In today’s mail bag.

Q:The person I’m searching for is James Francis Fewster b.1867.
I know that there was an article published about him in the Baltimore Sun – 12 August 1889 – but I can’t find it.
What am I doing wrong?

When I browse GenealogyBank I find NOTHING – but I know this article exists.
Please help – thank you.


Great question!

Here’s what you want to do.

A: At the search box simply type in: Fewster in the surname box and 1889 in the date box. You’ll see that the article about him comes right up.

Notice that GenealogyBank highlights the search term: Fewster – making it easy to spot it on the page.

Why search that way?

The newspapers in GenealogyBank have been published for over 300 years. Editors have used various editorial styles for writing about individuals. So – keep the searching simple.

In this case – the newspaper wrote James Francis Fewster’s name: as: Jas. F. Fewster.

So – if you type in his full name – you will miss this article.

Remember the rule of WYSIWYG (pronounced /ˈwɪziwɪɡ/).
It is an acronym that stands for What You See Is What You Get.

In other words – what you type in the search box is what the computer will search for.

Adding extra terms: like the middle name can be very helpful in limiting your search results to zero in on your ancestor – but – remembering WYSIWYG – it can also work against you.

Fewster is a distinctive surname and like most surnames, it is not very common.

So – a tip: limit your search to simply the “surname”.

The search engine will then cut through the 672 million articles and zero in on just the ones mentioning a person named Fewster.

And in this example you want only the articles published in 1889.

So, put both of those facts together and Bingo.
There it is.

Best Source for Finding Old Marriage Records!

GenealogyBank is your best source for finding old marriage records.

Newspapers regularly published marriage announcements – like this one from the Weekly Pelican (New Orleans, LA) 26 Oct 1889.

Whether you’re looking for a wedding announcement published in 1802, 1862 or 1962 – GenealogyBank is your most comprehensive source.

TIP: Focus your search by the type of article.
In this example in the Historical Newspapers section – limit your search to only the marriage notices. Click on the highlighted topic and only the wedding and marriage announcement articles will appear in your search – saving you time.

Find and document your ancestors in GenealogyBank – the best source for old newspapers & documents on the planet.

Period!

Baltimore newspapers 1775-1922

Julia Child (1912-2004)

This week the nation is remembering Julia Child – how much she contributed to our lives and how much fun she was to be with – via her books, newspaper columns, TV Show – The French Chef and interviews.

Julia Child was born Julia Carolyn McWilliams – this week – August 15, 1912 in Pasadena, California and died this week – August 13, 2004 in Montecido, California. She married Paul Cushing Child over a long Labor Day weekend – 1 September 1946. She had met Paul Child while stationed in Sri Lanka with the OSS during World War II. The OSS is now known as the CIA. For her life’s work she received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President George W. Bush in 2003. She was 92 years old.

She is celebrated in Meryl Streep’s new movie – Julie & Julia


and she is in GenealogyBank too – from her numerous recipes; articles about her books & TV series; numerous obituries published in newspapers across the country and her death record in the SSDI.

Cook like Julia Child

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Marriage Announcements -

Get the most out of GenealogyBank!







Whether you’re looking for a wedding announcement published on July 22, 1802, July 22, 1862 or July 22,1962 – GenealogyBank is your comprehensive source.
I didn’t know that was in GenealogyBank!

(Dallas (TX) Morning News – 22 July 1962)
(Maine Eagle – 22 July 1802)
(Baltimore Sun – 22 July 1862)

TIP: Focus your search by the type of article – In this example limit your search to only the marriage notices. Click on the highlighted topic and only those articles will appear in your search.

Discover your heritage, preserve it and pass it on!

Be a part of GenealogyBankSign up Now.

Find and document your ancestors in GenealogyBank – the best source for old newspapers & documents on the planet.

Period!

So, what do you have on Long Island?

A friend of mine asked – “What do you have on Long Island?”

We started looking in GenealogyBank to see what we had – turns out we have quite a bit.

We found millions of articles, obituaries and records from the 1700s to today. There are over 330 New York newspapers in GenealogyBank – we spotted this early obituary of Mary Youngs (ca. 1784-1810) printed in the Long Island (NY) Star (22 Feb 1810).
I didn’t know that Long Island had it’s own newspaper that early in the century. GenealogyBank also includes the obituaries from Newsday right up to today’s paper.

