering after the wish was supposedly granted. Yes, some have reported feeling a presence at her tomb or a hand on their shoulder – this “ghost story” is about what Marie does for others from the beyond.

article about Marie Laveau's tomb in New Orleans, Advocate newspaper article10 August 1976

Advocate (Baton Rouge, Louisiana), 10 August 1976, page 28

However, unlike most ghost tales involving America’s old cemeteries, this one has had an unfortunate consequence. Years of those “X” marks have led to damage to her family tomb and the resulting closure of the cemetery to the public (to visit the cemetery now you must have family buried there or be part of a guided tour).

It’s now134 years later, and the last sentence of Marie’s obituary continues to ring true: “Marie Laveau’s name will not be forgotten in New Orleans.”

Celebrity Ghost Sightings

Even celebrities have been known to haunt America’s old cemeteries. Hollywood Forever Cemetery in Southern California is known for its celebrity burials. Some of the famous who reside there include Douglas Fairbanks, Jayne Mansfield, and Rudolph Valentino. As with any old cemetery it also has its share of ghost stories, including one non-resident ghost that comes to visit.

Marion Davies, film actress and longtime mistress of newspaperman William Randolph Hearst, died in September 1961 after succumbing to cancer. She was buried in Hollywood Forever Cemetery in a family mausoleum that would later include her “niece” Patricia Lake.

obituary for Marion Davies, Springfield Union newspaper article 23 September 1961

Springfield Union (Springfield, Massachusetts), 23 September 1961, page 1

Hearst died almost 10 year prior to Davies and was buried in Northern California at Cypress Lawn Memorial Park in Colma. Still married when he died, Hearst had openly lived with Davies and is rumored to have fathered a child with her – Patricia Lake – who was raised by Davies’ sister. Davies played hostess and helped Hearst with financial matters, even providing him a million dollar check when his business was in trouble. All this happened while he was married to his wife Millicent, who escaped the day-to-day reality of the scandal by moving to New York to conduct her philanthropic work – out of sight of her husband’s affair.

obituary for William Randolph Hearst, Dallas Morning News newspaper article 15 August 1951

Dallas Morning News (Dallas, Texas), 15 August 1951, page 1

With Hearst and Davies long gone, you’d think their story had come to an end — but not so. Some startled visitors to Hollywood Forever Cemetery have reported seeing the ghost of William Randolph Hearst haunting the gravesites of the mistress he loved and the daughter he could never publicly acknowledge.

Nevermore, Nevermore

It probably comes as no surprise that the final resting place for writer Edgar Allen Poe is haunted.

obituary for Edgar Allen Poe, Enquirer newspaper article 16 October 1849

Enquirer (Richmond, Virginia), 16 October 1849, page 4

Most people are familiar with the story of the mysterious visitor, the “Poe Toaster,” who for 75 years – starting in 1934 – visited Poe’s grave in the middle of the night on January 19 (the author’s birthday), drank a toast to him, and left three roses and the rest of the bottle of cognac.

article about the mysterious "Poe Toaster" who secretly visited Edgar Allan Poe's tomb for 75 years, Register Star newspaper article 23 January 2004

Register Star (Rockford, Illinois), 23 January 2004, page 25

Poe’s mysterious visitor made his last appearance in 2009, the 200th anniversary of the author’s birth. He – or it – was never identified, and perhaps never will be.

And while some have claimed that Poe’s ghost walks the cemetery catacombs, there are other ghostly residents that make Westminster Hall and Burying Ground (established in 1787) repeatedly named as one of the most haunted cemeteries.

The “Screaming Skull of Cambridge,” a head belonging to a murdered minister, is just one of the ghostly residents of this old Baltimore, Maryland, cemetery reported by visitors. The ghost story goes that his corpse would scream day and night, so his mouth was gagged in an effort to muffle the ongoing screams. When that didn’t work his body was decapitated and his skull was buried in a block of cement. Other reported ghosts roaming the old cemetery grounds include a teenage girl that can be seen praying by her grave, and a woman who spent time in an asylum who follows visitors around the cemetery. She is quite recognizable since she was buried in a strait jacket.

Ghosts in the Cemetery

Do you live by a haunted cemetery? Have you ever seen a ghost? If you want to research the cemetery you’ve visited, or learn more about the rumors you heard about a ghost sighting there, search GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives.

There’s no doubt that genealogists spend a lot of time walking through old cemeteries and are the most likely folks to see the supernatural. Whether you enjoy seeking out haunted experiences or would rather stay safely away from such places, have a Happy Halloween!

