Top Genealogy Websites: Utah Genealogy Resources for Records

Are you researching your family roots in Utah? Here are two good sources of Utah genealogy information online—GenealogyBank and vital records put up by the state itself—to help with your family history research in the “Beehive State.”

collage of genealogy records from the Utah Division of Archives & Records Service

Credit: Utah Division of Archives & Records Service

Utah county and state genealogical records are going online. The state’s Division of Archives & Records Service is putting up indexes and digital copies of original records ranging from birth certificates to probate records, and all types of records in between.

Utah has put up a wider variety of records than perhaps any other state in the U.S.

Utah Death Records

Utah has digitized and is in the process of putting online their death records from 1904-1961. These are Series 20842 (Index to Series 81448).

According to its website there are also these records. (Note: the series without links are not available online, but can be searched in person at the Utah Division of Archives & Records Service office.)

  • Reports from Summit County (Utah). County Coroner, Series 3716, contains the death certificates that are associated with the individual deaths investigated in this coroner record.
  • Military death certificates from the Department of Administrative Services. Division of Archives and Records Service, Series 3769, includes death certificates for military personnel killed in World War II and the Korean War, whose bodies were transported back to Utah for burial.
  • Death certificates electronic index from the Department of Health. Office of Vital Records and Statistics, Series 20842, is a computerized index for the death certificates.
  • Burial record from Vernal (Utah)Series 25360, contains death certificates from Uintah County beginning in 1905.

Utah Birth Records

Utah has an index to Birth Certificates 1905-1906 and has additional Birth Certificates 1907-1912 that are not indexed but can be browsed.

According to its website there are also these related birth records online:

  • Birth certificates from Weber County (Utah). County Clerk, Series 20896, includes all live births occurring in the state of Utah as recorded by the Office of Vital Records and Statistics.
  • Birth certificate indexes from the Department of Health. Office of Vital Records and Statistics, Series 81437, indexes the birth certificates (1904-1934) by Soundex code number.
  • Out-of-state births from the Department of Health. Office of Vital Records and Statistics, Series 81442, are birth certificates from other states sent to the Utah Office of Vital Records and Statistics for statistical compilation of Utah residents that were born in other states.
  • Native American birth certificates from the Department of Health. Office of Vital Records and Statistics, Series 81444, are a separate file of birth certificates issued for Indians.
  • Delayed certificates of birth from the Department of Health. Office of Vital Records and Statistics, Series 81445, are birth certificates that are registered with Vital Records a year or more after the date of birth.
  • Amendments to birth records from the Department of Health. Office of Vital Records and Statistics, Series 81446, are forms used to change information on birth certificates, either through error, name change, or subsequent sex change.
  • Birth registers from Emery County (Utah). County Clerk, Series 84038, contains birth certificates filed with the Bureau of Vital Statistics beginning in 1904—but do not become public until 100 years after birth. The researcher should contact the agency.
  • Birth and death records from Weber County (Utah). Vital Statistics Registrar, Series 85146, contains the official copy of birth certificates.

More Utah Records for Genealogy

Utah has also put an extensive collection of records online ranging from cattle brand registration books to naturalization records to probate records. See its complete list of records here.

Utah Newspapers for Genealogy

GenealogyBank has an extensive collection of Utah newspapers online dating from 1851 to 1922 & 1988 to Today.

Search Utah Newspaper Archives (1851 – 1922)

Search Utah Recent Obituaries (1988 – Current)

Discover a variety of genealogy records and news stories in these 8 Utah newspapers:

Search recent obituary records for your relatives in these 15 Utah newspapers:

Click on the image below to download a printable list of the Utah newspapers in GenealogyBank for your future reference. You can save to your desktop and click the titles to go directly to your newspaper of interest.

Utah Newspaper Archives at GenealogyBank

Feel free to share this list of Utah newspapers on your blog or website using the embed code provided below.

Top Genealogy Websites, Pt. 5: State Vital Records in the U.S.