We also found this sermon – that was preached in Hempstead, Long Island in 1813. It certainly gives the tenor of the sermons from 200 years ago.

We found many articles about the Blizzard of 1898 – including this one about Abram Decker who was saved from freezing to death in the snowstorm by the persistence of his “devoted wife”. This story was picked up and printed by the Idaho Daily Statesman, 18 Aug 1898.

Wow, what a story. His wife searching for him through 15′ snow drifts – finally spotting his foot above the snow and her efforts to rescue him by taking the railings from a fence to build a bonfire – lit by the flame in her lantern, to keep him warm. The fire got the attention of two farmers who came to their rescue. Now that’s an incredible family story.

Tip: Don’t limit your search to just one state – Remember that the articles you’re looking for may have appeared in a newspaper in another state – in this example the story was picked up and printed in a paper clear across the country in Idaho.

We found millions of articles about Long Islanders from the 18th Century to today.

What will you find in GenealogyBank?

To celebrate GenealogyBank’s success over the past two years, GenealogyBank is now offering a 30-day trial for only $9.95. Give it a try right now.

Woman struck blind on seeing her son …

Obituaries can give us the details of our ancestor’s lives that we just don’t find anywhere else.

Today I found this obituary in GenealogyBank for Judith Tormey (1800-1898) who died in Newark, NJ.

Baltimore Sun 4 July 1898


This obituary article gives us lots of details and clues to fill in the family tree.

1. Mrs. Judith Tormey – her name and tells us that she was married
2. Died on Friday night at her home and then gives the exact street address
3. She has “lived in Newark since 1847″
4. “She was born in County Cavan, Ireland, in 1800″
5. “Her father (not named) was 101 years old when he died and her mother was ninety-nine”
6. “A grandmother died at the age of ninety-nine”
7. “She was the mother of five children”
8. “She lost her sight in 1894″
9. “In that year her son Edward died”
10. She was blind from the final moment “she was taking a farewell look at his face in the coffin”

Incredible – we learn not only about four generations of the family – but also the dramatic story of how she became blind in the last years of her life.

GenealogyBank has millions of obituaries from over 3,700 newspapers.
We add even more every day.
Click here and search GenealogyBank right now.

What will you find?

GenealogyBank Adds Over 4 Million Records & Documents

GenealogyBank announced today that over 4 million historical newspapers records and documents from 24 States have been added to its database.

This constantly growing collection now features over 221 million family history records – I estimate that to contain over 1.3 Billion names.

You can search GenealogyBank for free and see a small slice of every record for your ancestors but you must join GenealogyBank to view the complete documents – 30 day trial memberships are available for only $9.95.

Here’s what’s new on the site:
Alaska
Juneau. Daily Alaska Dispatch. 5/1/1917 to 8/31/1917

Alabama
Montgomery. Montgomery Advertiser. 10/1/1912 to 12/31/1912

California
Anderson Valley Post. 5/3/2006 to Current

Connecticut
Bridgeport. Republican Farmer. 1/5/1814 to 12/20/1815

Georgia
Cordele. Cordele Dispatch. 11/14/2007 to Current
Savannah. Savannah Tribune. 12/4/1875 to 12/27/1913

Illinois
Danville. Commercial News. 11/6/2007 to Current

Massachusetts
Boston. Boston Journal. 7/1/1880 to 10/6/1917
Boston. Daily Atlas. 7/1/1841 to 4/11/1857
Lowell. Lowell Daily Citizen and News. 3/21/1857 to 1/24/1879
Springfield. Springfield Republican. 5/17/1900 to 11/15/1910
Worcester. Worcester Daily Spy. 7/6/1903 to 9/22/1903

Maryland
Baltimore. Baltimore American. 9/1/1917 to 12/31/1922
Baltimore Sun. 7/1/1847 to 1/3/1848