Related Cemetery Articles:

August Update: 4 Million Genealogy Records Just Added!

Every day, GenealogyBank is working hard to digitize more newspapers and obituaries, expanding our burgeoning collection to give you the largest newspaper archives for family history research available online. We just completed adding 4 million more U.S. genealogy records, vastly increasing our content coverage from coast to coast!

screenshot of GenealogyBank's homepage showing the Monthly Update for the month of August

Here are some of the details about our most recent U.S. newspaper additions:

  • A total of 30 newspaper titles from 19 U.S. states plus the District of Columbia
  • 10 of these titles are newspapers added to GenealogyBank for the first time
  • Newspaper titles marked with an asterisk (*) are new to our online archives
  • We’ve shown the newspaper issue date ranges so that you can determine if the newly added content is relevant to your personal genealogy research

To see our newspaper archives’ complete title lists, click here.

State City Title Date Range Collection
California Idyllwild Idyllwild Town Crier 11/1/1946–12/20/1947 Newspaper Archives
California Redding Free Press 1/2/1892–12/31/1892 Newspaper Archives
California Riverside Riverside Daily Press 4/1/1941–6/30/1941 Newspaper Archives
California San Francisco San Francisco Chronicle 1/1/1871–8/31/1984 Newspaper Archives
Connecticut Cheshire Cheshire Citizen, The* 11/20/2012–Current Recent Obituaries
Connecticut New Canaan New Canaan Messenger 1/2/1904–12/25/1909 Newspaper Archives
District of Columbia Washington (DC) Washington Times 3/1/1982–10/31/1989 Newspaper Archives
Idaho Boise Idaho Statesman 10/21/1886–12/6/1970 Newspaper Archives
Idaho Idaho Falls Idaho Falls Times* 5/16/1966–5/31/1966 Newspaper Archives
Indiana Evansville Evansville Courier and Press 1/1/1932–12/31/1937 Newspaper Archives
Kentucky Lexington Lexington Herald-Leader* 3/1/1951–1/8/1984 Newspaper Archives
Kentucky Lexington Lexington Leader 1/1/1965–9/15/1981 Newspaper Archives
Louisiana New Orleans New Orleans States 11/1/1923–11/30/1928 Newspaper Archives
Louisiana New Orleans Times-Picayune 1/1/1860–9/3/1860 Newspaper Archives
Maryland Baltimore Sun 1/28/1921–2/20/1921 Newspaper Archives
Massachusetts Manomet Manomet Current, The* 04/27/2011–Current Recent Obituaries
Mississippi Biloxi Daily Herald* 4/1/1953–12/31/1955 Newspaper Archives
Missouri Kansas City Kansas City Star 5/27/1945–7/12/1945 Newspaper Archives
New Mexico Albuquerque Albuquerque Morning Democrat 9/20/1882–12/30/1885 Newspaper Archives
North Carolina Winston-Salem Winston-Salem Journal 4/1/1921–12/31/1922 Newspaper Archives
Ohio Cleveland Cleveland Leader 7/6/1902–7/6/1902 Newspaper Archives
Oklahoma Coweta Coweta American* 03/13/2006–Current Recent Obituaries
Pennsylvania Bristol LevittownNow.com* 03/13/2013–Current Recent Obituaries
Pennsylvania State College Centre Daily Times 7/1/1988–12/31/1996 Newspaper Archives
South Carolina Charleston Charleston News and Courier 5/1/1970–5/1/1970 Newspaper Archives
South Carolina Charleston Evening Post 11/1/1977–11/30/1977 Newspaper Archives
Texas Austin Texas State Gazette 8/25/1849–6/7/1851 Newspaper Archives
Texas San Angelo San Angelo LIVE!* 06/09/2015–Current Recent Obituaries
Virginia Dumfries, Stafford, Woodbridge Potomac Local* 06/28/2010–Current Recent Obituaries
West Virginia Charleston Charleston Gazette-Mail* 07/20/2015–Current Recent Obituaries

Related Articles:

July 2015 Update: GenealogyBank Just Added 8 Million More Records!

Every day, GenealogyBank is working hard to digitize more newspapers and obituaries, expanding our collection to give you the largest newspaper archives for family history research available online. We just completed adding 8 million more U.S. genealogy records, vastly increasing our content coverage from coast to coast!

screenshot of GenealogyBank's home page showing the announcement that 8 million genealogy records were added in July

Here are some of the details about our most recent U.S. newspaper additions:

  • A total of 22 newspaper titles from 13 U.S. states plus the District of Columbia
  • 9 of these titles are newspapers added to GenealogyBank for the first time
  • Newspaper titles marked with an asterisk (*) are new to our online archives
  • We’ve shown the newspaper issue date ranges so that you can determine if the newly added content is relevant to your personal genealogy research

To see our newspaper archives’ complete title lists, click here.

