Breaking News: More newspapers added to GenealogyBank

GenealogyBank adds another 13 million records – obituaries, news articles and more. More than 1,800 newspapers were updated and new titles added.

That’s too many titles to list here – but here are some of them:
Alabama, Mobile
Mobile Register. 1980-10-16 to 1983-05-30

Arkansas, Little Rock
Arkansas Gazette 1838-01-02 to 1871-11-25
Arkansas, White Hall
White Hall Journal* 10/2/2009 to Present

Arizona, Casa Grande
Casa Grande Dispatch* 6/19/2010 to Present
Arizona, Kearny
Copper Basin News* 6/10/2010 to Present

Colorado, Colorado Springs
Gazette-Telegraph 1904-01-17 to 1922-04-11

Connecticut, Hartford
Hartford Daily Courant. 1863-12-31 to 1866-06-27
Hartford Daily Courant. 1874-01-01 to 1876-05-27

Georgia, Augusta
Augusta Chronicle. 1843-06-12 to 1878-03-29

Hawaii, Kaunakakai
Molokai Dispatch, The* 3/1/2010 to Present

Idaho, Kellogg
Shoshone News-Press* 4/6/2007 to Present
Idaho, Sandpoint
Bonner County Daily Bee* 3/2/2004 to Present
Idaho, Twin Falls
Twin Falls News. 1919-06-20

Indiana, Aurora
Journal-Press, The* 5/13/2010 to Present

Kansas, Coffeyville
Vindicator*. 1904-12-23 to 1906-02-09
Kansas, Kansas City
Topics* . 1895-05-16 to 1895-12-07
Kansas, Parsons
Parsons Weekly Blade. 1900-03-02
Kansas, Topeka
Kansas Sentinel*. 1960-07-07 to 1960-11-26
Kansas, Topeka.

Kansas Watchman*. 1905-05-25 to 1905-11-17
Kansas, Wichita
Wichita Protest . 1920-08-20

Louisiana, Bossier City
Bossier Press-Tribune*. 2/4/2010 to Present
Louisiana, New Orleans
New Orleans Tribune. 1864-08-02 to 1869-02-14
Louisiana, New Orleans
Times-Picayune. 1848-01-04 to 1886-12-02 and 1973-10-02 to 1978-08-15

Massachusetts, Andover
Andover Townsman*. 4/20/2010 to Present
Massachusetts, Gloucester
Gloucester Daily Times*. 5/12/2010 to Present
Massachusetts, Greenfield
Greenfield Gazette. 1792-11-08 to 1809-07-31
Massachusetts, Newburyport
Daily News of Newburyport, The*. 5/13/2010 to Present
Massachusetts, Northampton
Hampshire Gazette. 1786-09-20 to 1843-03-28
Massachusetts, Springfield
Springfield Union. 1964-05-16 to 1969-02-20
Massachusetts, Worcester
National Aegis. 1821-01-10 to 1854-10-04

Michigan, Jackson
Jackson Citizen. 1868-10-06 to 1870-05-31
Michigan, Jackson
Jackson Citizen Patriot. 1865-07-01 to 1868-12-09

Minnesota, Virginia
Mesabi Daily News*. 3/17/1999 to Present

New Hampshire, Concord
New Hampshire Observer. 1825-01-03 to 1826-12-29
New Hampshire, Concord
New Hampshire Patriot . 1879-06-12
New Hampshire, Exeter.
Freeman’s Oracle . 1788-01-18

New Jersey, Englewood
Northern Valley Suburbanite*. 1/21/2010 to Present
New Jersey, Fort Lee
Fort Lee Suburbanite*. 11/5/2009 to Present
New Jersey, Midland Park
Midland Park Suburban News*. 10/11/2009 to Present
New Jersey, Montclair
Montclair Times, The*. 4/1/2010 to Present
New Jersey, Trenton
Trenton Evening Times. 1883-07-22 to 1885-08-02

New York, Albany
Albany Evening Journal. 1856-09-15 to 1876-12-29
New York, New York
New York Herald-Tribune. 1878-01-19 to 1896-12-07
New York, Penn Yan
Chronicle Express, The*. 3/27/2010 to Present

North Carolina, Clinton
Sampson Independent, The*. 4/18/2010 to Present
North Carolina, Pilot Mountain
Pilot, The*. 3/27/2010 to Present