A growing number of states in the U.S. are putting their vital records online, making it easier for genealogists to obtain these records.

collage of genealogy records available online from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History

Credit: West Virginia Division of Culture and History

The West Virginia Division of Culture and History is a prime example of how these state projects are revolutionizing family history research in the 21st Century.

West Virginia has put up millions of genealogical documents including:

wedding records for Joseph Strother and Amelia Davenport available online from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History

Credit: West Virginia Division of Culture and History

With a click you can see the original vital records registers for the Mountain State.

Take for example the marriage of Joseph Strother and Amelia Davenport on 5 June 1808 in Charles Town, West Virginia.

wedding records for Joseph Strother and Amelia Davenport available online from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History and GenealogyBank

Credit: West Virginia Division of Culture and History and GenealogyBank

West Virginia has given us easy online access to the original entry in the 1808 marriage register for this couple’s marriage.

photo of the wedding register for Joseph Strother and Amelia Davenport available online from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History

Credit: West Virginia Division of Culture and History

Brief and to the point: we get the date of their marriage, their names and the name of the minister that performed the wedding.

Couple that information with their marriage announcement that we find in GenealogyBank and we get the rest of the story.

wedding announcement for Joseph Strother and Amelia Davenport, Farmer’s Repository newspaper article 10 June 1808

Farmer’s Repository (Charleston, West Virginia), 10 June 1808, page 2

The marriage announcement tells us that the minister, Rev. Mr. Mines, is of Leesburg (Loudoun County), Virginia.

Now we know where to look for the church registers of that denomination.

From the marriage announcement we also learn that the groom, Joseph Strother, is of Madison County, Virginia, and that the bride, Miss Amelia Davenport, is the daughter of Major A. Davenport of Jefferson County, West Virginia.

This is critical information for genealogists.

Now we know where to dig deeper for information about the Strother and Davenport families: Jefferson, Loudoun and Madison counties.

Newspapers are the cutting-edge source for genealogists. GenealogyBank has made it easy to find facts like these details of the Strother-Davenport wedding. Combine this newspaper information with states like West Virginia putting digital copies of the original birth, marriage and death registers online—and it’s easy to see that this is a great time for genealogists!

For reference, here is a list provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of all the state websites offering vital records across the United States: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/w2w.htm

What about the Kids? Researching Your Family Tree’s Children

Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book “From the Family Kitchen.” In this guest blog post, Gena writes about the family history challenge of researching your ancestors’ lives when they were children.

My sons have had the opportunity to visit more cemeteries and hear more genealogy presentations than most family historians. They’ve been a captive audience as I give genealogy talks to conferences, societies, and libraries. They even have a few of my genealogy presentations memorized. Unimpressed by the family history topics I cover, my youngest always asks: “why don’t you ever talk about researching kids?”

old photo of children from Gena Philibert-Ortega's collection

Old photo of children, from the author’s collection

It’s a fair question considering that all of our ancestors started life as children. My guess is that most family historians would reply that children don’t leave a record trail, or that their lives aren’t as documented as adults—and that is why genealogists don’t spend much time researching their ancestors’ early years.

But there are instances where children do leave a paper trail. A visit to the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library in Springfield, Illinois, reinforced this fact to our family when we viewed a photographic exhibit of Civil War soldiers. Boys as young as 9 years served in the Civil War, and some of them were photographed.

photo of an unidentified young Civil War soldier in Union uniform and forage cap, from the Library of Congress

Photo: Unidentified young Civil War soldier in Union uniform and forage cap. Credit: Library of Congress.

From: Library of Congress. Flickr, The Commons. Accessed 23 March 2013.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/library_of_congress/5229153190/

While children are too young to leave the type of documentation reserved for adults, they do leave behind records. A birth record or church christening announcement may start your search, depending on the time period. School records are another choice for researching kids. Don’t forget the variety of articles found in a local newspaper.