State City Title Date Range Collection
Arizona Phoenix Phoenix New Times* 01/29/2007–Current Recent Obituaries
California Hollister BenitoLink* 04/01/2013–Current Recent Obituaries
California La Jolla La Jolla Village News* 04/18/2014–Current Recent Obituaries
California Lakeport Lake County News* 12/21/2006–Current Recent Obituaries
California Mission Beach, Pacific Beach Beach & Bay Press* 04/17/2014–Current Recent Obituaries
California Redding Searchlight 1/1/1910–12/30/1917 Newspaper Archives
California Redding Weekly Searchlight 10/3/1899–12/27/1923 Newspaper Archives
District of Columbia Washington (DC) Washington Times 6/4/1982–11/27/1989 Newspaper Archives
Florida Ormond Beach Ormond Beach Observer* 04/11/2013–Current Recent Obituaries
Idaho Boise Idaho Statesman 7/14/1957–2/15/1971 Newspaper Archives
Idaho Idaho Falls Idaho Falls Times 11/16/1970–11/30/1970 Newspaper Archives
Indiana Elkhart Elkhart Truth 5/18/1905–5/18/1905 Newspaper Archives
Indiana Evansville Evansville Courier and Press 7/1/1933–12/31/1937 Newspaper Archives
Kentucky Lexington Lexington Herald 10/1/1957–10/31/1957 Newspaper Archives
Kentucky Lexington Lexington Leader 3/3/1912–11/30/1977 Newspaper Archives
Michigan Grand Haven Grand Haven Tribune* 01/02/2014–Current Recent Obituaries
Minnesota Virginia Hometown Focus* 01/08/2010–Current Recent Obituaries
Mississippi Biloxi Daily Herald 1/2/1947–7/20/1955 Newspaper Archives
Missouri Kansas City Kansas City Star 5/26/1945–7/13/1945 Newspaper Archives
North Carolina Bryson City Smoky Mountain Times* 02/06/2004–Current Recent Obituaries
Pennsylvania State College Centre Daily Times 3/8/1983–9/30/1994 Newspaper Archives
Washington Bellingham Bellingham Herald 10/1/1947–10/1/1947 Newspaper Archives

You can either print or create a PDF version of this Blog post by simply clicking on the green “Print/PDF” button below. The PDF version makes it easy to save this post onto your desktop or portable device for quick reference—all the newspaper links will be live.

Related Articles:

Walt Elias Disney’s Fantasy Made Real: Disneyland Opens

Walt Elias Disney had a problem. With the success of his popular cartoons and movies, letters were pouring in from people wanting to visit the movie studio. The problem was – there really wasn’t much to see at the studio. His two daughters Diane and Sharon loved amusement parks, and that gave Walt his brilliant insight: he decided to build a Disney-themed amusement park to delight children and parents alike.

photo of the Sleeping Beauty Castle at Disneyland, Anaheim, California

Photo: Sleeping Beauty Castle at Disneyland, Anaheim, California. Credit: Tuxyso; Wikimedia Commons.

On 17 July1955, with a gala opening broadcast nationwide on the ABC Television Network, Walt’s dream became a reality when more than 20,000 invited guests poured into Disneyland to gawk and gaze in wonder. Sixty years and hundreds of millions of visitors later, they’re still coming to experience America’s most famous amusement park.

Disneyland was extravagant and dazzling, unlike anything that had been created before. It cost $17 million and a frenetic year of construction to build after Walt Disney bought 160 acres of an orange grove in Anaheim, California, and tore down the 11,000 orange trees. The sprawling amusement park featured four main areas: Adventureland, Frontierland, Tomorrowland, and Fantasyland, to represent Walt’s dream of celebrating the past, the future, and the power of the imagination. Disneyland opened with 18 attractions.

As Walt Disney told the nationwide television audience in his dedication speech on 17 July 1955:

To all who come to this happy place: welcome. Disneyland is your land. Here age relives fond memories of the past, and here youth may savor the challenge and promise of the future. Disneyland is dedicated to the ideals, the dreams, and the hard facts that have created America, with the hope that it will be a source of joy and inspiration to all the world.

photo from the opening ceremony for Disneyland, Oregonian newspaper article 18 July 1955

Oregonian (Portland, Oregon), 18 July 1955, page 30

This old Oregon newspaper article describes Disneyland’s grand opening.