Ohio, Canton
Repository, The*. 10/1/1999 to Present
Ohio, Cincinnati
Cincinnati Daily Gazette. 1868-09-07 to 1871-01-17
Ohio, Cleveland
Plain Dealer. 1858-11-02 to 1866-09-11 and 1971-01-31 to 1981-10-20

Oregon, Portland
Oregonian. 1969-09-01 to 1972-09-15

Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
Aurora General Advertiser. 1797-01-02 to 1797-12-30
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
Philadelphia Inquirer. 1829-06-01 to 1849-12-31

Rhode Island, Pawtucket
Pawtucket Times . 1920-01-10 to 1921-02-08

Tennessee, Sweetwater
Advocate and Democrat, The*. 12/8/2009 to Present

Texas, Dallas
Dallas Morning News. 1980-07-23 to 1980-12-19
Texas, Fort Worth
Bronze Texan News*. 1969-05-02 to 1969-10-16

Virginia, Alexandria
Alexandria Gazette. 1821-04-12 to 1852-06-30

Vermont, St. Albans
St. Albans Daily Messenger. 1870-02-25 to 1898-07-02 and 1869-07-16
Vermont, Windsor
Vermont Republican . 1809-01-30

Washington, Seattle
Seattle Daily Times. 1957-10-06 to 1984-04-17

Wisconsin, Ashland
Daily Press, The*. 1/2/1999 to Present
Wisconsin, Hartford.

Times Press*. 3/29/2010 to Present
Wisconsin, Madison
Wisconsin Free Press*. 1984-05-10 to 1990-01-12
Wisconsin, Mukwonago
Mukwonago Chief*. 3/28/2010 to Present
Wisconsin, Oneida
Kalihwisaks*. 3/27/2010 to Present
Wisconsin, Wauwatosa
Wauwatosa NOW*. 3/27/2010 to Present

48 More newspapers added to GenealogyBank

GenealogyBank adds 48 more newspapers
Search GenealogyBank now!

Kodiak Daily Mirror (Kodiak, AK) Death Notices: 02/01/2010 – Current
Birmingham Times (Birmingham, AL) Death Notices: 04/01/2010 – Current
Pinal Nugget, The (San Manuel, AZ) Death Notices: 05/14/2010 – Current
Midway Driller (Taft, CA) Death Notices: 10/05/2009 – Current
Oakland Post, The (Oakland, CA) Death Notices: 03/28/2010 – Current
Milford Beacon (Milford, DE) Death Notices: 10/23/2009 – Current
Times-Herald, The (Newnan, GA) Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current
Abbeville Meridional (Abbeville, LA) Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current
Rayne Acadian-Tribune (Rayne, LA) Death Notices: 10/06/2009 – Current
Richland Beacon-News (Rayville, LA) Death Notices: 10/08/2009 – Current
Hanson Express (Hanson, MA) Death Notices: 05/06/2010 – Current
North Attleborough Free Press, The (North Attleborough, MA) Death Notices: 10/03/2009 – Current
Coldwater Daily Reporter (Coldwater, MI) Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current
Jefferson Post (West Jefferson, NC) Death Notices: 10/05/2009 – Current
Atlanticville (Long Branch, Oakhurst, NJ) Death Notices: 12/29/2009 – Current
East Brunswick Sentinel (East Brunswick, NJ) Death Notices: 01/20/2010 – Current
Examiner (Millstone, Englishtown, Allentown, NJ) Death Notices: 03/08/2010 – Current
Hub, The (Red Bank, NJ) Death Notices: 01/05/2010 – Current
Independent, The (Middletown, Hazlet, NJ) Death Notices: 01/05/2010 – Current
North-South Brunswick Sentinel (North Brunswick, South Brunswick, NJ) Death Notices: 01/13/2010 – Current
Suburban (Old Bridge, NJ) Death Notices: 01/06/2010 – Current
Tri-Town News (Howell, Jackson, Lakewood, Plumstead, NJ) Death Notices: 01/16/2010 – Current
Daily Sparks Tribune, The (Sparks, NV) Death Notices: 11/12/2009 – Current
Cooperstown Crier, The (Cooperstown, NY) Death Notices: 04/21/2010 – Current
Courier, The (Bath, NY) Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current
Journal-Register, The (Medina, NY) Death Notices: 03/17/2010 – Current
Long Beach Herald (Long Beach, NY) Death Notices: 04/01/2010 – Current
Lynbrook – East Rockaway Herald (Lynbrook, NY) Death Notices: 03/28/2010 – Current
Riverdale Press, The (Bronx, NY) Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current
Villager, The (New York, NY) Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current
Antlers American, The (Antlers, OK) Death Notices: 03/27/2010 – Current
Express Star, The (Chickasha, OK) Death Notices: 03/17/2010 – Current
Daily Press, The (St. Marys, PA) Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current
Dispatch, The (Walterboro, SC) Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current
Blount Today (Maryville, TN) Death Notices: 12/23/2009 – Current
Morgan County News (Wartburg, TN) Death Notices: 04/22/2010 – Current
Bay City Tribune, The (Bay City, TX) Death Notices: 10/03/2009 – Current
Greenville Herald-Banner (Greenville, TX) Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current
Northeast Herald (San Antonio, TX) Death Notices: 10/18/2009 – Current
Journal Press, The (King George, VA) Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current
Shenandoah Valley-Herald (Woodstock, VA) Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current
Valley Banner, The (Elkton, VA) Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current
Warren Sentinel (Front Royal, VA) Death Notices: 01/16/2010 – Current
Progress-Index, The (Petersburg, VA) Obituaries: 10/31/2001 – 08/29/2005 Death Notices: 11/05/2001 – 08/29/2005