Maine
Portland. Portland Daily Advertiser. 1/1/1863 to 6/30/1863


Minnesota
St. Paul. St. Paul Daily Pioneer. 9/23/1854 to 4/12/1855

Missouri
Hannibal. Missouri Courier. 1/18/1849 to 2/17/1853
St. Louis. St. Louis Republic. 10/1/1889 to 4/30/1900

Montana
Anaconda. Anaconda Standard. 1/2/1898 to 4/30/1915

Nevada
Ely. Ely Times. 10/10/2007 to Current

New Hampshire
Portsmouth. Portsmouth Journal of Literature & Politics. 6/2/1838 to 12/31/1842

New Jersey
Bridgeton. Washington Whig. 1/7/1821 to 12/27/1822

New Mexico
Albuquerque. Albuquerque Journal. 9/1/1910 to 12/31/1910
Gallup. Gallup Independent. 10/11.2007 to Current

New York
New York Herald. 8/1/1858 to 12/31/1858

North Carolina
Halifax. North Carolina Journal. 1/2/1797 to 9/11/1797

Ohio
Ashtabula. Star Beacon. 10/20/2007 to Current

Oklahoma
Altus. Altus Times. 1/14/2008 to Current
Bartlesville. Bartlesville Examiner Enterprise. 10/18/2007 to Current
Knight. Frontier Index. 4/14/1868 to 4/14/1868
Oklahoma City. Daily Oklahoman. 5/1/1913 to 6/30/1913
Pauls Valley. Pauls Valley Daily Democrat. 9/8/2007 to current

Oregon
Portland. Oregonian. 8/8/1920 to 8/29/1920

Pennsylvania
Philadelphia. North American. 1/1/1845 to 6/30/1879

West Virginia
Bluefield. Bluefield Daily Telegraph. 12/28/2007 to Current
Fairmont. Times West Virginian. 1/11/2008 to Current
Logan. Logan Banner. 7/8/2007 to Current

And more – big news is on the way! Stay tuned.

B-Ann Moorhouse (1925-2008)

Joy Rich, Editor, Dorot: The Journal of the Jewish Genealogical Society (New York), contacted me with the sad news that B-Ann Moorhouse has passed away.
She was a terrific genealogist. When I began researching in the 1960s I got to know her and always appreciated her kindness and assistance.

With permission I am reposting Joy’s announcement of her passing.

I write to you with a heavy heart about the passing of B-Ann Moorhouse. B-Ann was a professional genealogist (and a CG) for several decades. She was loved and respected by the enormous number of people whose lives she touched.

B-Ann was the epitome of kindness and graciousness. She believed in people and encouraged them to fulfill their potential. She was always eager to share – especially with the next generation of professional genealogists and with librarians and archivists – the astonishing amount of wisdom, knowledge, and insight she had in the field of genealogy, particularly concerning Irish and colonial American genealogy.

Another area of great interest to B-Ann was the history of African American families in Brooklyn. B-Ann was the founder in 1978 of the Ulster Historical Foundation’s Ulster Genealogical and Historical Guild, a research co-operative established to link people worldwide who shared a common interest in Irish genealogy. She also founded the Genealogy Workshop at the Brooklyn Historical Society, which, at the time, was named the Long Island Historical Society.

She authored numerous articles for genealogical publications, abstracted Kings County, New York, administration proceedings and typed them on an extremely temperamental computer, and created finding aids for New York City for several New York state censuses. B-Ann was given access to basements and storage rooms in New York City’s Municipal Archives (when it was still in the Tweed Courthouse), Brooklyn Surrogate’s Court, and the Long Island Historical Society. Left to her own devices, she proceeded to rummage around and found many hidden treasures that she brought to light.

B-Ann passed away on February 15, 2008, in Georgia. Her beloved niece, Ann, who assured me that B-Ann died peacefully, moved her there last year so that she could care for B-Ann in her last months. It will bring a smile to your lips to know that, under Ann’s care, our B-Ann of the small frame gained sixteen pounds in six months.

Soon before she moved to Georgia, Jim Garrity and I paid her what turned out to be our final visit. We took her for a stroll on the promenade in her Brooklyn Heights neighborhood and then out to dinner. We had a wonderful time. It is just one of so many good memories of her that we will have with us always.

B-Ann will be dearly missed by her friends and her family.

Joy Rich
Brooklyn, NY