Disneyland Opens Gates, Oregonian newspaper article 18 July 1955

Oregonian (Portland, Oregon), 18 July 1955, page 29

This historical newspaper article reports:

Anaheim, Cal. (AP) – The $17,000,000 Disneyland, a combination world’s fair and Arabian Nights dedicated to the delight of children, opened Sunday.

A year ago these 160 acres contained 11,000 orange trees. Sunday 22,000 invited guests swarmed through the gates and were dazzled by the wonders of yesterday and tomorrow, concocted by the imagination of Walt Disney and his fellow creators.

“It was nip and tuck but we made it,” sighed Disney. Dressed appropriately for the hot weather, he greeted arrivals in light blue slacks, white shirt with red polka dots and Tahitian straw hat.

Rush in Last Minute

Everywhere there were signs of the last minute rush. A painter put final touches on the marquee of the Disneyland opera house. Workers unloaded crates in the turn-of-the-century stores along Main street and a crane hovered over the mad tea party ride.

Among the notables ogling the sights: Debbie Reynolds and Eddie Fisher, Irene Dunne, Gale Storm, George (Superman) Reeves, Robert Cummings, George Gobel, and, of course, Fess Parker, who played Tennessee’s Davy Crockett in the Disney TV series.

Among the dignitaries on hand for the nationwide telecast of the opening were two governors, Goodwin Knight of California and Frank Clements of Tennessee.

Fittingly enough, the guests were greeted by a floral pattern outlining Mickey Mouse, the star who started Disney’s empire.

The guests walked into a city square of the 1900 era, bounded by an old-time railroad station, city hall and fire station, opera house and other vintage merchant houses.

Boats Carry Visitors

Walking further into the city square, the previewers came to the hub of Disneyland, from which extend its four great realms. In one direction was Adventureland, dominated by a large Tahitian hut containing a dining room. Nearby the guests piled aboard such riverboats as the Amazon Belle, Ganges Gal and Nile Princess for a spine-tingling ride past wild hippos, elephants and crocodiles, all plastic replicas. The ride ended with a dash under a waterfall and emptied the passengers outside native bazaars.

A huge wooden log stockade guards the entrance to Frontierland. Here the onlookers were impressed by Davy Crockett’s museum, an Indian village with real redskins, a Golden Horseshoe frontier saloon and an outdoor New Orleans café. At a dock alongside a realistic river was the 103-foot paddle-wheeler, the Mark Twain.

Tomorrowland offered the aspects of a world’s fair with its cascading fountains and futuristic buildings. The guests saw imaginative exhibits of the world of tomorrow and children drove tiny gasoline-powered autos on a miniature freeway. They were also whisked on a rocket trip to the moon via a realistic movie.

Swans Sail Quietly

But, as Disney himself agrees, the greatest of the realms is Fantasyland. There the Disney creators have lavished their most vivid imaginations. Children passed over the moat, in which swans sailed serenely, and through the towering sleeping beauty’s castle.

Inside the courtyard was a splash of color and more delights than a child can imagine.

A King Arthur’s carousel of 72 leaping horses whirled in the center and all around were rides featuring famed Disney characters. There was a flying circle of Dumbo elephants, Mr. Toad’s motor car ride, Casey Jr.’s ride, etc.

photo of Walt Elias Disney, 1938

Photo: Walt Elias Disney, 1938. Credit: Alan Fisher, New York World-Telegram and the Sun staff photographer; Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

Disneyland will never be completed. It will continue to grow as long as there is imagination left in the world.
~ Walt Disney

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How to Find Old Family Photos & More in Newspapers

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this blog article, Gena shares some of her favorite old photos that she’s found in historical newspapers.

There’s no doubt I love to read and research old newspapers. The diverse news stories you can find are always amazing. But newspapers also provide a visual feast of images. Let’s face it, images tell a story much more powerfully than words alone. Images provide us with additional information as we research our ancestor, their place, and time.

Often when we research an ancestor we are focused on finding information about that single person and perhaps their family. In some cases you might find your ancestor’s photo in the newspaper – but what other types of photographs are available? Here are some of my favorite examples of old photos I found while browsing in GenealogyBank’s Historical Newspaper Archives.

