Using Newspaper Birthday Announcements for Genealogy Research

Genealogists spend years getting to know their sources. We learn the ins and outs of archives and their collections of genealogical records, looking to get the maximum amount of information on our ancestors.

birthday bulletin for Israel W. Durham from the philadelphia inquirer newspaper 24 October 1903

Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 24 October 1903

In combing through the Philadelphia Inquirer newspaper archives I noticed that they ran a regular feature called the “Birthday Bulletin,” starting in 1903. Generally these newspaper birthday announcements ran on page 2 or 3 and included a brief biography and an etching or photograph of the featured person.

In this example, published 24 October 1903, page 2, an Israel W. Durham is featured. The newspaper article includes his photo, and a brief biography gives us his date and place of birth: “He was born in this city (Philadelphia) October 24, 1856” along with a sketch of his public service and a portrait etching.

Some of these shout-out newspaper birthday announcements are much briefer, like the following four-panel “Birthday Bulletin” published 29 August 1922, page 3, which featured the birthdays of four area businessmen. In this example we can get their date of birth, occupation and a photograph. It can be very difficult locating a photo of our ancestors so it is a real plus when they were published in a newspaper.

birthday bulletins from the Philadelphia Inquirer newspaper 29 August 1922

Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 29 August 1922, page 3

These “Birthday Bulletins” focused on acknowledging the birthdays of established business and public figures in the community. The Philadelphia Inquirer also routinely published “Births” announcing the arrival of newborn infants, such as the following birth announcement, published 5 April 1911, page 10.

birth notice from the Philadelphia Inquirer newspaper 5 April 1911

Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 5 April 1911, page 10

We expect newspapers to publish information about the area’s births, marriages and deaths. It is a bonus when a newspaper creates an additional local interest feature like these “Birthday Bulletins” that is so helpful to genealogists.

When you approach the old newspapers for your local area, take the time to become familiar with them.

Flip through the newspapers and see what features were unique to that paper. Doing so can help you uncover hidden gems to aid in your genealogy research.

The newspaper is your friend—get acquainted.

In my experience we can find genealogical information throughout a newspaper, from the front page to the classified ads.

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Faith and Begorrah – Ireland 1901 Census is now live online.

Breaking News!
The National Archives of Ireland has just put the complete Irish 1901 Census online.

More Irish genealogy resources:
GenealogyBank – is packed with Irish American newspapers as well as birth announcements, marriage notices and obituaries.

GenealogyBank keeps on growing.

Search it now!

Breaking News: Ireland 1901 Census Going Online

Breaking News

The National Archives of Ireland has announced that they will be putting the complete Irish 1901 Census online. It is expected to go live within the next two weeks.
The National Archives of Ireland already has the Ireland 1911 census online.

The census gives the name of each person in the household, age, sex, their relationship to head of the household, religion, occupation, marital status, town, county or country of birth.

Other essential Irish genealogical resources:
Ireland Civil Registration Indexes – 1845-1958

This handy, free online resource is an index to Irish births, 1864-1958, marriages, 1845-1958, and deaths, 1864-1958.

Notice in this example that it gives the citation so you can quickly obtain copies of the original marriage certificate.
GenealogyBank – is packed with Irish American newspapers as well as birth announcements, marriage notices and obituaries.
GenealogyBank keeps on growing.
Search it now!

Genealogy Boot Camp – Quick Tips

Genealogy Boot Camp

Here are a few tips that every genealogist should know.

Using an online index

Researchers using an online index sometimes try to tell the computer everything they know about their deceased ancestor.

Assuming that the computer will sort through all of the facts and narrow down the hits to just their ancestor – they will type in the person’s full name, complete dates of birth/death, nicknames and any other facts that might be helpful.

Sometimes – less is more.

What you want to do is try multiple approaches as you interrogate the index.

1. Search on the full name: first name, middle name, surname.
Give it a try and see if it promptly gives you the results you want. This is particularly effective if the parts of the name are distinctive, uncommon words.

2. Not finding your guy? Then – try again. This time search on only the surname. Or – if the first name is distinctive – search on just the first name. 3. Notice that once you have made your initial search you may narrow down your search to only the obituaries, marriage notices or birth announcements.

Click on Obituaries and the computer will bring you only the 55 obituaries – instead of all 2,651 article results for “Starbird”.

This is a handy tool for speeding up your search.

4. Be careful not to narrow your search too much.

It is common for new researchers to only search the “local” newspaper published in the town where their ancestor once lived. That is a common mistake.

Newspapers routinely published information about people living far from the town where the newspaper was published.

For example – Chloe Starbird – wife of John Starbird died in Portland, Maine – but her obituary appeared in the Boston Semi-Weekly Advertiser (16 March 1822) – published in another state. Newspapers routinely published articles about people who lived in other counties; or other states. Their mandate was to fill the newspaper with news every day and to expand their circulation base. So – editors routinely added birth, marriage and death notices for individuals – providing their readers with the news they needed.