Obviously the era the child grew up in will determine what mentions could be found in the newspapers. But some ideas include:

Organizations

What organizations or clubs did the child belong to? By learning more about the history of the place your ancestor was from, you may identify groups that they may have taken part in, including organizations that were social, educational, ethnic or religious in nature.

The Boy Scouts of Black Wolf and B.P., Lexington Herald newspaper article 25 September 1910

Lexington Herald (Lexington, Kentucky), 25 September 1910, page 4

Although far from comprehensive, here is a list of some groups from the 20th century:

School

In a previous blog article, “Searching Family History: Old School Records in the Newspaper,” I explored the types of newspaper articles that listed teachers and students.

As explained in that blog article, there are numerous types of articles mentioning children. From their achievements and awards, to sporting events and even misdeeds, you can find mentions of school children in local newspapers. One of the pluses to digitized newspapers is that a search of just a name can assist you in finding these mentions. Consider limiting your search by date as you explore GenealogyBank, allowing you to focus on an ancestor’s early years.

Letters to Santa

Reading letters to Santa from the late 19th and early 20th centuries reminds one how much better off materially most people are now.

Letters to Santa from the Children, Kalamazoo Gazette newspaper article 16 December 1906

Kalamazoo Gazette (Kalamazoo, Michigan), 16 December 1906, page 9

These letters range from requests for toys or food to desperate pleas for almost anything their parents couldn’t afford. These letters often include the child’s name and, in some cases, an address. What a great find to see the requests of your family member to the jolly guy in the red suit!

Dear Old Santa Claus, Kalamazoo Gazette newspaper article 21 December 1899

Kalamazoo Gazette (Kalamazoo, Michigan), 21 December 1899, page 2

Social History

As with any genealogy research, consider social history when learning more about children from past generations. Use the newspapers as a local history source to get a sense of what organizations and activities your ancestors may have been involved in during their younger years. Read histories of the time to learn more about what childhood was like during their era. By learning more about the locality of your ancestor, you can learn more about what types of activities they may have enjoyed. Gaps in specific family records can be filled with broader social history information.

Keep your own children’s interests in mind! Including stories about their ancestors’ childhoods will stimulate present and future generations of children to take more interest in the family history you are documenting and preserving.

Irish American Genealogy & Family History Facts Infographic

Irish American Genealogy & Family History Facts Infographic

In celebration of Irish Heritage Month, here are some interesting facts about Irish ancestry in America.

Irish American Population Statistics

  • There are 34.5 million people who claim Irish ancestry in America
  • Approximately 11% of the total United States population is Irish American
  • There are over 7 times more people of Irish descent in the United States than the entire population of Ireland

History of Irish Immigration to America

There were 2 major waves of Irish immigration to America.

  1. The first immigration period was in the Colonial era of the 18th century. These people set sail from the northern provinces of Ireland looking for new lives as American pioneers. The migration consisted of approximately 250,000 Scots-Irish who were predominately Protestant. The major ports of entry for these incoming Irish immigrants were in New York and Philadelphia.
  1. The second wave of immigration was between 1846 and 1900. During this period approximately 2,873,000 people fled to America from the southern provinces of Ireland. This was primarily due to the Great Irish Potato Famine, which caused poverty and starvation throughout Ireland. These new arrivals were predominately of Catholic denomination. The major American ports of entry were in New York and Boston. The Irish also arrived on trains and ships from Canada, which was then called British North America.

Origins of the Saying “Luck of the Irish”

During the 1848-1855 California Gold Rush many Irish immigrants headed out West to mine silver & gold. Many Americans said the immigrants’ mining success was due to luck, not skill—hence the saying “Luck of the Irish.”