Old Family Reunion Photos

Newspapers are a great resource for finding family stories. Newspaper articles provide information about a person’s life from cradle to grave – and all the activities in between. One way they report on family stories is through articles about family reunions – and these articles can have photos that are very helpful to family historians.

Family reunion photos may be of everyone at the gathering or just a few members, such as this reunion photo of two of the older members in attendance at the Chenault-Chennault clan’s 1952 reunion that drew over 255 relatives from seven states to Dallas, Texas. One of the issues discussed at the reunion? Whether their surname should be spelled Chenault or Chennault.

photo from the Chenault family reunion, Dallas Morning News newspaper article 1 September 1952

Dallas Morning News (Dallas, Texas), 1 September 1952, section III, page 1

It’s great to have this old family photo and the accompanying information about those relatives pictured. Mrs. Blanche Chenault Junkin was a retired teacher and stated she had “won three college degrees after she was sixty years old.”

Sometimes a “family reunion” isn’t a large gathering of descendants, but instead a celebration of a singular family event – such as this photo taken on the occasion of Mrs. Nancy J. Atkinson’s 91st birthday in 1922, when her eight children came to pay her a visit and help celebrate.

photo of the Atkinson family reunion, Colorado Springs Gazette newspaper article 10 September 1922

Colorado Springs Gazette (Colorado Springs, Colorado), 10 September 1922, page 20

Multi-Generation Family Photos

How many generations of your family could you have pose for a family photo? Unfortunately, in my current family we max out at three – but for other families, four to six generations can be found in one photograph. Newspapers are a great place to find these types of multi-generation family photos.

This five-generation family photo is of Mrs. Eliza Heminger, her son George Heminger, Mrs. Lillian Hall, Mrs. Ethel Campany and Ethel’s baby daughter Leafy.

photo of the Smith family reunion, Grand Rapids Press newspaper article 12 January 1907

Grand Rapids Press (Grand Rapids, Michigan), 12 January 1907, page 11

Multi-generation family photos are just one of the general interest-type stories and images that one can find in old newspapers.

Natural Disaster Photos

Telling your ancestor’s story is more than just finding vital statistics about him or her. Filling in the details about their life is equally important – as well as finding out what was going on in the times they lived in – and for those stories, you need newspaper articles of the day. You can find all types of photos from historical events in the newspaper – and often if the event was big enough, those photos were not limited to just the hometown newspapers.

For example, photographs of this 1915 Italian earthquake were published in a Northern California newspaper. Most likely this was the 13 January 1915 Avezzano earthquake that killed 30,000 people. Photos of the devastation, printed weeks and months after the event, were the only way that distant family, friends, and concerned parties could size up the destruction.

photo of an earthquake in Italy, San Jose Mercury News newspaper article 6 February 1915

San Jose Mercury News (San Jose, California), 6 February 1915, page 1

California is no stranger to earthquakes. One of the most famous is the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, which not only caused destruction from the shaking but the subsequent fires. Three days after the earthquake of 1906 struck, 500 city blocks—over 25,000 buildings—had been smashed or burned; the earthquake and fire combined to destroy over 80 percent of the city. So many old news articles and images can be found for this earthquake that it’s quite easy to put together information about how a family was affected during and after the disaster.

photo of the San Francisco Earthquake of 1906, Register Star newspaper article 18 April 2005

Register Star (Rockford, Illinois), 18 April 2005, page 3

Genealogy Tip: As you put together a timeline of your ancestor’s life, make sure to note any events, including disasters, which may have impacted them. Once you have identified dates for those events, search the newspaper for accompanying photos and stories.

School Group Photos

One thing I love about newspapers is the ability to find all family members, not just adults. Children, teens, and young adults are well represented in the newspaper, especially when it comes to school activities. Numerous school group photos can be found in newspapers. While we may think of class photos, graduation announcements, or sports highlights, other types of school happenings are also well documented in old newspapers, like this 1939 photo from Brownsville, Texas, of the new student leaders at the high school and junior college.

photo of school class presidents, Heraldo de Brownsville newspaper article 6 October 1939

Heraldo de Brownsville (Brownsville, Texas), 6 October 1939, page 3

Unlike the photo above that includes everyone’s name, this next photo has only one student name: Miss Borghild Asleson. However, this old school photo provides some important social history regarding attending college during the Great Depression. This class photo of students at Park Region Lutheran College in Minnesota shows them paying their tuition with wheat grown on their family farm. You can imagine how important that payment option was to families during those hard economic times.

photo of student paying tuition with grain at Park Region Lutheran College, National Labor Tribune newspaper article 24 September 1931

National Labor Tribune (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania), 24 September 1931, page 8

The examples of historical photos shown in this blog article are just the tip of the iceberg. Newspaper photos provide an important element in telling your family story, whether you are searching for the people photographed, an event, or a place. Old newspapers can help you tell that story with this rich resource.