Statesman-Examiner (Colville, WA) Death Notices: 10/08/2009 – Current
Brookfield-Elm Grove NOW (Brookfield, WI) Death Notices: 10/04/2009 – Current
Kettle Moraine Index (Dousman, WI) Death Notices: 10/02/2009 – Current
Oconomowoc Enterprise (Oconomowoc, WI) Death Notices: 03/27/2010 – Current
Sussex Sun (Hartland, WI) Death Notices: 10/03/2009 – Current
.

Listen my children and you shall hear…

“Bloody News – This town has been in a Continental Alarm since Mid-day ….. the attack began at Lexington (about 12 miles from Boston) by the regular troops, the 18th Infantry before sunrise…From thence they proceeded to Concord where they made a general attack…”

Stirring news – as gripping as a bulletin on TV.

Thanks to GenealogyBank we can read the same newspapers our ancestors read and feel the impact of the news as they lived it. No other site has the depth of coverage found on GenealogyBank. Sign-up now.
April 19, 1775 – Attack on Lexington & Concord

The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere
by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Listen my children and you shall hear
Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere,
On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-five;
Hardly a man is now alive
Who remembers that famous day and year.

He said to his friend, “If the British march
By land or sea from the town to-night,
Hang a lantern aloft in the belfry arch
Of the North Church tower as a signal light,
One if by land, and two if by sea;
And I on the opposite shore will be,
Ready to ride and spread the alarm
Through every Middlesex village and farm,
For the country folk to be up and to arm.”

Then he said “Good-night!” and with muffled oar
Silently rowed to the Charlestown shore,
Just as the moon rose over the bay,
Where swinging wide at her moorings lay
The Somerset, British man-of-war;
A phantom ship, with each mast and spar
Across the moon like a prison bar,
And a huge black hulk, that was magnified
By its own reflection in the tide.

Meanwhile, his friend through alley and street
Wanders and watches, with eager ears,
Till in the silence around him he hears
The muster of men at the barrack door,
The sound of arms, and the tramp of feet,
And the measured tread of the grenadiers,
Marching down to their boats on the shore.

Then he climbed the tower of the Old North Church,
By the wooden stairs, with stealthy tread,
To the belfry chamber overhead,
And startled the pigeons from their perch
On the somber rafters, that round him made
Masses and moving shapes of shade,–
By the trembling ladder, steep and tall,
To the highest window in the wall,
Where he paused to listen and look down
A moment on the roofs of the town
And the moonlight flowing over all.

Beneath, in the churchyard, lay the dead,
In their night encampment on the hill,
Wrapped in silence so deep and still
That he could hear, like a sentinel’s tread,
The watchful night-wind, as it went
Creeping along from tent to tent,
And seeming to whisper, “All is well!”
A moment only he feels the spell
Of the place and the hour, and the secret dread
Of the lonely belfry and the dead;
For suddenly all his thoughts are bent
On a shadowy something far away,
Where the river widens to meet the bay,–
A line of black that bends and floats
On the rising tide like a bridge of boats.