Common Irish Surnames

Here is a list of the top 10 most common Irish last names and their meanings:

  • Murphy – Sea Battlers
  • Kelly – Bright-headed Ones
  • O’Sullivan – Hawkeyed Ones
  • Walsh – Welshmen
  • O’Brien – Noblemen
  • Byrne – Ravens
  • Ryan – Little Kings
  • O’Connor – Patrons of Warriors
  • O’Neill - From a Champion, Niall of the Nine Hostages
  • O’Reilly – Outgoing People, Descendants of Reilly

Percentage of Irish Americans by State

The Northeastern United States has the highest concentration of Irish Americans. The following 9 states all have more than 15% Irish ancestry in their total populations. The states are listed in descending order from highest to lowest total Irish population percentages. Massachusetts has the highest percentage in the United States with 22.5% of its residents claiming Irish ancestry.

  1. Massachusetts
  2. New Hampshire
  3. Rhode Island
  4. Delaware
  5. Connecticut
  6. Vermont
  7. Pennsylvania
  8. New Jersey
  9. Maine

The following 9 U.S. states also have high Irish American populations of 12-14%. Montana has the highest in this range with 14.8% of its population claiming Irish ancestry.

  1. Montana
  2. Iowa
  3. Nebraska
  4. Wyoming
  5. New York
  6. Missouri
  7. Ohio
  8. Colorado
  9. Illinois

11% to 11.9% of the residents in the following 7 states claim Irish ancestry.

  1. Oregon
  2. Maryland
  3. Kansas
  4. Washington
  5. Minnesota
  6. Nevada
  7. West Virginia

The remaining states have less than 11% Irish ancestry in their total populations.

Famous Americans Who Are a Wee Bit Irish

From presidents to outlaws, there have been many famous Irish Americans throughout U.S. history. Here are a few of them:

  • John F. Kennedy a.k.a. JFK: 35th President of the United States
  • Henry Ford: Founder of Ford Motor Company
  • Barack Obama: 44th President of the United States
  • William Henry McCarty Jr. a.k.a. Billy the Kid: Outlaw
  • Judy Garland: Actress & Singer
  • Bill O’Reilly: TV Host & Political Commentator
  • Conan O’Brien: TV Host & Comedian
  • Grace Kelly: Actress & Princess of Monaco
  • Walter Elias Disney a.k.a. Walt Disney: Film Producer & Co-founder of the Walt Disney Company
  • Danica Patrick: NASCAR Driver
  • Eddie Murphy: Actor & Comedian
  • Mel Gibson: Actor & Film Producer

Top Irish Genealogy Records

The top genealogy records to trace your Irish roots are:

Did You Know?

Civil registration in Ireland didn’t begin until 1864, although some non-Catholic marriages were recorded as early as 1845. Fortunately for genealogists, Irish American newspapers routinely published the news of Irish births, marriages and deaths for more than half a century before Ireland started recording them.

Got a little Irish in you? Discover your Irish American ancestry at http://www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/ethnic/irish_american/

Follow GenealogyBank on social media with hashtag #IrishHeritage for more Irish American genealogy facts throughout Irish Heritage Month.

Sources:

http://www.biography.com/people/groups/famous-irish-americans

http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/facts_for_features_special_editions/cb13-ff03.html

http://www.edwardtodonnell.com/

http://www.energyofanation.org/waves_of_irish_immigration.html

http://www.irishcentral.com/roots/The-10-most-popular-Irish-last-names-2-133737553.html?page=3

http://names.mongabay.com/ancestry/st-Irish.html

http://www.udel.edu/soe/deal/IrishImmigrationFacts.html

http://www.wikipedia.org/

Genealogy Search Tip: Are Your Queries Returning Too Many Records?

GenealogyBank has grown from 160 million records since its inception to over 1.3 billion records today. That is a lot of articles to search through to find information about your family history. Genealogists often approach GenealogyBank with a direct search—using a surname—searching across the entire database to make sure we don’t miss any genealogy records about the family.

Sometimes, though, the simplest search query returns too many records for you to reasonably examine them all. When that happens, GenealogyBank has created over a dozen targeted search pages to help you narrow down the number of results you get back. Here’s a quick list of these helpful targeted search pages to get you started:

You can also perform targeted ethnic family searches with our African American, Hispanic and Irish American search pages.

Use these special search pages to narrow down your search to a particular type of newspaper article, as the following example shows.