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June 2015 Update: GenealogyBank Just Added 37 Million More Records!

Every day, GenealogyBank is working hard to digitize more newspapers and obituaries, expanding our collection to give you the largest newspaper archives for family history research available online. We just completed adding 37 million more U.S. genealogy records, vastly increasing our content coverage from coast to coast!

screenshot of GenealogyBank's home page showing the announcement of 37 million records recently added to GenealogyBank's archives

Here are some of the details about our most recent U.S. newspaper additions:

  • A total of 46 newspaper titles from 20 U.S. states plus the District of Columbia
  • 26 of these titles are newspapers added to GenealogyBank for the first time
  • Newspaper titles marked with an asterisk (*) are new to our online archives
  • We’ve shown the newspaper issue date ranges so that you can determine if the newly added content is relevant to your personal genealogy research

To see our newspaper archives’ complete title lists, click here.

State City Title Date Range Collection
Alaska Anchorage Arctic Sounder* 06/28/2013–Current Recent Obituaries
California San Francisco San Francisco Chronicle 2/21/1982–2/23/1982 Newspaper Archives
California San Luis Obispo San Luis Obispo Daily Telegram 11/1/1952–10/30/1954 Newspaper Archives
California Stockton Record, The* 02/20/2015–Current Recent Obituaries
District of Columbia Washington (DC) Washington Times 8/14/1984–11/1/1989 Newspaper Archives
Florida Miami Miami Herald 10/11/1928–9/22/1929 Newspaper Archives
Georgia Columbus Columbus Daily Enquirer 3/19/1941–4/5/1943 Newspaper Archives
Georgia Macon Macon Telegraph 7/1/1944–10/31/1945 Newspaper Archives
Idaho Boise Idaho Statesman 1/7/1957–10/13/1957 Newspaper Archives
Illinois Rockford Register Star 10/1/2007–4/30/2008 Newspaper Archives
Indiana Evansville Evansville Courier and Press 1/2/1931–12/31/1937 Newspaper Archives
Kentucky Lexington Lexington Herald 4/1/1939–10/15/1973 Newspaper Archives
Kentucky Lexington Lexington Leader 7/1/1901–8/27/1975 Newspaper Archives
Kentucky Lexington Lexington Leader* 3/1/1912–8/30/1975 Newspaper Archives
Louisiana Baton Rouge Advocate Extra, The* 10/09/2014–Current Recent Obituaries
Louisiana Clinton Watchman, The* 12/18/2014–Current Recent Obituaries
Louisiana Greensburg St. Helena Echo* 12/18/2014–Current Recent Obituaries
Louisiana St. Francisville St. Francisville Democrat* 12/18/2014–Current Recent Obituaries
Louisiana Zachary Zachary Advocate and Plainsman, The* 10/09/2014–Current Recent Obituaries
Maryland Baltimore Sun 2/5/1903–12/19/1917 Newspaper Archives
Minnesota Wayzata Lakeshore Weekly News* 07/17/2014–Current Recent Obituaries
Mississippi Biloxi Daily Herald 1/1/1946–3/28/1953 Newspaper Archives
National National UPI NewsTrack* 04/26/2013–Current Recent Obituaries
New Hampshire Chester, Hampstead, Sandown Tri-Town Times: Web Edition Articles* 02/28/2013–Current Recent Obituaries
New Jersey Absecon, Pleasantville Current of Pleasantville, The* 04/23/2013–Current Recent Obituaries
New Jersey Atlantic City Atlantic City Weekly* 03/10/2005–Current Recent Obituaries
New Jersey Cape May Cape May Gazette, The* 09/09/2010–Current Recent Obituaries
New Jersey Egg Harbor Current of Downbeach, The* 05/19/2010–Current Recent Obituaries
New Jersey Egg Harbor Township Current of Egg Harbor Township, The* 06/02/2010–Current Recent Obituaries
New Jersey Galloway Current of Galloway Township, The* 04/08/2010–Current Recent Obituaries
New Jersey Hamilton Current of Hamilton Township, The* 05/26/2010–Current Recent Obituaries
New Jersey Linwood, Somers Point, Northfield Current of Linwood, Somers Point, Northfield* 07/20/2010–Current Recent Obituaries
New Jersey Middle Township Middle Township Gazette, The* 01/05/2011–Current Recent Obituaries
New Jersey Ocean City Ocean City Gazette, The* 04/12/2010–Current Recent Obituaries
New Jersey Upper Township Upper Township Gazette* 11/11/2010–Current Recent Obituaries
New Jersey Wildwood Wildwood Leader, The* 05/24/2010–Current Recent Obituaries
New York Middletown Times Herald-Record, The* 02/18/2015–Current Recent Obituaries
North Carolina Charlotte Charlotte Observer 1/1/1934–12/6/1935 Newspaper Archives
North Carolina Robbinsville Graham Star* 01/28/2009–Current Recent Obituaries
Oregon Medford Mail Tribune* 02/23/2015–Current Recent Obituaries
Pennsylvania State College Centre Daily Times 10/1/1982–11/30/1983 Newspaper Archives
South Carolina Charleston Charleston News and Courier 7/12/1971–9/30/1991 Newspaper Archives
South Carolina Charleston Evening Post 3/18/1971–3/19/1971 Newspaper Archives
South Carolina Charleston Post and Courier 9/1/1984–2/29/1996 Newspaper Archives
Washington Bellingham Bellingham Herald 5/1/1947–8/31/1948 Newspaper Archives
Washington Olympia Morning Olympian 1/1/1951–4/30/1952 Newspaper Archives