Meanwhile, impatient to mount and ride,
Booted and spurred, with a heavy stride
On the opposite shore walked Paul Revere.
Now he patted his horse’s side,
Now he gazed at the landscape far and near,
Then, impetuous, stamped the earth,
And turned and tightened his saddle girth;
But mostly he watched with eager search
The belfry tower of the Old North Church,
As it rose above the graves on the hill,
Lonely and spectral and somber and still.
And lo! as he looks, on the belfry’s height
A glimmer, and then a gleam of light!
He springs to the saddle, the bridle he turns,
But lingers and gazes, till full on his sight
A second lamp in the belfry burns.

A hurry of hoofs in a village street,
A shape in the moonlight, a bulk in the dark,
And beneath, from the pebbles, in passing, a spark
Struck out by a steed flying fearless and fleet;
That was all! And yet, through the gloom and the light,
The fate of a nation was riding that night;
And the spark struck out by that steed, in his flight,
Kindled the land into flame with its heat.
He has left the village and mounted the steep,
And beneath him, tranquil and broad and deep,
Is the Mystic, meeting the ocean tides;
And under the alders that skirt its edge,
Now soft on the sand, now loud on the ledge,
Is heard the tramp of his steed as he rides.

It was twelve by the village clock
When he crossed the bridge into Medford town.
He heard the crowing of the cock,
And the barking of the farmer’s dog,
And felt the damp of the river fog,
That rises after the sun goes down.

It was one by the village clock,
When he galloped into Lexington.
He saw the gilded weathercock
Swim in the moonlight as he passed,
And the meeting-house windows, black and bare,
Gaze at him with a spectral glare,
As if they already stood aghast
At the bloody work they would look upon.

It was two by the village clock,
When he came to the bridge in Concord town.
He heard the bleating of the flock,
And the twitter of birds among the trees,
And felt the breath of the morning breeze
Blowing over the meadow brown.
And one was safe and asleep in his bed
Who at the bridge would be first to fall,
Who that day would be lying dead,
Pierced by a British musket ball.

You know the rest. In the books you have read
How the British Regulars fired and fled,
How the farmers gave them ball for ball,
From behind each fence and farmyard wall,
Chasing the redcoats down the lane,
Then crossing the fields to emerge again
Under the trees at the turn of the road,
And only pausing to fire and load.

So through the night rode Paul Revere;
And so through the night went his cry of alarm
To every Middlesex village and farm,
A cry of defiance, and not of fear,
A voice in the darkness, a knock at the door,
And a word that shall echo for evermore!
For, borne on the night-wind of the Past,
Through all our history, to the last,
In the hour of darkness and peril and need,
The people will waken and listen to hear
The hurrying hoof-beats of that steed,
And the midnight message of Paul Revere

Patriot’s Day – Read the news as they read it.

“Bloody News – This town has been in a Continental Alarm since Mid-day ….. the attack began at Lexington (about 12 miles from Boston) by the regular troops, the 18th Infantry before sunrise…From thence they proceeded to Concord where they made a general attack…”

Stirring news – as gripping as a bulletin on TV.

Thanks to GenealogyBank we can read the same newspapers our ancestors read and feel the impact of the news as they lived it. No other site has the depth of coverage found on GenealogyBank.
Sign-up now.

April 19, 1775 – Attack on Lexington & Concord NH Gazette & Historical Chronicle. 21 April 1775). April 19, 1775 – Attack on Lexington & Concord Thomas Jay Kemp “Bloody News – This town has been in a Continental Alarm since Mid-day ….. the attack began at Lexington (about 12 miles from Boston) by the regular troops, the 18th Infantry before sunrise…From thence they proceeded to Concord where they made a general attack…”NH Gazette & Historical Chronicle. 21 April 1775. Stirring news – as gripping as a bulletin on TV. Thanks to GenealogyBank.com we can read the same newspapers our ancestors read and feel the impact of the news as they lived it. No other site has the depth of coverage found on GenealogyBank.comSign-up now.

The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere
by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow


Listen my children and you shall hear
Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere,
On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-five;
Hardly a man is now alive
Who remembers that famous day and year.

He said to his friend, “If the British march
By land or sea from the town to-night,
Hang a lantern aloft in the belfry arch
Of the North Church tower as a signal light,
One if by land, and two if by sea;
And I on the opposite shore will be,
Ready to ride and spread the alarm
Through every Middlesex village and farm,
For the country folk to be up and to arm.”

Then he said “Good-night!” and with muffled oar
Silently rowed to the Charlestown shore,
Just as the moon rose over the bay,
Where swinging wide at her moorings lay
The Somerset, British man-of-war;
A phantom ship, with each mast and spar
Across the moon like a prison bar,
And a huge black hulk, that was magnified
By its own reflection in the tide.