Let’s say you’re searching for all the arrivals and departures of the ship Hector. If you search GenealogyBank just using the word “Hector,” you’ll get 400,000 hits. But, if you search the word “Hector” using the handy Passenger Lists link on our home page or in the left navigation pane of the Newspaper Archives category, you can narrow those search results to 14,000 passenger and ship records that specifically mention the ship Hector.

GenealogyBank Passenger List search for "Hector"

GenealogyBank Passenger List search for “Hector”

Even 14,000 records are a lot to examine. Limit the search again by a range of years when your relatives likely arrived on the ship Hector and you’ll have a manageable number of articles to sift through. Let’s say you are reasonably sure your ancestors arrived in America on the ship Hector sometime between 1820 and 1825—go ahead and use that date range in your search query.

GenealogyBank search results page for Passenger List search on "Hector" from 1820-1825

GenealogyBank search results page for Passenger List search on “Hector” from 1820-1825

Save time and zero in on the articles you need. GenealogyBank has more than a dozen targeted search pages: use them to focus your searches for the type of newspaper article you are looking for.

GenealogyBank targeted search pages

GenealogyBank targeted search pages

How to Find Your Grandfather’s Birth Records Online

Every day we receive questions from our members regarding their family history searches. We are here to help!

Here’s a genealogy question we just received.

GenealogyBank Member Question:

My grandfather Hugh Cornwell was born in Prairie Grove, AR, 4/6/1883. I have been searching for a birth record for the past 20 years with no luck. Any suggestions?

“Ask the Genealogist” Response:

Arkansas vital records do not begin until 1914.

So, while you can possibly obtain a church baptismal certificate, you won’t be able to find a government birth certificate for your grandfather.

I found your grandfather’s California death certificate, which does give his date of birth along with the family surnames of his father and mother. His death certificate is available online on the FamilySearch website at https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VPW3-9Q3.

There is another record for your grandfather in the 1900 census, which also states that he was born in April 1883. His census record is available on FamilySearch.org at https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M9PK-R7K.

Here is a third document with genealogical information about your grandfather: his World War II draft registration card, also showing that he was born on April 6, 1883. You can view your grandfather’s military record at https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/V48Y-54Q.

So, while you cannot get a formal birth certificate—here are three U.S. government documents, created over the past 112 years, that give his date of birth. That should be the evidence you are looking for.

Let’s see how we can help you make progress in your own family history research.

All the best in your genealogy research.

I found one of my ancestors in the 1881 Canadian census. What do I do now?

I found one of my ancestors in the 1881 Canadian census on http://www.familysearch.org/What do I do now?

Good work.

FamilySearch.org is a terrific free site – with helpful indexes like the 1881 Canadian census index.

You may see the original census page at a website put up by the The Library & Archives of Canada. It has the 1881 (and other) census records online – free.

New Brunswick Vital Records are online – free.

I copied out the index citations for Ella’s brother Charles and sisters: Agnes and Elizabeth.

But, now look carefully at these records. In the census – the mother’s name is: Mary and in these vital records it is given as Annie Stewart.

So, you need to determine – if these records are for the same family or not.

Questions you might ask:
1. Are Annie & Mary the same person?
Perhaps one name is her first name and the other her middle name OR perhaps Annie died and Stephen remarried a person named Mary before the 1881 census was taken.

2. Are these two different families with similar names?

The oldest child listed in the census – William – was born in 1862. So you want to search the Church registers from 1850 on to check for the parent’s marriage record and the records for each of the children.

Like the birth records from the New Brunswick Archives – the Church records should give the mother’s maiden name.

Notice too – that Stephen Jackson was born in England – in 1881 he gave his age as 45 – that would make his birth year as approximately 1836. Let’s hope that he rounded his age – since British birth, marriage and death records were started on July 1, 1837.

3. Your next critical question is: When did they leave Canada and emigrate to the United States? If they are in the US by 1900 – you will want to look for them in the 1900 Census.
If they are still in Canada in 1901 – then you want to search for them in the 1901 Census.