You can either print or create a PDF version of this Blog post by simply clicking on the green “Print/PDF” button below. The PDF version makes it easy to save this post onto your desktop or portable device for quick reference—all the newspaper links will be live.

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Assassination of Robert F. Kennedy: Shot after Victory Speech

Only 4½ years after his older brother, President John F. Kennedy, was assassinated – and just two months after civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., had been gunned down – America awoke on 5 June 1968 to read the horrifying news that another of the nation’s young leaders had been attacked: Senator Robert F. Kennedy. He was shot three times by a Jordanian, Sirhan Sirhan, in the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles right after giving a victory speech in the California Democratic presidential primary. Five others were wounded in the shooting as well.

photo of Robert F. Kennedy, 1964

Photo: Robert F. Kennedy, 1964. Credit: U.S. News & World Report; Library of Congress.

RFK had only entered the presidential primary in March, but was rapidly gaining momentum. Winning the California Democratic primary over his rival Senator Eugene J. McCarthy on June 4, Kennedy gave his victory speech to a gathering of about 2,000 buoyant supporters in the hotel’s ballroom. He ended his victory speech shortly after midnight and headed for the hotel’s kitchen, a shortcut to get to a press conference. At 12:15 a.m., 5 June 1968, Sirhan struck and Kennedy fell to the floor, bleeding and mortally wounded from the gunshots.

He clung to life for 26 difficult hours, but died early in the morning of June 6. He was 42 years old. America had lost another legendary leader, felled by an assassin. Sirhan later said he was angry over Kennedy’s support for Israel.

Here is the shocking newspaper front page editorial that readers in the Seattle, Washington, area saw that day.

article about the assassination of Senator Robert F. Kennedy, Seattle Times newspaper article 5 June 1968

Seattle Times (Seattle, Washington), 5 June 1968, page 1

The lead news story reports:

Robert Kennedy’s Condition Remains Extremely Critical

Associated Press and United Press International

Los Angeles—Senator Robert F. Kennedy emerged from more than three hours of surgery in extremely “critical condition” today after he was shot in the head by a mysteriously silent gunman early this morning. The shooting occurred after he had won the California Democratic presidential primary.

The gunman was identified at midmorning as Sirhan Sirhan, 23, a Jordanian born in Jerusalem.

Kennedy was shot down about 4½ years after his brother, President John F. Kennedy, was assassinated by a rifleman in Dallas, Tex.

An aide said all but a fragment of a bullet was removed from Kennedy’s brain and a second bullet, less serious, remains in the back of his neck.

Vital signs—pulse and breathing—are in good order, Frank Mankiewicz, Kennedy’s press secretary, told newsmen, but the next 24 to 36 hours will be critical. He said there “may have been some impairment of the blood supply to the center of the brain”—which controls pulse, blood pressure and tracking of the eye—but “not the thinking processes.”

A series of tests conducted on the senator “do not show measurable improvement” in his condition, which remains extremely critical, Mankiewicz reported at 2:15 p.m.

Mayor Samuel Yorty said identification of the gunman was made by the suspect’s brother, Adel Sirhan of Pasadena, who was traced through the death weapon.