Meanwhile, his friend through alley and street
Wanders and watches, with eager ears,
Till in the silence around him he hears
The muster of men at the barrack door,
The sound of arms, and the tramp of feet,
And the measured tread of the grenadiers,
Marching down to their boats on the shore.

Then he climbed the tower of the Old North Church,
By the wooden stairs, with stealthy tread,
To the belfry chamber overhead,
And startled the pigeons from their perch
On the sombre rafters, that round him made
Masses and moving shapes of shade,–
By the trembling ladder, steep and tall,
To the highest window in the wall,
Where he paused to listen and look down
A moment on the roofs of the town
And the moonlight flowing over all.

Beneath, in the churchyard, lay the dead,
In their night encampment on the hill,
Wrapped in silence so deep and still
That he could hear, like a sentinel’s tread,
The watchful night-wind, as it went
Creeping along from tent to tent,
And seeming to whisper, “All is well!”
A moment only he feels the spell
Of the place and the hour, and the secret dread
Of the lonely belfry and the dead;
For suddenly all his thoughts are bent
On a shadowy something far away,
Where the river widens to meet the bay,–
A line of black that bends and floats
On the rising tide like a bridge of boats.

Meanwhile, impatient to mount and ride,
Booted and spurred, with a heavy stride
On the opposite shore walked Paul Revere.
Now he patted his horse’s side,
Now he gazed at the landscape far and near,
Then, impetuous, stamped the earth,
And turned and tightened his saddle girth;
But mostly he watched with eager search
The belfry tower of the Old North Church,
As it rose above the graves on the hill,
Lonely and spectral and sombre and still.
And lo! as he looks, on the belfry’s height
A glimmer, and then a gleam of light!
He springs to the saddle, the bridle he turns,
But lingers and gazes, till full on his sight
A second lamp in the belfry burns.

A hurry of hoofs in a village street,

A shape in the moonlight, a bulk in the dark,
And beneath, from the pebbles, in passing, a spark
Struck out by a steed flying fearless and fleet;
That was all! And yet, through the gloom and the light,
The fate of a nation was riding that night;
And the spark struck out by that steed, in his flight,
Kindled the land into flame with its heat.
He has left the village and mounted the steep,
And beneath him, tranquil and broad and deep,
Is the Mystic, meeting the ocean tides;
And under the alders that skirt its edge,
Now soft on the sand, now loud on the ledge,
Is heard the tramp of his steed as he rides.

It was twelve by the village clock

When he crossed the bridge into Medford town.
He heard the crowing of the cock,
And the barking of the farmer’s dog,
And felt the damp of the river fog,
That rises after the sun goes down.

It was one by the village clock,

When he galloped into Lexington.
He saw the gilded weathercock
Swim in the moonlight as he passed,
And the meeting-house windows, black and bare,
Gaze at him with a spectral glare,
As if they already stood aghast
At the bloody work they would look upon.

It was two by the village clock,
When he came to the bridge in Concord town.
He heard the bleating of the flock,
And the twitter of birds among the trees,
And felt the breath of the morning breeze
Blowing over the meadow brown.
And one was safe and asleep in his bed
Who at the bridge would be first to fall,
Who that day would be lying dead,
Pierced by a British musket ball.

You know the rest. In the books you have read
How the British Regulars fired and fled,
How the farmers gave them ball for ball,
From behind each fence and farmyard wall,
Chasing the redcoats down the lane,
Then crossing the fields to emerge again
Under the trees at the turn of the road,
And only pausing to fire and load.

So through the night rode Paul Revere;
And so through the night went his cry of alarm
To every Middlesex village and farm,
A cry of defiance, and not of fear,
A voice in the darkness, a knock at the door,
And a word that shall echo for evermore!
For, borne on the night-wind of the Past,
Through all our history, to the last,
In the hour of darkness and peril and need,
The people will waken and listen to hear
The hurrying hoof-beats of that steed,
And the midnight message of Paul Revere.

Jacquelyn Ladd Ricker – 1935-2008

Long time office manager of the Connecticut Society of Genealogists has passed away.
A prolific genealogist and writer – she was a long time presence in Connecticut genealogical circles. She is best known for her republication of the Barbour Index to Connecticut Vital Records which was issued as a CD-ROM under the title: The Ricker Compilation of Vital Records of Early Connecticut Based on the Barbour Collection of Connecticut Town Vital Records and Other Statistical Sources.