You may use the 1900 Census – free at FamilySearchLabs

You may search the 1901 Canadian Census at the Library & Archives of Canada.

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Newspapers are a good source for birth records – family details

The Duluth News Tribune (13 Jan 1918) reported that more than half of the births registered for Duluth were simply listed as “male” or “female” child. This can be a problem for genealogists today but it was also a problem for one Minnesotan in 1918 who was trying to establish he was the legal heir to a family estate.

Per the article the local health department was going to begin to routinely follow-up with parents to have them file ammended birth certificates so that the names of the children would be permanently recorded.

Newspapers regularly published birth announcements which included the names of the new child; date/place of birth; names of the parents and often the names of siblings, grandparents and other genealogical information.

In this example from the Columbus (GA) Enquirer Sun (22 Sept 1922) you can find the core information – names of the new children, their parents and the dates of birth.

Note that the announcements also give the maiden names of the mother and that Porterdeat Golden Smith was named for his maternal grandfather.

Newspapers are a terrific source to get the details we need to document our families.

Search GenealogyBank and see what you’ll find.
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GenealogyBank adds 63 newspapers from 21 States

GenealogyBank announced today that added 63 historical newspapers from 21 States – including 33 more Spanish language newspapers.

With well over 3,500 newspapers on GenealogyBank it has never been easier to find birth records, wedding announcements, obituaries and the biographical details of more than 1 billion of our ancestors and cousins.

These titles are live on GenealogyBank right now. Give it a try.

Arkansas
Jonesboro, AR: Jonesboro Evening Sun. 10/8/1904 to 12/27/1916

Arizona
Tucson, AZ: Tucsonense. 3/17/1915 to 11/1/1931

California
Berkeley, CA: Grito. 9/1/1967
Colton, CA: Chicano. 4/21/1968
Los Angeles. CA: Heraldo de Mexico. 12/9/1917 to 12/28/1928

Colorado
Colorado Springs, CO: Gazette-Telegraph. 1/1/1903 to 12/31/1908
San Luis, CO: Adobe 3/1/1974


Connecticut
New London, CT: New London Democrat. 1845-04-26 to 1851-01-25

Georgia
Savannah, GA: Savannah Tribune. 1/6/1912 to 12/28/1912

Idaho
Idaho City, ID: Idaho Falls Times. 1891-07-09 to 9/16/1920
Idaho City, ID: Idaho Register. 2/17/1908 to 8/7/1908
Twin Falls, ID: Twin Falls News. 4/22/1921


Illinois
Chicago, IL: Latin Times. 2/1/1958 to 5/2/1975
Chicago, IL: Vida Latina. 10/21/1954 to 12/21/1959

Louisiana
New Orleans, LA: Abeja. 1829-01-03

Massachusetts
Boston, MA: Boston Evening Transcript. 1850-03-01 to 1850-12-31
Nantucket, MA: Nantucket Inquirer. 1821-09-20 to 1830-04-24
Springfield, MA: Springfield Republican. 1886-01-01 to 1891-12-31

Missouri
Kansas City, MO: Kansas City Times. 1884-05-14 to 1896-01-31

Nebraska
Nebraska City, NE: Daily Nebraska Press. 1870-05-27

New Mexico
Las Cruces, NM: Dona Ana County Republican. 1897-03-11 to 2/15/1902
Las Cruces, NM: Labrador. 1896-09-08
Las Cruces, NM: Las Cruces Democrat. 1892-02-03 to 1899-11-29
Las Cruces, NM: Mesilla Valley Bulletin. 4/30/1937
Las Cruces, NM: Newmans Semi-Weekly. 1881-04-13
Las Cruces, NM: Thirty-Four. 1879-04-16 to 1880-11-03
Las Vegas, NM: Las Vegas Daily Gazette. 1880-07-27 to 1886-01-31
Las Vegas, NM: Misionero Bautista: Organo Oficial de la Convencion Bautista Hispano-Americana de Nuevo Mexico. 7/1/1948
Mesilla, NM: Mesilla News. 1879-02-08 to 1883-11-24
Santa Fe, NM: Daily New Mexican. 1872-04-02 to 1875-06-28
Santa Fe, NM: Santa Fe Weekly New Mexican and Livestock Journal. 1885-10-08bto
1895-12-26
Silver City, NM: Silver City Independent. 1897-08-03
Springer, NM: Colfax County Stockman. 1893-07-08
Springer, NM: Sentinel. 2/15/1901 to 12/27/1901