Notice that in this same example from the Boston Semi-Weekly Advertiser (16 March 1822) – that there are obituaries for individuals from Portland, Maine; Dublin, New Hampshire; Sturbridge; Shrewsbury; Bolton; New Braintree; Barre, Vermont; Zanesville, Ohio and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Think big – search all of GenealogyBank – then narrow your search by region, state or town.

Search Baltimore Sun Online

Search the back issues of the Baltimore Sun – click here.

Go through every page – millions of articles – obituaries, birth announcements and wedding notices. GenealogyBank has Maryland covered.

Click on these links to search the back issues of other Baltimore newspapers:

Click here to search newspapers published in other Maryland towns:

Tip: You can bookmark these links and quickly start your search in the back files of any Maryland newspaper.
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Idaho Statesman turns 145 years old!

Congratulations to the Idaho Statesman newspaper – it turned 145 years old yesterday!

Click Here to search the old pages of the Idaho Statesman 1864-1922 in GenealogyBank.

Read about the fall of Richmond and the ending of the Civil War; sift the paper for the old obituaries, marriage notices and birth announcements.

“But now everything has changed.
The once little village has been transformed to the big, modern city…
and I am sure were I to revisit your beautiful city,
I would be a veritable Rip Van Winkle.”

G.B. Baldwin
20 Dec 1908 Idaho Statesman


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Find and document your ancestors in GenealogyBank – the best source for old newspapers & documents on the planet.

Period!

A, E, I, O, U and sometimes Y

I am often asked: Do you have Canadian newspapers in GenealogyBank?

Well, no we don’t – but that’s not the question you want to ask. GenealogyBank has over 3,800 newspapers – all of them published in the United States – but it has several million articles, records and documents on Canadians.

Tip: I have been researching my family tree for 45 years and I can tell you that you’ll find the information on your family where you least expect to find it.

Here’s a wedding announcement for Alexander James Ross of Winnipeg, Manitoba and Mary Moore McArthur of Picton, Nova Scotia – they were married in Chicago 6 March 1882. (Inter Ocean 14 March 1882).

Newspapers were published – every day.
And every day editors had to fill the next day’s paper & they wanted to sell papers.

So they pulled “news” from a wide circle of influence. Birth announcements, marriage announcements, and obituaries from small town and big city newspapers.

Just like CNN or Fox News – the daily newspapers had to fill their pages with hard news. News that people wanted to read and that would sell subscriptions.

If you are researching Canadian genealogy then
GenealogyBank is an essential online tool.

Eastport, Maine is a small town on the Maine coast right on the border with New Brunswick, Canada.

As you would expect the Eastport Sentinnel regularly carried birth, death and marriage announcements for individuals and families from the Canadian side of the border.

Look at this example of marriage notices published in the
29 March 1828 Eastport (ME) Sentinnel. Look at the places mentioned “Lubec” – “Dennysville” – “St. Andrews” – “Antigua” – “St. Stephens” and “Charlotte”. Towns on both sides of the border. “Antigua” refers to the island nation of Antigua.

Nothing unusual here – just a typical day with a newspaper editor packing his paper with the information his readers wanted to read.

Just like GenealogyBank – everyday we pack in more resources that genealogists need and rely on. You’re not finished with your research until you’ve searched the newspapers in GenealogyBank.
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Daily New Mexican (Santa Fe, NM) newspaper 1871-1887

GenealogyBank has added the Daily New Mexican (Santa Fe, NM) 1871-1887.

GenealogyBank has over 3,800 newspapers from all 50 States, going from 1690 to Today.

Search the Daily New Mexican for specific obituaries, marriage or birth announcements as well as news articles of the day.
I used to live in New Mexico and was interested to see the details avialable in the newspaper.

This obituary for Gentry Floyd caught my attention. The 1870 Census listed a “John” Floyd – living in Tierra Amarilla, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. It gives his age as 80 and states that he was born in Kentucky. (FamilySearchLabs.org)

This could be our “Gentry” Floyd. His obituary gives more details of his life and death.

That he was born in 1798 in Christian County, Kentucky; joined the Christian Church and was baptized by Alexander Campbell who founded that church. That he taught school at the Indian Pueblo.

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GenealogyBank adds Dutchess Observer (Poughkeepsie, NY) Newspaper

GenealogyBank has added the Dutchess Observer – 1816-1821 – an historical newspaper published in Poughkeepsie, NY.

This early American newspaper includes local news, obituaries and birth announcements.


Find and document your ancestors in GenealogyBank – the best source for old newspapers on the planet.

Period!

So, this couple just had a baby ….


I met a couple with a new baby boy.

They decided to name him for his mother’s brother –

They call him: Uncle.


Not only does GenealogyBank.com have over 130 million obituaries and death records it has tens of millions of birth announcements as well.

What will you find?
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