Our condolences to the family.

Here is her obituary – posted by permission of GenealogyBank.com

Star-Gazette (Elmira, NY) – April 4, 2008
RICKER, Jacquelyn Ladd 1935-2008
Was born September 25th, 1935 in Elmira, NY, and passed away March 30th, 2008 in Payson, AZ. Mrs. Ricker graduated from Southside High School in Elmira, NY, and then attended Upsala College in East Orange, NJ. Mrs. Ricker returned to her native Elmira, and worked at the American Bridge Division of the U.S. Steel Corp in Elmira, where she met her husband.


After moving to Glastonbury, CT, she volunteered in several civic organizations while rearing their two sons. Then Mrs. Ricker began a career in genealogy and worked her way up to be Office Manager of the Connecticut Society of Genealogists. During this time, she became an active member in several genealogy organizations. She also became a prolific researcher of genealogy archives and was a noted author and editor of several genealogy publications. After retiring from The Connecticut Society of Genealogists, Mrs. Ricker moved to Payson, AZ with her husband and continued her extensive Genealogy research and publishing.

She also has been active with the Library Friends of the Payson Public Library, The Gila County Historical Society and The Zane Grey Cabin Foundation. Mrs. Ricker was predeceased earlier this year by her husband of nearly 50 years, David T. Ricker. Mrs. Ricker is survived by her sons, David W. Ricker of Dallas, TX, and Dr. Jonathan E. Ricker (Nancy) of Danville, KY. She is also survived by her mother, Arthea Johnson of Prescott, AZ; two brothers, William E. Ladd (Mary) of Scottsdale, AZ and Gary A. Ladd (Vivian); two grandchildren, Jeffrey L Ricker and Rachel E. Ricker, both of Danville, KY; four nephews and one niece.

A celebration of life will be held from 11:00 a.m. to noon Wednesday, April 2nd, 2008, at Messinger Payson Funeral Home, 302 W. Aero Dr., Payson, AZ. Memorial gifts may be sent in Mrs. Ricker’s honor to the Library of Friends, Payson Public Library, 328 N. McLane Rd., Payson, AZ 85541; Payson Humane Society, 812 S. McLane Rd, Payson, AZ 85541; RTA Hospice, 511 S. Mud Springs Rd., Payson, AZ 85541; and the Zane Grey Cabin Foundation, 201 N. McLane Rd., Payson, AZ 85541.

Newspapers are terrific!

Newspapers are terrific! They give us the real details of our ancestor’s lives.

This week I found an article about the estate sale for my first cousin, Thomas Huse (1742/43-1816).

It was published in the Newburyport (MA) Herald, 16 July 1816.

Everything was being sold – his household effects; a covered sleigh; ox cart, an ox wagon; an eight day clock, a share certificate in the Merrimack Bridge, a grindstone and various tools.

It would be great to have these items as family heirlooms.

Was that “eight day clock” a Grandfather clock? Apparently most “eight day clocks” in that day were Grandfather or banjo clocks.

My Grandfather Huse made a banjo clock that still hangs in my uncle’s home in New Hampshire. Who knows, maybe Thomas Huse made the clock that was sold in his estate sale.

Thomas Huse owned a share of the Merrimack Bridge – that was one of the first suspension bridges built in America. The original was built in 1792 and it was replaced in 1810 with a wrought iron suspension bridge designed by Judge James Finley.

Thomas didn’t live long enough to see it, but eleven years after his death, February 6, 1827, the bridge collapsed under the weight of six oxen and two horses that were pulling a cart “loaded with wood” across the bridge.
The animals, wood and the two drivers all went into the water. Only the two drivers and horses survived. Who knew that oxen were so heavily used in early Newburyport.
See: Essex (MA) Register 8 Feb 1827. There are also articles describing the collapse of the bridge and the bridge that was built to replace it.

I think of my family and ancestors as “regular” people and I don’t expect to find them mentioned in newspapers but now that I’ve found hundreds of articles about them, I see how “local” papers used to be.

These old newspapers show us clearly who they were and how they lived their lives. You just can’t find this level of detail in any other source – newspapers are a terrific tool for genealogists.

GenealogyBank has over 2,400 historical newspapers from the 1600s to today. Give GenealogyBank a try (click here) right now.

Be sure to take advantage of GenealogyBank’s special price: only $69.95 for an annual subscription – but hurry, this special ends soon.
It’s a great day for genealogy!