New York
Albany, NY: Albany Evening Journal. 1834-06-12 to 1849-03-22
Cazenovia, NY: Pilot. 1808-08-10 to 1821-09-06
Cazenovia, NY: Union Herald. 1838-05-11 to 1840-04-11
New York, NY: Grafico. 11/11/1928 to 1/3/1931
New York, NY: Jewish Daily News. 1/2/1916 to 12/31/1922
New York, NY: True Sun. 1847-05-24 to 1848-02-25
Oxford, NY: Times. 1838-10-10 to 1839-12-25
Schoharie, NY: Schoharie Observer. 1818-11-25 to 1823-05-07
Troy, NY: Times. 1885-07-09 to 1886-06-24

Ohio
Chillicothe, OH: Supporter. 1809-01-05 to 1818-01-20
Dayton, OH: Democratic Herald. 1835-05-07 to 1837-08-12
Xenia, OH: Greene County Torch-Light. 1841-07-01 to 1842-01-20

Rhode Island
Pawtucket, RI: Pawtucket Times. 1/1/1920 to 2/28/1921

Tennessee
Nashville, TN: Tennessee Gazette. 1800-02-25 to 1807-05-30

Texas
Austin, TX: Texas Gazette. 1829-09-25 to 1832-02-18
Beaumont, TX: Beaumont Enterprise & Journal. 3/28/1906 to 9/30/1911
Brazoria, TX: Texas Republican. 1834-07-05 to 1835-10-17
Brownsville, TX: Heraldo de Brownsville. 1/12/1936 to 2/29/1940
Cleburne, TX: Cleburne Morning Review. 7/4/1911 to 5/30/1916
El Paso, TX: Atalaya Bautista: Semanario Evangelico Bautista. 1/2/1908
El Paso, TX: Continental. 12/12/1934 to 3/11/1960
El Paso, TX: Evening Tribune. 1889-04-03
Kingsville, TX: Eco. 4/1/1931
Kingsville, TX: Tex. Mex. Reflector. 1/21/1921
San Antonio, TX: Pan American Labor Express. 9/4/1918 to 12/4/1918
San Antonio, TX: Prensa. 10/11/1918 to 2/19/1935

Utah
Salt Lake City, UT: Salt Lake Telegram. 2/3/1902

Virginia
Winchester, VA: Winchester Virginian. 1828-04-18 to 1836-09-06

Vermont
St. Albans, VT: St. Albans Daily Messenger. 1853-01-13 to 12/31/1922

GenealogyBank adding newspapers from 22 States

In a major release GenealogyBank today announced that it is adding 67 historical newspapers from 22 States – including 32 more Spanish language newspapers.

With well over 3,500 newspapers on GenealogyBank it has never been easier to find birth records, wedding announcements, obituaries and the biographical details of more than 1 billion of our ancestors and cousins.