The 42-year-old New York senator came from behind in California’s crucial primary to accrue a winning lead over Senator Eugene J. McCarthy around midnight. Kennedy had proclaimed his win to about 2,000 supporters at an Ambassador Hotel rally and was taking a shortcut through the kitchen to a meeting with newsmen when shots rang out.

With stunning rapidity at 12:15 a.m., a man police described as a Caucasian, 5 feet 6 inches and 140 pounds, with dark hair and complexion, emptied the chamber of an eight-shot .22-caliber pistol.

Kennedy fell, hit three times. Five others near him were wounded, none as badly as Kennedy.

Pandemonium broke loose. Roosevelt Grier, giant Negro tackle for the professional Los Angeles Rams, quickly grabbed the much smaller gunman, wrestled the gun from him and held him for police.

The man under arrest was arraigned secretly at 7 a.m. as John Doe and bail was set at $250,000. The arraignment was on six accounts of assault with intent to commit murder.

Police Chief Thomas Reddin said the man remained silent for hours, then broke that silence and proved to be “extremely articulate with an extensive vocabulary,” but he refused to identify himself or discuss the shooting.

Kennedy was taken first to Central Receiving Hospital, where a doctor said he was “practically dead” upon arrival.

Physicians there administered closed cardiac massage, oxygen and adrenalin. “At first he was pulseless,” a doctor who treated him said, “then his pulse came back and we began to hear a heartbeat and he began to breathe—a little erratically.”

The doctor, Victor Baz, said Ethel Kennedy, who accompanied her husband in the ambulance, was frightened. “She didn’t believe he was alive because she couldn’t see that he was responding. I put the stethoscope to her ears so she could listen and she was tremendously relieved.”

Kennedy was taken to Good Samaritan Hospital near downtown Los Angeles. There a team of six surgeons began brain surgery at 3:12 a.m. that lasted about 3 hours and 40 minutes.

Doctors said one bullet struck near the right ear and entered the brain. Another hit in the shoulder. A third apparently grazed his forehead.

The actual surgery here was performed by Drs. Maxwell Ambler of the University of California at Los Angeles Medical School and Nat Downes Reid and Henry Cuneo of the University of Southern California Medical School.

Kennedy’s brother, Edward, senator from Massachusetts, flew here from San Francisco and was taken by helicopter to Good Samaritan.

Wounds were suffered by Paul Schrade, 30, United Auto Workers official; William Weisel, 30, unit manager for the American Broadcasting Co.; Ira Goldstein, 19, a radio newsman; Irwin Stroll, 17; and Mrs. Elizabeth Evans. All but Weisel, of Washington, D.C., are from the Los Angeles area.

The gunman appeared in the kitchen area behind the bandstand of the Embassy Room, where Kennedy backers, including movie stars and students, were listening to their candidate’s light-hearted victory speech.

Kennedy finished his speech and began working his way off the platform and into the kitchen, followed by close associates and members of his family.

At that moment the gunman pushed through the throng, reached his arm around others in front of him and shot the senator.

Grier, the football player, grabbed the man’s arm. Joe LaHive, a local Kennedy campaigner, wrested the gun away. Grier and a former Olympic decathlon champion, Rafer Johnson, lifted the assailant and spread him on a steel kitchen table.

“Nobody hurt this man!” one of the athletes shouted. “We want to take him alive!”

Women were screaming, “Oh no!” “God, God, not again!”

Kennedy was stretched on the floor, his face covered with blood. “Give him room! Step back!” someone yelled.

Kennedy seemed to hear nothing. His face was blank, his eyes staring sightlessly.

Grier, Johnson and two or three others held the gunman on the table 10 feet away. Screams began to be heard in the ballroom as news of the shooting spread to the campaigners, who had been cheering their candidate two minutes before.

Kennedy was given emergency treatment by a doctor summoned from the ballroom.

The gunman, apparently unharmed, was rushed through the Ambassador lobby by police 10 minutes after the shooting. By this time the crowd knew that Kennedy had been shot.

“Kill him! Lynch him!” onlookers shouted. They milled forward to get at the man, but the police ran him down the stairs and got him to the central jail.

Learn more about Robert F. Kennedy’s life, political career and assassination in GenealogyBank’s newspaper archives: http://www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/?fname=robert+f.&lname=kennedy

RFK Family Tree Chart

family tree for Robert F. Kennedy

Download our free family tree chart template to create your own personalized family tree chart like the Robert F. Kennedy family tree chart featured above: http://blog.genealogybank.com/family-tree-template-free-download

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