Photo courtesy: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, DC – LC-USW3-F104-009104-E [P&P].
Alaska
AK. Juneau. Daily Record-Miner. 1903 to 1911

Arkansas
AR. Helena. Western Clarion. 1864 to 1865
AR. Jonesboro. Jonesboro Evening Sun. 1905 to 1916
AR. Heber Springs. Jacksonian. 1890 to 1904

California
CA. Sacramento. Prensa Libre. 1969 to 1970

Connecticut
CT. Danielsonville. Windham County Transcript. 1863 to 1890
CT. New London. New London Daily Chronicle. 1849 to 1861
CT. New London. New London Democrat. 1846 to 1873
CT. Norwich. Norwich Morning Bulletin. 1860 to 1887

Florida
FL. Tampa. Revista de Cuba Libre. 1897 to 1898

Georgia
GA. Savannah. Georgia Republican & State Intelligencer. 1803 to 1807

Idaho
ID. Twin Falls. Twin Falls Daily News. 1918 to 1922

Illinois
IL. Chicago. Sol de Chicago. 1960
IL. Centralia Marion Co. Centralia Sentinel. 1863 to 1867
IL. Chicago. Vorbote. 1974 to 1876

Kansas
KS. Topeka. Colored Citizen. 1978 to 1904

Massachusetts
MA. Stoughton. Stoughton Sentinel. 1863 to 1874

Maryland
MD. Bel-Air. National American. 1861 to 1865
MD. Chestertown. Chestertown Transcript. 1866 to 1876
MD. Fredrick. Republican Gazette & General Advertiser. 1822 to

Minnesota
MN. St. Paul. Daily Minnesota Pioneer. 1854 to 1855
MN. St. Paul. Saint Paul Daily Press. 1868 to 1872

Missouri
MO. Kansas City.
Kansas City Times. 1884 to 1895

Mississippi
MS. Vicksburg. Daily Commercial. 1877 to 1882

Nebraska
NE. Nebraska City. Daily Nebraska Press. 1868 to 1876
North Carolina
NC. Raleigh. Semi-Weekly Standard. 1861 to 1863

New York
NY. Bronx. Republicas Hispanas Unidas. 1943
NY. Bronx. Vida Hispana. 1953 to 1954
NY. Brooklyn. Curioso. 1934 to 1935
NY. Cazenovia. Union Herald. 1838 to 1840
NY. New York. Ahora. 1950
NY. New York. Alba de Nueva York. 1954
NY. New York. America Continental. 1956
NY. New York. Americana. 1947 to 1948
NY. New York. Artistas Hispanos. 1948
NY. New York. Ateneo. 1934
NY. New York. Cascabeles. 1934
NY. New York. Crisol. 1949
NY. New York. Cronica. 1950 to 1950
NY. New York. Eco Antillano. 1941 to 1942
NY. New York. Guaimaro. 1895 to 1896
NY. New York. Kan-de-la. 1949
NY. New York. Liberacion. 1946 to 1959
NY. New York. Machete Criollo. 1927
NY. New York. New Yorker Volkszeitung. 1886 to 1898
NY. New York. Nueva Republica. 1897 to 1898
NY. New York. Nueva Voz. 1962 to 1965
NY. New York. Nueva York al Dia. 1945
NY. New York. Pueblos Hispanos. 1953 to 1944
NY. New York. Puerto Rico en Marcha. 1951 to 1969
NY. New York. Semanario. 1955
NY. New York. Seminario Hispano. 1946
NY. New York. Soberania. 1958
NY. New York. Voz. 1960 to 1962

Ohio
OH. Cincinnati. Cincinnati Weekly Herald and the Philantropist. 1936 to 1840
OH. Ravenna. Portage County Democrat. 1854 to 1855
OH. Wooster. Wooster Republican. 1862 to 1863
OH. Xenia. Greene County Journal. 1863 to 1864
OH. Cincinnati. Cincinnati Volksfreund. 1863 to 1864
OK. Miami. Miami Record-Herald. 1899 to 1903

Pennsylvania
PA. Philadelphia. Sunday Mercury. 1864 to 1865

Texas
TX. Cleburne. Cleburne Morning Review. 1911 to 1916
TX. Galveston. Galveston News. 1877 to 1893
TX. Kingsville. Accion. 1931 to 1932
TX. San Antonio. Revista Mexicana. 1916 to 1920
TX. Taft. Pan Americana News. 1942 to 1956

Utah
UT. Salt Lake City. Inter-Mountain Advocate. 1894 to 1897